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Posts Tagged ‘Emily Bazelon’

Media Takes Sides on Zimmerman Decision

After continual media coverage of the George Zimmerman trial in the shooting of Trayvon Martin and more than 16 hours of deliberation by the jury, Zimmerman was acquitted of charges of second-degree murder and manslaughter over the weekend.

Since the shooting occurred last year, the case has been heavily followed by the media, with some outlets taking clear, strong stances. Now that the not-guilty verdict has been announced, some publications are being even more outspoken on the matter. We looked at a wide array of news organizations to analyze each publication’s own verdict of the case.

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Fish Food

(A Sprinkling of Things we Think you Ought to Know…)

Fox News Contributor Battles Cancer— Richard Grenell, the Mike Tyson of Twitter, has non-hodgkins lymphoma. He’s already completed two rounds of chemo. He told FishbowlDC that that the cancer was caught early and he has great doctors, so he’s hopeful for a good outcome. He did lose his hair though, but despite some initial concerns about doing TV bald, he went on Fox a few weekends ago with the network’s full support. On his blog, he said despite the seriousness of his illness, he’s in a good place. “God has given me a great peace and I am blessed to be surrounded by an amazing partner and the support of family and friends. I am ready for this fight.” We wish Grenell a quick trip on the path back to good health. If he tackles his cancer like he does his Twitter foes, we have a feeling this is a fight he’s going to win.

CNBC Host Apologizes For ‘Foot in Mouth’— On Monday Andrew Ross Sorkin said he would’ve arrested Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald, who published classified information leaked to him by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, for wanting to help Snowden in his flight from U.S. authorities. Today, he apologized. On Twitter, Sorkin said to Greenwald, “My apologies, sincerely…hope you saw what I said this morning on @SquawkCNBC.” What did he say? According to Politico, “I put my foot in my mouth…” He wanted to make a point about the difference between publishing and actually aiding someone accused of violating the law, but admits he failed and “overstepped” with the way he said it. Noteworthy: An apology that’s an actual apology. No cowardly ‘sorry if you were offended’ BS, just… I’m sorry. How refreshing.

Childish Behavior At the Supreme Court… Surprise?— Justice Samuel Alito needs some lessons from Miss Manners. While Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg was reading from her dissents in a few cases about discrimination that Alito wrote the majority opinions for, those in the courtroom reported that he pursed his lips, rolled his eyes and even mouthed the word “no” several times. We’d call this a great argument for cameras in the Supreme Court on the theory that it might be incentive to stop these blatant displays of disrespect, but these just happen to be some of the same things he did during President Obama‘s State of the Union speech in 2010, according to Slate’s Emily Bazelon. “Decorum isn’t his thing,” she wroteAtlantic’s Garrett Epps, who was in the court and is especially appalled by Alito’s behavior, makes it a point to note that Ginsberg is both older and the more senior justice—but we agree with others who say that’s not really the point. If you’re being a dick, you’re being a dick. It shouldn’t matter who you are or whom your target is. Jezebel sums it up nicely: “…guy who literally today authored a Supreme Court opinion that made it easier for workplace bullies to get away with it is himself acting like a workplace bully, but I can’t bring myself to imagine anyone trying to shove Ruth Bader Ginsburg into a locker.”

 

The Atlantic Has 17 Ideas to Change the World

The Atlantic’s annual ideas issue is out, with 17 of the mag’s picks for “modest” and unconventional notions they think can change the world. It’s a mix of some good, some bad and some entirely nonsensical.

The Atlantic‘s complete list of their picks for the year’s best ideas is online here, and it’s worth a look.

Some other stories that caught our eye…

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Slate Hosts Live ‘Gabfest’ Tonight

Want to gab with Slate?

Tonight’s your chance. The publication is hosting a live discussion with Emily Bazelon, David Plotz and John Dickerson at the Synagogue at Sixth and I at 7 p.m.

Tonight’s topics:
- the shootings in Arizona
- Freshmen in Congress
- GOP contenders for the 2012 presidential race

Of course we wondered whether Slate‘s savvy reporter Dave Weigel will be there. “As for Weigel, the Political Gabfest features David Plotz, John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon. Weigel won’t be on stage with them, but being that it’s a Slate event there’s a good chance he’ll be in the audience,” a spokeswoman said.

Tickets are $12. Purchase them here.

Morning Reading List, 03.19.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you read the Drudge Report every single day.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Helen Fessenden is joining Congress Daily as managing editor of the PM edition.

  • Former Technology Daily Staff Writer Michael Martinez has moved onto WAMU, where he is now a producer at the Kojo Nnamdi Show.

  • Why isn’t your local newspaper surviving on the Web? Because there are too many media outlets selling the exact same news.”

  • Mark Carter Named CCJ Executive Director and Goldenson Chair at the Missouri School of Journalism

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • “In a week when the Democrats dominated campaign coverage, presumptive Republican nominee John McCain may have been the candidate to fare the best in the media, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 10-16.”

  • Somewhere East of Eden: Why the St. Pete Times model can’t save newspapers

  • McClatchy sees revenues fall

  • Too Much Access? McCain Campaign Reporter: ‘It Gets To The Point Where You Just Want Them To Shut Up Sometimes’

  • Former GW University President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg tells us that free newspapers have returned to GW’s campus. “Two years after the ‘second termination’ students once again have access to free newspapers. I confess I am delighted as I trust are Donald Graham and Arthur Sulzberger. I know that newspaper readership is going down all over the country but I’m pleased at least on my campus, it is not going down without a fight.”

  • Newspaper Marketing Taking a Hit from the Do-Not-Call List?

  • Thomson Financial reports, “Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services said the US economic slowdown will hurt some media and entertainment companies, as the cutbacks in consumer discretionary spending could be reflected in as diverse areas as the number of attendees at The Walt Disney Co’s amusement parks and ad revenue at Time Warner Inc’s magazines or News Corp’s newspapers.”

  • Newspapers Should Focus on Local News — But Not Forget Bigger Picture

  • The New York Times reports, “The New York Times Company has struck a deal with a pair of hedge funds that want to shake up the company, giving the funds two seats on the board in order to avoid a proxy fight, the two sides announced Monday. The agreement with Harbinger Capital Partners and Firebrand Partners marks the first time since the Times Company went public in 1967 that it has accepted directors nominated by outsiders, Times Company executives said.”

  • Market Watch reports, “The New York Times Co. said Tuesday that its advertising revenue for February fell 6.6% to $148 million.”

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    TV

  • Candy Crowley: “I was so sleep deprived once that I found myself brushing my teeth with moisturizer.”

  • Jay Rosen: “Obama Tells the Best Political Team on Television: You Guys Have a Choice…

  • From DCRTV:

      DCRTV hears that Tucker Carlson is planning to heard straight to Fox News as soon as his NBC/MSNBC contract is up, and his non-compete clause expires. Carlson ain’t happy that his MSNBC show got axed. Also, look for former WMAL News Director John Matthews to also wind up at Fox News, in some behind-the-scenes gig, we’re told. More soon…..

  • Study finds TV’s war coverage is way down

  • Ben Stein explains how business news became the new Victoria’s Secret catalog

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ placed first among Adults 25-54 for the week of March 10-14. The ABC News broadcast averaged a 2.0/8 and 2.51 million, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 60,000 demo viewers and tying in the demo rating/share. Among Total Viewers, the ABC News broadcast averaged 8.1 million, placing second.”

  • Check out The Arch Campbell Variety Show at the Arlington Drafthouse, “a monthly fun and unique live stage show hosted by Arch Campbell.” It is this Friday, March 21. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

  • Media Daily News reports, “Big video content producers need to come up with aggregate ratings that combine television viewing with online video consumption, says Patrick Keane, vice president and chief marketing officer for CBS Interactive, speaking Monday morning at MediaPost’s OMMA Global conference in Hollywood. The combined rating would provide media buyers with a cross-platform option that’s simpler and more detailed in terms of data, because of online metrics.”

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “The Supreme Court announced yesterday that it will rule on the government’s standards for policing the public airwaves for the first time since the court agreed 30 years ago that a midday radio broadcast of comedian George Carlin’s ‘seven dirty words’ monologue was indecent.”

  • The Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “Comcast Corp. is asking a federal appeals court to overturn a Federal Communications Commission rule enacted in December that bars it from making a major cable acquisition.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • A Slate release announced, “Slate, the daily online magazine, today launches a legal blog featuring some of the most prominent voices in law. ‘Convictions,’ the law blog, will include daily commentary from a wide range of legal professionals, including Slate’s Jurisprudence columnists Dahlia Lithwick and Emily Bazelon and top litigators and law professors across the country.”

  • We should have online rules.

  • CNet News.com reports, “It might not be Austin’s South by Southwest Interactive, but New York City will be getting its own digital-culture festival. Called Internet Week New York (OK, they could have picked a better name), it will span June 3 to 10 and encompass several existing events like Federated Media Publishing’s Conversational Marketing Summit, Advertising Age’s Advertising 2.0 conference, and the 12th annual Webby Awards.”

  • Norman Geras writes, “Was Czechoslovakia in 1975 a better place politically than the US is in 2008? I know what my answer to that question would be. But what is Tim Dowling’s answer? I couldn’t tell you. All I can do is point you towards the set of comparisons he offers. … There you go — low approval ratings for both Husak and Bush.”

  • Terry Heaton writes, “When the Internet bubble burst early in the new millennium, many smart people learned the harshest of all business lessons: when the money’s gone, there is no business. Great ideas aren’t self-sustaining, and when the investors decide they’ve given enough, it’s over, unless you can actually make money. Business is business, and while many of us frolicked in the coolness of innovation, those who paid attention to the bottom line were stressed to the max. In the end, it’s always about the money.”

  • Pulitzer Prize nominee George Archibald has had another run in with the Middleburg, Virginia police. This time he was received a “misdemeanor citation for having a quiet backyard barbecue.” If you missed the earlier police episode, check it out here.

  • Huffington Post takes a look at “The Reporting Team That Got Iraq Right”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters today launched a unique multimedia online documentary called ‘Bearing Witness’ which pays tribute to its 100 correspondents who have reported from Iraq over the last five years of war.”

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    RADIO

  • Pajamas Media reports, “Four short segments of conservative views were enough to flood NPR with angry phone calls and email. So much for ‘fairness,’ writes Pam Meister.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • ABC Pushes Mags to File Sales Figs. Faster

  • Random Mumblings reports, “In what could only be viewed as a perverse and often baffling development, author and New Yorker magazine writer Malcolm Gladwell said last week a story he told in an early February segment of public radio’s ‘This American Life’ is, well, a complete tall tale. In the story, recorded at a New York club called the Moth, Gladwell recounts his early days as a cub reporter at that august bastion of journalism, Ben Bradlee’s The Washington Post.”

  • Jury Still Out on Future of Newsweeklies

  • On The Media’s Brooke Gladstone talks to The Atlantic’s David Samuels who penned the cover story that featured Britney Spears on the magazine’s cover. Also, listen to New Yorker correspondent Seymour Hersh discuss the “on-the-ground reporting behind his Pulitzer Prize winning scoop” from 1968.

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    JOBS

  • Financial Week is looking for a Reporter.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Researcher, Senior NGM.

  • Scholastic is looking for an Event Associate — Part-time.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext