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Posts Tagged ‘Jack Mirkinson’

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Afternoon Reading List 11.19.13

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Journos VS Flacks: Newscastic co-founder and contributor Chris Ortiz posted a blog yesterday about the six ways in which PR flacks piss off journalists. The list comes complete with some wacky, fun, and zany GIFs, but more importantly, it includes six very true, very irritating flack-related pet peeves.

Why you should read it: It’s all true, and that makes the piece funny. The GIFs however, are priceless and were perfectly placed at the proper points of the list, highlighting each of the pet peeves. Read more here.

Shep Smith mocks fat Canadian crackhead mayor: Yesterday, HuffPost’s Jack Mirkinson added a clip of Fox News’ Shep Smith and his instant replay videos of Toronto Mayor/ginormous crack enthusiast, Rob Ford. In the clip, Ford thundered across the floor of a busy city council meeting and barreled into an old lady. A reporter’s voice in the background details Ford’s movements, but Smith shamelessly mocks the egg-shaped druggy as he power-waddles into a bystander and then topples her to the floor.

Why you should read/watch it: The clip of Ford truffle-shuffling all the way across the room has been blasted all over the cable news stations, but Smith’s captions make his coverage the one most worth watching. Read/watch more here.

What does the media keep getting wrong in its Obamacare coverage?

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Afternoon Reading List 11.4.13

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The Simpsons takes digs at the Media: According to Jack Mirkinson from HuffPost, last night, as ”The Simpsons” rounds the bases on its 24th season, it also took several jabs at all the big media outlets. CNN, MSNBC, and the New York Times were all subject to lampooning, the bulk of which was reserved for Fox News. Rachel Maddow was also given an extended guest spot on the show.

Why you should read it: See how in “The Simpsons” universe, they use technology to deal with bipartisanship. Read more here.

Media misreports LAX shooting, still a win: Erik Wemple posted his appearance on CNN’s “Reliable Sources” with David Folkenflik on his WaPo blog. In that appearance, Wemple called the reporting of the LAX shooter a “win” for the media and a huge improvement from the breaking news reporting of Navy Yard and Newtown. Given, the media still misreports breaking news whenever it can. Now it’s just slightly better misreporting going on.

Why you should read it: See what NBC News still misreported, and see what hoax the Toronto Globe and Mail fell for and reported as actual news. Read more here.

Who was always skeptical of Obama’s “Keep Your Plan” promise?

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Afternoon Reading List 10.23.13

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Shep Smith is a jerk (to waitresses):  Gawker’s Jim Cooke has posted a story about Shep Smith‘s unorthodox method of ordering drinks at a bar. Apparently, Shep tends to scream and berate waitresses, and then leave without tipping. Scolding an employee at a bar and humiliating them in public is one thing, but not leaving a tip? That’s messed up, man. The servers still have to tip out the busboys and cooks, and that comes out of their pocket. Not cool, bro.

Why you should read it: The story brings to light a side of Shep that only the readers, a reporter from Florida, and a Tallahassee court have seen. Read more here.

Are big newspapers pro-surveillance or pro-privacy?: According to HuffPost’s Jack Mirkinson, a study by the Colombia Journalism Review found that most of the big-wig newspaper companies, including WaPo, LAT, NYT, and USA Today all showed significant amounts of pro-surveillance language over the past 2 months when reporting on the NSA and other government leaks.

Why you should read it: Although specific verbiage isn’t a direct indicator of a media bias, it’s still interesting to see how different media outlets report the same thing. Read more here and/or check out the full study here.

Who made a slightly racist remark at CNBC 

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Afternoon Reading List 10.21.13

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The love/hate relationship between technology and news: NYT media writer David Carr had a piece Sunday about the budding bromance between technology and news, after the two have been at odds with each other for the better part of their relationship. But with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos buying WaPo and eBay founder Pierre M. Omidyar starting a newly conceived news site with Glenn Greenwaldit’s becoming apparent that there may be an actual future for journalism and technology.

Why you should read it: The news game is  changing. Don’t be stuck riding the bench when your team gets a new coach. Read more here.

Obama to give Rose Garden rally: According to Daily Caller’s Neil Munro, this morning, the President was scheduled to speak with consumers, small business owners, and pharmacists about the new healthcare law in the Rose Garden. Munro, who made himself famous in the Rose Garden, points out that since most early Obamacare success stories have either been outright lies or erroneous exaggerations, this is an attempt to save face and earn political points before the 2014 elections by pointing out Obamacare’s successes while claiming its failures unacceptable.

Why you should read it: The Rose Garden healthcare awareness rally will probably not answer why numerous companies have reduced employment and reduced workers’ hours to escape the high cost of the Obamacare regulations, but this story does. Read more here.

How does Fox News handle mean commenters?

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Afternoon Reading List 10.15.13

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BuzzFeed hires from Free Beacon: Dylan Byers reported Mond in Politico that the left leaning Buzzfeed would be hiring Katherine Miller from the right leaning Free Beacon to work as a deputy political editor to serve under McKay CoppinsWhen asked about the hire Coppins said, “Our basic approach is to hire talented, fair-minded people who are doing great, smart, compelling work wherever they are.”

Why you should read it: Let your heart be your guide! Just because you work at RedAlert or The Blaze doesn’t mean you can’t apply to work at HuffPost or MotherJones. Believe in yourself! Read more here.

Random PBS viewer helps homeless woman: According to Cat Wise of PBS’ “The Rundown,” Dior Hall, a homeless woman in San Francisco, received a random leg up from an anonymous donor who saw a previous story about her on NewsHour last Wednesday and paid for her first month’s rent. Hall had been stepped over for government subsidized housing after the government shutdown began.

Why you should read it: KQED radio reporters Wise and Mina Kim had no idea their story was going to directly impact those they were reporting on. Think about that the next time you write. Read more here.

Who suggested the need for a new political party? Follow the jump for more…

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Afternoon Reading List 10.02.13

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Alec Baldwin blasts Scarborough, Kristol on Twitter: In a HuffPost piece this morning by Jack Mirkinson, new MSNBC host Alec Baldwin blasts his colleague, Joe Scarborough, and his guest, The Weekly Standard Editor Bill Kristol on Wednesday morning. Despite the wishes of his new boss, Phil Griffin, the president of the network, who publicly told Alec that he needed to tone down his Twitter fighting, Alec went on his rampage before most people even finished their morning coffee.

Why you should read it: Check out Alec’s tweets and see who he credits for his flagrant disregard for his new boss’s orders. Read more here.

Press to blame for government shutdown? According to Media Matters blogger, Eric Boehlert, members of the press are partially responsible. For using falsely equivalent terms like “both sides” and “Congress” in reporting, Boehlert says the media takes the blame from those who really deserve it. Namely, in Boehlert’s liberal eyes, the Republicans, specifically, the far right-wing faction of the party, (AKA the Tea Partiers).

Why you should read it: This story may be talking about you and the reporting you did that one time about Obamacare and America and people and such. Remember? Well that’s why. Read more here

Who’s up for a beer after the jump?

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Afternoon Reading List 09.18.13.

Media blames violent video games for aggressive behavior: Political blogger Oliver Willis of MediaMatters posted a story yesterday detailing how the media has blamed video games for gun violence. The argument over video games influencing real world violence isn’t new. The gunmen behind Columbine, Virginia Tech, Arizona, Norway, Aurora, Sandy Hook, and most recently, the Navy Yard, were all avid video game players. In the aftermath of Monday’s tragedy, media outlets like Fox News and MSNBC cited Aaron Alexis‘ intense video game addiction as a possible cause for his deranged actions. Willis then makes a point to clarify that all of the studies done on this subject have either failed to provide a correlation between violence and video games, or they have debunked the myth that a connection between the two even exists.

Why you should read it: Even though intense, life affecting video game addiction has not proven itself to be the cause of real world gun violence, it may be a reliable indicator of certain personality types or unusual emotional states. Who doesn’t want to be forewarned?

Snooping Justice Department accidentally helps advance shield bill: Today, The Hill’s lobbying and advocacy reporter Megan Wilson wrote a story highlighting the current state of a shield bill that recently advanced through the Senate Judiciary Committee in a 13-5 vote as the response to the illegal Justice Department snooping on reporters. Finally, after several years, a proposed bill for a shield law aiming to grant federal protection to journos and their sources is more than likely going to make it to the Senate floor.

Why you should read it: It could affect your future. After it passed through committee, the big-wig media giants picked up the check for a massive increase in lobbying muscle and put it behind the shield bill. The suits essentially told the journos ‘Hey, don’t worry guys. We got your back on this,’ which was a pretty cool move on their behalf.

Jump for more on big changes at Fox News…

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Afternoon Reading List 07.03.12

What’s happening in Egypt? — Protestors in Egypt are turning out in massive numbers and now have the support of country’s military, leaving the Egypt’s president, Mohammed Morsi, on the verge of being overthrown. With the dramatic developments to the story in Egypt, television networks undoubtedly had live coverage and analysis of the events taking place, right? Well, not really. As HuffPost’s Jack Mirkinson reports, MSNBC, Fox News and CNN were covering the George Zimmerman trial all day and showed very little of the conflict in Egypt. The trial had ended by the time Morsi gave a live address to attempt to save himself from being ousted. Instead of airing the speech, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews showed some footage of the protests before going to commercial, returning with a segment on Michelle Obama and Laura Bush. Fox News covered a story about the Facebook page of a 19-year-old. On CNN, Wolf Blitzer mentioned Morsi’s address and said the network was “monitoring” it, noting that something “historic” was happening in Egypt before focusing on the Zimmerman trial. CNN did have segments from Blitzer and Anderson Cooper on the uprising and MSNBC’s Chris Hayes was the lone anchor from his network to have extended coverage, devoting two segments to the conflict.

Why you should read it: You may have been one of the people forced to go online for updates on what was happening in Egypt.

 

Don’t plot me, bro — NPR and Buzzfeed recently tried to define what makes a bro. But Robert Charette, associate editor of the Washington Free Beacon, writes in a blog post that the two media organizations are themselves “not ‘bro.’” Charette credits NPR for their use of Venn diagrams to explain their bro theory, but criticizes Buzzfeed’s “X/Y Axis measuring between ‘high-brow’ and ‘low-brow’ and ‘mildly bro’ to ‘something-something-we’re-trying-way-to0-hard-bro.’ I made the last one up.” Whoa, bro. In fact, the X axis measures from “mildly bro” to “broier than cologne-flavored muscle milk” (well, Charette pretty much nailed it). Buzzfeed also in the chart, which shows books that bros supposedly read, labels bros as “hilariously overconfident dudes,” which Charette doesn’t appreciate. “Overconfident dudes make this nation great,” he argues after referencing Michael Jordan, Bill Gates and Bubba Watson. Charette also doesn’t appreciate the lack of context with the plotting of all the book titles, wondering what “makes The Great Gatsby ‘broier than cologne-flavored muscle milk.’” Charette said the ideal bro graphic would show that “bros either read ‘Bar Stool Sports,’ or ‘The Chive,’ or ‘Both Bar Stool Sports and the Chive.’” Don’t worry, bro, we made one that will make you proud. Just one question: is the Free Beacon anywhere on the radar of bros?

Why you should read it: Bro, besides standing up for true broism, it has not one, but two GIFs for your viewing pleasure.

Are you really an American? Read more

Fish Food

(A sprinkling of things we think you ought to know…)

Byers’ NYT story faces Twitter backlash– Politico media reporter Dylan Byerspiece on NYT Executive Editor Jill Abramson sparked a debate Wednesday on whether the story was sexist in nature. HuffPost‘s Jack Mirkinson wrote a story rounding up some of the negative reaction to it headlined, “Jill Abramson: ‘Very Unpopular’ Or Just Doing Her Job?” Byers’ story includes an insider account wherein Abramson snapped at an editor to leave in the middle of a meeting and change a photo that was on NYT‘s website. Editor-in-Chief of Guardian U.S. Janine Gibson mocked it. “Spent the first hour of the day apologising to [staff writer] Maraithe Thomas for that time I asked her to change the front page pic a bit brusquely,” she tweeted. “This is the most non-story, story I’ve read in a while,” tweeted CQ Roll Call‘s Emily Cahn, linking to Byers’ story. “People at any major, large company will complain about leader. If it affected quality, it’s a story. NYT won 4 Pulitzers…”

A Koch’d Los Angeles Times, isn’t necessarily a conservative Los Angeles Times– There’s buzz circulating that the conservative Koch brothers are considering purchasing several newspapers around the country, including the Los Angeles Times. Naturally, it has some journalists suspicious, including WaPo‘s Harold Meyerson, that the Times and the others will become out of control right-wing publications. Not so fast, says The Atlantic‘s Garance Franke-Ruta. “There are several reasons regional newspapers are an awkward fit for anyone looking to counter-program what they see as liberal bias in the news media,” she writes. “The main reason is that all major U.S. newspapers are based in cities.” Franke-Ruta argues that big newspapers are subject to the culture of the cities they’re based in. People who live in cities tend to be progressive, or at least comfortable with with the concept, and the papers, by geographical necessity, have to hire those people. The readers who buy the papers in those cities are no different. If the Times is suddenly an overtly conservative paper, will Los Angeles residents continue to buy it?

Does Fox News have a “new” anchor you’ve never heard of?– WaPo‘s Aaron Blake wrote an item Wednesday about an interview on Fox Business featuring Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.). The anchor of the segment was identified as “New Cavuto.” Who? Must be a new host. But a review of the clip shows it was actually longtime anchor Neil Cavuto. That’s unfortunate. A new, and perhaps improved, Cavuto may be just the thing the fledgling Fox Business channel needs. Maybe a “Neat Cavuto.” Or a “Notable Cavuto.” A “Noble Cavuto”? Just Neil for now.