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Posts Tagged ‘Hillary Rodham Clinton’

Pomfret and Kessler Take New Roles for WaPo Nat’l Security

WaPo memo obtained by FBDC:

“We are delighted to announce that Glenn Kessler will take on a new role as player/coach for the national security staff and that John Pomfret will return to National, this time as a diplomatic correspondent concentrating on U.S. relations with China and the rest of Asia.”

Glenn has spent more than seven years as The Post’s main chronicler of the State Department and Secretaries of State from Colin Powell to Hillary Clinton. In his new role he will help oversee the coverage of U.S. foreign policy while continuing to cover U.S. relations with the Middle East. He will also occasionally fill in for Cameron Barr as editor.

The rest of the memo after the jump…

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R.I.P. WaPo “Mouthpiece Theater”

“I don’t think the series worked as they intended. It was meant to be funny and insightful and translate the superb journalism Chris and Dana do in print and online into a new format,” WaPo Exec. Editor Marcus Brauchli told Howard Kurtz of Cillizza and Milbank’s Mouthpiece Theater video series.

Brauchli killed the series today after it sparked controversy from a joke made about Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Dana Milbank and Chris Cillizza agreed with the decision and apologized in separate interviews with Kurtz.

>Earlier: Women’s Media Group Sends Letter to WaPo to Protest a Certain “Mouthpiece Theater”

Morning Reading List, 01.09.09

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 12.03.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 04.04.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Kitty Kelley’s birthday and the 40th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Ok, so maybe you can’t run, but you can do 20 push ups non-stop.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I’ve had nothing to do for the last three hours. But because ‘something might happen,’ I need to stay here — on the clock — wasting my own time and the company’s money.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Veteran newsman Richard Willing has joined the Office of the Director of National Intelligence as its Director of Public Affairs. Willing, 59, covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • NewsHour with Jim Lehrer announced that Betty Ann Bowser will be the new Health Correspondent. She will replace Susan Dentzer, who is the new Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said a purchase of the Long Island newspaper Newsday would give his New York Post a ‘more secure future’ and help compete with the New York Times for advertising.”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “WashPost’s Dan Balz considers buyout”

  • Reuters reports, “Tribune Co is at risk of defaulting on its debt in as little as 18 months if the newspaper business deteriorates further, and it fails to unload more properties.”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Thinner. Lighter. Skinnier. There’s a good chance your daily newspaper is a lot easier to lift off your front stoop than it used to be. Economic pressures and competition are brutal, forcing newspapers to slim down. Industry experts warn that editorial quality could suffer. But does dieting have to be a negative development? No.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Tribune Co. Chairman Sam Zell will have to sell assets besides the Chicago Cubs baseball team and its Newsday newspaper on Long Island to pay back debt maturing in 2008 and 2009, bond research firm Gimme Credit said.”

  • A White House press release announced, “The New York Times Mistakes Its Own Blindness For Presidential ‘Invisibility’ –
    Apologist For Democrat-Led Congress’ Inaction, Paper Criticizes President Bush For Public Unawareness Of Housing Event Old ‘Gray Lady’ Forgot She Failed To Cover”

  • Romenesko reports, “A study of blogs and audience engagement during the week before the fall 2006 elections found that most newspaper staff-produced blogs contained a small number of postings, failed to create much interaction between the blogger and the audience and attracted few audience comments. ‘Newspapers might consider spending staff time monitoring blogs as sources of news rather than trying to re-create the blogosphere on their websites,’ says j-prof Lori Demo.”

  • Politico reports, “WSJ may endorse in ’08; first time since Hoover!”

  • City Paper’s Mike DeBonis reports, “On Monday morning, the Washington Post flooded the proverbial zone on its Nationals Park coverage — more than 20 reporters documented every last aspect of the ballpark’s first official major-league game. The Post also flooded the paper with an inaccuracy: that the stadium cost $611 million.”

  • From a Postie regarding this, “How many pulitzers do you think the post will lose in the buyouts? Sue Schmidt is just the first band in that parade.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “The AP reports Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama have accepted the invitation of CBS News and the North Carolina Democratic Party to debate on April 27. The 90-minute debate will follow 60 Minutes and be moderated by Katie Couric and Bob Schieffer.”

  • The Baltimore Sun reports, “For decades, local TV stations in cities like Baltimore were cash cows for the companies that owned them. Even though one or two stations with the most popular anchors often came to dominate each market, everybody made money. Local TV was that surefire a business — even for last-place and poorly managed stations. But not today.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The number one network morning show last week was again NBC’s Today show. All three networks saw increases in their A25-54 demo viewership.”

  • TVNewser reports, “A producer/reporter working for the Brian Ross investigative unit at ABC News was roughed up Tuesday as he tried to get an interview with a West Virginia energy company executive. The unidentified producer, DV camera in hand, was trying to get an interview with Don Blankenship, the CEO of Massey Energy.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tech Crunch reports, “As Al Gore’s Current Media gets ready for its IPO, the cable channel is drawing more on its Website audience for TV content. Today, it is launching Current News, a three-minute wrap-up culled from audience submissions on the Web that will play every hour on Current TV. As such, the site now has a new look, with the audience contributions front and center. Each one can be voted up the page, and at the very top are the most popular, which get packaged together every hour on TV in the new Current News segment. The video can also be seen on the Website.”

  • ClickZ.com reports, “A classified ad industry research firm says Craigslist could ‘easily’ rake in $100 million with a few minor changes to improve service. The company, Classified Intelligence of Altamonte Springs, Fla., estimates Craigslist’s 2008 revenue will be about $81 million this year, a figure Classified Intelligence Principal Peter Zollman called ‘amazing’ in light of the laid-back operations of the mostly-free classifieds Web site.”

  • Wired.com reports, “Google argues that the plummeting click-through rates on its ads are a good thing — but advertisers aren’t buying it. A major change Google made in early March to its AdWords algorithm is resulting in a double whammy for some advertisers: The rates they’re paying for ads have rocketed while conversion rates for those ads have dropped. Disgruntled advertisers have dubbed the move the ‘Google slap.’”

  • Politico reports, “Gawker uses Nielsen data to chart the political leanings of news web site readers. Mother Jones is found to bring in the most liberal, with Fox News topping the conservatives.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer is “Grumbling about the misuse of hyperlinks on news sites.”

  • TVWeek.com reports, “Ads embedded in YouTube videos perform just as well as ads on television, Google said. Those are the findings from a study commissioned by Google to measure the effectiveness of 30-second ads on YouTube, on TV and embedded into content online. Harris Interactive conducted the study.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc on Wednesday unveiled new features to make Web search easier and more relevant to mobile phone users, the latest step in its battle with Google Inc in the next frontier for Web use.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. reported the biggest workforce reduction in its nine-year history, cutting jobs at DoubleClick Inc., the online advertising company it bought last month for $3.24 billion”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio joins with EWTN Global Catholic Network to launch a six-day channel covering Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to the USA, including a major public event at DC’s new Nationals Field. It’ll be on XM-120 from 4/15 to 4/20″

  • The New York Times reports,Randi Rhodes, an afternoon host for the progressive Air America radio network, was suspended Thursday after repeatedly insulting Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton at an event last month.”

  • Also from DCRTV, “DC-based lefty radio talker Bill Press releases his latest book, ‘Trainwreck: The End Of The Conservative Revolution (And Not A Moment Too Soon),’” today.

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • TVNewser reports, “When You Think GQ, You Think… Karl Rove, right? The former Bush deputy chief of staff and current Fox News contributor is featured in a lengthy Q&A by Lisa DiPaulo on GQ’s web site today. Rove describes his new job at FNC as ‘odd.’ ‘It’s weird for me,’ he says. ‘But it’s interesting.’

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    JOBS

  • National Women’s Law Center is looking for a Communications Mgr.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Staff Tax Accountant.

  • Smithsonian Magazine is looking for an Editorial Intern.

  • The Roanoke Times is looking for an Editorial Writer.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for a Senior Designer, PBS KIDS GO! Broadband.

  • PBS is looking for a Production Associate and an Assistant Director, Program Project Management.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for Staff Writers for Online Daily Health Publication.

  • The Capitol Hill Current/Voice of The Hill is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Committees Reporter.

  • Georgetown University is looking for a Senior Writer/Editor.

  • Association of Governing Boards is looking for a Writer/Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. Perez Hilton is a WHCA guest! And Donatella Versace, too! And it’s the birthday of Politico’s Jonathan Martin and Mike Allen’s Mom. Speaking of Jonathan Martin’s b-day, Mike Allen has this to say: “Without J-Mart, Politico readers would know a lot less and the campaign trail would have a lot fewer exclamations of ‘SOLID!’ and ‘SO GOOD!’ (Martin’s the last person we know who carries a checkbook in his back pocket.) No truth to the rumor that TAGG ROMNEY will jump out of the cake. But KEVIN MADDEN has a touching tribute: ‘Happy Birthday to Jonathan Martin — a guy who has Patrick O’Connor’s style, John Bresnahan’s charm, a face for radio and a brain that should be left for science.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you cannot run three miles non-stop.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “With the exception of the Wall Street Journal, most of today’s print mass media is biased crap, agenda-based sensationalism, mere entertainment. I do believe there is a market for solid journalism (objective and fact-based), but readers like myself have to look pretty hard to find it.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Leon Walczak, 61, a retired Washington bureau chief for Business Week and a writer and editor who specialized in national politics, died March 28 of pancreatic cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda.”

  • Also from The Washington Post, “Betty Miles James, 84, one of the first female reporters at the Washington Star, died March 18 of congestive heart failure at Ingleside at Rock Creek, a Northwest retirement community.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Martha Wright, director of design for the Washington Post’s Style section, recently quit to move to Chicago.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • “Democrats dominated election coverage by about a six-to-one margin over Republicans in a week when making headlines was not necessarily a good thing, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 24-30.”

  • Vanity Fair’s Michael Wolffe reports, “The Sulzberger family would never let go of The New York Times. Or would it? With the latest shareholder assault on the ‘invulnerable’ paper’s management — this one from a couple of upstart hedge funds—the author plays out the most likely (and unlikely) scenarios.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Mystical Pennsylvania Foodstuffs Confuse NYT Reporter”

  • Mad.co.uk reports, “The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp since December, is set to sell its US print edition in London, the first time the newspaper has been printed in Europe.” Romenesko has more.

  • Eric Boehlert says “Fact: The press tuned out Iraq.”

  • Joe O’Connell, a Special Contributor to The Dallas Morning News
    reports, “What happens if the newspaper presses stop rolling? That’s the big question behind the documentary Stop the Presses: The American Newspaper in Peril, which has its world premiere today at the AFI Dallas International Film Festival.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes about the New York Times, “The paper’s design director defends its expanded summary pages.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A U.S. Senate committee plans to vote April 24 on a measure to reverse federal rules that let companies such as Tribune Co. own a broadcast station and daily newspaper in the 20 largest markets.”

  • E&P’s Steve Outing writes, “I stopped getting the print edition of my local newspaper this month. Among my new-media expert colleagues, I’m behind the curve with that move; many gave up the print habit long ago. But compared to the general population, I’m still ahead of most folks. I admit, I feel a bit guilty about this. After all, I write for and offer advice to newspapers on an industry website.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “MSNBC ends March 2008 tied for #2 in primetime in the advertiser-friendly 25-54 demographic, the best monthly finish for MSNBC compared to CNN since May 2001. In primetime, there is a true three-way race in cable news, with only 66,000 viewers A25-54 separating first and second place. MSNBC also delivered its best-ever quarterly weekday primetime ratings in 1Q08 in total viewers, and best in the 25-54 demographic since 4Q01.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of March 24-28, ‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54 and tied for first place among Total Viewers. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/8 and 2.55 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 90,000. Among Total Viewers, ABC and NBC both averaged 8.41 million.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The historic and long-running presidential campaigns of Senator Barack Obama and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton have injected issues of race and gender into politics as never before. With campaign coverage center stage on the cable channels, producers and critics are again assessing the diversity among pundits, who talk (and talk) about things like Mr. Obama’s pastor, the Hispanic vote, Iraq and the economy.”

  • Politico looks at the upcoming Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association dinner.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC was the fourth ranked cable network during the first quarter of 2008 (during prime time), despite not hosting a debate during the time period. CNN, who hosted four highly rated debates, finished #14 while MSNBC came in at #27.” And, “Fox News had the top five program in Total Viewers, and 15 out of the top 20, during the first quarter of 2008. The top CNN program was CNN Election Center at #6, while the top MSNBC program was Countdown with Keith Olbermann at #20. The O’Reilly Factor was the top program during the time period.”

  • “While CNBC continues to grow in Total Viewers, the A25-54 demo numbers continue to slide. For Q1 2008, CNBC was down in many “business day” hours (5amET-7pmET) year-to-year,” reports TVNewser.

  • “Headline News had one of its best quarters in five years in Total Viewers (today day). Also, Glenn Beck Tonight at 7pmET posted its best quarter ever in Total Viewers, while Nancy Grace’s 8pmET hour scored its best quarter ever in the A25-54 demo,” TVNewser also reports.

  • CBSNews.com reports, “CBS, reeling from disappointing earning in the last quarter has done some layoffs, at the corporate level, and separate from that, at some local O&O stations. On corporate level, TVNewser reports that CBS News has made cuts in to editorial, technical operations and the bureaus. The total cuts amount to 1 percent of the staff, the post says.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In the first quarter, Fox News Channel was the most-watched channel in all of cable news, winning both the today day and prime time categories in Total Viewers. This marks the 25th consecutive quarter in which FNC has won these categories.”

  • Also, “In addition to MSNBC tying for second in the A25-54 demo in prime time for the month of March, the network experienced a 63% year-to-year increase in weekday prime time, averaging 885,000 Total Viewers.”

  • And, “As TVNewser first reported Friday, CNN did in fact win the ad-friendly A25-54 demo in prime time for the first quarter.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Consumers appear to be turning down the volume on television purchases. As the largest specialty-electronics retailers get set to report year-end results, recent consumer surveys and comments from a TV supplier and from club stores point to slowing TV demand. The category has been among the few bright spots in big-ticket spending for the home as the economy has weakened.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister asks, “Will Thrills Abound When Obama Plays Hardball?”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Hugh Downs

  • A release announced, “From his riveting radio reports of World War II to his dramatic television showdown with Sen. Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow established the gold standard for American broadcast journalism. Celebrating the centennial of the legendary broadcaster’s birth, Murrow’s son Casey Murrow and former colleagues Richard C. Hottelet and Marvin Kalb will explore Murrow’s life and legacy at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 24, 2008, in GW’s Jack Morton Auditorium, located at 805 21st St., NW. The seminar will be moderated by Michael Freedman, GW vice president and professorial lecturer in journalism and former general manager of CBS Radio Network News.”

  • The Village Voice reports, “Supposedly Democrat-Friendly MSNBC Has Let a Clinton-Hating Joe Maul New York’s Senator”

  • TVNewser asks, “Do Cable’s Pundits Reflect Diversity of Presidential Race?”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Radar reports, “Former Vanity Fair and New Yorker editor Tina Brown has more than her much-ballyhooed bio of Bill and Hillary Clinton coming down the pipeline: Radar has learned that the erstwhile ‘Queen of Buzz’ is partnering with InterActiveCorp honcho Barry Diller to launch her own news aggregator website. The site, Brown tells Radar, will have ‘no ideological stance’ and will be edited by Edward Felsenthal, the former deputy managing editor of the Wall Street Journal who is currently a consultant at Portfolio.”

  • A reader asks, “Have there been any talks of a website called Politics 2 or Politics II?”

  • The AFP reports, “They’re angry at their demanding editors. They’re angry about the mushrooming workload in shrinking newsrooms. They’re even angry about other angry journalists. But these angry journalists are happy they can now vent their frustrations to the rest of the world, courtesy of angryjournalist.com, a sort of online complaint board allowing ink-stained wretches to gripe anonymously. Ironically, their anger is partly fueled by the Internet, which has forced newspapers and television networks to reinvent themselves with painful consequences for their staffs.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Observer’s Doree Shafrir writes, “‘There’s not one path anymore,’ David Hirshey, executive editor of HarperCollins and former longtime deputy editor of Esquire magazine, said the other day. ‘Thirty years ago, you worked at a newspaper, you moved to a magazine, and then you wrote books or screenplays. Today you can be a blogger who writes books or you can be a stripper who wins an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.’”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Interviews with editors of magazines like Wired, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, Us Weekly and several others elicited more of the same:Magazines are not, for the most part, worried about the Internet.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “WAMU 88.5, America Abroad Media, and The American Interest magazine will present a special town hall entitled ‘Foreign Policy and the Presidential Election: America’s Image Problem’ at 7 p.m., Monday, April 7, at the Kay Spiritual Center on the campus of American University in northwest Washington, D.C. This event is free and open to the public.” For more, click here.

  • Matthew Felling is hosting the “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm EDT.

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Rupert Murdoch addressed the students and faculty of Georgetown University this afternoon, explaining the ‘creative destruction’ wrought upon the news and entertainment industries by changing technology. Murdoch cast himself as a relentless competitor, which he is, who has taken on entrenched monopolies and oligopolies around the world, which is also true.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • BtoB reports, “Despite the slowing economy, mergers and acquisitions in the media and information industries kept up a fairly strong pace in the first quarter, according to a report released Tuesday by media investment bank Jordan, Edmiston Group.”

  • NPR’s On The Media reports, “The Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual State of the News Media report and the state of the news is strong.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman is “Pondering the strange appeal of the Newseum”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Washington Post’s On The Plane reports, “The White House press charter that ferries journalists, presidential staff and Secret Service agents whenever the president travels has been grounded. The chartered jumbo jet is one of the 52 Boeing-777 aircraft that United Airlines ordered out of service today until it can inspect them for possible problems with the fire suppression systems in the cargo holds. The jet is currently here in Bucharest, where President Bush is attending a NATO summit that opens tonight.”

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    JOBS

  • National Television Network is looking for a Director of Field Operations.

  • American Psychological Association is looking for a Marketing Manager, Journals Circulation.

  • AARP is looking for a Quality Associate.

  • The Hotline of National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a Design editor.

  • Daily News-Record is looking for an Editorial Page Editor.

  • AOPA is looking for a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.20.08

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    Good morning Washington. Did you go to The Express’ happy hour last night at The Greene Turtle? Or perhaps you were at Al Neuharth Free Spirit Conference’s evening gala, which recognized “Free Spirit of the Year” Cathie Black. Or yet another birthday party for that reporter with the curliest chest hair in the business?

    The Newseum’s getting some serious dough, Tim Russert’s bobblehead only went for $46 on eBay, U.S News & World Report’s Alex Kingsbury, just back from Iraq, will be on Jon Stewart Thursday night and Lauren Conrad’s coming to the WHCA dinner!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • It’s not even close — you think the D.C. protests yesterday were annoying as hell.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Barbara Paulsen, former senior editor of National Geographic magazine, has been promoted to assistant executive editor for text.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports,Cliff Sloan, the publisher of Slate and vice president of business affairs at The Washington Post Co.’s online media subsidiary, will join the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in June as a partner in its intellectual property group.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The New York Observer reports,David Paterson and the Art of the Leak”

  • Reuters reports, “Dow Jones & Co, recently bought by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, is ending an agreement of more than 40 years to carry news from the Associated Press after the AP said it wanted more money.”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Now that Tribune Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Sam Zell’s not swearing so much in his meetings with staff, his national tour of the Chicago Tribune parent’s properties hasn’t gotten much attention. Which is too bad. Because what’s being said as he and Randy Michaels, Tribune Co.’s chief executive of Internet and broadcasting, continue their road show is still newsworthy—even if it has nothing to do with cursing, Cubs and Wrigley Field.”

  • E&P reports, “The Audit Bureau of Circulations has moved closer to an overhaul of how it counts paid newspaper circulation. During a meeting of its board of directors last week in Kiawah Island, S.C., the bureau approved modifications that will affect how publishers report starting April 1, 2009. Among those changes: Newspapers will be considered ‘paid’ by ABC regardless of the price.” And, BtoB reports, “ABC gives initial approval to U.S. newspaper rule changes”

  • The Washington City Paper’s City Blog announced, “You’re invited to celebrate the Best of the Nation’s Capitol at Washington City Paper’s Best Of D.C. Ballot Party at Lounge 201.” It is tonight! “Here’s what you get: Free drinks, free hors d’oeuvre, free conversation with other people who you may or may not like but you can at least make fun of. Plus: An opportunity to cast your votes for the best places and people in the DC Metro Area. Votes for the Best Of D.C. will be tallied on March 27th and the results will be showcased in the City Paper Best Of Issue, hitting newsstands April 18th! Best Of categories include Food and Drink, Arts and Entertainment, Goods and Services, and People and Places.”

  • E&P reports, “You may be surprised to learn that, precisely five years ago, at least one-third of the top newspapers in this country came out against President Bush taking us to war at that time. Many of the papers may have fumbled the WMD coverage, and only timidly raised questions about the need for war, but when push came to shove five years ago they wanted to wait longer to move against Saddam, or not move at all.”

  • John McCain failed the Jeff Stein test — a question Stein asked in 2006, “Can You Tell a Sunni From a Shiite?”

  • The New York Observer reports, “It’s 1 P.M.: Who Is on Clinton Phone? Howard Wolfson: Hillary Spokesguy’s Daily Conference Call Is Hottest Party Line”

  • The Tribune Chronicle reports, “It was incorrectly reported in Tuesday’s Tribune Chronicle that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton answered questions from voters in a local congressman’s office. Reporter John Goodall, who was assigned to the story, spoke by telephone with Hillary Wicai Viers, who is a communications director in U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson’s staff. According to the reporter, when Viers answered the phone with ‘This is Hillary,’ he believed he was speaking with the Democratic presidential candidate, who had made several previous visits to the Mahoning Valley. The quotes from Viers were incorrectly attributed to Clinton.”

  • The Crimson reports, “Former Managing Editor of the Wall Street Journal Paul E. Steiger spoke last night at the John F. Kennedy Forum at the Institute of Politics about the current recession in the newspaper business, contending that ‘we have not reached the bottom yet.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Lame duck reporters are bored”

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    TV

  • Obama Ratings Hit, Schedule Stays Packed

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research in metered markets for March 18, 2008, ABC News’ exclusive interview with Barack Obama which aired first on ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Leno’ and ‘Letterman’ in the metered markets. ABC’s ‘Nightline’ averaged a 4.0/9 household rating/share among the 56 metered markets which flew past ‘Leno’ 3.9/10 and ‘Letterman’ 2.5/6. Compared to the prior four week time period average, ‘Nightline’ is up 18% among households.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Oh, It’s On: Dan Rather’s Lawsuit Proceeds As Discovery Moves Forward”

  • Huffington Post’s Maia Szalavitz writes, “Wire v. The Media on Drugs II: You’re Right, David Simon, We Suck”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp.’s Fox passed CBS as the most-watched television network after its ‘American Idol’ singing contest topped ratings and the Hollywood writers strike limited competition from scripted shows.”

  • Machinist reports, “How local TV embraced fake news”

  • Media Daily News reports, “Big Video content producers need to come up with aggregate ratings that combine television viewing with online video consumption, says Patrick Keane, vice president and chief marketing officer for CBS Interactive, speaking Monday morning at MediaPost’s OMMA Global conference in Hollywood. The combined rating would provide media buyers with a cross-platform option that’s simpler and more detailed in terms of data, because of online metrics.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “An unusually hefty though widely expected U.S. Federal Reserve rate cut Tuesday led to the biggest Wall Street rally in five years, but media stocks underperformed.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Los Angeles Time reports, “Facebook Inc. is rolling out tighter privacy controls that allow users to decide which friends can see their profile information and other personal details, the popular social networking site announced during a briefing at its headquarters Tuesday.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commission’s auction of valuable wireless airwaves ended yesterday after raising a record $19.6 billion and setting the stage for the first nationwide network that would be open to all devices and software. The FCC would not yet name the winners of airwaves, so it was unknown whether a new company would enter the wireless world to compete against the two biggest carriers, AT&T and Verizon Wireless. Further, the sole bid for a block of spectrum to be used for public-safety workers was far below the minimum price set by the agency.” And, The Wall Street Journal reports, “After 261 rounds of bidding, a government auction of airwaves ended yesterday, raising almost $20 billion from companies hoping to build new broadband wireless networks for next-generation phones and other devices.”

  • Folio reports, “There’s still a lot of Internet out there. And for publishers joining — or cobbling together — mini ad networks, that means revenue. So says a new white paper released late last week by media investment banking firm DeSilva + Phillips. According to the report, Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail, the approval of Google’s $3.1 billion acquisition of DoubleClick shouldn’t spell doom for smaller ad networks.”

  • The National Press Photographers Association announced, “One of the most comprehensive and powerful visual compilations of America’s past five years of war in Iraq has been published by Reuters in partnership with MediaStorm.org. ‘BEARING WITNESS: Five Years Of The Iraq War’ is a multimedia gallery of photography, video, audio interviews, and informational graphics that’s a must-see for photojournalists.”

  • ars technica reports, “The man who spoke for Comcast at Harvard last month has told the Federal Communications Commission that the agency has no legal power to stop the cable giant from engaging in what it calls ‘network management practices’ (critics call it peer-to-peer traffic blocking). Comcast vice president David L. Cohen’s latest filing with the Commission claims that regulators can do nothing even if they conclude that Comcast’s behavior runs afoul of the FCC’s Internet neutrality guidelines.”

  • CyberJournalist reports, “Microsoft is building a new site called ‘Blews’ that scans the blogs to determine what are the hottest news stories.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Mediabistro reports, “So What Do You Do James Bennet, Editor of The Atlantic?”

  • The AP reports,Lynndie England, the public face of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a German news magazine that she was sorry for appearing in photographs of detainees in the notorious Iraqi prison, and believes the scenes of torture and humiliation served as a powerful rallying point for anti-American insurgents.”

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    RADIO

  • Politics and Prose announced, “Veteran reporter Daniel Schorr, the last of Edward R. Murrow’s legendary CBS team and currently senior news analyst for NPR, will discuss his book, Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium, at the Friendship Heights Village Center on Thursday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m.”

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    JOBS

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer.

  • Voice of America is looking for a Reporter and a News Division/writer.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.12.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Wonkette’s Jim Newell. And “a former sex worker” scores a NYT op-ed. Happy days are here again.

    In more serious news, be sure to continue to follow the latest in the Tony Locy case. And check out the winners of the Sixty-Fifth Annual Pictures of the Year International Competition.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think Spitzer should resign.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Keith Tomatore, Vice President of Sales Development and Operations and Manager of Newsweek and Budget Travel, has left WPNI.

  • The New York Post reports, “AOL ousted Curt Viebranz, the president of AOL’s Platform A ad business, just seven months after tapping him for the top post. The company said Lynda Clarizio, president of AOL’s Advertising.com, will replace him as part of a ‘consolidation and integration plan.’”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Charting 4-Year Circ Plunge at Major Papers

  • His Extreme-ness analyzes “Richard Cohen’s Me-mail.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Monday that most U.S. newspapers suffer from declining classified advertising, with help-wanted ads headed to the Web ‘almost completely.’ The results force such papers to cut down on journalists and international bureaus, and ‘at smaller papers, even just local coverage.’ Newspapers will not go away, Murdoch said.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Billionaire Sam Zell is traveling the U.S. using pep talks laced with profanity to exhort Tribune Co.’s 19,000 employees to be more creative or risk seeing their jobs disappear. The real estate mogul turned chairman of Chicago-based Tribune has used the f-word and called himself the human equivalent of Viagra to address what ails one of the company’s newspapers, the 126-year-old Los Angeles Times.”

  • AJR reports, “A federal judge’s ruling requiring a former USA Today reporter to personally pay heavy fines for not identifying confidential sources stirs concern among journalists and First Amendment advocates.”

  • Frank Foer on “My epistolary relationship with William F. Buckley.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 8.99 million Total Viewers and a 2.3/8 among Adults 25-54 during the week of March 3rd. For the week, ‘World News’ placed first in the Adult 25-54 rating (2.3), tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News.’ Compared to this week last year, ‘World News’ grew its Total Viewing audience (+1%) and held its demo audience.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 3, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 9.541 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “To mark the fifth anniversary of the war in Iraq, ABC News will feature the special series, ‘Iraq 5 Years Later: Where Things Stand,’ the latest installment in its Emmy-award winning series of reports. Over the past five years, this comprehensive series has periodically examined how the Iraqi people and the country are faring in the wake of the US-led invasion. As in past installments, on- and off-air reporters were dispatched to nearly two dozen cities and towns across the country, and ABC News commissioned an exclusive, national public opinion poll of more than 2,200 Iraqis. ‘Iraq 5 Years Later: Where Things Stand’ will begin airing across ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms on Saturday, March 15, 2008 and will continue through the week.”

  • “‘It was a good show. I’m proud of it,’ Tucker Carlson tells TVNewser about his now-canceled MSNBC daily program, which began in 2005.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Less than one second. That’s how long it took Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton to answer, ‘Of course not,’ to Steve Kroft’s question on 60 Minutes about whether she thought Sen. Barack Obama was a Muslim. You can time it yourself by watching the clip at YouTube. Still, that didn’t stop MSNBC’s Chris Matthews from complaining on-air last week that it took Clinton ‘the longest time’ to answer Kroft’s question.”

  • New York Times reports, “Now hear this: NBC Universal is not for sale. No how, no way. Looking to squelch persistent rumors, Jeffrey R. Immelt, the chairman of General Electric, plans to make his most definitive statement yet about his company’s chief media asset.”

  • USA Today reports, “If Kevin Martin, the Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, is smarting from bruising battles last year with fellow commissioners, Congress and the cable industry, he’s showing no signs of it.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reuters reports, “A majority of Americans do not read political blogs, the online commentaries that have proliferated in the race for the U.S. presidency, according to a poll released on Monday. Only 22 percent of people responding to the poll said they read blogs regularly, meaning several times a month or more, according to the survey conducted by Harris Interactive.”

  • A release announced, “USA TODAY announces the launch of a new online consumer advertising campaign. The campaign will feature banner advertising within online ad networks, internet portals, social networks and on entertainment, leisure and lifestyle websites. The campaign encourages consumers to become active members of the USA TODAY online community and was developed by Arnold Worldwide.”

  • Romenesko points out, “Why didn’t the deaths of eight US soldiers make page one? … That’s what a Washington Post chat participant asks Thomas Ricks.”

  • What do WTOP and Extreme Mortman have in common? His Extreme-ness tells us here.

  • The AP reports, “The Web site of The New York Times suffered substantial delays Monday as traffic spiked following its reports linking Gov. Eliot Spitzer to a prostitution ring. Normally, the Times site takes about three seconds to load. Just minutes after the Times posted its first article on Spitzer at about 1:57 p.m., average load times increased to more than 20 seconds, according to Keynote Systems Inc., a company that measures Web site performance. Keynote checked the Times site using automated probes in 10 U.S. cities.”

  • A release announced, “First Online Free Expression Day to be launched on Reporters Without Borders website under UNESCO patronage
    on March 12″

  • Wired.com reports, “The Fox News Network is a ratings leader in cable news. But the channel is a loser when it comes to protecting its Fox mark. The World Intellectual Property Organization is concluding that a Florida businessman is the rightful owner to foxbusinessnetwork.com. Still, WIPO said it was ‘suspicious’ that the name was registered the same day the Rupert Murdoch-owned network announced February 2007 it was launching a business news channel.”

  • Buzz Flash.com reports,Reverend Moon – Source of Right-Wing Funding and ‘The Washington Times’ — Comes to Life in ‘Bad Moon Rising’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said he isn’t going to challenge Microsoft Corp.’s attempt to buy Yahoo! Inc., narrowing options for the second-largest Internet search engine.”

  • Information Week reports, “Despite the attention given to political blogs, only one in five Americans read them regularly, a research firm said Monday. In fact, 56% of Americans say they never read blogs that discuss politics, and just under a quarter say they read them several times a year, Harris Interactive found in a survey of more than 2,300 U.S. adults. Surprisingly, those who read blogs are less likely to be young adults. Some 19% of adults aged 18 to 31 read political blogs regularly, defined as several times a month or more; and only 17 % of people aged 32 to 43 say the same.”

  • The ClickZ Network reports, “The digital magazine market still represents only a fraction of its print counterpart, but a study to be released today suggests that people who subscribe to magazines online are more engaged with the advertising than those who read them in print.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “The Nielsen Co. is set to introduce Tuesday a series of quarterly reports aimed at fostering community interaction online, beginning with a study examining the correlation between bloggers and the boxoffice. While Nielsen PreView is launching with a film-centric report timed to this week’s ShoWest, the new venture plans to coordinate with many of Nielsen’s myriad research divisions to create market intelligence relevant to all aspects of the entertainment industry. The research will be made available at NielsenPreview.com, where registration is available to the public or to paid members who can access additional information as well as make recommendations on future research topics.”

  • Poynter Online’s Ernst Poulsen wonders, “If Newspapers Were Invented Today by a Web Journalist…”

  • XM’s Lee Abrams Moves To Tribune Co.

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    JOBS

  • Lakeway Publishers, Inc. is looking for a Live Your Love of History.

  • Agra Informa Inc. is looking Editor in Chief.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.15.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think MSNBC has some serious issues with sexism and obnoxious statements.

  • And, it is close, but more than half of you are in loooove.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Barack Obama is seen by most Democrats as inspiring and as most likely to bring about change. Hillary Clinton is widely viewed as prepared to lead the country, but also hard to like.”

  • Rochester Paper, WashingtonPost.com Reach Most Adults

  • Regarding this, a reader writes in, “shouldn’t it embarrass the Post newsroom downtown just a little bit that it’s been 10 years and they’re still having the same freak-bouts about .com as they were when it started? Seriously. wp.com ain’t the one with dropping circulation numbers, people — get on board or get off. Short-sighted and silly.” And, another reader says, “Maybe the Posties at 15th and L ought to spend their time figuring out how to beat the competition, rather than eating themselves alive from within — and whining at every turn about how they just don’t understand what’s happening to the news business.”

  • Gannett, NYT, Tribune, Hearst in online ad sales venture

  • Dallas Morning News Managing Editor George Rodrigue writes, “Several readers wrote to ask why we ran a photo of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton at the top of Wednesday’s front page, after Sen. Barack Obama had just won primaries in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. ‘If I just looked at a glance I would have bet the farm that Hillary Clinton had won all the marbles in Tuesday’s primaries,’ said Yvonne Crum of Dallas. ‘Obama wins eight states in a row, yet Hillary gets the front page spread. Fair and balanced? I don’t think so, and I am not even a Democrat,’ said Joe Womack of Dallas. On the photo, we simply made the wrong call. The headline (‘Obama wins three more’) and the photo were out of synch. We should have run the photo of Mr. Obama, which was down-page, in the lead position occupied by the image of Mrs. Clinton. But the fact that our layout desk featured Mr. Obama’s victories in the headline should answer any worries about deliberate bias.”

  • A release announced, “The New York Daily News is preparing to write a new colorful chapter in its rich history with the announcement of its purchase of state-of-the-art, high-volume full-color press equipment. By the end of 2009, the Daily News will become the first major market daily newspaper in the United States to be produced in 100% color on new press equipment manufactured by KBA, a global leader in printing technology. The new Commander CTÃ’ presses will give the Daily News the ability to efficiently produce all copies of all editions in color, reinforcing its future as the country’s leading tabloid and enabling its millions of readers to enjoy the city’s first full-color newspaper.”

  • Forbes.com asks, “Do newspapers still need The Associated Press? And does The Associated Press still need newspapers? Until recently, these would have been ridiculous questions. But print circulation is tumbling. So is advertising revenue. Editors are slashing budgets and making do with less. Readers are moving online, where they get all the national and international news, sports scores and celebrity gossip they can read–for free, updated constantly, and often by AP.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Media observers already are noticing the changes in a Rupert Murdoch-owned Wall Street Journal — a British editor for the glossy magazine launch, talk of a sports section, a move to Midtown. Now word around the Journal newsroom is that a prototype is being developed for a culture section, possibly to run weekly. The project is in the very early development stages, and a spokesman for The Journal declined comment Tuesday.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “The U.S. Department of Journalism under assault — from another branch of government!”

  • Wall Street Journal’s The Numbers Guy reports, “Election Handicappers Are Using Risky Tool: Mixed Poll Averages”

  • Radar’s Full Court Press writes “The estimable Warren P. Strobel of McClatchy Newspapers, who has a fine record of questioning all of the Bush administration’s lies on the way to the war in Iraq. But this time he seems to have been a bit sloppy. Strobel wrote that Weekly Standard editor and New York Times columnist Bill Kristol is part of ‘McCain’s foreign-policy team.’ But Strobel didn’t bother to confirm this with Kristol. When Times editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal asked Kristol about it, he flatly denied it.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 10, 2008 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.497 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of February 4, 2008, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with CBS’ ‘Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. The program posted 3.6 million total viewers and 1.75 million Adult 25-54 viewers, its best performance since the week of December 3, 2007. Among Adults 25-54, both CBS’s and NBC’s leads over ‘Nightline’ have declined for the 5th consecutive week.”

  • TVNewser asks, “Did ‘Blurred Lines’ Lead to Shuster Suspension?”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “MSNBC Spokesperson: Shuster Will Not Be Fired And Will Return To Network”.

  • TVNewser reports,Hillary Clinton Confirmed for MSNBC Debate”

  • “Legendary broadcast journalist Daniel Schorr will speak about and sign his book, Come to Think of It at a luncheon program co-sponsored by the English-Speaking Union on Tuesday, February 19 at the Woman’s National Democratic Club. … The cost of the program is $30. For tickets, contact the English-Speaking Union at esuwdc.net/(202) 234-4602, or the Woman’s National Democratic Club at (202) 232-7363.

  • Chris Matthews blasts Clinton press office

  • “TVNewser obtained an email that American Morning EP Edward Litvak sent last night to the A.M. staff: ‘Chez Pazienza has left ‘American Morning’ and CNN. We wish him well in all of his future endeavors.’ A CNN insider tells TVNewser Pazienza was let go because, “he did not get permission to publish personal writings. Those personal writings come from The Huffington Post, where Pazienza has been blogging since January 23. His most recent post, on February 10, took on the controversy surrounding MSNBC correspondent David Shuster.”

  • Brand Republic reports, “News International is considering taking The Sunday Times compact, as part of a planned series of major changes to the title.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, may have to buy back more stock or pay a dividend to satisfy investors after a 35 percent drop in the shares last year.”

  • The New York Observer asks, “MSNBC’s David Shuster: Defender of Clinton Family Honor?”

  • TVNewser asks, “What Could Tucker Possibly Be Referring To?” Check out the video here.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mediabistro.com asks, “So What Do You Do, Paul Steiger, Editor-in-Chief, ProPublica?”

  • Inside Cable News says goodbye. “I can’t keep ICN going in its current form anymore. If you’d noticed it’s been slipping a bit this week as I floundered to try and ‘do it all’. That was a wake up call. Time to call it a day. Time to reclaim those five hours a day of of my life that are devoted to doing something I like but which I can’t make a living off of. And then there’s my real job which pays me more than I could probably make blogging.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Yes, MSNBC consistently has the lowest ratings among the cable news channels. But all is not lost. It does stand out in one underappreciated category: embarrassing, mealy-mouthed apologies.”

  • AlwaysOn reports, “We all know VCs and startups have to be bullish about 2008, despite a rocky economy, but when a top analyst says digital media M&A will be up, even after an explosive 2007, it’s worth another look.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Veteran journalist Philip S. Balboni, who built New England Cable News into the nation’s largest regional news network, is leaving the station next month to start the first US-based website devoted exclusively to international news. The site is expected to launch early next year with correspondents in nearly 70 countries. The company, Global News Enterprises LLC, will have its headquarters on the historic Boston waterfront at the Pilot House on Lewis Wharf.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner Inc’s Internet division AOL and IAC/InterActiveCorp’s Citysearch site will announce on Thursday a partnership to share local content and advertising resources. Under the deal, Citysearch will provide its local business reviews, videos from merchants and promotions for AOL Web sites such as AOL CityGuide, AOL Local Search and MapQuest.”

  • Tech Crunch reports, “At the start of the Microsoft/Yahoo saga we reported that News Corp. was scrambling to put together a bid to compete with Microsoft, but backed down because they were unable to find outside funding to make the deal lucrative enough (the sorry state of the debt markets contributed to the problem). Yesterday Silicon Alley Insider reported that talks between the two were continuing. We’ve confirmed the rumor — Yahoo and News Corp. are in the middle of marathon discussions, and have more details.”

  • “CNN’s iReport.com Makes Its Debut”

  • Kim McLarin writes about “Surviving on a blackness-only diet.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah explores Michelle Obama’s Reuters Halo!”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “In yesterday’s review of MSNBC’s primary night coverage, Alessandra Stanley made one huge, glaring error that proved to anyone even casually watching the coverage that she had no credibility on the matter, at all. The error was this: Attributing the slogan ‘the best political team on television’ to MSNBC and not CNN, where that slogan is shoehorned into pretty much every segment, debate, pre-commercial sign-off and available chyron. It is a constant refrain, one which I find I can’t read without hearing Wolf Blitzer’s voice awkwardly intoning it in my head.”

  • Private Equity Hub reports, “Tributes.com, a new spinout from Eons, has raised $4.3 million in funding from Dow Jones, Eons and other strategic backers. VentureWire reports a post-money valuation of $8.9 million. Tributes.com is an online content company focused on obituaries and related information, which means it will compete with sites like Legacy.com. Eons is a social network for the baby boomer set, and has raised $32 million in VC funding to date.”

  • Folio reports, “Time Editor: Someday There Will Be People Who Don’t Know There’s a Print Version”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Traffic to Magazine Web Sites Grows 8.1 Percent in Fourth Quarter”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Vanity Fair’s JFK Love Child Goes Public”

  • On Tuesday, Ronald Brownstein, the Political Director of Atlantic Media, will discuss his latest book at The Aspen Institute from 12:00-2:00 pm.

  • New York Post reports, “BUSINESSWEEK, the McGraw-Hill flagship magazine that was rattled by pre-Christmas layoffs in the editorial department, has pushed another 20 people with contracts closer to the door. Last Friday, Executive Editor John Byrne on a conference call told the contract workers they were being reassigned to a contract with Kelly Services.”

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    RADIO

  • The AP reports, “The Justice Department on Wednesday approved the $19.5 billion sale of Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. operator of radio stations and the world’s largest billboard company.”

  • Also from The AP, “The owner of a radio station that promoted a rock concert where pyrotechnics ignited a deadly blaze reached a tentative $22 million settlement with survivors and victims’ relatives, according to court papers filed Wednesday. The deal with Clear Channel Broadcasting is the latest in a series of settlements stemming from the Feb. 20, 2003, fire at The Station nightclub in West Warwick that killed 100 people and injured more than twice that many.”

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    JOBS

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Web Producer.

  • Jane’s is looking for a Maritime Reporter.

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division /writer.
  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Editor (Copy), News & Information.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist, Int’l Children’s Magazines.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Advertising Sales Manager.

  • FOX News Channel is looking for a Producer.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a Director, Public Relations and Communications.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Senior Video Producer.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Editorial Assistant.

  • Retirement Living Live show is seeking a Creative Producer.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.25.08

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    Good morning Washington. Five years ago, the Department of Homeland Security opened its doors.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you, almost all of you, have invested money in stocks.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Kathleen O’Malley, an assistant national editor at the Washington Times, is leaving to take a position on the copy desk of the Indianapolis Star.” Her last day at the Washington Times is Super Tuesday.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s Campaign Coverage Index shows, “Republicans attracted more of the media’s attention than did Democrats last week. Fully 45% of campaign stories focused on GOP candidates, while 40% were significantly or primarily about the Democratic Party.”

  • From DCRTV:

      In February, the Washington Blade plans to move its offices into the National Press Building at 14th and F. The region’s gay newspaper is currently located in the U Street corridor. “This new location offers us support services for hosting community groups that we just didn’t have” at the Blade’s current site, says Blade publisher Lynne Brown. The 40-year-old weekly got its start in offices at 930 F Street, which later became the famed 930 Club music venue…..

  • How Bill Kristol Landed that ‘Times’ Gig

  • Guest Poster Walter Dellinger on Journalism and Objectivity

  • Why doesn’t the New York Times stand up for Linda Greenhouse?

    Top of post

    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of January 14, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 9.566 million total viewers”

  • Ranking the Local TV Forecasters: Who’s the best of the best?”

  • Debate Ranker: CNN Scores With Contentious Debate

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ placed 1st among key demo viewers last week, tying with NBC’s ‘Nightly News’; both broadcasts averaged 2.80 million and a 2.3/8 among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 9.23 million, placing second. Week-to-week, the ABC News broadcast closed the Total Viewing gap with NBC by 13%. Compared to this week last year, the Total Viewing gap between ABC and NBC was 55% smaller.”

  • An NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams will moderate a debate among the Republican presidential candidates Thursday, Jan. 24, 9-10:30 p.m. ET, live on MSNBC from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Fla. Tim Russert, moderator of ‘Meet the Press’ and NBC News Washington Bureau Chief, will join Williams in questioning the candidates. Chris Matthews will anchor post-debate analysis on MSNBC, 10:30 p.m.-12 a.m. ET.”

  • TV Decoder reports, “As a seemingly endless series of presidential candidate debates have proven this election cycle, the posture of the debate moderator can make the difference between a forgettable evening and a feisty one.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Democratic Debate in South Carolina on CNN (from 8pm-10:05pmET) was the No. 1 most-watched primary debate in cable news history among total viewers and all key demos.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tonight at the Press Club, check out a panel “for a Web writing/editing panel … from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Zenger Room. The panel will be geared toward journalists hoping to make the transition to online, as well as anyone interested in digital media. We’ll have a diverse panel of experienced online media professionals from publications such as Smithsonian Magazine and NPR to talk about their work, give advice to aspiring journalists, and talk about future trends in digital journalism. For more information, please contact Christine Dell’Amore at rueparadis@gmail.com or 301-520-7153. Please RSVP to 202-662-7501.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “When Chris Matthews’ long-winded monologue at the opening of the January 17 Hardball program eventually touched down with an apology to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) for the way the cable talker had been treating the candidate on the air, the moment represented an unmistakable victory for the liberal blogosphere. By not only getting Matthews to apologize, but by also forcing the rest of the press — post-New Hampshire — to back off its, at-times, overtly sexist coverage of a prominent Democratic contender, the blogs have already had more impact on how the traditional press covers this presidential campaign than they did during the entire 2004 White House run.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Automattic, the commercial arm of the popular WordPress publishing platform for blogs, has received $29.5 million in financing from four companies, including a small portion from The New York Times Company.”

  • Media Week reports, “This may be the Internet age, but when it comes to political advertising, the traditional media are still candidates’ preferred channels. Online political advertising will total only $20 million in 2008, according to a forecast from Borrell Associates, scheduled for release later today (Wednesday). Online political advertising lags online’s 9 percent overall ad share, representing less than 0.5 percent of 1 percent of all political advertising, a tiny sliver by any measure.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Washington Post reports, “Over the last five years, Ted Genoways, VQR’s editor, has taken a staid old literary magazine and transformed it, adding not only great journalism but also color photos, comics, cartoons, eye-popping graphics and anything else that strikes his fancy. In those years, VQR has been nominated for 10 National Magazine Awards and has won two. It deserves them. It’s a great magazine.”

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    JOBS

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • Forbes.com is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • Direct Marketing Association is looking for a Director, Public Affairs.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for a Research Associate: Higher Education.

  • Liberty University is looking for a Promotional Copywriter.

  • The Mercatus Center at George Mason University is looking for a Manager for New Media.

  • Conservation International is looking for a Writer, External Affairs.

  • Goucher College is seeking an Internet Communications Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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