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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Mortman’

Morning Chatter

Quotes of the Day


“This is how I’m keeping cool.” — NBC Washington’s Angie Goff over the weekend.

Journo encounters threesome

“Just took the dog for a walk in the woods. Happened upon a threesome. Stark naked. Clearly strung out. #dida180 #myeyes #MYEYES” — Takoma Park, Md. writer Carol Blymire.

Daily Caller‘s Michelle Fields as Mother Theresa

“Only in DC does a man walk into the metro with a broken foot and arm and no one offers him their seat.” — Michelle Fields.

Paul Wharton in mourning

“We had the memorial for our loving friend Butch Hopkins today. Just now ‘patched into’ the grief, my heart hurts literally.” — Style expert and TV host Paul Wharton.

Important Q to ponder: “When is the @einsteins finally going to open in Union Station?” — NBC Washington’s Matt Glassman.

Self-appointed media critic

“Anybody know if there’s a network where I can watch two non-subject matter experts debate policy?” — Politico‘s Alexander Burns.

The TV critic

“I mean, the premise of Newsroom is fairly interesting. But did they have to make the primary focus/main character be Sorkin’s scripting?” — C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman.

Russia TV: The go-to network for hard-hitting Joe Williams’ Interviews

“Jesus Christ. Just watched three Euronews packages. Every damn one started with a wideshot of the EU flags. Is creativity that f*ing hard?!” — Russia TV Senior Producer Lucy Kafanov. Um, hey Russia TV, is asking Politico‘s Joe Williams a real, challenging question that f*ing hard?!

Better Left Unsaid

“YES! Got my tweet on #edshow! And got way too excited about it.” — Mediaite White House Correspondent Tommy Christopher.

Interesting co-byline this morning (wink! wink!): Daily Caller‘s Jamie Weinstein and Michelle Fields. Nothing like bonding over Jeremiah Wright.

Peter Ogburn contributed to this report.

Google’s Self-Driving Car on Capitol Hill

C-SPAN’s Communications Director Howard Mortman remarks on Google’s self-driving car making an appearance on Capitol Hill this morning: “The Google-self driving car gets a taste of life in the red-hot DC media fishbowl on Cap Hill.”

The Google self-driving car is parked right outside 400 N. Cap. St., which houses C-SPAN and Fox News. The picture below is from a half hour ago.

 

C-SPAN Gives Sen. Saxby Chambliss a Tongue-Lashing

The normally mild-manner C-SPAN just has one thing to say to the idiotic GOP Senator from Georgia, Saxby Chambliss, who is whining that C-SPAN is at the root of the deeply divided Senate: Check out your 599 C-SPAN appearances. A quick piece of advice: Maybe an intern can count up your C-SPAN appearances before you decide to blast them next time, Senator? In response to Chambliss’s statements on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” and a subsequent story that appeared in Politico, C-SPAN tweeted the following zinger:

Despite the childish slap from Chambliss, C-SPAN Spokesman Howard Mortman said “of course” the senator will be invited back on again. But not without a little ribbing from former C-SPAN CEO Brian Lamb, who told Politico‘s Tim Mak, “It’s like blaming the Bureau of Printing and Engraving for our $15 trillion debt.” Contrary to Politico‘s report, Lamb is now a top executive on the C-SPAN Board. He officially steps down as CEO today and begins his new role on April 1.

Morning Chatter

Quotes of the Day

Protesters pissed at Fox News: “Occupydc protestors upset @foxnews truck is parked illegally.” — WTOP’s Mark Segraves with the accompanying photograph.

Boybander down on J-School: “I feel like $30 million in angel investments in journalism startups would do much more good than $30 million in j-school donations.” — Slate business and economics correspondent Matt Ylgesias.

Producer calls Romney camp inaccessible to media
“One thing I absolutely cannot stand about Romney’s campaign is their inaccessibility to the media. It’s so McCain-like & losing strategy.” — Exec. Producer of Morning Majority at WMAL news Heather Smith.

Words to live by…“Remember: you’re not fully clean unless you’re Zestfully clean.” — C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman.

AnonymASS reaction to Romney sweat poll

“With topics like this is it any wonder why people are turning away from the mainstream media for real news.  Those who think this is news might welcome an investigation on Michelle Obama‘s menstrual cycles and it’s effect on how Obama decides things.” — AnonymASS commenter. The Q: What’s that under Romney’s armpits? Poll results: A shadow – 51.72 percent; Sweat mark – 48.28 percent.

Newt volunteer goes after Townhall editor
“Moron of the Day! >> @KatiePavlich << Townhall editor! This fuck is the biggest moron I’ve ever seen come out against Newt on FOX. #withNewt” — Jeff Rainforth, Gingrich volunteer and former Calif. Gov. and U.S. Congress candidate. Pavlich told FishbowlDC, “It is what it is, calling me a moron, or other choice names, isn’t going to get Obama out of the White House in 2012.”
Journo sports unique hairdo
“D.C. Examiner’s David Freddoso on Fox News. Who did his hair? Charlie Chaplin?!” — The Blaze‘s and FBDC’s Eddie Scarry.

News of the weird…“I have just been informed by the deputy that next week is both national marriage week and national cancer week. Coincidence?” — TWT‘s Anneke Green.

JetBlue reaches out to FNC’s Bret Baier: “Bret Baier have a g8 flight and enjoy the unlimited snacks and Inflight entertainment-maybe you’ll catch yourself on TV” — @JetBlue. Baier replied, “Ha thnx!”

Morning Chatter

Quotes of the Day: The Moon Edition

To the Moon, Newt

“THEY ARE STILL DEBATING GOING TO THE MOON.” — The New Yorker‘s Washington writer Ryan Lizza.

“This portion of the debate is about colonizing the Moon. Just wanted to point that out.” — ReutersSam Youngman. He added, “I’ve been saying for years that the way POTUS is neglecting the Moon is shameful.”

“Shocking amount of #mooncolony talk tonight.” — NBC TODAY Show’s Savannah Guthrie.

Praise for Wolf Blitzer

“That’s right Wolf, get in Newt’s ass. I love this. Wolf is soooooo much better than Jon King.” — NYT‘s Charles Blow. He added, “I knew that I shouldn’t have had that 3rd drink before watching these debates.”

And a critic…“This wife stuff is embarrassing. #cnndebate” — Actress Mia Farrow.

A breath of fresh air: Ron Paul

“Ron Paul is like a palet-clearing sorbet between six courses of mud.” — The Daily Beast‘s Lloyd Grove.

Meanwhile…WaPo Express Editor discusses sex act

While most Washington reporters were fixated on last night’s debate, WaPo Express’s Clinton Yates was out on the town talking dirty. “At dinner with the gf, her friend and other friends of friends. One is certifiable. What a nightmare,” he wrote. “We’re at a Mexican restaurant btw. Arriba! This woman is trying to impress us with her knowledge. Next term: fisting! She’s so hip.”

Hair and Makeup

“I think each candidate should be given an electric razor and be allowed to cut one opponent’s hair anyway he wants.” — National Review Online’s Jonah Goldberg.

“Does Callista’s hair ever move?” — WaPo‘s Right Turn blogger Jennifer Rubin. Chicago Book Editor Beth Renaldi remarked, “Callista Gingrich’s hair never moves. #cnndebate.”

“Callista’s makeup is looking a little more natural tonight. #CNNdebate Kurtz” — The Hill‘s Howeesha Kurtz (a.k.a. Judy Kurtz).

Really Howie?

“Wolf: Why would your wife make the best first lady? All eyes will be on Newt for his Callista answer.” — The Daily Beast/Newsweek‘s Howie Kurtz in the most painfully obvious observation of the night.

Birthweek: Maureen Orth

“Missing the #FLDebate for @LukeRsmom birthday dinner. The only disagreement here is what flavor ice cream to get.” — NBC Congressional Correspondent Luke Russert referring to his mom, VF’s Maureen Orth. (h/t Luke Russert, h/t Mike Allen for h/t)

A special Happy Birthday to C-SPAN’s Communications Director Howard Mortman. From his colleague Steve Scully: “Howard is an incredibly hard worker…in the league of Chuck Todd and Mike Allen. As he gets another year older…he also looks much older than Todd or Allen. But we still love him. In fact I remember him when he was ‘Extreme’ Mortman. Those were the days. :)

Cartoons & Cocktails and the Full Monty

Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe and daughter, Rose

A mysterious hand model holds a martini.

Something needed to perk up the subdued crowd at the Newseum’s Cartoon & Cocktails last night. And Carol Knopes, Director of Education Projects for the Radio TV News Directors Foundation, was just the woman to do it. She began low-key with a few Qadaffi jokes, saying, “If the Qadaffi family is in the back of the room, I’m sorry about all this.” The second Qadaffi joke came minutes later as she announced that they were getting in the first Qadaffi cartoon, you know, the one after he was assassinated.

If that sounds tame, she grew racier as the evening wore on as the quiet crowd bid on the cartoons of some 60 artists. At one point Knopes twirled around on stage and remarked, “I’m going to give you the full monty here,” she said, although she never made good on her promise.

The gimmicky night included a string of auctioneers that included Washingtonian‘s National Editor Harry Jaffe and Politico‘s Ken Vogel. C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman was spotted in the crowd. Jaffe was there with his daughter, Rose, a cartoonist who has published work in the Michigan Daily. Astonishingly, a Newseum employee (who shall remain nameless) asked Rose how often the Michigan Daily comes out. She politely told him daily.

Jaffe hammed it up on stage. “How did I get so lucky to follow Carol?” he asked. “Do I have to take my clothes off?” Vogel, meanwhile, was having trouble reaching the minimum bid on a Donald Trump/Sarah Palin cartoon. “I spent months with her up there in Alaska,” Vogel pleaded to the crowd. “You owe me.”

Knopes, Ms. Full Monty herself, cracked on Vogel, saying, “Are you filing while we’re sitting here? Everyone at Politico seems to have nine jobs.” Vogel may have heard her, but he didn’t react.

She swiftly moved on to a joke involving the Wonder Bra.

A cartoon with former House Maj. Leader Tom DeLay.

Good Morning FishbowlDC Readers

Quotes of the Day


“Game Over” — Politico‘s Roger Simon accompanying the above picture.

More on the Christie fat issue…

RT @foxheadlines “Do You Want a Fat President or a Thin President?” // Or do you want a fat president to EAT a thin president? — The Daily Show

Journo could do without Levi fame

“Levi Johnston says fame has improved him. Anyone else wish he’d stayed obscure? #HotlineSort” — NJ “The Hotline’s” Editor-in-Chief Reid Wilson. Read here for more in New York Magazine.

An exclusive Jewish New Year

“May you all be inscribed in the Book of Life for the Jewish New Year.* *except for some of you.” — ABC News White House Correspondent Jake Tapper.

“Happy New Year to my family and any Jewish followers, in honor of @howardmortman (his fav joke), hope I can stop writing 5771 on my checks.” — NBC’s Chuck Todd. Howard Mortman is C-SPAN’s Communications Director. The pair worked together at NJ‘s “The Hotline” back in the day. The full joke is: “Happy new year. Can you believe It’s already 5772? Wow, it flies by so fast. I’m still writing 5771 on all my checks.” Mortman explained, “It’s actually an old joke. Chuck was kind to remember me telling it during our Hotline days together… I think back in 5761 or so.”

Unusual pitch of the week: This week we were offered the chance to get fitted for bras by a specialist known as the Bra Whisperer. FishbowlMatt declined. I’m on the fence though I’ve agreed to go this afternoon. “She’s back Thursday/Friday doing VIP fittings, maj lingerie (like fancy schmancy $500 french underpinnings). You want to come to meet her? She also just fit the Kardashians before the Royal Wedding if you want to pump her for juice?”

Quick Convo Between Two Journos

NPR’s Michele Norris: “Clyburn said he cringed when president made bredroom slippers comment because he feared it would overshadow rest of speech.”

PBS’s Gwen Ifill: “@michele_norris It has indeed been widely overlooked that the folks in the room at CBC didn’t seem to mind what POTUs sed.”

Drudge Whores: In a potentially new feature, we highlight journos who mention the attention they get from the God of Page Views…”Leading Drudge now (from @DailyCaller): NC governor sounded serious about suspending elections (AUDIO)” — The Daily Caller‘s Executive Editor David Martosko. Read here.

Unnecessary Tweet of the Day

“Is anyone an Amtrak Guest Rewards member? Is it worth my time to join? I feel like it is, but I need your support to feel whole inside.” — Politico web producer Alex Byers in a truly who gives a sh-t tweet of the day.

Um…WHO CARES? We can read TV Guide. Politico CLICK writes on actor Kelsey Grammer‘s new show, “Boss,” in which he plays a Chicago mayor with a brain disorder. He’s a Republican in real life. And that’s about all you need to know. Go ahead and torture yourself here.

A question probably best left unanswered… “Has anybody called you a racist yet today? If not, consider it done.” — The Daily Caller‘s Jim Treacher.

Brag Book: Politico‘s Alex Trowbridge is having a hell of a good week. First, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, during his Tuesday night speech, ordered everyone to go to Politico.com to watch Trowbridge’s video montage in which Christie repeatedly declares that he’s not running for prez. Then on Wednesday night, Jon Stewart discussed his video and ran Christie’s shout-out and a portion of the montage on The Daily Show. “It’s like a treasure hunt, I love it!” Stewart cracked with fake enthusiasm. “It’s like a live linking to another website. We’ll follow the clues and reveal the secret message!”

Q: Where Were You on Sept. 11?

Today we ask Washington, D.C. journalists one question:

Where were you on Sept. 11?

Politico‘s Roger Simon: “I was just climbing in the car to drive to work when my wife came rushing into the garage to tell me of the attack on the first tower. Made phone calls and scribbled notes while driving into work, by which time second tower had been hit. Began making more calls, taking more notes and writing when the plane hit the Pentagon. More calls, more notes, more writing. Journalism can be a great anesthetic…until it wears off.”

The Hill‘s White House Correspondent Sam Youngman: “I was in college at Western Kentucky University. We had put the school paper to bed the night before, so I was sleeping in when my roommate woke me up. We sat there in silence watching the TV as the towers burned. He got up to get a beer, and I walked to the newsroom. A couple days later, my hillbilly buddies and I were ordering hundreds of bourbons at an all-you-can-drink bar. It seems silly, but listening to my drunk country buddies talk about what they would do to bin Laden gave me hope for the future of the country.”

Roll Call‘s John Stanton: “I was at the Inside Washington Office news room in Crystal City, which had a pretty great view of the Potomac and Pentagon. My desk faced out of a window, and I was just sitting down to check Drudge to see if he had any stories on the plane crashing into the building in New York. Something caught my eye over the top of my monitor. When I looked up you could see smoke and then flames coming from the Pentagon.”

HuffPost‘s Ryan Grim: “I was working at Chestertown Middle School on the Eastern Shore as an aide in a classroom of kids with behavioral problems (the same middle school I attended, actually). I remember giving a lesson about who Osama bin Laden was and why al Qaeda hated us. They actually sat and listened quietly to the entire thing, unpersuaded by my promises that Osama had no designs on Chestertown. My girlfriend, now wife, Elizan, was in Manhattan, and I was able to get a hold of her in the afternoon. Three weeks earlier, I’d turned down a job with Morgan Stanley on the 42nd floor of the second tower, a decision I’m very pleased with on a number of levels. Though I suspect I’d have been fine because I’m not one to be in the office by 9 a.m.”

Politico’s Julie Mason: “I drove with a coworker in a berserk, hurtling panic in a rental car from D.C. to NYC and covered the story from there for the Houston Chronicle for about 10 days. The thing that no one likes to say is that it was really the story of a lifetime — a huge challenge to try to understand and explain. And the trickiest part was writing about it clearly, without being overwrought — especially when you felt overwrought. I can’t believe it’s been 10 years.”

NBC and MSNBC “The Daily Rundown” Host Chuck Todd: “I was at ‘The Hotline,’ our offices at The Watergate on the third floor. We decided to publish, didn’t know what else to do. We turned it into a public service of sorts. Just loaded it up with every bit of info we could get our hands on, whatever every network was reporting. I’ll never forget the visual of my staff racing to the big windows we had overlooking the Potomac and simply staring in the sky wondering if another plane was coming – total frozen fear. I wouldn’t let anyone take the Metro home. A few of us with cars took everyone home. The four issues of that week 9/11,9/12, 9/13 and 9/14 are the proudest issues I oversaw during my days there. I still have them, framed.”

WaPo Opinion Writer Jonathan Capehart: “On Sept. 11, I went to vote in the Democratic Primary and then headed to my desk at the Bloomberg for Mayor campaign. At one point, I looked up at the bank of televisions and said, ‘Look, the World Trade Center is on fire!’ The rest of the day was a literal nightmare.”

C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman: “Ten years ago I was still with ‘The Hotline,’ writing my online column.  Sept. 11, 2001 was the day of the New York City mayoral primary.  That morning, I boarded an Amtrak train to go cover the primary.  I even had an invite to Michael Bloomberg‘s election-night party.  The train left Washington around 8:30 a.m.  As I approached Baltimore headed north, my cell phone went off twice.  My wife of four months and a good friend both told me that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. Both warned me not to continue on to New York.  A minute later, the train arrived in Baltimore.  I decided to abandon the trip and got off.  The train left the station (I learned later that that train was one of many that became stranded that day).  In Baltimore, I saw on TV what was happening.  There were already huge lines for taxis.  No real options to head back south to D.C.  Back down on the train tracks, the light rail was still operating.  I got on a deserted light rail train. But it terminated at BWI airport.  About 30 minutes later I arrived at BWI airport.  By that point airports had stopped operating.  BWI was full of stranded — and dazed — travelers.  I saw on TV that the twin towers were gone.  I had no way of getting home, so I called my parents. They drove from Greenbelt and picked me up.  They took me back with them, where my wife met me.  We drove back to DC (we lived then at 22nd and L Streets, NW).  An eerie feeling getting into the city, when so many were leaving.  The city was empty.  Outside our building was a humvee and soldiers holding machine guns. We went out for a walk, toward the Pentagon, saw the fire and smelled the smoke, saw more soldiers, walked near the State Department and White House, then returned home and watched TV the rest of the day and night.”

Slate’s Dave Weigel: “No great story here — I was in my parents’ house in Delaware, a few days before heading back to school. My granddad was watching TV while I was upstairs updating my HTML blog. He called me down, and then we watched TV, and then my mother called from a barber shop to ask if we were watching. We picked up my dad from his evacuated building, and later my friends who’d also gotten the day off hooked up with me for a trip to buy the new Dylan album. Returning from that, I updated my blog again.”

The Washington Examiner‘s Nikki Schwab: “Sept. 11, 2001 was a day of immense sadness, but for those of us living in Southwestern Pennsylvania, it was also a day of massive confusion. I was a senior in high school at the time, having lived in the small town of Ligonier, Pa., my entire life. After the World Trade Center had been hit in New York City my friend Brea ran into Ms. Barr’s jazz band homeroom and said, ‘We’re being attacked.’ We threatened a mutiny against music that morning and informed Ms. Barr that we wanted to watch CNN. She finally obliged. We watched the Twin Towers collapse and heard the news about the Pentagon. I always carried my cell phone, what we nicknamed ‘the contraband,’ to school even though it was against school rules. Using that phone my friends secretly called their parents from the instrument storage room. That’s when we found out about how close Flight 93 was to where we lived. My friends’ moms had seen the plane wobbling through the air before it finally came down about 30 miles away in Shanksville, Pa. At the time we didn’t know why one of the hijacked planes was flying through our backyards. Rumor on the street was that it was on its way to attack Pittsburgh. (Yeah, right). Now we know that it was the heroism of the passengers and flight attendants that most likely saved countless lives right here in D.C.”

AP’s Phil Eillott: “I was a junior at Ohio University on Sept. 11, 2001, and the managing editor of our independent student-run daily newspaper, The Post. It was our first week of publishing for the academic year and I was the late editor the day before. I was at the office until after 4 a.m., making sure the edition got to print by the 6 a.m. deadline. I was still asleep when the first tower was hit. An early editor called with few details to wake me. I was getting ready for work when a second phone call came in with news of a second plane. Not quite understanding what was going on, I made a quick stop at the bookstore to pick up a textbook on my way to The Post. By the time I arrived in the newsroom, the significance of what had happened started to sink in.”

