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Posts Tagged ‘FREELANCE:’

Keija Minor, Editor-in-Chief of Brides on Her Jump From Law to Publishing

keija-minor2Keija Minor has come a long way from her initial career as a corporate lawyer. This D.C. native left the world of law around 2003 and took a major pay cut to start over again as a magazine intern. Her leap of faith paid off: she’s now the editor-in-chief of Brides.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Minor discusses her vision for Brides, being inspired by artistic director Anna Wintour and how she transitioned from law to publishing:

How did you make the move from corporate law to magazines?
There is literally a book called What Can You Do With a Law Degree? that was sticking out on a shelf at Barnes & Noble, and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, it’s a sign!’ So I decided basically by the end of year two [of my job as a lawyer] that I needed to look for something else, and then it took a year to save a year’s worth of mortgage payments, with my theory being that I may be broke and not be able to eat, but I won’t be homeless. And I actually started taking [women's magazine] classes at Mediabistro. Once I made up my mind that that’s what I wanted to do, it was like this huge burden was lifted off my shoulders — I had five minutes of regret about two minutes after I left the firm.

To hear more from Minor, including what it’s like to be the first African American to hold a top position at Condé Nast, read: So What Do You Do, Keija Minor, Brides Editor-in-Chief?

Mediabistro Course Management 101

Become a better manager in our new online boot camp, Management 101! Starting October 27, MediabistroEDU instructors will teach you the best practices being a manager, including, how to transition into a management role, navigate different team personalities, plan a team event and more! Register before September 30 to get $50 OFF with early bird pricing. Register now!

The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

Freelancers: When Should You Leave A Client?

LifeAsAFreelancer

Becoming a freelancer after working full time at a more traditional job can be a daunting transition. You are suddenly forced to be your own boss, create your own schedule and hunt for clients yourself.

Although there are plenty of benefits to becoming a freelancer, one of the major downfalls is the lack of financial stability. And nowadays, there seems to be a constant battle between what you should be paid and what you’re actually getting:

The “I can get it cheaper mindset” seems more prevalent since the Internet boom. Clients see numerous listings for blog posts at “5 cents a word” or “$6 a page” or “$10 an hour.” So often they don’t realize how unrealistic these rates are once issues like research, interviews, deadlines — plus overall skill — are factored in. Graphic designer Lucy A. Clark feels you have to hold your ground. “Unless you can educate [potential clients] about what’s really involved, walk away,” she said.

To get more tips on freelancing, read: Pros and Cons of Life as a Freelancer.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Rebound After Your Story Has Been Rejected

KilledStory

Whether it’s in your love life or your work life, being told ‘no’ can sting. When an editor rejects your writing, it can feel like a personal attack — but it’s usually not.

Editors kill stories based on a number of reasons, such as timing issues or internal changes in the publication. In any case, it’s important to find out why your piece was killed and then move on:

Whatever you do, don’t be overly apologetic. You’ll only appear desperate and needy to the editor, which doesn’t bode well if you hope to work with him or her again. I learned the hard way that editors simply don’t have patience for it. Instead, thank them for the opportunity and assure that you’ll apply the lessons from the experience to future assignments. Regardless of the reason, it’s never easy dealing with the rejection of an assignment. But instead of getting emotional, wondering if you’ll ever be good enough, try being logical, suggests New Jersey freelance writer, Stephanie Auteri. “I like to remind myself you can’t make everyone happy and you can’t be the right writer for everyone.”

To hear more words of wisdom from veteran freelancers and editors, read: 6 Things to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Lessons in Freelancing: Ignore the Hostile Comments

freelancer mistakes

Learning from your own mistakes is great; learning from others mistakes puts you one step ahead of the game.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, we talk to some writers about rookie mistakes they made (and you can now avoid), including freaking out about comments:

Maria Guido, blogger at GuerillaMom.com, gives this advice: “Just chill out. Don’t worry about what everyone says because it really doesn’t matter. Try not to take every comment to heart because I totally believe that’s something people just do — all day! They just get online and attack people.” She also reminds writers that the people who comment are a very, very tiny portion of your actual collective readership.

For more tips on how to navigate the freelance world, read 7 Mistakes Every Freelance Writer Should Avoid.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Rising Star Finalists

mblogo.jpgAfter the jump, you’ll find the finalists for FishbowlDC’s Rising Star competition. Congrats to everyone for being nominated and making it into the 2nd round in our first “Rising Star” competition. The winners will accompany mediabistro.com and FishbowlDC to the National Press Foundation Dinner, with a seat next to a high-profile guest (and if you’re a high profile guest who wants to go, let us know).

Plus: We’ll be giving away seats to lucky winners we’ll pick at random. Click here to enter the raffle (send your name, affiliation and contact info).

Now, before you write in to complain about so-and-so not getting included, etc., etc., let’s explain a few things.

1.) If you didn’t get nominated, you didn’t get considered. The pool of contenders was chosen by you.
2.) Some (actually, many) people were not included because, in our opinion, they were already “risen”, not “rising” (For instance: Ed Henry was nominated. Funnily enough, so was Helen Thomas). So, for some of you, it’s a compliment.
3.) We did our best to limit the number of finalists from each publication, from certain beats, and from each medium (print, radio, broadcast, etc.).
4.) Most importantly, we’re well aware that the list is imperfect. We did our best. Our apologies in advance if you felt snubbed. Dorian, Inky and Patrick discussed the finalists but the finalists were mostly determined by consulting with employees at various news organizations for their insight, thoughts and advice.

Okay, so this is how it’s going work: After the jump is the list of finalists. If you’re already attending the National Press Foundation Annual Awards Dinner on February 22, let us know. Unfortunately, we’ll have to remove your name from consideration, since that means you won’t be able to sit with us (*tear*). Also, if you simply don’t want to be considered, please also let us know. Then, with the list tweaked as/if needed, we will open up voting Thursday morning and it will go through Monday.

Click below for the finalists…

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