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Posts Tagged ‘Donald Graham’

Black Ad Employee Sues WaPo for Discrimination

So far mums the word around WaPo about a federal lawsuit being brought forth by a black advertising department employee for age and race discrimination. The news first surfaced in a story by Evan Gahr for The Daily Caller published Wednesday. It’s his first freelance story for the publication. He says there are more to come.

Lawsuits can be complex so we’ll boil it down for you.

The Plaintiff: a longtime employee, David DeJesus, 59, who claims he was abruptly fired only to be replaced by a younger, white man. DeJesus has an 18-year employment record at WaPo and has won awards for his sales performance. At the crux of the suit is the treatment of DeJesus by his Caucasian boss, Noelle Wainwright, who he alleges treated him in a demeaning manner that she did not extend to white employees. According to the story, “DeJesus was actually reinstated at the Washington Post early this year following binding arbitration required by the paper’s union contract.”

WaPo‘s defense from court papers: “Some or all of Plaintiff’s purported claims are barred because, even if the Post were found to have considered any impermissible factors in any decisions or actions with respect to Plaintiff, which the Post denies, no such decisions were motivated by impermissible factors and the Post would have taken the same action regardless of any impermissible factors.”

Noteworthy: The lawsuit states that between 2009 and 2011 WaPo fired at least 18 black employees over the age of 40.

The status: Discovery reportedly begins later this month.

Who spoke to Gahr from WaPo and who didn’t? Read more

Mediabistro Course

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Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

WaPo: SOLD for $250 million!

WaPo announced today that it has signed a contract to be sold to Amazon CEO Jeffrey Bezos.

“Everyone at the Post Company and everyone in our family has always been proud of The Washington Post — of the newspaper we publish and of the people who write and produce it,” said Donald Graham, Chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Company. “I, along with Katharine Weymouth and our board of directors, decided to sell only after years of familiar newspaper-industry challenges made us wonder if there might be another owner who would be better for the Post (after a transaction that would be in the best interest of our shareholders). Jeff Bezos’ proven technology and business genius, his long-term approach and his personal decency make him a uniquely good new owner for the Post.”

Bezos: “I understand the critical role the Post plays in Washington, DC and our nation, and the Post’s values will not change. Our duty to readers will continue to be the heart of the Post, and I am very optimistic about the future.”

Bezos has asked Katharine Weymouth, CEO and Publisher of The Washington Post; Stephen P. Hills, President and General Manager; Martin Baron, Executive Editor; and Fred Hiatt, Editor of the Editorial Page to continue in those roles.

Weymouth: “With Mr. Bezos as our owner, this is the beginning of an exciting new era. I am honored to continue as CEO and Publisher. I have asked the entire senior management team at all of the businesses being sold to continue in their roles as well.”

UPDATE: From a WaPo insider commenting on the office meeting….”Silence for much of the meeting. not really anger or dread, but more wondering what’s next. And there weren’t a lot of questions. People gave Don a nice ovation at the end. It feels like people understand that this is something that had to be done, and even Don said something to the effect of ‘Jeff can do things for this paper that we can’t.’ (Not a direct quote)”

More details on the sale… Read more

WaPo Ombudsman Insists the Paper’s Head Honchos are Committed to Survival

Over the weekend, WaPo‘s ombudsman Patrick Pexton signed off for the last time. Pexton completed his two-year position. And now his position has died. As has widely been reported, WaPo‘s days of having an ombudsman are over.

In the writeup, Pexton compliments the paper, the reporters, the copy editors and management profusely. He insists people should have compassion for those tasked with making tough calls where layoffs are concerned. But one line that jumped out at us as odd in Pexton’s farewell was the following, perhaps unintentional, kick in the pants that he sandwiched in right after thanking Post Co. chief executive Donald Graham and Publisher Katharine Weymouth for never interfering with what he wrote.

“And readers, you should know that, although the future Post may not look like the present Post, the commitment of Graham and Weymouth to the survival of this publication is ironclad.”

Whoa! Survival? Read more

Where’s Bo’s Newsroom Memo?

WaPo puts out internal memos when someone in the newsroom sneezes. So why no pithy departure memo for Bo Jones‘ sudden leap to PBS Newshour to become President and CEO? His full name, by the way, for name aficionados is: Boisfeuillet (Bo) Jones Jr. He first went to work for WaPo in 1980 as vice president and counsel. He moved to corporate in 2008 when he became Vice Chairman of The Washington Post Company and Chairman of WaPo.

“We will put out memos whenever the most minor person goes,” said a WaPo insider. “He is hardly minor.”

Poynter reported news of The Washington Post Company Chairman leaving the publication late Thursday morning. The report included MacNeil/Lehrer Productions’ lengthy, mind-numbing memo. WaPo, how could you let them show you up? You know you know how to write an agonizing, boring memo.

As it happens, there was a more formal release that went out to the wires and to “key people in the newsroom,” explains Washington Post Company Spokeswoman Rima Calderon. The release included good wishes from CEO Donald Graham.

“If I made a list of the greatest contributors to the Post over the last 30 years, Bo Jones would be right up there with Ben Bradlee and Len Downie. Bo won crucial lawsuits for the paper and kept us out of many more; he was a wise and resourceful publisher at a critical time; and his values, character and integrity epitomize what’s best in our business.” Graham continued, “We will miss Bo, but I’m glad that if he is leaving us, he’ll be going to one of the classiest organizations in journalism.”

 

 

Morning Reading List 03.20.09

Good Morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Its day 60 covering the Obama administration and week seven for us. What we know and what we’re reading this Friday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | ONLINE | NEWS NOTES | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

NEWPAPERS

The Graham family that owns WaPo has been selling shares in the parent company in recent months. Chairman and CEO Donald Graham has sold tens of millions of dollars worth of stock in the past year.

Microsoft says it had no interest in acquiring NYT or other leading print brands. “No,” CEO Steve Ballmer said outside the McGraw-Hill Building in yesterday morning. “Not ‘no comment.’ No.” BusinessWeek reports Ballmer says Microsoft is still interested in acquiring Yahoo.

One banker’s plan to save the newspaper industry: “Despite that gloom and doom, the reality is that, within the pantheon of media sectors, the newspaper business is actually still one of the better ones,” says Jonathan Knee, an investment banker who advised on the San Diego Union-Tribune deal and who has covered the media industry for over 15 years.

WSJ managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to all Journal and Dow Jones Newswire reporters yesterday signaling that Dow Jones plans to compete more aggressively against Reuters, Bloomberg and AP.

TV

From WSJ: “President Obama Makes History by Appearing on ‘Tonight Show’

Why President Obama skipped ‘Meet the Press’: “The new moderator often seems like he’s wearing a suit made for someone else – Russert – and as a result has yet to clearly establish why he got this gig instead of anyone else in the conga line of potential successors. David Gregory is terrifically polished, well-informed, a good listener and has the talking points of both sides down cold. But he also seems more intent on covering the waterfront than digging for news, or in pushing the talking heads off their talking points.”

From TVNewser: CNN’s Fareed Zakaria lands first tv interview with former NY Gov. Elliot Spitzer since the scandal that forced him out office a year ago (you all remember that).

Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren responded on her blog yesterday to the WaPo report that her husband John Coale was advising Sarah Palin. “No, he is not a paid adviser to Governor Palin and never has been,” she writes. “And no, he does not want a job with her or with the other women he has helped.” More here.

RADIO

Will NPR Save the News? “In one of the great under-told media success stories of the past decade, NPR has emerged not as the bespectacled schoolmarm of our imagination but as a massive news machine poised for what Dick Meyer, editorial director for digital media, half-jokingly calls ‘world domination.’”

ONLINE

Check out TVNewser’s Bracket Challenge ’09.

NEWS NOTES

From Politico: Is Washington ready for Wanda? This year’s entertainment at the White House Correspondents Association Dinner: “‘I’m sick of politicians across the board, Republicans and Democrats,’ Sykes says on ‘Sick & Tired.’ ‘They’re all shady. I’m sick of them. To me, political office should be like jury duty. You should just get a notice in the mail one day and say, ‘Aw, sh-, I’m secretary of state next month. Ain’t this a b–?’”

Stealing President George Bush’s thunder, from AP: Obama signs deal for post-presidency book.

Where are they now? Former President Bush Deputy Assistant Press Secretary Pete Seat has a biweekly column in The Times of Northwest Indiana. This week’s: Obama offers too much material for critics.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro; Romenesko

REVOLVING DOOR and JOBS after the jump.

Read more

Morning Reading List, 11.13.08

1113 007.JPG

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 07.30.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Washington Post reports, “Four days after the Democratic debate in Charleston, S.C., more than 400 questions directed to the GOP presidential field have been uploaded on YouTube, as Republicans are scheduled to take their turn at video-populism on Sept. 17. But only Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) and Rep. Ron Paul (Tex.) have agreed to participate in the debate, co-hosted by the Republican Party of Florida in St. Petersburg.”

  • Carrie Sheffield, formerly of The Politico, has joined The Washington Times as an editorial writer.

  • One year ago last week, Ana Marie Cox was named the Washington Editor ot Time.com and Tammy Haddad was named a Vice President for MSNBC.

  • Swampland reports, “The Ron Paul campaign announced, and other campaigns have confirmed, that CNN is moving the YouTube debate to another date, possibly in December.”

  • The Columbia Journalism Review has some prime examples of “Why the Dow Jones Vote Matters”

  • The Politico reports that CNN president Jon Klein “said the new Campbell Brown show at 8 p.m. will be talk-oriented, built around the day’s news. Leaning toward more an opinion show where Campbell doesn’t give the opinions, the guests do.”

  • From the Christian Science Monitor: “Declining newspaper readership, especially among the young, is forcing editors to reexamine their focus.”

