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Posts Tagged ‘Duffy Dyer’

Morning Reading List, 04.15.08

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Happy Tax Day Washington. Playbook tells us that “Patrick Henry, Ed’s son, is 7.” Here’s your TV coverage of the Pope’s visit. Here’s the full text of Sen. John McCain’s remarks to the AP annual meeting yesterday. Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks today. And be sure to check out TVNewser’s ongoing coverage of the 2008 NAB-RTNDA conference in Las Vegas.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • You think Obama’s bitter comment was totally overblown.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I just had a great job interview at a paper that has an actual functioning newsroom, with good editors who get to the root of the community’s problems. So, why am I angry? They can’t afford to pay me as much as the crappy paper I’m working at now. Damn IT!”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported on Saturday, “Caroline H. Little stepped down yesterday as chief executive and publisher of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the company announced.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe reports, “The Internet is up, the newspaper business is down, so no one would expect the top people at the Washington Post Company to be pulling down tens of millions of dollars a year like their counterparts in finance and entertainment. But they’re not suffering. According to 2007 filings, here are paychecks for the three best-paid Posties and their boss.”

  • Bernstein: what makes good journalism

  • British Journalist for CBS Freed in Iraqi Army Raid

  • My Wall Street Journal Editor: WSJ Officials ‘Pretty Thin-Skinned‘”

  • After 18 years as founding editor of ForbesLife, Christopher Buckley has decided to move into the role of editor at large in order to focus more on his writing.”

  • US military to free AP photographer

  • Writers Vs. Editors: A Battle for the Ages

  • The AP reports, “As newspaper publishers build up their online operations and struggle through an advertising slump, one group is worried about being left behind — the folks who make printing presses and other equipment used to make newspapers.”

  • Time for New Blood in Newspaper Boardrooms: A Slate

  • E&P reports, “U.S. daily newspapers shrank their newsrooms by 2,400 journalists in the past year, a 4.4% workforce decrease that’s the biggest year-over-year cut in ranks since the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) began conducting its annual census 30 years ago.”

  • A Second Opinion of David Brooks

  • Romenesko has a memo from the Post’s Frank Ahrens: “After our big Pulitzer win on Monday, there was some melancholy around the newsroom along the lines of, ‘Oh, this will be the last year this kind of thing will happen.’ I said just the opposite. I bet the Big Three — us, the Times and the Journal — will most likely increase our dominance of the Pulitzers in coming years. Why? Because it’s the mid-sized papers that have been/will be so hard-hit by cuts they will no longer be able to produce Pulitzer-caliber journalism.” And, Los Angeles Times’ Peter Spiegel responds: “Frank Ahrens is an old friend of mine, so I hate to disagree with him in public, but I feel the need to defend my employer’s honor. I’m not sure where he gets the idea that the Washington Post, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are ‘the big three’ of American newspaper journalism.”

  • The Editors Weblog reports, “San Jose Mercury News designer Martin Gee has posted a photo documentary of the effects of several rounds of layoffs and buyouts in his California newsroom.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Steinberg reports, “TK Continues to Win Argument Against Nobody”

  • Daily Campello Art News reports, “Norfolk newspaper The Virginian-Pilot sponsors an annual Student Gallery competition hosted at the Chrysler Museum of Art. The top awards were announced a couple of weeks ago at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where works by the contest’s 62 finalists are on display. Erin Ayres ‘Unveiled Tokens of Lonely and Deserted Past,’ was among two works that earned her the $1,000 first-place award. Now the controversy part… Teresa Annas, art critic for the same newspaper courageously writes that: This year’s top winners resulted from a third round of judging. The first two jurors selected nude artworks for first place. Those judges were Aaron De Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, and Scott Howe, director of education and public programs at the Chrysler Museum. The Virginian-Pilot, the contest’s main sponsor, declined to honor those choices.”

  • Business Week reports, “Who Rupert Murdoch Had On Speed Dial. … Among a list understandably studded with News Corp executives and operating heads, it’s interesting to find New York Post editor (and longtime Murdoch confidant) Col Allan.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Jack F. Patterson, a hard-nosed newspaper executive who guided The Washington Post to unprecedented circulation growth from the 1950s to the 1980s and who mentored generations of the paper’s top administrators, died April 9 of melanoma at his home in Bethesda. He was 93.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt explores “The Blur Between Analysis and Opinion”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell asks, “The Washington Post was awash in Pulitzer Prizes last week — six of them, the most ever for The Post. In the world of newspaper journalism, Pulitzers are the pinnacle. But the prizes are awarded by journalists to journalists. Do they mean anything to readers, especially in this perilous time of newspaper contraction?”

  • Ben Pershing’s Player of the Week is Sen. Robert Byrd. “And, at 90 years old and in increasingly poor health, he is the chairman of one of the most important committees in Congress. The headline news on Capitol Hill this week was about Iraq, housing and the Colombia free trade agreement. But below the surface, a crucial subplot was unfolding in the Senate, as Byrd’s Democratic colleagues cautiously began discussing whether he should continue to chair the Appropriations Committee. On Tuesday, about 15 key Senate Democrats discussed at a private meeting whether Byrd would be able to handle the upcoming Iraq supplemental bill, according to a Roll Call story (subscription required). That initial media report sparked a flurry of subsequent and sometimes contradictory stories in the Capitol Hill press. The Politico got several Senate Democrats saying — publicly, at least — that they support Byrd. Roll Call came back with a report that Byrd was calling colleagues in hopes of saving his job. The Hill newspaper said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) was angling for Byrd’s post, though Leahy denied it. … What’s really going on here? Why is there so much confusion on the subject? There are two primary reasons: Senate collegiality and media skittishness.”

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    TV

  • Obama doesn’t commit to N.C. debate

  • Debating the Debate Usage Guidelines

  • A release announced, “WTTG FOX 5 has been awarded four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards by the Radio-Television News Directors Association, including ‘Overall Excellence,’ announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. FOX 5 News also received awards in the ‘Best Newscast,’ ‘Investigative Reporting’ and ‘Videography’ categories.”

  • Ailes to B&C Hall of Fame

  • Newsweek asks, “Can news anchors like Katie Couric survive?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Indecency cases stuck in legal limbo at FCC”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “The 2008 Media Research Center’s DisHonors Awards took place last night in Washington, D.C. and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was (dis)honored with the ‘Quote Of The Year Award.’”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “CNN’s Wolf Blitzer isn’t just a newsman. He’s also a Washington sports nut, a regular at George Washington University men’s basketball games, a midcourt season ticket holder for the Washington Wizards, and big fan of the new Nationals baseball team. Lately, he’s tied both passions together, giving a Wizards pregame analysis from CNN’s Situation Room for the Verizon Center’s JumboTron. Now, he has his eyes on the Nats, whose new stadium boasts the biggest outfield TV ever. ‘I’d do it for the Nationals, too, but only if they want me,’ he tells us. ‘That’s a really big scoreboard.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter

  • CJR’s Curtis Brainard reports, “A strange thing happened Tuesday. The New Republic had just launched a new ‘Environment & Energy’ blog on Sunday, and it had already hit a bump in the road. Just below the blog’s masthead was a small, green logo with the words, ‘Powered by BP.’ Within a day of the launch, TNR readers had begun to complain about irony of an oil giant (even one that has been trying to burnish its green credential for years) ‘powering’ (most assumed sponsoring) a blog about issues such as climate change and the development of renewable fuels. Just as I was reading the blog’s inaugural posts and its readers’ comments I refreshed the page and, lo and behold, the controversial BP logo had disappeared.”

  • The AP reports, “As people turn increasingly to the Internet for their news, there is concern whether they are learning enough about what goes on in their communities. With ‘the thinning down of newspapers and local television in America, there is measurably less local, civic information available,’ said Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. ‘So what are the consequences of that?’ The foundation and the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, hope to find out.”

  • AdAge.com allows you to “Test Your Knowledge of Budget-Conscious News Ops and More in Media Guy’s Media-Studies Quiz”

  • PaidContent.org reports, “Salon Media, the parent of Salon.com, has raised $1 million in equity financing by selling its stock, just in time as its money was running out, again. The note, which it issued on April 4, 2008, may be convertible at a future date into common stock of the company at a conversion price equal of $1.68, it said in an SEC filing. They bear interest at the rate of 7.5 percent per annum, payable semi-annually, in cash or in kind, and mature on March 31, 2012, the filing states. It will use the funds raised for working capital and other general corporate purposes, the company said.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • BIG MAGAZINE TITLES SEE AD PAGES DWINDLE DOWN IN Q1

  • toohotfortnr writes, “On Monday, THFTNR goes out of business and Attackerman rises to take its place. That means I have a limited amount of time to take this blog back to its essence: the beef with TNR. And I have one score in particular that I badly need to settle. The story of Snitching Ryan Lizza.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington City Paper reports, “The health problems that sidelined WTOP’s Mark Plotkin for more than three months have apparently been resolved–the man was back in the chair this morning on the Politics Program in fine old form”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Gridskipper takes a look at The Newseum.

  • Don’t forget, the NLGJA-DC Happy Hour is Thursday, April 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel Helix Lounge at 1430 Rhode Island Ave., N.W.

  • Washington Social Diary reports, “There are small parties and there are big parties, and there are parties that are huge. Washington’s newest monumental addition, the Newseum, gave itself an opening party the other night that was huge — so many (one count had it at 1800) that they had to stand in line. Men in black tie, women in evening dresses, getting checked off the guest list.”

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    JOBS

  • St. Mary’s Today is looking for a News Desk/Reporter Person.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 03.27.08

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    Good morning Washington. Dana Bash and John King will get married on Cape Cod over Memorial Day weekend.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You would rather hang out with Barack Obama over Michelle.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Atlantic Names New Publisher Jay Lauf

  • More Changes to ABC News Executive Ranks

  • Andrea Jones is leaving her position as Executive Director of ABC News and Emily Lenzner is taking her place.

  • Linda Greenhouse Returning To Yale Law School in 2009 as Journalist-in-Residence

  • A release announced, “Michael Flagg, a veteran business reporter and editor at the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg and the Washington Post, has joined the Washington, D.C. office of Manning Selvage & Lee (MS&L) as senior vice president. His appointment is effective immediately.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Washington Times won seven awards in the 2007 Virginia Press Association’s annual competition for writing, photography, artwork and news design.

  • A reader asks, “Why was McCain off limits with the media? Is it because of his advanced years or because he’s a war hero or both? everything was coming up roses for McCain with the Media. Guess that was good for him, since his senior moments crop up every once in awhile.”

  • Finding Political News Online, the Young Pass It On

  • Huffington Post’s Thomas Edsall presents, “Interview With Walter Pincus On The State Of The Press”

  • Romenesko has “Tribune innovation chief Lee Abrams’ e-mail to staff”

  • AJR asks, “Why is the media consensus so often wrong about political campaigns? And isn’t there a better way to cover elections?”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. President and Chief Executive Janet Robinson received total compensation valued at $2.1 million in 2007 but got no stock options, reducing her pay 38 percent from a year ago, according to calculations by The Associated Press.”

  • AJR reports, “Why news organizations have to act much more boldly if they are to survive”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s latest pictures featuring Howard Wolfson and David Brooks.

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “The New York Times has been around for 156 years. For all that time, it has trusted its readers, more or less, to find what they’re looking for. Not anymore. Today saw the introduction of ‘Inside the Times,’ a new multi-page index of that day’s highlights, in print and online, which runs on pages 2, 3 and 4 of section A. The purpose is ‘to help readers navigate and mine the paper and its Web site,’ according to an editor’s note.”

  • Politico, Viacom, Paramount Vantage are teaming up to present a private screening of the new Rolling Stones, Scorsese Shine a Light film on the eve of the White House Correspondent’s dinner, April 25th at the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.

  • Kelly Flynn writes, “No news is bad news for Kearsley journalism students”

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    TV

  • Mark your calendars! On April 2, nine women will speak at the “Women on the World” at the Chamber of Commerce, including Daryn Kagan, Jenna Bush, Andrea Koppel, Kelly O’Donnell and Donna Brazile. For more on what Kagan has been up to, click here.

  • A CNN release announced, “Following a campaign coverage strategy of creating mini-bureaus in key political battleground states, CNN has parked the CNN Election Express in Philadelphia this week to create a full-time reporting presence for the April 22 Pennsylvania primary.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This morning marked new NBC/MSNBC analyst Harold Ford, Jr.’s first appearance on Morning Joe. Co-anchor Joe Scarborough brought up his time in congress with Ford, and how the pair ‘transcended politics,’ as they sat on opposite sides of the aisle.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. advertising spending was little changed in the fourth quarter as a weakening economy prompted marketers to cut newspaper and radio ads, according to TNS Media Intelligence.”

  • USA Today reports, “Advertisers and marketers, struggling to keep up with changing consumer habits, are about to make massive investments in new digital and out-of-home media platforms, according to a forecast out today from research firm PQ Media.”

  • A release announced, “FOX 5 finishes the March 2008 news race as the #1 choice for late news in key adult demographics, announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. ‘FOX 5 News Edge at 11′ and ‘FOX 5 News at 10′ rank #1 in their respective time periods.”

  • JackMeyers.com reports, “Assuming this week’s release of fourth quarter GDP data confirms an official recessionary economy, marketers, media companies, economists and unofficial economic pundits will weigh in with appropriately reactionary forecasts of ad industry doom and gloom.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Over the past two years, Lynda Clarizio has helped build Advertising.com, AOL’s ad network, into one of the hottest properties in online advertising. Her reward: She gets to try to clean up one of the Internet company’s messiest divisions.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The two biggest U.S. cable providers, Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., are discussing a plan to provide funding for a new wireless company that would be operated by Sprint Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp., people familiar with the talks say.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “On the morning of Friday, March 21, Chris Wallace woke up at his home in Washington, D.C., grabbed some fruit and yogurt, and turned on the Fox News early show, Fox & Friends. Steve Doocy, Gretchen Carlson and Brian Kilmeade were talking about Barack Obama’s recent characterization of his grandmother on a Philadelphia radio show: She was a ‘typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn’t know, there’s a reaction that’s been bred into our experiences that don’t go away and that sometimes comes out in the wrong way.’ ‘Can you say ‘typical white person’ if you’re white?’ asked Mr. Doocy. Of course not, noted Ms. Carlson. There’s no way that Senator Hillary Clinton could use the phrase ‘typical black person,’ they noted. ‘So there is a certain double standard in society,’ said Ms. Carlson. And also: ‘I sort of take offense at that line: ‘typical white.” Mr. Wallace was getting a little bit annoyed. ‘I didn’t think it was fair. I didn’t think it allowed Obama to make his point,’ Mr. Wallace later told The Observer in a telephone interview.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • 24/7 Wall St. presents, “The Twenty-Five Most Valuable Blogs”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “How dreadful was the news coverage last week surrounding the official release of Hillary Clinton’s public White House schedule from her eight years as first lady? So bad that I found myself in rare (unprecedented?) agreement with at least two prominent conservative bloggers who noticed the same thing I did: The Beltway press corps is, at times, a national embarrassment.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Hillary Clinton’s Bosnia Story A Hit On YouTube!”

  • Gangrey.com presents the winner of the 2008 Goat Awards.

  • Media Week reports, “Time Inc., which has been hit by sweeping layoffs in recent years, has continued to pare its head count in its quest for cost-savings, albeit in smaller ways. This Old House shed four people in the past few weeks in communications, production and TV production, while at Sports Illustrated, a handful of people were laid off from the title’s Picture Collection archive. (Some of the SI staffers were to be assigned to other positions in the company, a Time Inc. spokesperson said.)”

  • Mesh Media Strategies reports, “I was privileged to join a group of bloggers, along with TV news executives and personnel from the Washington DC area, Monday night for a reception and private tour of the soon-to-open Newseum in the nation’s capital. In a word, it is spectacular.”

  • The Annenberg School for Communication at USC Online Journalism Review reports, “J-schools need to encourage and develop, not inhibit, students’ passion — not only for the favorite topics, but for the craft of journalism itself.”

  • MinOnline reports, “Tribune Media Services (TMS), the content syndication and licensing division of Chicago-based Tribune Company, will launch a new weekly political commentary magazine called Opinionated: Voices and Viewpoints on America and the World.”

  • The San Jose Business Journal reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s HotJobs feature on Tuesday launched a search ranking algorithm called REAL — Relevance, Engagement, Availability and Location. Sunnyvale-based Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) said the system is part of an overall strategic initiative designed to ‘make the recruiting process more efficient using Yahoo technology and to provide recruiters with unique insights into job seeker behavior.’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Reader’s Digest’s Carl Cannon was interviewed on C-SPAN by Bob Schieffer this past weekend. Check out the interview here.

  • What you missed last night: Atlantic Media’s Journalism on Tap, a panel discussion on the upcoming election.

  • WWD.com reports, “Financial market turbulence, housing bubble bursts, Bear Stearns collapses — no wonder advertising isn’t looking rosy (or that most publishers don’t want to go on the record and talk about it). As the end of the first half draws near for magazines, business looks soft. Through April, the latest Media Industry Newsletter numbers show ad pages declined for most fashion titles and the unpredictable economy makes it impossible to predict how things will end up by June, much less the entire year.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Beginning Wednesday, April 2, at 9 p.m., the National Symphony Orchestra will return to the airwaves of Classical WETA 90.9 FM. Performances are being drawn from NSO archives, and most broadcast programs will feature repertoire from multiple NSO concerts. These two-hour broadcasts will take place on the first Wednesday of each month for the next year. WETA’s John Chester will host. The series is made possible by WETA’s Friends of Classical Music, including Patricia Sagon.”

  • The Wall Street Journal writes, “The Justice Department’s approval this week of the XM-Sirius satellite radio merger was a long time coming — maybe too long given that the deal was announced more than a year ago. Still, credit Antitrust Division chief Thomas Barnett for making the right call in the end.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “One of the marquee deals of the now-faded corporate buyout boom was close to collapse Tuesday night, a victim of the credit-market turmoil that began last summer. The planned $19 billion privatization of the nation’s largest radio broadcaster, Clear Channel Communications Inc., looked increasingly likely to fall through as the private-equity firms and banks backing the transaction failed to resolve their differences over final financing terms, people familiar with the matter said. It would be one of the biggest leveraged buyouts yet to implode as the upheaval in global credit markets has made it nearly impossible for banks that financed such deals to spread their risk by packaging their loans for sale to other investors. That’s left many banks exposed to massive losses they have been trying to avoid.”

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    BOOKS

  • GalleyCat answers the question, “How’s Book Publishing Handling the Election?”

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    JOBS

  • Politico is looking for a Weekend Editor.

  • Human Events is hiring a Manager Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext