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Posts Tagged ‘James Poniewozik’

All A-Twitter: Benghazi is The Gift that Keeps on Giving

Journos from across the political spectrum are taking to Twitter (again) to air their grievances with /sing the praises of David Kirkpatrick‘s NYT piece on what really happened in Benghazi on Sept 11, 2012.

 

 

 

More after the jump…

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What You Should Think, Nate Silver Edition

We’ve read a bunch of opinion pieces on Nate Silver this week, mostly so you don’t have to—because we know how much some of you hate him. The highlights:

You’re Fired!

NYT‘s Public Editor, Margaret Sullivan, wrote in a recent column that after praising Nate Silver, she was contacted by three “high-profile” political reporters at the paper “criticizing him and his work. They were also tough on me for seeming to endorse what he wrote, since I was suggesting that it get more visibility.” She thinks this is because Silver’s style of data-based journalism threatened the more… traditional way they covered politics. In other words, he made them feel irrelevant and they lashed out at Sullivan. Mother Jones’ Kevin Drum thinks this is a firing offense. “Even for those of us who are pretty cynical about political reporting, this is astonishing. If I were editor of the Times, I’d do whatever it took to find out who those three are, and then fire them instantly,” he says. Let’s see… fire a reporter who reacts badly out of an inflated sense of self-importance and ego. If that’s the standard, journalism could be in more trouble than we thought.

The Guy Who Doesn’t Get It, But Thinks He Does

David Hill‘s columns at The Hill are normally confounding, and this week’s on Silver is no exception. He spends a lot of time explaining how Silver will fail in his switch to ESPN for reason’s he can’t quite articulate, other than that “(l)ots of Web clicks, even millions of clicks, for a few months every four years does not qualify as mass media by most standards.” Really? Let’s be clear—Hill has absolutely no idea what Silver’s traffic at the Times is, or when. He’s speculating, and poorly. Scratch that, he’s just making stuff up to prove a point that seems to elude even him, facts or truth be damned. He says there isn’t enough interest out there for Silver to make it beyond his “15 minutes of fame at The New York Times,” (is Hill’s watch that slow?) and then tells us how he had the idea to exactly what Silver does “probably before Silver was born.” The kicker is Hill doesn’t seem to actually totally understand what Silver does—it’s statistics and probabilities and data modeling and that’s… science. So why would Hill, a Republican, take time to understand it? To top it off, this column follows one a few weeks back in which he calls big-data a “craze”  that threatens polling standards and then excoriates the Obama campaign for perceived ethical lapses in microtargeting voters. Nevermind Karl Rove pioneered microtargeting years earlier for Bush. Facts are not Hill’s strong point. Read more

In Memoriam: Michael Hastings

Michael Hastings, a writer for Buzzfeed and Rollling Stone best known for the career-ending profile of Gen. Stanely McChrystal, was killed yesterday in a car crash in Los Angeles.

News of Hasting’s death first came Tuesday afternoon from BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith, who posted a note on the site that said,”We are shocked and devastated by the news that Michael Hastings is gone.”

“Michael was a great, fearless journalist with an incredible instinct for the story, and a gift for finding ways to make his readers care about anything he covered from wars to politicians,” Smith said in his note. “He wrote stories that would otherwise have gone unwritten, and without him there are great stories that will go untold.”

Rolling Stone followed with an obituary a few minutes later.

Hastings’ hallmark as reporter was his refusal to cozy up to power. While other embedded reporters were charmed by McChrystal’s bad-boy bravado and might have excused his insubordination as a joke, Hastings was determined to expose the recklessness of a man leading what Hastings believed to be a reckless war.

Buzzfeed has a full story about Hastings here, there are tributes from the Buzzfeed staff here and finally, a collection of remembrances from other journalists, here.

Read on for a selection:

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WTF? With Matt Lewis

If for nothing else, the unpredictable musings of Matthew Lewis in his twice-weekly column at The Week can get people talking. But what’s he saying?

Lewis, who is Christian, writes in his column Friday that national newsrooms “should at least have a few journalists hanging around who share — or at least, aren’t hostile to — the Christian faith.” He says it would help the newsrooms “understand America,” where most people identify as Christians. A recent obituary of a former NYT reporter who was Christian and reports on a Philadelphia doctor’s extreme abortion practices inspired Lewis’ column.

Lack of diversity in the news industry is well documented, whether on race, sexuality, gender or religion. But what’s often missing is an explanation as to why an increase in diversity would lead media outlets to “understand America.” Would more Christians in a newsroom lead to different story selection? Would a Christian reporter’s story on the stock market have a different perspective than a reporter who considers himself more secular or even Jewish? What about Muslim? It’s possible to be both Christian and live a secular life in the workplace, which is something Lewis doesn’t acknowledge in the piece. So why more Christians?

“Too many Jews?” asked Gawker‘s John Cook on Twitter. “Because there are too many non-Christians?” asked Politico‘s Glenn Thrush. “I love these periodic calls for affirmative action for the religious majority,” tweeted The Atlantic‘s Garance Franke-Ruta.

“I never said newsrooms shouldn’t be diverse,” Lewis defended himself to FishbowlDC. “I’m actually making an argument in favor of diversity.”

Lewis told FishbowlDC a Christian perspective is Read more

Time’s Cover: The Taliban (Inside: ‘Family Guy’ Smacks Down Palin)

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Time magazine’s cover story this week deals with Taking on the Taliban. But inside, Time’s James Poniewozik takes on former V.P. hopeful Sarah Palin’s war with ‘Family Guy’. The author points out the show’s counterattack on Palin. What’s more, a cartoon picture gives the former Alaskan governor a black eye.

Sunday Show Notes: Obama and Fox

As we’re sure you’ve already heard, President Obama will make an unprecedented five Sunday show appearances this week- ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Univision. Noticeably missing is “Fox News Sunday.”

Time‘s TV critic James Poniewozik blogs:

You may have noticed, by the way, the one notable omission from his schedule: Fox News. I think this is a mistake. The perception may be that Fox is a nest of Obama-haters whose audience is monolithically opposed to him, but I think he would only benefit from being perceived to have the stones to do Fox and do it regularly. His campaign interview with Bill O’Reilly was tough-and it was the best interview he gave in the whole campaign cycle.

As I said then, “The fact remains that – according to Pew Research – over half of Fox News’ audience members are Democrats or Independents. Their votes are legitimate, whether Fox News is or not. And to continue to freeze out Fox would go against one of Obama’s most consistent messages: that people are sick of red-vs.-blue America divisions and that we should be able to talk with people who disagree with us.” I’m sticking by that.

We’ll open it to a vote…

Skipping “Fox News Sunday”(opinion)

On a related note… Fox News’ Neil Cavuto on cable yesterday (via TVNewser): “I’m here to tell you, Mr. President, it’s ok. I’m ok. But this ain’t sitting well with other broadcasters you are leaving out. You didn’t hear it from me, Mr. President, but I’m told the folks at ESPN are furious. ESPN-2, too, and the the Speed Channel…”

Cavuto used a clip from the children’s channel Sprout, saying, “they’ve reduced themselves to begging.” “Not here, Mr. President, we’re too classy for that sort of thing. We don’t beg,” said Cavuto.

Morning Reading List 09.14.09

Good morning FishbowlDC! Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Congratulations to WaPo‘s Ed O’Keefe who married Valerie Hallow this weekend. What know and what we’re reading this Monday morning…

TV | ONLINE | MAGAZINES | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

TV

Upcoming TV interviews (via Playbook): The President sits down with Bloomberg News and CNBC’s John Harwood. Christina Romer, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, is doing the financial and news cable channels right after the speech from Wall Street. The CEA’s Austan Goolsbee pre-taped a “Morning Joe” interview yesterday. Treasury Secretary Geithner is sitting down with Katie Couric, anchor and managing editor of the “CBS Evening News,” and ABC’s Diane Sawyer, for “Good Morning America,” to air tomorrow.

Steve Kroft‘s interview with President Obama aired on last night’s “60 Minutes.”

Tonight’s Jay Leno‘s prime time debut on NBC.

“Even if the Leno show fails, this still points to the way the future of television is changing… Audiences are smaller and smaller in television.” -Time‘s James Poniewozik on CNN’s “Reliable Sources” yesterday.

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” is on the west coast this week. Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough pretaped today’s show from the Ronald Reagan Library with Nancy Reagan, Pat Buchanan and a live studio audience.

ONLINE

Unauthorized pop-ups on NYTimes.com.

MAGAZINES

With hope to make some money, Newsweek is changing its subscription policy.

NEWS NOTES

WaPo‘s Howard Kurtz and Paul Duggan‘s take on the CNN coast guard debacle on Friday. “The “news,” such as it was, quickly hit the media echo chamber.”

And Dana Milbank‘s take.

Related? AP: Nearly two-thirds of Americans think the news stories they read, hear and watch are frequently inaccurate, according to a poll released Sunday by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. That marks the highest level of skepticism recorded since 1985, when this study of public perceptions of the media was first done.

Tom Ricks and the military’s new philosophical embeds in CJR: The doctrine of counterinsurgency has received almost uniformly positive press coverage, at times making it appear to be the only possible avenue for the U.S. military, and in the process that coverage has cast it in the most positive light.

And Newsweek‘s Jon Meacham in NYT: Our Reporter, Ahmadinejad’s Prisoner.

WEST WING REPORTAGE

“I spent all day… working the phones, pestering, cajoling, asking as many questions as possible and they really did not have much detail.” -WaPo‘s Ceci Connolly on difficulties in dealing with administration officials on the health care plan on Sunday’s “Reliable Sources” on CNN. Connolly made the Sunday show rounds- she also appeared on the “Chris Matthews Show.”

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, TVNewser, Politico, Daniel Lippman

Sunday Show Preview

NBC’s Meet the Press: Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), former DNC Chairman Howard Dean, and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA) and a roundtable with CNBC’s Erin Burnett, author Joshua Cooper Ramo and NBC’s Chuck Todd

CBS’ Face the Nation: Senior White House advisor David Axelrod, Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-ME), syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker and Politico‘s Roger Simon

ABC’s This Week: HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA), Governor Tim Pawlenty (R-MN) and a roundtable with ABC’s George Will, Cokie Roberts, Sam Donaldson and NYT‘s David Brooks

Fox News Sunday: Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC), Sen. Kent Conrad (D-ND), Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Service Employees International Union President Andy Stern and a panel with Fox News’ Brit Hume and Fox News’ contributors NPR’s Mara Liasson, Weekly Standard‘s Bill Kristol and NPR’s Juan Williams

CNN’s State of the Union: White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs, Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Democratic strategist and CNN political contributor Donna Brazile, former RNC Chairman and former White House counselor Ed Gillespie and Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA)

CNN’s Reliable Sources with Howard Kurtz: WaPo‘s Ceci Connolly, Christian Broadcasting Network’s David Brody, NYT Book Review’s Sam Tanenhaus, Air America’s Ana Marie Cox, Washington Examiner‘s Chris Stirewalt, TVNewser’s Gail Shister and Time‘s television critic James Poniewozik

CNN’s GPS with Fareed Zakaria: Afghan presidential candidates Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani, former Afghan Diplomat Masood Aziz, “The Places In Between” author Rory Stewart, “Limits of Power” author Andrew Bacevich and WSJ‘s Bret Stephens

NBC’s The Chris Matthews Show: Time‘s Joe Klein, NYT‘s Helene Cooper, Newsweek‘s Howard Fineman and WaPo‘s Ceci Connolly

Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and National Journal: NYT‘s Peter Baker, AP’s Charles Babington, USA Today‘s Joan Biskupic and LAT‘s Doyle McManus

Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) and Bloomberg’s Hans Nichols, Kristin Jensen, Rich Miller, Margaret Carlson and Kate O’Beirne

Will update as we learn them.

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Obama supporter Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA), Clinton supporter Gov. Ed Rendell (D-PA) and Tom Brokaw, Michael Eric Dyson and Amb. Andrew Young.

  • Face the Nation: Howard Dean, The Washington Post National Editor Rajiv Chandrasekaran, McClatchy Newspapers Chief Pentagon Correspondent Nancy Youssef and CBS News Chief Foreign Correspondent Lara Logan.

  • This Week: Dean and Sens. Jim Webb and Lindsey Graham and a roundtable with The Nation’s Katrina vanden Heuvel, Republican strategist Dan Senor, and ABC News’ Cokie Roberts and George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Sens. John McCain and John Kerry, and a panel with Brit Hume, Washington managing editor of FOX News; Mara Liasson of National Public Radio; Bill Kristol of the Weekly Standard, and Juan Williams of National Public Radio. The Power Player is Newseum executive director Joe Urschel.

  • Late Edition: Clinton supporter Rep. John Murtha, Obama supporter Sen. Christopher Dodd, and Sens. Dick Durbin and John Cornyn, and Rev. David O’Connell, Catholic University President. A roundtable with CNN’s Ed Henry, Candy Crowley, and Bill Schneider.

  • Chris Matthews Show: NBC’s Ron Allen, BBC’s Katty Kay, The Atlantic’s Andrew Sullivan, U.S. News & World Report’s Gloria Borger

  • Reliable Sources: Townhall.com’s Mary Katharine Ham, Chicago Tribune’s Clarence Page, Politico’s James Kotecki, Time’s James Poniewozik, St. Petersburg Times’ Eric Deggans, Buzzmachine.com’s Jeff Jarvis

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Cardinal Francis George, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, President, will be interviewed by Jay Tolson, U.S. News & World Report, Senior Writer & Cathy Lynn Grossman, USA Today

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN)

  • This is America: Roger Wilkins, Deborah Simmons of the Washington Times, Jabari Asim of the NAACP’s Crisis magazine, Michelle Bernard of the Independent Women’s Forum, Rev. Dr. Morris L. Shearin Sr. of the Israel Baptist Church, and Fath Davis Ruffins of the Smithsonian Institution.

    Note: The guest lists for Tim Russert and CN8′s Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham were unavailable.

  • Morning Reading List, 02.08.08

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    Good morning Washington. Is the writer’s strike really over?

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • It’s close, but you think David Brooks would win in a street fight against Bill Kristol.

    REVOLVING DOOR

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • His Extreme-ness on the Weymouth hotness.

  • EWA reports, “The National Education Writers Association has ventured into new territory with the hiring of former Washington Post reporter Linda Perlstein as its newly created Public Editor.”

  • The New York Times reports, “In just the last few weeks, The San Diego Union-Tribune eliminated more than 100 jobs, one-tenth of its work force. The Chicago Sun-Times began a major round of newsroom layoffs, then put itself up for sale, and publishers in Minneapolis and Philadelphia warned that tough economics could force cuts there. Some major newpapers have several times as many readers online as in print, but grim financial reports have forced the papers to downsize.
    Not long ago, news like that would have drawn much commentary and hand-wringing in the newspaper business, but in the last few months, reductions have become so routine that they barely make a ripple outside each paper’s hometown. Since mid-2007, major downsizing — often coupled with grim financial reports — has been imposed at The San Francisco Chronicle, The Seattle Times, The San Jose Mercury News, USA Today and many others.”

  • MergersUnleashed.com reports,Randy Michaels, who late last year was tapped to be the Tribune Co.’s Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of broadcasting and interactive properties, will be elevated to CEO of the entire company, according to a source familiar with the Chicago-based media conglomerate.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Public interest in economic news remained high last week as 40% of Americans followed news about the condition of the U.S. economy very closely. The economy has also become the dominant issue in the presidential campaign – when asked to name the one issue they have heard the most about from the candidates recently, 29% name the economy. While public interest in economic news is growing, the media remains mainly on the campaign.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “The streamlining of Tribune Co. corporate operations that billionaire Sam Zell promised when he assumed control in December has begun with a string of layoffs this week. Around a dozen employees in the Chicago-based media concern’s human resources department were informed their positions at Tribune Tower are being eliminated, according to sources.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “The New York Times’s op-ed section has been catching a lot of flak of late over everything from the hiring of intellectually-threadbare neoconservative Bill Kristol to Maureen Dowd’s dateline sleight-of-hand to Roger Cohen’s general suckiness. So I figured it was time to say something nice for a change. Fortunately, there’s Gail Collins.”

  • Is Philip Seib, a professor of journalism at the University of Southern California, a Politico advertiser? In the Baltimore Sun, Seib said “his focus this election year has shifted to Web sites like Politico.com. ‘I am spending more and more time with my computer,” Seib says. “It is hard to find anything on TV that can compare with the kind of analysis of vote totals offered at Politico.com.’”

  • E&P reports, “The clear focus on editorial pages is the promotion of ideas and views and, of course, opinion. Some want newspapers to quit backing candidates, but these choices are among the most valid of those opinions and, for many readers, instructive or even nececessary.”

  • Financial Times gets James Woods’ take on living in DC.

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    TV

  • Reporting the Breaking News, Without A Camera

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 3, 2008. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.231 million total viewers”

  • TVNewser reports, “Romney Out: FNC is First, With The Source”

  • FNC Puts McCain In the Democratic Party

  • A release announced, “American Women in Radio & Television (AWRT) is pleased to announce that the recipient of the 2008 AWRT International Outreach Award is international journalist and author Mariane Pearl.”

  • AJC.com reports, “Super Tuesday? Try the nightly combat between CNN, the Fox News Channel and MSNBC. A month ago, CNN finally whupped long-time cable news leader Fox News Channel, edging out its arch rivals in the New Hampshire primary coverage.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “During February 5th’s Super Tuesday presidential primaries and caucuses, web and mobile users turned to ABC News’ digital platforms for up-to-the-minute news and analysis. On Super Tuesday, ABC News Digital garnered all-time highs in traffic across all platforms continuing its record-breaking growth in January.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup February Meetup is scheduled for Wednesday, February 20 at 7:00PM. Mark those calendars!

  • VentureBeat.com reports, “Search engine Ask.com has launched a new area of their site called Ask BigNews which combines news aggregation with elements of social news site Digg. Ask Big News describes itself as ‘a search and browse service that helps you find and track the most important and most talked about stories in the news.’”

  • AP reports, “AOL had its slowest quarter of advertising growth since beginning its ambitious transformation into an ad-focused Internet business, increasing uncertainty about AOL’s future especially as Microsoft Corp. boosts its ambitions in the same arena.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Chief Executive Barry Diller said Wednesday he doubted he would be interested in buying Time Warner Inc.’s (TWX) AOL Internet portal unless it was reduced to a ‘ridiculous’ price.”

  • Wired reports, “Last year, there were a couple of articles about a back channel love-fest between senator Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and Matt Drudge. But it seems that Drudge still isn’t beyond posting mean-spirited items online about the senator, and now in multi-media dimensions. Yesterday, Drudge posted this footage of Clinton on YouTube suffering from a coughing fit, and it quickly became the most viewed item, garnering more than 300,000 views overnight.”

  • Google News reports, “Something you already know about Google News is that we crawl thousands of sources from around the world. This means you get as many different perspectives on a story from many perspectives. A while back, we started thinking about how to bring this same diversity of sources to local news, so that “local” doesn’t necessarily mean ‘limited’. Today we’re releasing a new feature to find your local news by simply typing in a city name or zip code. While we’re not the first news site to aggregate local news, we’re doing it a bit differently — we’re able to create a local section for any city, state or country in the world and include thousands of sources. We’re not simply looking at the byline or the source, but instead we analyze every word in every story to understand what location the news is about and where the source is located.”

  • TextandIdeas.com reports,Bill Adair is one of the lucky ones. His bosses at the St. Petersburg Times let him experiment with a new way of delivering news and do it full time, he told me in a recent e-mail Q&A. Adair founded PolitiFact.com and runs it with a small staff of writers and fact checkers from the St. Pete Times and its sister publication, Congressional Quarterly. Not only do they check the claims of candidates running for president, but they rate the truthfulness of those claims on a scale from ‘True’ to ‘Pants-on-fire.’”

  • Check out The Prince of Petworth’s profile of The Washington City Paper’s Angela Valdez.

  • Check out the newest member of the Wonkette team.

  • Poynter Online reports, “As many newspapers continue to falter financially, the quest for a new business model to support journalism continues. The Jan. 29 episode of American Public Media’s Future Tense explored a controversial option: direct or indirect government subsidies to prop up newspapers.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • “Over the years, Washingtonian has written profiles about nearly every important political candidate in this year’s presidential race. Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite political articles.”

  • Time’s James Poniewozik writes, “Writing about election coverage, I have disclosed, probably to the point of tediousness, that I voted for Obama. I think it’s a good thing for you to know, but I really do it for me. It’s important to me that I have enough perspective to critique campaign coverage whether it works for my candidate or against him. Having you know more about where I’m coming from helps you keep me honest and forces me to police myself.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Beginning Feb. 11, 2008, WAMU 88.5′s The Kojo Nnamdi Show will join XM Radio as part of the satellite radio service’s line-up for ‘The Power’ (XM Channel 169), the nation’s only 24-hour radio channel exclusively dedicated to African-American talk programming. The Kojo Nnamdi Show will air at 7 p.m., and 11 p.m., weekdays on ‘The Power.’”

  • Also, “WAMU 88.5 will broadcast live coverage of the Virginia, Maryland, and District of Columbia presidential primaries at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2008. Kojo Nnamdi, host of The Kojo Nnamdi Show, and WAMU 88.5 News Director Jim Asendio will co-host the program. Jonetta Rose Barras, political analyst for The Politics Hour with Kojo and Jonetta, will provide in-studio analysis and commentary. WAMU 88.5 news reporters will contribute live field reports from polling sites throughout the region.”

  • Public Radio reports, “The number of people turning to the Internet for campaign coverage has tripled since 2000. While the Web still lags television in viewership and ad revenue, it’s making some big gains as a source of political coverage.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

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    JOBS

  • Sister 2 Sister magazine is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Publisher, Governing Magazine.

  • The Gazette is looking for a Reporter.

  • Warren Communications News is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • The Roanoke Times is looking for an Editorial Writer.

  • Environment & Energy Publishing, LLC is seeking a copy editor.

  • Urban Land Institute is looking for an Associate, Virtual ULI

  • BIPAC is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The Carnegie Endowment is looking for a Communications/Web Coordinator.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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