HuffPost‘s Christina Wilkie: “I was an intern at The Brookings Institution, and I arrived at work just after the first tower was hit. Twenty of us crowded around a TV in the conference room as we tried to absorb what was going on. There was another new intern, Tracee, who had never been in a big city before and didn’t know where to go, so I took her with me and we walked up Massachusetts Ave in the middle of the street, 30 blocks to my house. We sat together, virtual strangers, for the next six hours.”

Politico‘s Keach Hagey: “I was in Manhattan, on my way to work. I ran into a friend coming out of the subway at 23rd St. who said, ‘Turn around.’ I looked down Broadway and saw the first tower fall. People were just standing in the middle of the street, screaming.” [Hagey was writing for non-profits at the time.]

C-SPAN’s Steve Scully: “I was on C-SPAN doing a segment on President Bush’s education agenda when I received a note about a plane hitting the first tower of the World Trade Center. It was approximately 8:47. The House was in at 9 a.m. so I was off the air at 9. I turned the corner and saw the 2nd plane hit the 2nd tower LIVE at 9:02. Then immediately mobilized because I knew, we knew, this is not just an accident. We stayed on air for days after that.”

ABC White House Correspondent Jake Tapper: “I was in my apartment in Adams Morgan trying to figure out what I would write about that day when my then-boss at Salon.com, Kerry Lauerman, called. He told me to turn on the TV. I did just as the second plane hit. No one knew what was happening. Kerry soon called again because there were rumors that the Mall was on fire. In reality, it was smoke from the Pentagon. I hopped on my bicycle to go check it out; I didnt want to have to worry about traffic. Rumors were swirling — there was a bomb at the State Department, a car bomb at Treasury. At the Mall, traffic was insane, cars were at a standstill. I ran into a friend, Ellen Gamerman, then of the Baltimore Sun. Car radios were blaring news and people would gather around to listen. I decided to get out of there and gave Ellen a lift on the bike. When we got near the White House, a panicky policeman told us to get out of there as soon as possible since there were reports that a fourth plane was headed to the White House. Right around then is when the towers started to fall. The whole world had changed. No one knew what to do. I called around and made sure everyone I knew and cared about in NYC and New Jersey was OK.  My little brother was living in Cairo, so there was a whole new worry I immediately adopted. I was glued to the TV for hours. No one knew
how many people had died. Peter Jennings was great that day. A friend of mine and I went to go give blood. We just needed to do something. We walked to the Red Cross but they were overwhelmed so they sent us away. I think all that blood ended up getting spoiled anyway. Kerry kept calling me to ask me what I was going to write. [Read the story here.] It wasn’t easy to write that day. Looking back on it, I’m amazed at how dispassionate the story seems. I was overwhelmed with grief. The next day I went to the Capitol — I
worked in the Senate Periodical Press Gallery — and called Gary Hart
and Warren Rudman, who had chaired a commission warning of a terrorist
attack. Their warnings had been ignored. That day I got angry. It was a weird time to be a reporter.”

WaPo‘s Aaron Blake: “Getting ready for my first day of college at the University of Minnesota. I still went to class for some reason. I think that’s proof that this didn’t set in right away.”

Poshbrood Travel Blog Founder and blogger Elizabeth Thorp: ” On 9-11, I had a plane ticket to fly from IAD to Denver around 11 am. I was Executive Director of the National Campaign for Hearing Health and we had a board meeting in Denver. A few colleagues had gone out Monday. I don’t love to fly (ironic, huh since I’m a travel writer and founder of travel website and consultancy Poshbrood?) My grandfather was killed in a small plane crash and I grew up in a family of nervous fliers. Almus and I had been married a year and lived in a condo near the Cathedral. I had gotten up early to exercise, had come back and was making coffee, reading the paper and watching the news. I was extra nervous about flying that day, just had a bad feeling and was dragging my feet. My insomniac mom called from LA around 8:30 a.m. and I told her I was going to Colorado but really didn’t want to fly…she said the weather’s great today, you’ll have a smooth flight! Later I was watching the Today Show (way pre-George on GMA which is our new morning show) and they broke in to say a small plane had it the Tower and showed the footage. I had been in the building recently for a client meeting and thought ‘the building is huge, there is no way that’s a small plane.’ I got online (dial up!) and checked to see how many other United flights there were to Denver as I didn’t want to head to the airport yet (but should by 9:30 am). There were more flights and I decided to wait a bit before heading to airport. I kept watching the TV and live (I remember it was Katie Couric and Al Roker talking) watched as the second plane hit the Tower. My blood ran cold and I knew something deliberate, horrible and evil was happening and it didn’t matter if I went to the silly board meeting or not. My husband came in from his run and he said he knew by my face something was very, very wrong. My parent’s called me to make sure I didn’t get on the plane (duh!) and several people thought I might be going to LA from IAD and couldn’t get through to me because lines were jammed. We watched live as Jim Miklaszewski reported an explosion at the Pentagon which was the other IAD plane and got a text that the rest of the office downtown at 17th and K were evacuating. We went to the roof of our condo and saw the plume of smoke at the Pentagon and I couldn’t get my head around the malicious evil of “people” who would deliberately crash a plane of innocents. I still can’t. We then started hearing about the PA plane crash and acquaintances or classmates who were in planes or the Tower. I cried and watched TV all day. In the afternoon, I walked over to the Cathedral with our dogs and met some nice out of town visitors. They were seeking comfort because a colleague of theirs had been on the flight that went into the Pentagon. It was so very sad. Still is. I have my unused 9-11 plane ticket somewhere in a box of keepsakes. After that day for awhile I was always given extra searches, pulled out of line and had bags searched. Even when 8 months pregnant! Maybe because I was flying on 9/11?”

Roll Call‘s Paul Singer: “I was the head of AP’s bureau in Cleveland — we were in our statewide morning news conference call when the second plane struck, and everybody just said ‘Well, OK, scrap everything else we were planning’ and hung up. Shortly thereafter we got an alert that there was a hijacked plane with a bomb aboard that was being forced to land at the Cleveland airport. Apparently flight 93 was on the same flight path as another plane headed west, and there was air traffic confusion as they passed into Ohio (the regional FAA station is in Oberlin). Flight 93 did a buttonhook and went down in Shanksville; the other plane was sent to land in Cleveland. The airport is about 15 miles out of town, but the mayor decided to evacuate downtown Cleveland. It’s a small city with a few major roads and bridges which all instantly became parking lots with panicked people trying to flee. The mayor held a press conference and I had to basically climb over cars to traverse the four blocks from the AP bureau to city hall. I had taken the Cleveland job in May and I am pretty sure that the ‘hijacked plane/bomb/evacuation’ series was my first experience filing an URGENT series for the AP; I had no idea what codes to use or what format. I had our veteran sportswriter standing behind me basically dictating to me while I hammered on the keyboard. It was very nearly Sept. 12 before I was finally at my neighborhood bar with a drink in my hand watching reruns of the collapsing towers over and over again, and wondering what we had just lived through.”

The Daily Caller‘s David Martosko: “I was on my way up I-395 on my way to work in DC, listening to the radio with my wife Susan — who had a dentist appointment downtown that morning, when Flight 11 hit the North tower. By the time we made it to my office, the Pentagon had just been struck. It took me two hours to get to my where Susan was, just 6 blocks away. She was waiting on the curb since the dentist’s building had been evacuated. We spent another four hours in the car trying to cross the 14th Street Bridge. Eventually, when the bridge was opened to (outgoing only) traffic, we made our way home. Along the way we offered to pick up several people who said they were too scared to go underground into the Metro tunnels. I learned later on that some of my co-workers had gotten home to Virginia much faster by abandoning their cars and walking. As luck would have it, I was due for a blood donation — I had been giving a pint every two months since high school, since my own life was saved by an emergency transfusion when I was very young. I stood in line that night at a Red Cross donor center in Arlington, along with dozens of others. Many were first-time blood donors.  There simply wasn’t much else we could do at that point. Susan and I had  several lunches and dinners at the Afghan restaurant on Route 1 in Alexandria, since the owners had (literally overnight) covered the building’s roof-eaves with red, white, and blue bunting. It was the first of many signs that our neighbors of Middle Eastern descent would suddenly have to work twice as hard to demonstrate their love of country, and that they would need our support. The only other thing I remember vividly about that day was holding on to Susan, and she to me, and wondering if World War III had just begun.

A special note of thanks to all who responded.

Washingtonian’s Mystery Tweet Turns Media Into Raging Comedians

Yesterday at 12:11 p.m. Washingtonian tweeted this: “Sorry about that last tweet. That was a mistake.”

But the last discernible tweet was this: “One woman found her Type 1 diabetes got under control with massage therapy. Now she administers alternative treatments.” Read here.

Thankfully our new wayward-BFF Slate‘s Dave Weigel was all over the actual last tweet, with a Coolio reference no less. Washingtonian‘s missing tweet was really this: “1.” To which Dave replied: “2,3,4, get your body on the floor.” And C-SPAN Communication’s Director Howard Mortman riffed on that: “5,6,7, 8 — top 100 budget restaurants you’ll agree are great.”

Not exactly a rhyming duo, but we’ll take it.

The First Toast

From L to R: Budding Fashion Reporters Jocelyn Luddy and Reilly Folsom.

WHCA President David Jackson (USA Today) and NYT’s Mark Leibovich

What’s a party with Washington’s media elite without bourbon, beer, wine, Food Truck quality mac ‘n cheese and 11-year-old fashionistas to put guests in the hot seat?

The view from the American Gas Association offered guests a perfect shot of the Capitol. The crowd at last night’s WHCD party thrown by QGA and FD blended White House correspondents like CNN’s Ed Henry, Ebony‘s Kevin Chappell, The Hill‘s Sam Youngman and USA Today‘s David Jackson , USA Radio Network’s Connie Lawn, and Politico’s Julie Mason with Fortune‘s Tory Newmyer, Politico‘s Amie Parnes, RealClearPoliticsErin McPike, Roll Call‘s John Stanton and NYT‘s Carl Hulse. Let’s just get one thing straight: NYT‘s Mark Leibovich has heard all the “bcc” jokes out there. And yours will not be special. Welcome to the first party leading into WHCD weekend.

The food was catered by D.C. food trucks of lore CapMac and Sauca and guests were dying over the mac ‘n cheese. Dessert was Good Humor ice cream bars from a cart complete with an umbrella. One partygoer remarked that the party could have been held on an outside corner. But a party outside wouldn’t have allowed for the two-station open bar, where bartenders made unsolicited repeat drinks for many of the journos. One guest called one of the bartenders “the motherf*cking man.”

Other guests in the crowd: QGA’s Jack Quinn and wife, Susanna, FD’s Jackson Dunn, Stacey Bowlin, Jared Allen and Mary Kathryn Cover, Terry McAuliffe, QGA and FBDC’s Matt DornicWaPo‘s Amy Argetsinger, SELF’s Marc Adelman, Pamela Sorensen of Pamela’s Punch, The Hill‘s Christina Wilkie and Emily Goodin, CNN Publicist Edie Emery and Megan Grant and TWT’s Emily Miller.

Miller said WHCD week makes her feel like an awkward teenager. “It brings out the worst 16-year-old in me,” Miller said, explaining that her worries go like this: ‘”Why wasn’t I invited to that party?’ or ‘Was I too fat for this dress?’” She adds, “At least I was invited to the pre-pre-pre-pre-pre party.”

The fashionistas at the party were Jocelyn Luddy (daughter to Jack and Susanna) and her friend, Reilly Folsom, who were testing out their journalistic skills by interviewing female party guests and Adelman. They’re trying out for a fashion blog out of San Fran called StyleBistro.com. They asked their subjects questions about what uniform they’d want for work if they had to have one and what styles they missed and didn’t.

The girls in flowered skirts and white T-shirts weren’t amateurs. They had practiced their questions for days. They cajoled by saying funny things like, “Come on, I want all the deets.” As the pair interviewed USA Today‘s Jackie Kucinich, the whole scene became so focused that photographers like Roll Call‘s Tom Williams began snapping pictures of the interview. Afterwards, Kucinich and Argetsinger (also interviewed by the girls) second-guessed their answers that involved Pappagallo purses and culottes.

Alec Jacob contributed to this report.

More pictures and guests after the jump…

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