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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Wolfson’

Where Are They Now?

Former presidential candidate Sen. John McCain’s Communications Director Jill Hazelbaker joins NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s re-election campaign. From the NYTimes blog, the Caucus: Hazelbaker will serve as a media strategist and spokesperson on the campaign, working under Howard Wolfson, the former communications director for Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton’s Democratic presidential campaign.

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Morning Reading List, 12.29.08

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Good morning, Washington. What DC museum is featured above? Think you know? Email us with your best guess. AND: Join us after the jump to find out if you guessed our last contest correctly.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.17.08

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Good morning Washington. Where can you find the above bathroom in Washington, D.C.? Email us your guesses.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 03.27.08

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Good morning Washington. Dana Bash and John King will get married on Cape Cod over Memorial Day weekend.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You would rather hang out with Barack Obama over Michelle.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Atlantic Names New Publisher Jay Lauf

  • More Changes to ABC News Executive Ranks

  • Andrea Jones is leaving her position as Executive Director of ABC News and Emily Lenzner is taking her place.

  • Linda Greenhouse Returning To Yale Law School in 2009 as Journalist-in-Residence

  • A release announced, “Michael Flagg, a veteran business reporter and editor at the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg and the Washington Post, has joined the Washington, D.C. office of Manning Selvage & Lee (MS&L) as senior vice president. His appointment is effective immediately.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Washington Times won seven awards in the 2007 Virginia Press Association’s annual competition for writing, photography, artwork and news design.

  • A reader asks, “Why was McCain off limits with the media? Is it because of his advanced years or because he’s a war hero or both? everything was coming up roses for McCain with the Media. Guess that was good for him, since his senior moments crop up every once in awhile.”

  • Finding Political News Online, the Young Pass It On

  • Huffington Post’s Thomas Edsall presents, “Interview With Walter Pincus On The State Of The Press”

  • Romenesko has “Tribune innovation chief Lee Abrams’ e-mail to staff”

  • AJR asks, “Why is the media consensus so often wrong about political campaigns? And isn’t there a better way to cover elections?”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. President and Chief Executive Janet Robinson received total compensation valued at $2.1 million in 2007 but got no stock options, reducing her pay 38 percent from a year ago, according to calculations by The Associated Press.”

  • AJR reports, “Why news organizations have to act much more boldly if they are to survive”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s latest pictures featuring Howard Wolfson and David Brooks.

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “The New York Times has been around for 156 years. For all that time, it has trusted its readers, more or less, to find what they’re looking for. Not anymore. Today saw the introduction of ‘Inside the Times,’ a new multi-page index of that day’s highlights, in print and online, which runs on pages 2, 3 and 4 of section A. The purpose is ‘to help readers navigate and mine the paper and its Web site,’ according to an editor’s note.”

  • Politico, Viacom, Paramount Vantage are teaming up to present a private screening of the new Rolling Stones, Scorsese Shine a Light film on the eve of the White House Correspondent’s dinner, April 25th at the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.

  • Kelly Flynn writes, “No news is bad news for Kearsley journalism students”

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    TV

  • Mark your calendars! On April 2, nine women will speak at the “Women on the World” at the Chamber of Commerce, including Daryn Kagan, Jenna Bush, Andrea Koppel, Kelly O’Donnell and Donna Brazile. For more on what Kagan has been up to, click here.

  • A CNN release announced, “Following a campaign coverage strategy of creating mini-bureaus in key political battleground states, CNN has parked the CNN Election Express in Philadelphia this week to create a full-time reporting presence for the April 22 Pennsylvania primary.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This morning marked new NBC/MSNBC analyst Harold Ford, Jr.’s first appearance on Morning Joe. Co-anchor Joe Scarborough brought up his time in congress with Ford, and how the pair ‘transcended politics,’ as they sat on opposite sides of the aisle.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. advertising spending was little changed in the fourth quarter as a weakening economy prompted marketers to cut newspaper and radio ads, according to TNS Media Intelligence.”

  • USA Today reports, “Advertisers and marketers, struggling to keep up with changing consumer habits, are about to make massive investments in new digital and out-of-home media platforms, according to a forecast out today from research firm PQ Media.”

  • A release announced, “FOX 5 finishes the March 2008 news race as the #1 choice for late news in key adult demographics, announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. ‘FOX 5 News Edge at 11′ and ‘FOX 5 News at 10′ rank #1 in their respective time periods.”

  • JackMeyers.com reports, “Assuming this week’s release of fourth quarter GDP data confirms an official recessionary economy, marketers, media companies, economists and unofficial economic pundits will weigh in with appropriately reactionary forecasts of ad industry doom and gloom.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Over the past two years, Lynda Clarizio has helped build Advertising.com, AOL’s ad network, into one of the hottest properties in online advertising. Her reward: She gets to try to clean up one of the Internet company’s messiest divisions.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The two biggest U.S. cable providers, Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., are discussing a plan to provide funding for a new wireless company that would be operated by Sprint Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp., people familiar with the talks say.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “On the morning of Friday, March 21, Chris Wallace woke up at his home in Washington, D.C., grabbed some fruit and yogurt, and turned on the Fox News early show, Fox & Friends. Steve Doocy, Gretchen Carlson and Brian Kilmeade were talking about Barack Obama’s recent characterization of his grandmother on a Philadelphia radio show: She was a ‘typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn’t know, there’s a reaction that’s been bred into our experiences that don’t go away and that sometimes comes out in the wrong way.’ ‘Can you say ‘typical white person’ if you’re white?’ asked Mr. Doocy. Of course not, noted Ms. Carlson. There’s no way that Senator Hillary Clinton could use the phrase ‘typical black person,’ they noted. ‘So there is a certain double standard in society,’ said Ms. Carlson. And also: ‘I sort of take offense at that line: ‘typical white.” Mr. Wallace was getting a little bit annoyed. ‘I didn’t think it was fair. I didn’t think it allowed Obama to make his point,’ Mr. Wallace later told The Observer in a telephone interview.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • 24/7 Wall St. presents, “The Twenty-Five Most Valuable Blogs”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “How dreadful was the news coverage last week surrounding the official release of Hillary Clinton’s public White House schedule from her eight years as first lady? So bad that I found myself in rare (unprecedented?) agreement with at least two prominent conservative bloggers who noticed the same thing I did: The Beltway press corps is, at times, a national embarrassment.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Hillary Clinton’s Bosnia Story A Hit On YouTube!”

  • Gangrey.com presents the winner of the 2008 Goat Awards.

  • Media Week reports, “Time Inc., which has been hit by sweeping layoffs in recent years, has continued to pare its head count in its quest for cost-savings, albeit in smaller ways. This Old House shed four people in the past few weeks in communications, production and TV production, while at Sports Illustrated, a handful of people were laid off from the title’s Picture Collection archive. (Some of the SI staffers were to be assigned to other positions in the company, a Time Inc. spokesperson said.)”

  • Mesh Media Strategies reports, “I was privileged to join a group of bloggers, along with TV news executives and personnel from the Washington DC area, Monday night for a reception and private tour of the soon-to-open Newseum in the nation’s capital. In a word, it is spectacular.”

  • The Annenberg School for Communication at USC Online Journalism Review reports, “J-schools need to encourage and develop, not inhibit, students’ passion — not only for the favorite topics, but for the craft of journalism itself.”

  • MinOnline reports, “Tribune Media Services (TMS), the content syndication and licensing division of Chicago-based Tribune Company, will launch a new weekly political commentary magazine called Opinionated: Voices and Viewpoints on America and the World.”

  • The San Jose Business Journal reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s HotJobs feature on Tuesday launched a search ranking algorithm called REAL — Relevance, Engagement, Availability and Location. Sunnyvale-based Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) said the system is part of an overall strategic initiative designed to ‘make the recruiting process more efficient using Yahoo technology and to provide recruiters with unique insights into job seeker behavior.’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Reader’s Digest’s Carl Cannon was interviewed on C-SPAN by Bob Schieffer this past weekend. Check out the interview here.

  • What you missed last night: Atlantic Media’s Journalism on Tap, a panel discussion on the upcoming election.

  • WWD.com reports, “Financial market turbulence, housing bubble bursts, Bear Stearns collapses — no wonder advertising isn’t looking rosy (or that most publishers don’t want to go on the record and talk about it). As the end of the first half draws near for magazines, business looks soft. Through April, the latest Media Industry Newsletter numbers show ad pages declined for most fashion titles and the unpredictable economy makes it impossible to predict how things will end up by June, much less the entire year.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Beginning Wednesday, April 2, at 9 p.m., the National Symphony Orchestra will return to the airwaves of Classical WETA 90.9 FM. Performances are being drawn from NSO archives, and most broadcast programs will feature repertoire from multiple NSO concerts. These two-hour broadcasts will take place on the first Wednesday of each month for the next year. WETA’s John Chester will host. The series is made possible by WETA’s Friends of Classical Music, including Patricia Sagon.”

  • The Wall Street Journal writes, “The Justice Department’s approval this week of the XM-Sirius satellite radio merger was a long time coming — maybe too long given that the deal was announced more than a year ago. Still, credit Antitrust Division chief Thomas Barnett for making the right call in the end.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “One of the marquee deals of the now-faded corporate buyout boom was close to collapse Tuesday night, a victim of the credit-market turmoil that began last summer. The planned $19 billion privatization of the nation’s largest radio broadcaster, Clear Channel Communications Inc., looked increasingly likely to fall through as the private-equity firms and banks backing the transaction failed to resolve their differences over final financing terms, people familiar with the matter said. It would be one of the biggest leveraged buyouts yet to implode as the upheaval in global credit markets has made it nearly impossible for banks that financed such deals to spread their risk by packaging their loans for sale to other investors. That’s left many banks exposed to massive losses they have been trying to avoid.”

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    BOOKS

  • GalleyCat answers the question, “How’s Book Publishing Handling the Election?”

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    JOBS

  • Politico is looking for a Weekend Editor.

  • Human Events is hiring a Manager Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.20.08

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    Good morning Washington. Did you go to The Express’ happy hour last night at The Greene Turtle? Or perhaps you were at Al Neuharth Free Spirit Conference’s evening gala, which recognized “Free Spirit of the Year” Cathie Black. Or yet another birthday party for that reporter with the curliest chest hair in the business?

    The Newseum’s getting some serious dough, Tim Russert’s bobblehead only went for $46 on eBay, U.S News & World Report’s Alex Kingsbury, just back from Iraq, will be on Jon Stewart Thursday night and Lauren Conrad’s coming to the WHCA dinner!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • It’s not even close — you think the D.C. protests yesterday were annoying as hell.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Barbara Paulsen, former senior editor of National Geographic magazine, has been promoted to assistant executive editor for text.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports,Cliff Sloan, the publisher of Slate and vice president of business affairs at The Washington Post Co.’s online media subsidiary, will join the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in June as a partner in its intellectual property group.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The New York Observer reports,David Paterson and the Art of the Leak”

  • Reuters reports, “Dow Jones & Co, recently bought by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, is ending an agreement of more than 40 years to carry news from the Associated Press after the AP said it wanted more money.”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Now that Tribune Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Sam Zell’s not swearing so much in his meetings with staff, his national tour of the Chicago Tribune parent’s properties hasn’t gotten much attention. Which is too bad. Because what’s being said as he and Randy Michaels, Tribune Co.’s chief executive of Internet and broadcasting, continue their road show is still newsworthy—even if it has nothing to do with cursing, Cubs and Wrigley Field.”

  • E&P reports, “The Audit Bureau of Circulations has moved closer to an overhaul of how it counts paid newspaper circulation. During a meeting of its board of directors last week in Kiawah Island, S.C., the bureau approved modifications that will affect how publishers report starting April 1, 2009. Among those changes: Newspapers will be considered ‘paid’ by ABC regardless of the price.” And, BtoB reports, “ABC gives initial approval to U.S. newspaper rule changes”

  • The Washington City Paper’s City Blog announced, “You’re invited to celebrate the Best of the Nation’s Capitol at Washington City Paper’s Best Of D.C. Ballot Party at Lounge 201.” It is tonight! “Here’s what you get: Free drinks, free hors d’oeuvre, free conversation with other people who you may or may not like but you can at least make fun of. Plus: An opportunity to cast your votes for the best places and people in the DC Metro Area. Votes for the Best Of D.C. will be tallied on March 27th and the results will be showcased in the City Paper Best Of Issue, hitting newsstands April 18th! Best Of categories include Food and Drink, Arts and Entertainment, Goods and Services, and People and Places.”

  • E&P reports, “You may be surprised to learn that, precisely five years ago, at least one-third of the top newspapers in this country came out against President Bush taking us to war at that time. Many of the papers may have fumbled the WMD coverage, and only timidly raised questions about the need for war, but when push came to shove five years ago they wanted to wait longer to move against Saddam, or not move at all.”

  • John McCain failed the Jeff Stein test — a question Stein asked in 2006, “Can You Tell a Sunni From a Shiite?”

  • The New York Observer reports, “It’s 1 P.M.: Who Is on Clinton Phone? Howard Wolfson: Hillary Spokesguy’s Daily Conference Call Is Hottest Party Line”

  • The Tribune Chronicle reports, “It was incorrectly reported in Tuesday’s Tribune Chronicle that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton answered questions from voters in a local congressman’s office. Reporter John Goodall, who was assigned to the story, spoke by telephone with Hillary Wicai Viers, who is a communications director in U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson’s staff. According to the reporter, when Viers answered the phone with ‘This is Hillary,’ he believed he was speaking with the Democratic presidential candidate, who had made several previous visits to the Mahoning Valley. The quotes from Viers were incorrectly attributed to Clinton.”

  • The Crimson reports, “Former Managing Editor of the Wall Street Journal Paul E. Steiger spoke last night at the John F. Kennedy Forum at the Institute of Politics about the current recession in the newspaper business, contending that ‘we have not reached the bottom yet.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Lame duck reporters are bored”

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    TV

  • Obama Ratings Hit, Schedule Stays Packed

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research in metered markets for March 18, 2008, ABC News’ exclusive interview with Barack Obama which aired first on ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Leno’ and ‘Letterman’ in the metered markets. ABC’s ‘Nightline’ averaged a 4.0/9 household rating/share among the 56 metered markets which flew past ‘Leno’ 3.9/10 and ‘Letterman’ 2.5/6. Compared to the prior four week time period average, ‘Nightline’ is up 18% among households.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Oh, It’s On: Dan Rather’s Lawsuit Proceeds As Discovery Moves Forward”

  • Huffington Post’s Maia Szalavitz writes, “Wire v. The Media on Drugs II: You’re Right, David Simon, We Suck”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp.’s Fox passed CBS as the most-watched television network after its ‘American Idol’ singing contest topped ratings and the Hollywood writers strike limited competition from scripted shows.”

  • Machinist reports, “How local TV embraced fake news”

  • Media Daily News reports, “Big Video content producers need to come up with aggregate ratings that combine television viewing with online video consumption, says Patrick Keane, vice president and chief marketing officer for CBS Interactive, speaking Monday morning at MediaPost’s OMMA Global conference in Hollywood. The combined rating would provide media buyers with a cross-platform option that’s simpler and more detailed in terms of data, because of online metrics.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “An unusually hefty though widely expected U.S. Federal Reserve rate cut Tuesday led to the biggest Wall Street rally in five years, but media stocks underperformed.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Los Angeles Time reports, “Facebook Inc. is rolling out tighter privacy controls that allow users to decide which friends can see their profile information and other personal details, the popular social networking site announced during a briefing at its headquarters Tuesday.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commission’s auction of valuable wireless airwaves ended yesterday after raising a record $19.6 billion and setting the stage for the first nationwide network that would be open to all devices and software. The FCC would not yet name the winners of airwaves, so it was unknown whether a new company would enter the wireless world to compete against the two biggest carriers, AT&T and Verizon Wireless. Further, the sole bid for a block of spectrum to be used for public-safety workers was far below the minimum price set by the agency.” And, The Wall Street Journal reports, “After 261 rounds of bidding, a government auction of airwaves ended yesterday, raising almost $20 billion from companies hoping to build new broadband wireless networks for next-generation phones and other devices.”

  • Folio reports, “There’s still a lot of Internet out there. And for publishers joining — or cobbling together — mini ad networks, that means revenue. So says a new white paper released late last week by media investment banking firm DeSilva + Phillips. According to the report, Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail, the approval of Google’s $3.1 billion acquisition of DoubleClick shouldn’t spell doom for smaller ad networks.”

  • The National Press Photographers Association announced, “One of the most comprehensive and powerful visual compilations of America’s past five years of war in Iraq has been published by Reuters in partnership with MediaStorm.org. ‘BEARING WITNESS: Five Years Of The Iraq War’ is a multimedia gallery of photography, video, audio interviews, and informational graphics that’s a must-see for photojournalists.”

  • ars technica reports, “The man who spoke for Comcast at Harvard last month has told the Federal Communications Commission that the agency has no legal power to stop the cable giant from engaging in what it calls ‘network management practices’ (critics call it peer-to-peer traffic blocking). Comcast vice president David L. Cohen’s latest filing with the Commission claims that regulators can do nothing even if they conclude that Comcast’s behavior runs afoul of the FCC’s Internet neutrality guidelines.”

  • CyberJournalist reports, “Microsoft is building a new site called ‘Blews’ that scans the blogs to determine what are the hottest news stories.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Mediabistro reports, “So What Do You Do James Bennet, Editor of The Atlantic?”

  • The AP reports,Lynndie England, the public face of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a German news magazine that she was sorry for appearing in photographs of detainees in the notorious Iraqi prison, and believes the scenes of torture and humiliation served as a powerful rallying point for anti-American insurgents.”

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    RADIO

  • Politics and Prose announced, “Veteran reporter Daniel Schorr, the last of Edward R. Murrow’s legendary CBS team and currently senior news analyst for NPR, will discuss his book, Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium, at the Friendship Heights Village Center on Thursday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m.”

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    JOBS

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer.

  • Voice of America is looking for a Reporter and a News Division/writer.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Republican strategists Mary Matalin and Mike Murphy and, Democratic strategists James Carville and Bob Shrum

  • Face the Nation: New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, Sen. Chris Dodd and Sen. Evan Bayh.

  • This Week: Howard Wolfson, Communications Director, Clinton Campaign; David Axelrod, Senior Advisor, Obama Campaign; New York Times’ David Brooks, Republican strategist Matthew Dowd, Democratic strategist Donna Brazile and George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin Karl Rove and a panel with Brit Hume, Mara Liasson, Bill Kristol and Juan Williams.

  • Late Edition: Jaap de Hoop Scheffer, NATO Secretary-General, Howard Dean, DNC chairman, Rep. Silvestre Reyes, chairman, House Intelligence Committee; Clinton campaign, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA), former presidential candidate; Obama campaign, Rep. Roy Blunt (R-MO), Minority Whip, John King, Gloria Borger and Candy Crowley.

  • Chris Matthews Show: Katty Kay, BBC Washington correspondent; Cynthia Tucker of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Kevin Cokely of KXAS in Dallas, Texas; and Patrick Preston of WCMH in Columbus.

  • Reliable Sources: Jessica Yellin, CNN congressional correspondent, Mark Halperin, senior political analyst and editor-at-large, TIME magazine, Kate Snow, anchor, ABC News, Joe Trippi, former advisor, John Edwards campaign, Kevin Madden, former
    press secretary, Mitt Romney campaign, Dee Dee Meyers, former White House press secretary; author, Why Women Should Rule the World and Sarah Baxter, Washington bureau chief, Sunday Times of London

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX) 21st District, Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee will be interviewed by Martin Kady, The Politico Congressional Correspondent and Jennifer Yachnin, Roll Call, Staff Writer

  • This is America: Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), who has endorsed Obama, and Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA), who has endorsed Hillary Clinton.

  • CN8′s Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Roll Call Editor Charlie Mitchell and Roll Call Reporters Erin Billings and Emily Heil.