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Posts Tagged ‘Hugh Hewitt’

Politico’s ‘Lifetime’ Ban From FNC; Was It Ben Smith’s Fault?

It’s well known that the staff at Politico is between the sheets with MSNBC and on the outs with FNC. An excerpt from the to-be-released An Atheist in the FOXhole published by Salon confirms that fact and provides a little more detail:

Sometimes entire organizations were given lifetime bans [at Fox News]. The website Politico wrote something a few years back that rubbed Roger the wrong way (we were never told what exactly the transgression was) and word went out to all the shows: No more Politico reporters as guests. Also, any anchors who mentioned the site on air had to use the phrase “left-wing Politico” — an absurd designation for a publication that usually played it down the middle.

A web search shows Politico has, in the past, been referred to as “liberal” or “lefty” at FNC. Those references seemed to take place exclusively on FNC’s morning show “Fox & Friends” and with particular zeal from co-host Steve Doocy.

It’s common knowledge that many current and former reporters at Politico (and a lot of different publications on Planet Earth) are on the outs with FNC and FNC PR in particular, with editors and scribes dealing with intense squabbles. But is Ben Smith to blame for the deep rift? Read more

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The Daily Caller and Politico: It’s War.

The Cold War between Politico and The Daily Caller is over. Now it’s just war.

This morning, The Daily Caller leads its site with a potentially explosive story by TV writer Jeff Poor on Politico‘s tight relationship with MSNBC. They’ve long tried to paint the Arlington, Va. giant with a tainted, liberal bias. Back in July, Editor-in-Chief Tucker Carlson backed down after ordering staff to refer to Politico in their stories as “a liberal publication based in suburban Virginia.” The ill will stemmed from a story by then-DCer Jonathan Strong (now at Roll Call) on GOP Presidential hopeful Michele Bachmann‘s migraine headaches. Politico royally pissed off Carlson by reassigning the story to reporters who described the DC as “conservative” and who “confirmed” the DC’s reporting, as though it needed confirming. At the time, new Managing Editor David Martosko was so eager to please that he vowed to go back into each story mentioning Politico and make the change. But it never happened and Carlson walked back his email decree to use the description.

But now The Daily Caller has a sampling of numbers on Politico reporters who regularly appear on the network. For this story, Poor had his eyes glued to MSNBC. “I watched a lot of MSNBC the past three days,” he told FishbowlDC. “I ought to get a Purple Heart.” His watching also unearthed other news: Politico‘s Mike Allen, who appears regularly on MSNBC for his Playbook segment, switches up his attire. “I can speak on authority that Mike Allen changes clothes on a daily basis,” Poor said, recalling some discrepancy on that.

Fox News pounced on the anti-MSNBC bandwagon. The story reports that no Politico reporter has appeared on the network in 18 months. And no network media story is complete without one of those blind and bitchy Fox News PR quotes — this one declares that Fox News is just not that into Politico reporters appearing on their programs: “We try to book guests that make for compelling TV; Politico reporters tend not to rate well,” a Fox News spokesperson told The Daily Caller.

That’s right. They prefer the company of Daily Caller journos such as Carlson, an FNC commentator, and Jamie Weinstein, who regularly appears on “Red Eye.”  They also frequently invite on reporters and editors from Roll Call and The Hill. But not all Politico foes appear on FNC. NJ and Politico also have an abrasive relationship. Former FNC White House Correspondent Major Garrett, now an NJ congressional correspondent, has returned to his former network minimally. He appears far more often on MSNBC.

Politico did not return requests for comment from Poor. Though the DC does quote Editor-in-Chief John Harris on Hugh Hewitt‘s radio show after the host wondered about the potential harm of Politico co-hosting a debate with NBC. Harris replied, “Well, I just don’t accept the premise and I don’t accept your premise about Chris Matthews, who I admire.” He also said Matthews was not moderating the debate — that would be Brian Williams.

In the meantime, we hear Politico media writer Keach Hagey, recently freed from the constraints of daily short bursts of blog writing and allowed to write long form, has been fishing around for a new bombshell story on Martosko, perhaps involving his former ties with the lobbying and consulting firm, Berman and Company. For today, The Daily Caller newsroom is aglow in anti-Politico sentiment, reflecting a longtime vendetta between the publications.

We reached out to Politico for comment. For now, radio silence.

Read the full story here.

 

Sunday Show Preview 02.07.10

SSP.jpg

NBC’s Meet the Press:

CBS’ Face the Nation: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, NFL Today Analyst Shannon Sharpe, NFL on CBS Announcer Jim Nantz, NFL on CBS analyst Phil Simms

ABC’s This Week: Sec. Treasury Timothy Geithner, ABC’s George Will, Bloomberg’s Al Hunt, WaPo’s Ruth Marcus, WSJ’s Peggy Noonan, Center for American Progress CEO John Podesta

CNN’s State of the Union: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Fox News’ Fox News Sunday: Sarah Palin, National Tea Party Spokesman Mark Skoda, Weekly Stabdard’s Bill Kristol, NPR’s Mara Liasson, FNC’s Laura Ingraham, NPR’s Juan Williams

CNN’s Reliable Sources with Howard Kurtz: HuffPo’s Arianna Huffington, syndicated talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, CNN’s James Carville

CNN’s GPS with Fareed Zakaria: King Abdullah II of Jordan and John Yoo, author of “Crisis and Command”

NBC’s The Chris Matthews Show: NYT’s Andrew Ross Sorkin, MSNBC’s Norah O’Donnell, TIME’s Michael Duffy, WaPo’s Kathleen Parker

Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and National Journal: NYT’s Jackie Calmes, TIME’s Michael Duffy, ABC’s Martha Raddatz, NBC’s Pete Williams

Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI), NFL Films President Steve Sabol, Margaret Carlson and Kate O’Beirne

Washington Watch with Roland Martin: National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial, Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory, National Urban League’s Patrick Gusman, Prime Movers Media founder Dorothy Gilliam, Frank Gilliam, dean of the UCLA School of Public Affairs and professor of public policy and political science. Roundtable with former WaPo reporter Dorothy Gilliam, CBS’ Michelle Miller, and Danny Bakewell, Sr., publisher of the Los Angeles Sentinel and chairman of the National Newspapers Publishers Association.

CNN’s Amanpour: former U.S. National Security Advisory Zbigniew Brzezinski, FP’s David Rothkopf, former Chinese foreign ministry official Victor Gao, former Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council Victor Cha, former Mexican foreign minister Jorge Castaneda, Consul General of Mexico in New York Ruben Beltran

C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers”: David Axelrod, Senior White House Advisor to President Obama, WaPo’s Anne Kornblut and WSJ’s Gerald Seib.

We’ll update as we get ‘em.

BREAKING: Snow Won’t Remain In WH For Remainder Of Bush Administration

Speaking to Hugh Hewitt, White House Press Secretary Tony Snow suggested that, for financial reasons, he may not be able to remain at the White House for the duration of the Bush administration.

    HH: Your intention to go the distance, Tony Snow?

    TS: No, I’m not going to be…I’ve already made it clear I’m not going to be able to go the distance, but that’s primarily for financial reasons. I’ve told people when my money runs out, then I’ve got to go.

    HH: How long will that be?

    TS: I’m not going to tell you.

    HH: Well, come on, make some news.

    TS: No.

Morning Reading List, 07.30.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Washington Post reports, “Four days after the Democratic debate in Charleston, S.C., more than 400 questions directed to the GOP presidential field have been uploaded on YouTube, as Republicans are scheduled to take their turn at video-populism on Sept. 17. But only Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) and Rep. Ron Paul (Tex.) have agreed to participate in the debate, co-hosted by the Republican Party of Florida in St. Petersburg.”

  • Carrie Sheffield, formerly of The Politico, has joined The Washington Times as an editorial writer.

  • One year ago last week, Ana Marie Cox was named the Washington Editor ot Time.com and Tammy Haddad was named a Vice President for MSNBC.

  • Swampland reports, “The Ron Paul campaign announced, and other campaigns have confirmed, that CNN is moving the YouTube debate to another date, possibly in December.”

  • The Columbia Journalism Review has some prime examples of “Why the Dow Jones Vote Matters”

  • The Politico reports that CNN president Jon Klein “said the new Campbell Brown show at 8 p.m. will be talk-oriented, built around the day’s news. Leaning toward more an opinion show where Campbell doesn’t give the opinions, the guests do.”

  • From the Christian Science Monitor: “Declining newspaper readership, especially among the young, is forcing editors to reexamine their focus.”

  • Poynter Online writes, “Facebook: What’s In It For Journalists? With the help of some new friends, we came up with a few answers. And just as many questions.”

  • Huffington Post’s Zack Exley writes, “GOP front runners seem to be bailing on the September 17 YouTube/CNN debate. Democrats should rejoice at this news.”

  • “With Senator Clinton—and her femininity—featured as a story line, the Presidential campaign filled 13% of the airtime and was the second most-popular talk topic on radio and cable, according to PEJ’s Talk Show Index from July 15-20. (Cable shows paid far more attention to the campaign than the radio talkers did.) The one subject that commanded more attention last week than the Presidential race was the renewed debate over U.S. strategy in Iraq.”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s new series, “Hey, How’d You Do That?”, “walking you through how those in the media industry navigated key professional junctures, achieved career-making coups, tackled spur-of-the-moment scenarios and made the decisions that furthered their work.”

  • Houston Chronicle’s Claudia Feldman called the YouTube debate “a lively CNN-YouTube debate that turned the usual format upside down and may have forever changed candidates’ obligatory parade in front of the TV lights.”

  • Fortune reports, “Newspapers are dying. At the Washington Post Co., CEO Donald Graham is banking on the Internet to save serious journalism. If he can’t figure this out, nobody can.”

  • From Save The Debate.com: “Some Republicans are talking about ditching the long-planned YouTube debate, like the Democrats and Fox News. As concerned Republicans, we respectfully ask them to reconsider. Republicans cannot surrender to Democrats on any front — least of all new media — or we may well lose in 2008.”

  • Todd And reports, “I’m very excited to announce that the Power 150 ranking of top marketing blogs is joining forces with Advertising Age, the world’s leading marketing and media publication.”

  • Reuters reports, “The number of help-wanted ads in U.S. newspapers fell in June to a 49-year low, a private research group said on Thursday.”

  • Time reports, “Hugh Hewitt, a popular right-wing blogger and radio talk show host, got more specific about what conservatives might object to in a CNN/YouTube debate — he alleged that CNN cherrypicked the submissions for biased questions that a ‘responsible’ journalist wouldn’t ask: ‘the CNN team used the device of the third-party video to inject a question that would have embarrassed any anchor posing it.’ One staffer for a Republican candidate now leaning toward not participating put it this way: ‘The problem isn’t YouTube, it’s CNN.’”

  • A release from Atlantic Media announced that Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Mallon, Debbie Applegate and Jeffrey Goldberg will be attending Bookmark events on Nantucket.

  • The Washington Examiner reports, “Washington wins the award for ‘most e-mail addicted’ city in the country, according to a new study released Thursday by Dulles-based AOL.”

  • Redding News Review reports, “Radio One’s Syndication One announced a new lineup late yesterday that includes ‘The Al Sharpton Show,’ ’2 Live Stews’ and ‘The Warren Ballentine Show’ on its XM 169 The Power.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle’s Chip Johnson writes, “Megan Greenwell was a reporter at Berkeley High School’s biweekly student newspaper, the Jacket, nearly eight years ago when she cracked one of the most sensational Bay Area news stories of the year — scooping the region’s media. … So it’s no fluke that Greenwell, now at the ripe old age of 23, is a professional journalist at not just any newspaper, but the Washington Post. And she’s not covering any average beat; she’s based in Baghdad and covering one of the world’s biggest stories, the war in Iraq.”

  • Who Still Reads Magazines? Just About Everybody”

  • New York Post reports, “Don Imus is about to get paid. The disowned shock jock is close to a settlement that would have former employer CBS buy out his contract as a way to avoid costly and ugly litigation, according to multiple sources close to the situation.”

  • Business Week reports, “Should the Bancroft family, the controlling shareholders of Dow Jones & Co., decide to reject Rupert Murdoch’s takeover offer, prompting the mogul to take his $5 billion off the table and walk away, everyone knows what would happen. Dow Jones’ stock price would fall from its recent highs in the upper 50s”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s updated How To Pitch.

  • Redding News Review reports, “Redding News Review today learned that Radio One has cut at least four staffers over at its satellite radio channel XM 169 The Power.”

    Jobs

  • The Education Trust is looking for a New Media Manager.

  • McClatchy is looking for a Senior Correspondent in Washington D.C.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for a Senior Producer for AAM Television.

  • CNN is seeking a Senior Producer for Reliable Sources.

  • Worcester County Times/Maryland Beachcomber/Ocean Pines Independent is looking for an Editor.

  • Print Solutions Magazine is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • DC Magazine is looking to hire style-savvy fall interns/editorial assistants immediately for the Fall Semester. Please send cover letter, resume, and clips to tjow@modernluxury.com with availability and potential start date. Position begins mid-August.

  • Washington Hospital Center is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • Connection Newspapers is looking for a Sports Writer/Editor.

  • PoliticsNJ.com is looking for an Advertising Sales Director.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.02.07

  • Leading today’s caption contest so far is “Wait… I keep getting this wrong – so first you mix in the polonium, then the sugar?”

  • From Pew’s Weekly News Interest Index: “Iraq remained the top news story last week, both in terms of public interest and news coverage. Anna Nicole Smith’s death and the bizarre aftermath continued to attract a distinct yet devoted audience. In spite of the fact that most Americans think Smith’s death has been over-covered, the core audience for the story gives the press high marks for its coverage. Other top stories of the week included the 2008 presidential campaign, mounting tensions between the U.S. and Iran, conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and the rescue of three climbers from Oregon’s Mt. Hood.”

  • An ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” won the February sweeps among viewers and adults 25-54. This is the first across the board sweeps win for ABC since 1996.

  • Voice of America is hiring an executive editor.

  • After getting in their digs at the Washingtonian by saying “Washingtonian joins the 21st century,” DCist gives a plug for alumna Catherine Andrews and the new Washingtonian blogs, calling them “largely interesting reading.”

  • A reader writes in saying that “This tipster is just whining: Go take a survey of how many women are WH correspondents. CNN had an all female WH team (still might), ABC’s lead and #2 are women (Raddatz and Yellin), and then there’s Norah O’Donnell and the incoming head of the White House Correspondents Association is a woman (Ann Compton, ABC Radio). That’s just off the top of my head. I’m sure there are lots of others.”

  • Do leap years have a special meaning for reporters?

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “AOL has found a new CFO, snatching an executive from parent company Time Warner.” Nisha Kumar, vice president of operations at New York-based Time Warner, will serve as the CFO at Dulles-based AOL.

  • C-SPAN2′s Book TV is airing on Saturday Arthur Schlesinger, Jr’s last television interview conducted with Book TV last week in New York City. The show will air at 8:25 a.m. and 9 p.m.

  • Dan Gerstein thinks it ain’t no thing that he “used The Politico as a platform partly to settle the old scores of — and to advance the current agenda of — a paying client, but without mentioning the ‘paying’ part.”

  • A huge discussion taking place in the comments section of Arianna Huffington’s post, “Limbaugh, Hannity, and the Right’s Faux Fury Over Anonymous Comments.”

  • Newsweek’s Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey look into the “senior administration official,” concluding that while “Most reporters would prefer never to quote a White House official on background. But that means never getting anything out of most White House officials.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah rescued himself from Wikipedia obscurity.

  • Hugh Hewitt points to the Politico as more than a paper, but as a substitute for other paper’s D.C. bureaus.

  • CJR Daily gives James Taranto “a history lesson on of digital death threats.”

  • E&P reports that Salon’s Mark Benjamin says he beat the Washington Post to the punch on the Walter Reed story. “Reportedly, he has sent Priest links to his articles — which covered a wide range of issues at Walter Reed — and also contacted Post media critic Howard Kurtz.”

  • Eric Boehlert on TNR’s new owner.