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Posts Tagged ‘interview’

How Soledad O’Brien Would Have Covered the Government Shutdown

SoledadOBrienSoledad O’Brien, the former CNN morning anchor, now has another label to add to her already impressive resume: CEO. O’Brien recently launched Starfish Media Group, a multiplatform company that has already garnered partnerships with HBO, Al Jazeera America and CNN.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, O’Brien talks about the challenges of being your own boss, gives advice to undergrads and tells why journalists should follow their passion:

What would the field look like if journalists could spend the bulk of their time reporting on their areas of passion? How would that translate to the information and the consumers of that information?

I’ll give you an example. Let’s talk about a “shut down the government” story. Most channels are going to be sitting in D.C. going back and forth like, “Here’s John Boehner and the president.” That’s really going to be your coverage, as if the entire world revolves around Washington. As much as they can shut down the government, the impact is not going to be felt solely there. You could tell that story through the communities that are going to be affected. I think that right there, if you told it that way, you could really change the debate that’s going on in the news.

To hear more from O’Brien, read: So What Do You Do, Soledad O’Brien, CEO of Starfish Media Group?

– Aneya Fernando

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

How Quarterly.Co Helps Bloggers: Revenue!

MitchLowe

Mitch Lowe, co-founder of Netflix and former president of Redbox, knows a thing or two about how to create a successful business. Now, he’s the CEO Quarterly.Co — a subscription service that lets people receive physical items in the mail from influential contributors of their choice. They include everyone from musicians to bloggers, entrepreneurs to artists. Marie Claire creative director Nina Garcia and Bill Nye the Science Guy are the company’s most recent sign-ups.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Lowe talks about how the service helps media pros:

How do you think the journalists, authors, bloggers or the media outlets themselves benefit from participating?

In a couple ways. The revenue is one. Right now they get a substantial percentage of the profits. And in addition, they are able to build their fan base and their brand in a whole new way, in a way that’s not currently possible to do. In addition, many of them participate in some of the products — they might own or they might be a sponsor of some of the products that they put in there — so they benefit because our subscribers are highly influential people. I can’t tell you the names of people, but they are people who anybody would love to have their products in the hands of.

For more, read: So What Do You Do, Mitch Lowe, Co-Founder of Netflix and CEO of Quarterly.Co?

– Aneya Fernando

Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer: The Anti-TMZ

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Jamie McCarthy has been taking pictures of celebrities since before the digital camera was born. For 17 years he’s been snapping flattering, red carpet shots of celebs who soon become friends.

McCarthy was mentored by his uncle, the storied nightlife and celebrity photographer Patrick McMullan. He recently spoke to Mediabistro about a recent photo shoot (Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi was involved), photographers that have influenced his work and the rise of TMZ:

Has the rise of TMZ affected the way you do your job?
Not really. My team of photographers at Getty, we’re kind of like the anti-TMZ. We’re the guys that are pretty much on the inside. So we’re the guys who want to do the nice photos and make them look good, whereas TMZ and those guys I feel like they’re looking more for the dirt on celebrities. My clients hire me because they know they can trust me and I’m not going to give up secrets about them and I make them look good. I want people who see the photos to say, ‘Wow, she looks beautiful’ or ‘He’s great-looking.’ Also, I only shoot at events where people are expecting photographs to be taken. I’ve never tried to shoot people in their personal lives. That’s not my style.

For more, read: So What Do You Do, Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer?

– Aneya Fernando

Writing Advice from Producer of The Tudors, History Channel’s Vikings

Just in time for the upcoming premier of Vikings on the History Channel, Michael Hirst, the show’s writer and producer, talks about his writing process in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series.

“The key for me with historical characters is they’re interesting because they’re human beings,” he said. “A little bit of Hemingway goes a long way here, but journalists and writers should honestly look at their material and have a real interest, a real passion in what they want to write, and they should also have a lot of knowledge, as well. You don’t write police procedural stuff unless you really know that beat, but it’s ultimately not the procedure that makes the show work — it’s the people. The more real they are, the better.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Michael Hirst, Creator of The Tudors and Vikings?