  • Poynter Online writes, “Facebook: What’s In It For Journalists? With the help of some new friends, we came up with a few answers. And just as many questions.”

  • Huffington Post’s Zack Exley writes, “GOP front runners seem to be bailing on the September 17 YouTube/CNN debate. Democrats should rejoice at this news.”

  • “With Senator Clinton—and her femininity—featured as a story line, the Presidential campaign filled 13% of the airtime and was the second most-popular talk topic on radio and cable, according to PEJ’s Talk Show Index from July 15-20. (Cable shows paid far more attention to the campaign than the radio talkers did.) The one subject that commanded more attention last week than the Presidential race was the renewed debate over U.S. strategy in Iraq.”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s new series, “Hey, How’d You Do That?”, “walking you through how those in the media industry navigated key professional junctures, achieved career-making coups, tackled spur-of-the-moment scenarios and made the decisions that furthered their work.”

  • Houston Chronicle’s Claudia Feldman called the YouTube debate “a lively CNN-YouTube debate that turned the usual format upside down and may have forever changed candidates’ obligatory parade in front of the TV lights.”

  • Fortune reports, “Newspapers are dying. At the Washington Post Co., CEO Donald Graham is banking on the Internet to save serious journalism. If he can’t figure this out, nobody can.”

  • From Save The Debate.com: “Some Republicans are talking about ditching the long-planned YouTube debate, like the Democrats and Fox News. As concerned Republicans, we respectfully ask them to reconsider. Republicans cannot surrender to Democrats on any front — least of all new media — or we may well lose in 2008.”

  • Todd And reports, “I’m very excited to announce that the Power 150 ranking of top marketing blogs is joining forces with Advertising Age, the world’s leading marketing and media publication.”

  • Reuters reports, “The number of help-wanted ads in U.S. newspapers fell in June to a 49-year low, a private research group said on Thursday.”

  • Time reports, “Hugh Hewitt, a popular right-wing blogger and radio talk show host, got more specific about what conservatives might object to in a CNN/YouTube debate — he alleged that CNN cherrypicked the submissions for biased questions that a ‘responsible’ journalist wouldn’t ask: ‘the CNN team used the device of the third-party video to inject a question that would have embarrassed any anchor posing it.’ One staffer for a Republican candidate now leaning toward not participating put it this way: ‘The problem isn’t YouTube, it’s CNN.’”

  • A release from Atlantic Media announced that Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Mallon, Debbie Applegate and Jeffrey Goldberg will be attending Bookmark events on Nantucket.

  • The Washington Examiner reports, “Washington wins the award for ‘most e-mail addicted’ city in the country, according to a new study released Thursday by Dulles-based AOL.”

  • Redding News Review reports, “Radio One’s Syndication One announced a new lineup late yesterday that includes ‘The Al Sharpton Show,’ ’2 Live Stews’ and ‘The Warren Ballentine Show’ on its XM 169 The Power.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle’s Chip Johnson writes, “Megan Greenwell was a reporter at Berkeley High School’s biweekly student newspaper, the Jacket, nearly eight years ago when she cracked one of the most sensational Bay Area news stories of the year — scooping the region’s media. … So it’s no fluke that Greenwell, now at the ripe old age of 23, is a professional journalist at not just any newspaper, but the Washington Post. And she’s not covering any average beat; she’s based in Baghdad and covering one of the world’s biggest stories, the war in Iraq.”

  • Who Still Reads Magazines? Just About Everybody”

  • New York Post reports, “Don Imus is about to get paid. The disowned shock jock is close to a settlement that would have former employer CBS buy out his contract as a way to avoid costly and ugly litigation, according to multiple sources close to the situation.”

  • Business Week reports, “Should the Bancroft family, the controlling shareholders of Dow Jones & Co., decide to reject Rupert Murdoch’s takeover offer, prompting the mogul to take his $5 billion off the table and walk away, everyone knows what would happen. Dow Jones’ stock price would fall from its recent highs in the upper 50s”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s updated How To Pitch.

  • Redding News Review reports, “Redding News Review today learned that Radio One has cut at least four staffers over at its satellite radio channel XM 169 The Power.”

    Jobs

  • The Education Trust is looking for a New Media Manager.

  • McClatchy is looking for a Senior Correspondent in Washington D.C.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for a Senior Producer for AAM Television.

  • CNN is seeking a Senior Producer for Reliable Sources.

  • Worcester County Times/Maryland Beachcomber/Ocean Pines Independent is looking for an Editor.

  • Print Solutions Magazine is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • DC Magazine is looking to hire style-savvy fall interns/editorial assistants immediately for the Fall Semester. Please send cover letter, resume, and clips to tjow@modernluxury.com with availability and potential start date. Position begins mid-August.

  • Washington Hospital Center is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • Connection Newspapers is looking for a Sports Writer/Editor.

  • PoliticsNJ.com is looking for an Advertising Sales Director.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext