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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Kurtz’s’

Morning Reading List, 03.06.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Alan Greenspan’s birthday and, on this day in 1981, Walter Cronkite signed off from CBS.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think John King is hotter than Wolf Blitzer.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • CQ’s Patrick Yoest is heading to Dow Jones

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Daily Collegian reports, “About 400 students gathered in the HUB Auditorium last night to hear esteemed journalist Dana Priest of The Washington Post speak as part of the Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers. Priest is a 2006 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for her disclosure of secret overseas CIA prisons. She has spent nearly 20 years reporting for The Washington Post, covering the CIA, military and counterterrorism.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Pulitzer-Winner David Cay Johnston on Times Buyout List”

  • From a tipster:

      the city paper’s article on david nakamura at the post is so silly. the city paper FOIA’d all these emails between Fenty and Nakamura — how much did that process take away from real government work? was this FOIA in the service of the public? or in the service of a bruised ego looking to settle a score?

  • API has “Five questions for … Richard Honack

  • Newspaper Association of America reports, “Some newspapers are methodically going greener, reducing energy consumption and saving money”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “Nothing seems to make our local paper happier than spotting a neighborhood in the midst of a renaissance, a rebirth, or just sort of coming back. Today, we get the happy headline: ‘A Rapid Renaissance in Columbia Heights’ under the byline of Paul Schwartzman.”

  • Iraq Was Invaded In 2002, As Far As Times Critic Is Concerned

  • The AP reports, “Moody’s Investors Service is considering downgrading New York Times Co.’s credit rating because of declining advertising revenue, the ratings agency said Tuesday. Moody’s is reviewing New York Times’ ‘Baa1′ credit rating, which implies ‘lower-medium grade” credit quality.’”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Regular readers of the Wall Street Journal will notice something new in Friday’s editions — a sports page that uses content from one of the many businesses owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.”

  • Politico reports, “Obama’s Rezko ties escape national radar”

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    TV

  • A tipster tells us, “In a promo for MSNBCs political coverage this morning, shots of most of their ‘personalities’ were shown (in the context of the best political team on TV, or whatever the slogan was) with one notable exception: Tucker Carlson. Why is he ignored by MSNBC management?”

  • TVNewser provides an abridged version of Howard Kurtz’s 2,500 word dissertation on election coverage.

  • In the Center On Primary Night

  • The Deal.com reports, “Timing is everything: Time Warner-Cablevision deal likely”

  • Reuters reports, “Landmark Communications is seeking up to $5 billion for the Weather Channel cable television network, with preliminary bids due next week, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter.”

  • A release announced, “Senator Kerry sent a letter to Kevin Martin, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission today, asking him to investigate an Alabama television station that ‘blacked out’ during a controversial segment of 60 Minutes. Allegations have been raised that the blackout, which the station blames on ‘technical difficulties’, was an example of censorship.”

  • Super Tuesday II: The Cable Ratings

  • TVWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin may be winning the fight he has picked with TV networks that air racy programming. Mr. Martin’s agency lost the last major indecency court case in federal appeals court and he’s awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision on whether it will resuscitate that action against Fox.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “TV ratings have been the gospel for the broadcasting and ad industries for nearly 60 years. They are the yardstick by which our business has determined success or failure; the reason why ‘Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip’ was canceled, why Fox loves Simon Cowell and why the Super Bowl continues to be the most important TV event every year.”

  • TVNewser reports, “America’s Election HQ, the one-hour political show that premiered last week at 5pmET, has been extended past its original end date of yesterday. The FNC program, temporarily taking the place of Big Story, will air through the end of this week.”

  • A Situation Room viewer writes, “When the phone rings at 3:00A.M., We want Wolf Blitzer to answer the phone in the situation room.”

  • Who’s That Reporter In My Studio?

  • Columbia Journalism Review writes, “Fox Business Network’s populist sensibility is refreshing, sort of, but nobody’s watching. Here’s why

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger March Meeting is set for Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00PM at RFD. To RSVP, click here.

  • Nieman Watchdog reports, “Saul Friedman: Mainstream Black Columnists and Barack Obama”

  • A tipster writes in “pr maven gloria dittus won a big award last night and the national museum of women in the arts. charlie cook introduced her, debbie dingell also at the party.”

  • Folio reports, “National Geographic Renews Legal War Over Digital Archive”

  • DMNews reports, “Southern Progress Corporation (SPC), a subsidiary of Time Inc., has launched an online portal, MyHomeIdeas.com, highlighting content from its shelter magazines and book line.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “iReport launched to be like ‘YouTube with focus on personal reporting’, claims CNN director”

  • Columbia Journalism Review reports,Jeannie Kever began her Houston Chronicle column yesterday — a column applauding the ‘US media’ for avoiding the ‘Texas cowboy stereotype’ in its primary coverage of her state”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Time Online reports, “Permira, the British private equity group, has emerged as a potential suitor for Reed Business Information, the trade magazines arm of Reed Elsevier, which could soon be for sale for about £1.25 billion.”

  • iReport, You Decide (if This Crap is Worth Your Time)

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple reports, “Washingtonian Publisher Has ‘Liable’ Concerns”

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    BOOKS

  • Washingtonian’s Garrett Graff writes, “Newsweek columnist Eleanor Clift likely wishes she didn’t have a reason to write her new book, Two Weeks of Life: A Memoir of Love, Death and Politics. Two of her previous books were written with her late husband, Tom Brazaitis, Washington bureau chief of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The new one is Clift’s journal of Brazaitis’s last days, when he was in hospice care with cancer.”

  • Publisher’s Weekly reports, “The New York Times reported Monday that the Far Eastern Economic Review, which Rupert Murdoch recently acquired, killed a review of the Viking Australia book Rupert’s Adventures in China due to the book’s unfavorable look at Murdoch. With the book set for U.S. release this summer, it’s unclear how the media will handle it.”

  • Ars Technica reports, “Book lovers have a message for e-book makers: you can have my paperback when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. We reported yesterday on the 2008 Digital Entertainment Survey from the UK, which found that 70 percent of Internet users would stop sharing files if they received notification from their ISP. But tucked in the survey data was another fascinating finding about the strength of consumer attachment to traditional paper books.”

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    JOBS

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Education Programming Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 01.11.08

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    It’s a good morning, Washington, even with the Dupont 5 closing. In honor of Mary J. Blige’s birthday, please have a drama-free day. And Playbook reminds us that it’s Mark Halperin’s birthday today. Which means that Ana Marie Cox has a prank planned. Those crazy Time.com’ers…

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you do not drink DC’s tap water.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Poynter Online reports, “The big news this week was that, despite predictions, Sen. Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in N.H. But a few major U.K. papers went to press with a different story — that Sen. Barack Obama won the election.”

  • Jon Fine says, “You’ve Got Tribune. Now Do Something

  • The AP introduced “‘Ask AP,’ a Q&A column where The Associated Press answers your questions about the news — anything from ‘What’s a subprime mortgage?’ to ‘What ever happened to Linda Tripp?’ to ‘How does a reporter prepare to be embedded with the military in Iraq?’ AP editors will choose some of the questions sent in by readers like you and get answers from AP reporters and editors — the people who spend their days covering the very issues you’re curious about.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “The presidential campaign dominated news coverage last week, with roughly half of the newshole (49%) devoted to the tight nomination contests in both political parties. Public interest in the campaign has increased but campaign news has not necessarily dominated the public’s focus to the same extent. Just over a third (34%) say the campaign is the story they followed most closely last week, up 12 points from early December (Dec. 2-7). But many also say the assassination of Benazir Bhutto (21%), was the story they followed most closely. Her untimely death was among the top foreign news interest stories over the last year.”

  • WSJ opinions…for free!

  • Regarding this a reader writes in, “Don’t forget the Southwest 7 p.m. flight from Manchester to Baltimore. There were the last two presidents of the National Press Club. Jerry Zremski and Jon Salant, chatting it up with Houston Chronicle political reporter Ben Roth.”

  • ‘NY Times’ Wants Your Polling Place Photos For The Web

  • Washingtonpost.com will be featuring animated cartoons by Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist Ann Telnaes two to three times per week starting yesterday. Check out the first one here.

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “One of the enjoyable subplots in Christopher Buckley’s book ‘Boomsday’ is what essentially is a Google zapper — a device that eliminates bad, harmful, or embarrassing links on Google. I was reminded of that all-too-real fictional tool when reading this in Howard Kurtz’s piece today about how the media embarrassed itself in New Hampshire”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, January 6, 2008, ABC News’ ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘This Week’ grew an impressive 24% among the key Adults 25-54 demographic compared to last year, the program’s best A25-54 delivery in almost a year (week of February 25, 2007).”

  • Is Obama warming up to Fox News?”

  • Brian Williams Drops Yiddish, Loves His Nickname

  • Comments Abound After Williams Blog Post

  • A NBC release announced, “Just two days before the New Hampshire
    primary, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning on Sunday, January 6, 2008 in all categories.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook:

      The “CBS Evening News” investment in politics — including substantial airtime, new correspondents, sharp embeds and an evident passion for the topic by anchor Katie Couric — is paying off.

      On Jan. 8, the night of the New Hampshire primary, Katie’s live broadcast from Manchester beat the “NBC Nightly News” in the 25-54 demo in New York, San Francisco, Atlanta and Houston, per CBS.
      And the “CBS Evening News” was the Des Moines ratings leader in the November sweeps among households, views and the demo, per CBS.

  • NewsBusters reports, “To riff off the Alice Roosevelt Longworth line: if you don’t have anything nice to say about Rupert Murdoch, go sit next to David Shuster. The MSNBCer and former Fox Newser has no love lost for his old employer.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports,Doug Byles has had it with his cable-television bill. The 44-year-old Walnut Creek, Calif., home builder said he’s paying more than $130 a month for basic service with two premium and eight high-definition channels.”

  • Comcast announced three major content initiatives at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show. “Comcast CEO Brian L. Roberts unveiled the Company’s plan to give consumers more than 1,000 HD choices in 2008, its strategy to begin adding additional HD movies, and announced Project Infinity — its vision to give consumers the ability to watch any movie, television show, user generated content or other video that a producer wants to make available On Demand.”

  • “MASN grabs ‘Rookie of the Year.’”

  • A Weather Window: Timing May Be the Key to the Battens’ Offer of Landmark”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN’s Klein: FNC ‘Almost Seems Downright Despondent in Their Coverage’”

  • Daily Show’s Take on N.H. Primary Coverage

  • Variety reports, “Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin J. Martin affirmed his commitment to a la carte cable subscriptions and to striking a balance between the need to protect digital content and ensure consumer rights to fair use of it.”

  • The AP reports, “U.S. TV broadcasters will be ready to start transmitting signals for portable electronics like cell phones next year, the developers of the technology, LG Electronics Inc. and Harris Corp., said Sunday. The technology represents a chance for broadcasters to challenge cell-phone carriers, who are trying to sew up the market for mobile TV with their own transmissions.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Wonkette presents “the first-ever dance competition between a White House Correspondent and a candidate for the White House: David Gregory vs. Barack Obama! Once you view the video, please play judge and vote in our poll.” So far, Gregory is in the lead.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Celebrity interviewer Rob McGibbon has launched a website business which aims to provide a comprehensive index of journalistic interviews. McGibbon, a freelance who has previously written celebrity interviews for Press Gazette, launched the aggregation website AccessInterviews.com last week.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity has assembled an award-winning team of journalists and researchers to build one of the most comprehensive, illuminating, and frequently updated websites on presidential politics and fundraising, The Buying of the President 2008. The site provides current and historical facts and figures, along with stories that explore a variety of issues related to money in presidential politics.”

  • WebProNews reports, “Video sharing websites watched their typical daily traffic double through 2007, with nearly half of US Internet users stopping by YouTube and similar sites.”

  • Online Media Post reports, “A majority of journalists say that blogs and other forms of social media are not affecting the quality of traditional news — for better or worse — but that the blogosphere is definitely having an impact on the speed, tone and editorial direction of their reporting. Almost 180 reporters and editors across multiple industries responded to the e-mail survey sent out by Omnicom’s Brodeur in mid-December. And while roughly 43% of respondents said that “new media” (blogs and social networks) had a ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ significant impact on the quality of news coverage, most journalists (56%) said that the impact of new media was ‘not very’ or ‘not at all’ significant.”

  • ABC’s Nitya Venkataraman was mistaken for John McCain’s 16-year-old adopted daughter of Bangladeshi origin. Check out the split screen here.

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    MAGAZINES

  • From Mediabistro.com: “One Rolling Stone writer offers a primer on tackling long-form journalism”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Eagle Publishing Inc. is looking for an Assistant Managing Editor for Regnery Publishing.

  • Moment Magazine is looking for a Web Master.

  • The Council for Advancement and Support of Education is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Producer, News & Information.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a web developer/technical journalist, an Economics and Finance Editor, an Editorial Assistant, a Legislative Researcher and an Assistant Editor, Schedules.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Post Reviews Kurtz

    Marvin Kalb reviews Howard Kurtz’s “Reality Wars”:

      Howard Kurtz, I am now certain, has a secret. Either he no longer sleeps, or he has found a way to expand the 24-hour day. How else can one explain his exceptional output?

      For the past 17 years, Kurtz has been the media reporter for The Washington Post, writing a column every Monday and covering breaking news many other days. Enough? Not for Kurtz. He also writes a long, sometimes numbingly long, media blog for the paper’s Web site, a basket for every item that doesn’t make his column. On weekends, he anchors CNN’s “Reliable Sources,” the longest-running weekly media criticism show on television. On radio, he is heard regularly offering his opinions on the media and politics. And in his “spare time,” he has written five books, including the 1998 bestseller Spin Cycle: Inside the Clinton Propaganda Machine. In the Soviet Union, he’d have been praised as a “Stakhanovite” journalist, fulfilling and then overfulfilling his quota.

      His newest book, Reality Show, takes you inside the minds and the newsrooms of the three major evening news anchors — a 464-page, sound-bite-by-sound-bite report on ABC’s Charles Gibson, CBS’s Katie Couric and NBC’s Brian Williams during a time of political crisis at home and war in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is a period of “daunting transition,” Kurtz writes, not only because these anchors replaced the Tom-Peter-and-Dan troika that dominated the airwaves for a quarter of a century but also because they are battling technological and economic challenges that are transforming the industry. It is a fascinating, richly detailed story — little of it new, however, if you have read Kurtz’s newspaper reports. But if you haven’t read them, I suspect you will benefit greatly from this tale of three remarkable reporters, who have the capacity every evening to influence 25 million viewers who still watch their presentation of the news. Granted, a few decades ago as many as 40 to 50 million watched the evening newscasts, but 25 million still represents the single biggest town hall in America, certainly worthy of a book.

    Read the rest here.

    Morning Reading List, 10.16.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Did you make it? The deadline for this year’s Knight News Challenge grants and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning competition, was yesterday!

  • Washington Life’s Curse: Jinxing diplomatic corps?

  • Don’t miss the Watergate Conference on Political & Congressional Reporting at the Watergate this weekend. For the full schedule, click here.

  • From NickDenton.com: “Each new medium — from the yellow press at the turn of the century, to the movies, television, trash television, video games and talk radio — has been the greatest threat to civilized discourse since, well, since the previous threat to civilized discourse. So, it’s something of a rite of passage that blogs in general — and Gawker in particular — are the subject of a critical cover story in this week’s New York magazine, one of the last bastions of old-school journalism. The cover line: ‘Gawker.com and the culture of bile.’”

  • His Extreme-ness points out two hair-raising (haha) similarities between The New York Times and Washington Post.

  • The Washington Post launched part two of “How the World Sees America” yesterday. Check it out here.

  • A CNN release announced, “The CNN Digital Network has staked a new high ground in September, topping not only all ‘Current Events and Global News’ sites but also beating out all other ‘News and Information’ sites including Internet stalwarts Wikipedia and the Weather Channel.”

  • Press Gazette reports, “Guardian News and Media is to make its entire archive, 212 years of material, available online as a paid-for service. The first phase of the online archive, comprising the Guardian from 1821 to 1975 and The Observer from 1900 to 1975, will launch on 3 November, the company said today.”

  • CNN reports, “A wide-open presidential race and a willingness by candidates, interest groups, unions and corporations to buy TV time will lead to historic spending for political and issue-advocacy advertising in the 2008 election cycle, an analysis shows.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “You may have heard of Second Life, the virtual online world that draws millions of aficionados every day. Now imagine a Second Life specifically for business, a world where workers can gather, share files, and communicate securely in a fully animated 3D office environment in cyberspace. Creating exactly that is what Justin Rounds does for a living. Rounds, 35, is a contractor for Sun Micro Systems in Burlington. He is one of the digital animators behind the MPK20 Project, Sun’s yet-to-be unveiled virtual workplace.”

  • E&P reports, “The death Sunday of journalist Salih Saif Aldin, the first Washington Post reporter killed in Iraq, will not spark a shift in the paper’s Iraq coverage or an increase in security measures, says Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr., who contends that the paper has always sought as much protection for reporters there as possible.”

  • Newsmax’s Ronald Kessler reports, “While at the Daily News and previously the Washington Post, [Lloyd] Grove would receive up to 10 invitations a day to attend the most glistering celebrity parties. Now the invitations are down to a trickle, but he claims he doesn’t mind.”

  • Wonkette raises the topic everyone is dying to talk about (don’t deny it).

  • Time’s James Poniewozik writes, “If the Fox News formula is going to work at FBN, in other words, then FBN will have to be even more like CNBC — more excited, effusive and rah-rah — than CNBC is. Is that possible? Judging at least by the first few hours, it’s going to try its damnedest.”

  • From AdAge: “Media Guy Quits His Complaining and Offers Up a Few Well-Deserved Shout-Outs (No, Seriously, He Does, Really)”

  • AP reports, “AOL is eliminating another 2,000 jobs worldwide as it tries to cut costs and make room to grow in online advertising.”

  • Denver Post’s Joanne Ostrow writes, “It’s a sign of the fragmented media times that Howard Kurtz’s ‘Reality Show: Inside the Last Great Television News War’ is mostly generating shrugs”

  • CJR has, “Salih’s Story”

  • The Independent reports, “CBS, one of America’s biggest radio and television networks, last week paid a reported $10m for little-known celebrity gossip blog DotSpotter.com.”

  • Power Line reports, “Today General Ricardo Sanchez gave a speech to the Military Reporters and Editors’ annual conference, in which he criticized just about everyone associated with our effort in Iraq. The Washington Post’s headline was typical: ‘Former Iraq Commander Faults Bush.’ Actually, I don’t believe Sanchez ever mentioned Bush by name, although, as I say, he was critical of just about everybody. But it would be hard to tell from press accounts of Sanchez’s speech that he was mostly critical of…the press.”

  • Reuters reports, “Random House, the world’s biggest book publisher, is considering joining a book-search project run by Google, once considered an arch-enemy by the paper publishing industry.”

  • Chicago Business reports, “AT&T Inc. is laying the groundwork for an assault on Comcast Corp.’s local cable TV monopoly starting this spring, perhaps as soon as April.”

  • Ed Driscoll explores, “The Legacy Media’s Brain Drain”

  • Don’t miss “Editrix of the Trade: How to Keep Your Job and Your Sanity as a Female Journalist in Washington, DC,” tomorrow night.
    Panelists include Susan Glasser from The Washington Post, Kate Marsh from The New Republic, Sarah Blustain from the American Prospect, Laura Helmuth from Smithsonian Magazine and Christine Chen and Kate Palmer from Foreign Policy. For more info, click here.

  • AFP reports, “‘Are you ready?’ was the message from the world’s first TV-quality online TV network, delivered at this week’s MIPCOM audiovisual trade show. The network, Joost, launched this month just ahead of a clutch of competitors that include Italy’s Babelgum, offers legal rather than pirated entertainment for free, but raises new questions about what this will mean for the massive TV business.”

  • Reuters reports, “Companies will spend a record $31 billion this year to advertise everything from toothpaste to home loans on the Internet, supporting countless news sites, social networks, video exchanges and blogs. But some media veterans worry that expectations for online advertising may be getting out-sized.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co. said Monday it joined with Tribune Co. to publish and syndicate a weekly edition of USA Today outside the United States.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • FairVote’s is holding an Upgrade Democracy video contest and inviting you to a short video answering the question: “If you could change anything you wanted about elections, what would our democracy look like?” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Time Warner’s weak second-quarter results prompted Pali Research analyst Richard Greenfield to release a blistering report on Thursday in which he called on the company’s board to shake up management and sell AOL. But it appears as if his opinion isn’t shared by his Wall Street colleagues.”

  • Why Do We Suck? and Other Questions Political Journalists Asked Themselves at YearlyKos

  • More ratings data from ABC’s Sunday GOP debate, over at TVNewser.
  • One Year Out From Olympics, A Test of Openness in Beijing

  • From the NYPost: “Ted Koppel has slashed the price of his suburban D.C. home almost in half. The Post’s Braden Keil reports the retired “Nightline” anchor is now asking $2.3 million for his 9,000-square-foot Potomac, Md., house after first listing it in May 2005 for $4.1 million.”

  • New York Magazine’s Robert Kolker reports, “Don Imus, it turns out, isn’t cooked. Far from it. Hiring Lenny Bruce’s lawyer—the veteran First Amendment attorney Martin Garbus—was the first step in what appears to be an increasingly likely if improbable comeback.”

  • Howard Kurtz weighs in on the first online debate.

  • The Nation’s Ari Berman reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s takeover of the Wall Street Journal this week is drawing the ire of some Democrats running for President. … But the Democratic frontrunner, Hillary Clinton, hasn’t said a peep. ”

  • MediaPost reports, “A recent study of America’s top 100 newspaper websites, entitled ‘American Newspapers and the Internet; Threat or Opportunity?’ by Bivings Research, noting that using the Internet to expand a newspaper’s reach is becoming more and more important, reports that ninety-two percent of America’s top 100 papers now offer video on their websites… a significant jump from 2006, where just 61 percent offered video.”

  • Mr. Magazine reports, “If the trend continues throughout the rest of the year, the total number of new magazine launches will set a record in terms of the percentage of decline in launches. The only hot activity last month was the heat index rather than the magazine launches. July new launches hit a record low equal to that of last February.”

  • CNETNews.com reports, “‘The hyperlink has changed everything,’ asserted Jarvis, who runs media criticism site BuzzMachine and political blog PrezVid. Citing the motto ‘do what you do best, and link to the rest,’ he said that news outlets can achieve new levels of efficiency through the ability to direct readers to click elsewhere for more information. In one sense, it’s the 21st-century equivalent of a newspaper running an Associated Press or Reuters wire story instead of assigning one of its own reporters to the task. On the other hand, the hyperlink is the foundation behind a phenomenon that’s purely Web 2.0: the news aggregator.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Drudge’s following is so large and loyal that he routinely can drive hundreds of thousands of readers to a single story, photo or video through a link on his lively compendium of the news. With media organizations competing fiercely for online audiences, the whims of Matt Drudge can make a measurable difference.”

  • Poynter reports, “Even Frank Rich of The New York Times, as well as the Washington Post, are interested in Drudge.”

  • AP reports, “In a move that might make some people scratch their heads, a loosely formed coalition of left-leaning bloggers are trying to band together to form a labor union they hope will help them receive health insurance, conduct collective bargaining or even set professional standards.”

  • Reuters reports, “Every U.S. presidential candidate has a Web site, of course, but when the top Democratic hopefuls were asked on Saturday whether they would appoint a White House blogger if elected, all of them said yes.”

  • Washington Post’s Jose Antonio Vargas reports, “Walking around McCormick Place during the weekend, it became clear that only a handful of the 1,500 conventioneers — bloggers, policy experts, party activists — are African American, Latino or Asian.”

  • His Extremeness reminds us “buying insurance in blackjack is a sucker’s bet.”

  • A tipster tells us that the Swampland event at Yearly Kos “was the ticket to have at Yearly Kos. We were at fire capacity and had a one person in, one person out policy. Line was 15 people deep at one point … I’m just saying.”

  • Boston Globe’s Alex Beam writes, “There was a curious detail in The New Yorker’s recent, none-wished-it-longer profile of real estate and media tycoon Mortimer Zuckerman. The longtime chairman of Boston Properties, Zuckerman writes a weekly column for U.S. News & World Report, which he owns.”

  • Washington Post’s Danna L. Walker explored whether a “a class of college students survive without iPods, cellphones, computers and TV from one sunrise to the next?”

  • The Newseum and the National Archives present, “50 Years After Little Rock: The Media and the Movement,” a panel at the National Archives on Thursday, August 23 at 6:30 p.m. The panelists include Washington Post’s Dorothy Gilliam.

  • A reader points our attention to Howard Kurtz’s profile on David Bradley, stating: “After reading it, Bradley reminds me of the Dan Snyder of journalism … always dreaming of which ‘free agent contract’ to go after, but never putting together a coherent plan on how it all meshes together.”

    Jobs

  • Argus Media is looking for Power, fuels, environmental markets
    reporters.

  • NPR.org is looking for a creative writer, editor and multimedia producer with daily news and online experience to help drive social-media projects and innovate new approaches for our radio programs on the Web.

  • Online Investment Publisher is looking for an Assistant Product & Marketing Manager.

  • Defense News is looking for a copy editor.

  • The News Virginian is looking for a Copy Editor/Page Designer.

  • Al Arabiya News Channel is looking for an intern.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for a Web Editor/Writer, Editor for the Web Project Team, a Technical Journalist/Web Developer, an Editor, User Experience & Design and a Multimedia Web Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Kurtz Slipping?

    According to Nielsen, Howard Kurtz’s CNN show, “Reliable Sources,” is in decline for 2007. Since January 2007, the show has declined 8% in total viewers and 13% in the 25-54 demo. For March-to-date, Howie took a 17% dive to 396,000 total viewers over the previous month. In the 25-54 demo, the loss was even steeper, losing 20% Adults 25-54 to 162,000.

    Tidbits

  • From here: “Tim Russert preparing to take the stand. Apparently the jury was given the Style section of the Washington Post, which contained Howard Kurtz’s article about the trial. It was missed by whoever screens the papers, and now there is some deliberation about what the jury read.”

  • MSNBC says they haven’t received complaints for Chris Matthews f-bomb.