NYT Veteran Gives Tips for Journos Who Want to Write a Book

It’s a pretty big accomplishment for a first-time author to land on the New York Times bestsellers list, but Isabel Wilkerson definitely deserves it. The Pulitzer-prize winning journalist spent 15 years researching and conducted over 1,200 interviews for The Warmth of Other Suns, an account of the men and women who lived through the Great Migration, when 6 million African-Americans moved to the North.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, she talks about her writing process and gives tips to fellow journos who want to write a book. Below, an excerpt:

You interviewed more than 1,200 individuals. What skills do you possess that made people feel comfortable sharing their stories and information?

I always go into interviews with a great sense of gratitude for the courage it takes to share one’s story, particularly one so painful and heartbreaking, things that they had deep within themselves and had just gotten to the point of being able to share. So I think being an empathic listener, someone who was truly wanting to understand what they had endured — those are things I think they could pick up and sense in me. I also think they felt I had a sense of connection with them.

For more, read Hey, How’d You Write a New York Times Nonfiction Bestseller, Isabel Wilkerson? [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

How the Founder of Pitchfork Made It Big

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber says that aspiring entrepreneurs should “be willing to put in the work for a long period of time for just the love of it.”

“Today, more so than any other time, it seems really difficult to make a living in the media, especially in the music media,” he explained. “It’s just so crowded, and at this point the publications that are really able to establish themselves are the ones that are the most passionate and the most relatable. I find that the publications I tend to connect with most are ones that are, in many cases, written by a single voice, somebody who has a really interesting viewpoint or perspective.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

MSNBC’s Tamron Hall on What Really Happened During That Tim Carney Interview

From interviewing world leaders to hurling water balloons during a lighthearted segment, Tamron Hall is as at home reporting on the world’s pressing issues as she is doing what “some people would see as fluff.” In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? interview series, the MSNBC anchor and Today substitute co-host gives her thoughts on objectivity and talks about her infamous on-air ‘throw down’ with Washington Examiner columnist Tim Carney over Mitt Romney’s background.

“I just handled a situation that wasn’t best for my audience and my viewers,” Hall recalled. “We were having a conversation and I was asking a legitimate question, and I felt at the time that we were cheating the viewer with what was just political gamesmanship. I’m not here to judge anyone’s opinions, but I would like to have a question answered. So, for me, it was not about admonishing him or creating a moment or trying to be controversial. My job is to ask questions and get to the bottom of the story or the issue at hand, and I felt that we were being unfair to the viewer in having a conversation that was not about the issue at hand.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Tamron Hall, Anchor of MSNBC’s NewsNation?

Sara Horowitz on What ‘Obamacare’ Means to Freelancers

When Sara Horowitz was hired as a lawyer, she was made an independent contractor and wasn’t given any benefits. Since then, she’s created Working Today, a nonprofit for uniting freelancers; Freelancers Union, an organization that promotes the needs of independent workers; and Freelancers Insurance Company, which provides health insurance. She also authored the recently released Freelancer’s Bible, a practical guide for the self-employed.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Horowitz talks about the best and worst parts of freelancing, and gives advice on networking, budgeting and getting ahead. Here’s an excerpt:

How does the re-election of President Obama and his healthcare agenda play into the future of the practice?
There are other things that are good all around, like the end of the preexisting conditions. We’re a nonprofit, and we own our own insurance company, so there are no private shareholders. I think what we’re going to see is that a lot of private equity is going to move out of the insurance business per se, because they won’t be able to make as much money. So, I think there’s going to be a lot of changes afoot in the healthcare industry.

For more, read So What Do You Do, Sara Horowitz, Founder and Executive Director of the Freelancer’s Union?