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Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Bercovici’

Morning Reading List 12.22.10

*Bob Ennis, the ex-hubby in Sunday’s scandalous NYT “Vows” story, opens up to Politics Daily‘s Annie Groer. He blasts the NYT and said he feared the damaging effects it could have on his children. The groom, meanwhile, says if he knew how much trouble the story (on leaving their spouses to marry family friends) would cause, they wouldn’t have done it (the story, that is). Hindsight is so 20/20. Read Groer’s story here. Forbes.com’s Jeff Bercovici also had a story interviewing Ennis. He said the NYT never contacted him about putting his 7-year-old daughter’s mug in the paper. He also told Forbes.com that the real story here isn’t the alleged cheating and lying but rather the NYT giving their actions a “megaphone.”

*It feels like forever until we learn the answer to Mother Jones Bureau Chief’s David Corn‘s question this morning asking if we’ll ever see Sarah Palin‘s e-mails. “A group of journalists, including myself, have been trying for two years to win access, under Alaska’s open records law, to emails Palin sent and received during her partial stint as governor of Alaska,” he wrote. The answer: The emails may not be disclosed before the 2012 presidential election. Want to know the wonky details in between? Read Corn’s story here. Not to be missed: his dangerous-looking comic book blue-hued picture.

*If you haven’t seen it, this well-choreographed video of ABC Diane Sawyer‘s birthday celebration is a must see. She laughs. She cries. Or something in between. We hear she sent a note to all involved calling it “the most surprising, glorious, and stupefying sight in my long life.” Reporters stationed all over the globe sing and dance, including those in Washington such as ABC White House Correspondent Jake Tapper who does something we think is singing.

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“HuffPo” Prefers More Formal “HuffPost”

huffpo-9.jpeg HuffPo prefers that people now use the moniker “HuffPost” to “HuffPo”. Just hearing it, the suggestion sounds snooty.

It’s like trying to move from Howie back to Howard (as in WaPo’s Kurtz) or from Barack to Barry and back to Barack (as in President Obama). Other jarring examples: Archy to Archibald, Arty to Arthur, Ben to Benedict.

Eliminating an abbreviated version of a name once it’s out there is a virtual impossibility, but The Huffington Post is trying to shake the realities of online writing and propensity to keep things short and snappy.

“HuffPost is now more commonly used than HuffPo,” said, ahem, a HuffPo spokesman familiar with the matter.

In a recent story in Daily Finance, writer Jeff Bercovici mentions the nickname issue, saying “HuffPo (the site prefers to call itself HuffPost, but everyone else uses the shorter version).” Bercovici, ignoring HuffPo’s desires, continuously calls the site “HuffPo” throughout his story.

Even Wikipedia (no, not always to be trusted) declares: “The Huffington Post (often referred to as HuffPo)”. Other media writers and outlets that refer to The Huffington Post as “HuffPo” include: Twitter; Wonkette, Politico’s Media Columnist Michael Calderone. Kurtz uses the ultra-formal “The Huffington Post.”

And even “HuffPo” still occasionally uses “HuffPo” on its site.

Which, of course, presents FishbowlDC with a mind-numbing decision to make – shall we say HuffPo as usual or use the more formal sounding HuffPost?

It’s a tough call. Pure agony.

Portfolio Folds

Conde Nast Portfolio is closing. Jeff Bercovici writes on the Portfolio blog:

Our editor in chief, Joanne Lipman, just broke the news to staff, saying the decision had been made “because of financial reasons at Advance,” Conde Nast’s parent company. “It’s not anything that the company wanted to do.” She said she was informed by Conde Nast chairman S.I. Newhouse Jr. this morning of the decision.

See the post here.

Ta Ta Turk Unit

A tipster tells FishbowlDC that, yesterday morning, CNN parted ways with its CNN Turk Unit, which was based out of DC.

Related: Portfolio’s Jeff Bercovici reports on more cuts at CNN.

More Matthews…

Portfolio’s Jeff Bercovici:

    Matthews is a jerk. And while being a jerk is sometimes a useful journalistic tool, Matthews is a jerk for no reason; he doesn’t seem to get the distinction between adversarial, which every journalist should be, and being combative. When Matthews brags about how “independent” he is, what he means is that he’s obnoxious to both sides.

Also, Matthews breaks some news in this TV Guide interview. He says that “three different people” from Vice President Dick Cheney’s office tried to silence him and Matthews adds that even “Hardball”‘s young bookers and producers have felt the heat at times.

Morning Reading List, 08.29.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • If Imus returns, you are not interested.

  • An NBC release announced, “MSNBC’s ratings growth continued this
    summer, as the network delivered the strongest growth of any cable news net in August in total day (M-Sun), weekday primetime (8-11 pm) and in sales primetime (M-Sun 7pm-2am) in both total viewers and the Adult 25-54 demographic, compared to August 06.”

  • MSNBC, HLN Up Double Digits

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54 for the seventeenth time in eighteen weeks. Averaging 8.08 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/9 among Adults 25-54, ‘World News’ outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 150,000 Total Viewers and 140,000 key demo viewers.”

  • Lance Armstrong to Chris Matthews: “Thanks for finally letting me ask a question. At least I had cancer.”

  • Check out Paul Farhi’s online chat yesterday (he discusses the death of Washington Post Radio).

  • Congrats to Patrick O’Connor , who was named by the Politico as Employee of the Month.

  • A GWU release announced, “Katie Couric, anchor and managing editor of The CBS Evening News with Katie Couric, will join veteran journalist and scholar Marvin Kalb to discuss democracy and the press in the first installment of the 2007-2008 Kalb Report series, produced by The George Washington University, Harvard’s Joan Shorenstein Center, and the National Press Club and underwritten by a grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.”

  • I Want Media features an interview with Mark Deuze, the author of the new book “Media Work.”

  • Portfolio’s Jeff Bercovici writes, “The Nation’s Eric Alterman isn’t stupid, but apparently he doesn’t mind playing stupid when he has a point to make.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Of all the disruptions caused by the Web, the chance that an old New York Times story featuring incomplete or outdated bad news about you might nix your chance of getting a job must rank near the bottom. Yet that’s what Clark Hoyt, the newspaper’s public editor, spends his Sunday, Aug. 26, column on.”

  • San Francisco’s Jon Carroll writes, “A while back I expressed some doubt about whether Mother Jones could be an effective magazine with two editors. …Anyway, that was all theory. Now we have had a look at the practice, and oh boy, was I wrong. Mother Jones right now is as good as I’ve ever seen it. I’m not sure what they’re doing right, but they should keep at it.”

  • CNSNews.com reports, “A Catholic group is criticizing at least two dozen newspapers, including The Washington Post, for refusing to run a cartoon last Sunday that may offend Muslims.”

  • From Politico’s Ben Smith: “Wikiscanner: The DLC edits itself”

  • From Ad Age.com: “In an Effort to Better Connect With America’s Youth, Media Guy Enterprises Is Rebranding Itself as a Musical”

  • Media Daily News reports, “Nielsen Finds Drop In TV Usage Is Real, Not Methodological, Impact Greatest Among Heavy Viewers”

  • Media Space Solutions has a three-part plan for the top 10 newspaper websites.

  • B&C reports, “Marvin Kitman, former Newsday TV critic, has officially joined the online community as the TV critic for The Huffington Post.”

  • Min Online reports, “Many consumer sites took a dive in June as Webiziens embarked on their traditional flight away from their LCDs and keyboards.”

  • CNN’s Media Biz reports, “While the Dow has fallen 4 percent since mid-July, shares of my parent company Time Warner (TWX) are down 8 percent. And shares of CBS (CBS), Viacom (VIAB) and News Corp. (NWS) are off 9 percent. Disney (DIS) has been the best media stock performer, falling only 2 percent.”

  • Times Online reports, “After a troubled start, the US version of OK! is flying high. In a crowded, celebrity-obsessed magazine market OK! has grown 54.3% in the past year, according to the Media Industry News-letter (Min), and is selling more than 850,000 copies a week.”

  • The new Digg homepage went live on Monday.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Sony Corp.’s ‘Superbad’ pushed Hollywood’s U.S. summer box-office sales to a record $4 billion this past weekend, surpassing the industry’s previous high established in 2004.”
  • Media Week reports, “Fox Television Stations Monday got into the game to dominate high school sports coverage with the launch of Foxhilites.com in the 23 cities where it owns and operates a TV station.”

    Jobs

  • Northwestern University is looking for a faculty member for Public Affairs Journalism.

  • From Ed2010: An unpaid fall editorial intern position is available at national, monthly, entertainment print magazine for African-American women. Send resumes and cover letters to Sabrina Parker, sabrinas2s@aol.com by August 31.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for a Director of Content Management, an Associate Director, PBS Interactive Elections Initiatives, an Associate Director, Content & Video, a Project Coordinator, The Ready To Learn initiative and an Assistant Director, PBS Parents & Teachers Interactive.

  • PBS is also looking for a Senior Producer for television.

  • SNL Financial is looking for a Project Manager.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for a Research Associate.

  • The Daily Press is looking for a Page Designer/Copy Editor and a Shipyard Reporter.

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for a Transportation Reporter and an Energy Policy Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext