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Posts Tagged ‘Jeffrey Bewkes’

Morning Reading List, 03.13.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Donald Duck’s birthday!

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you do not know someone who has hired a prostitute before.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Chicago Tribune reports,Lee Abrams, who is credited with inventing FM radio’s album rock format and with giving Howard Stern and Steve Dahl their first major market jobs, has left XM Satellite Radio to become Chief Innovation Officer for Chicago-based Tribune Co., it was announced today.”

  • Neil Adler has left the Washington Business Journal to start up a new media public relations firm with his brother and a friend. His new company is D*MN Good LLC, a creative agency in D.C.

  • The Washington Times has made some internal moves. Maria Stainer is moving from Features to become the new Assistant Managing Editor for Continuous News. Danny Wattenberg is replacing Stainer as Assistant Managing Editor for Features.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Ralph E. Hanson reports, “Former USA Today reporter and current WVU journalism professor Toni Locy has won a temporary reprieve from thousands of dollars of fines being levied against her for refusing to identify the sources who spoke to her about former Army scientist Steven Hatfill. According to USA Today, a three-judge federal appeals court blocked the lower court’s fines as Locy pursues an appeal of a contempt order designed to force her to testify as to who her sources were. The fines were to start out at $500 a day, growing from there to $1,000 and eventually $5,000 a day; the fines were set to begin Tuesday.”

  • McCain to media: Let’s stay together

  • The Deal reports, “New York Times Co. CEO Janet Robinson said at a Bear Stearns Conference Tuesday that the company is unlikely to sell The Boston Globe or its stake in the Boston Red Sox. ‘The regionals took many steps to reduce their cost structure, and they will do so this year. There are a number of competitive companies in the market, and they are not selling in this difficult climate,’ she said. ‘We believe that the Red Sox have performed very well,’ she added.”

  • Don’t forget that the America and the World 2008 panel discussion is tonight at the Press Club. For more info, click here.

  • Making Sausage: A Reporter’s Emails

  • How dare they! Express slaps Tucker.

  • Spitzer’s media enablers.”

  • Mark Hemingway thinks that some reporters really had it tough when researching the Spitzer story.

  • The National Archives is hosting a Public Interest Declassification Board Meeting on March 17 to solicit public reaction to its recent Report, “Improving Declassification.” The meeting will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at the National Archives and Records Administration, Jefferson Conference Room.

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    TV

  • A release announced, “Smithsonian Channel continues to increase its distribution with the announcement today of a High Definition
    (HD) carriage agreement with RCN Corporation (NASDAQ: RCNI), a broadband, facilities-based competitive telecommunications provider that delivers video, high-speed data, and voice services to residential and small-medium business customers and high-capacity data transport and voice services to large commercial customers”

  • Happy 70th Birthday to CBS’s World News Roundup. Check out the first Roundup ever from from March 13, 1938 here.

  • Why Is Managing NPR So Damn Difficult?”

  • Reuters reports, “An unexpectedly long presidential primary season has helped CBS Corp. avoid the worst of U.S. economic doldrums, Chief Executive Les Moonves told analysts on Tuesday.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Nielsen will offer a new service that uses cable set-top boxes to shed light on people’s TV-viewing habits. Nielsen has long dominated the U.S. television business with its panel-based ratings. But for the past two years, competitors such as TiVo, TNS and others have begun to chip away at that dominance by packaging second-by-second viewing of TV programs and ads from set-top-box data, something Nielsen has lacked.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Do you know your news IQ? Check out the Pew News IQ test.

  • A release announced, “Reporters Without Borders is making a new version of its Handbook for Bloggers and Cyber-Dissidents available to bloggers today to mark Online Free Expression Day.” Check out the report here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Bewkes, who took the helm of the world’s largest media company on Jan. 1, left open the possibility of a merger for its AOL Internet unit.”

  • The AP reports, “The CEO of The New York Times Co. said Tuesday that the company has an ‘absolute priority’ on expanding its operations online as a large shareholder is stepping up pressure on the Times to do even more.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Crain’s New York Business reports, “Magazine publishers are once again trying to wean media buyers from circulation models to new models that measure their success based on audience engagement. On Tuesday, following a year of discussions between magazine executives from Hachette, Meredith, TV Guide, Time Inc., and others, the Magazine Publishers of America (MPA) and consultants McKinsey & Co., the MPA announced a new initiative to introduce readership metrics that are closer to TV, radio and Web than current circ-based measurements.”

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    JOBS

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Reporter.

  • The Baltimore Sun is looking for a Web Producer.

  • 1105 Media, Inc. is looking for a Reporter, Technology Trade Publication.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Editor.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Producer, Arts and Living.

  • Society of American Florists is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • Pew Research Center is looking for a Communications Associate.

  • CATO Institute is looking for a Marketing Coordinator.

  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is looking for a Marketing Communications Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Freelancing 101

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    Morning Reading List, 11.09.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Pricey shampoos are your thing.

  • Can you answer this week’s CQ Political Trivia?

  • The Associated Press reports, “Newspaper publisher Lee Enterprises Inc. said Thursday its fourth-quarter profit nearly doubled versus a year ago with much of the gain attributed to one-time benefits of tax changes and other issues.”

  • We knew we were forgetting something. John Kelly tells us that yesterday was Journalist Day.

  • McClatchy again hit by setbacks.

  • The 2007 Weblog Awards announced…with the Extreme-ness taking a bronze!

  • Wonkette: “WaPo Repressing Horrible Headline Word Choice

  • FEMA Press Secretary Directed Fake News Briefing, Inquiry Finds

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “Time Warner must focus on being ‘the most profitable, not the biggest’ entertainment company, and his team must concentrate on boosting the stock ‘now,’ CEO designate Jeffrey Bewkes said here Wednesday in his first public appearance since being tapped for the promotion.”

  • Rachel Sklar says, “Goodbye my Finger Bowl.”

  • Digital Drives Discovery Results

  • David Westin’s ABC News Re-Org Continues

  • Stars and Stripes Ombudsman: “ASY arrangement threatened Stripes’ objectivity

  • Confederate Yankee reports, “At least two of the leading advertisers for The New Republic are reconsidering their advertising relationships with the magazine in the wake of the magazines handling of the Scott Beauchamp “Shock Troop” scandal.”

  • FT.com reports, “Warner Bros has signalled its intention of expanding more aggressively into the video games industry with the acquisition of TT Games, the UK publisher of the LEGO Star Wars series which has sold 12m copies around the world.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “You might expect a former studio chief like Michael Eisner to side with the studios over the current writers strike, and you would be very right. Speaking at the Dow Jones/Nielsen Media and Money conference this morning, the ex-Disney honcho called the Writers Guild work stoppage ‘stupid,’ ‘misguided’ and ‘insanity.’

  • Another FEMA Official Leaves In Wake of Scandal

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Three days in, the writers strike is hitting television hard as schedules are being juggled, overall deals suspended, production on series shut down and layoffs kick in.”

  • New York Post reports, “NBC may be trying to claw its way out of the prime-time TV ratings cellar, but that’s not stopping the network’s party-hearty new savior, Ben Silverman, from praising himself and bashing the top dogs at rivals ABC and FOX.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, said first-quarter profit fell 13 percent from a year earlier, when a gain from the sale of investments boosted results. Sales topped analysts’ estimates.”

  • RumorMonger reports, “Digg is close to announcing its sale to a major media player for $300 million to $400 million, according to sources close to the company, I hear.”

  • Reuters reports, “Digital video recorder company TiVo Inc is offering a new service giving advertisers detailed profiles of its users, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday in its online edition.”

  • B&C reports, “On the News Corp. earnings conference call Wednesday, president and chief operating officer Peter Chernin said, ‘A strike is probably a positive for the company.’”

    Jobs

  • International Justice Mission is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.10.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Overwhelmingly, Joe Biden is your Democratic candidate of choice.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of October 1-5, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54. Averaging 7.57 million Total Viewers and a 1.9/8 among Adults 25-54, the ABC broadcast outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 110,000 Total Viewers and 260,000 key demo viewers. This marks ABC’s largest demo advantage over NBC in two months (week of July 30, 2007).”

  • It can’t be long before Mike Allen drops an LOL or OMG. From today’s Playbook: “One key producer even told Playbook that Romney looked ‘sexy’ during the debate. Whatever.”

  • Hotline’s Maura O’Brien took over as Wake-Up Call Associate Editor on Tuesday.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media asks, “Can the success of an ultra-partisan pressure group possibly be a good thing for objective journalism? My answer is yes. The group I have in mind is Media Matters , which has got conservative panties in a bunch after recent campaigns against Rush Limbaugh, Bill O’Reilly and Don Imus.”

  • The Horse’s Mouth reports, “I just got off the phone with former Ambassador Joe Wilson, and in our conversation he angrily disputed Robert Novak’s latest assertion about the outing of his CIA operative wife, adding that if the columnist isn’t going to confession, ‘he’s going straight to Hell.’”

  • TVNewser reports that CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo is one busy “Money Honey”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell takes on “Sex, Blood and Advertising”

  • How often does Morning Joe get confused with “skinamax”? At least once. TVNewser reports.

  • CQ announced some new changes this week, with mobile e-mail alerts and an enhanced story page. To check out the new changes, click here.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Journalistic websites see amateur scribes as partners, not rivals. They increase coverage and may share revenue.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Younger Demos Shift Focus From TV Screens to YouTube”

  • From AJR: “Newspapers are paying the price for shortsighted thinking.”

  • Whoops. Turns out C-SPAN Radio’s 10th birthday is not September 14, but October 9. Happy Birthday!

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Fox News President Roger Ailes outs his boss as a Republican-hater.”

  • Confederate Yankee reports, “For reasons as yet unknown, Memeorandum.com dredged up a Josh Marshall entry on Talking Points Memo from August 10 this past Sunday afternoon. Marshall cited a subscribers-only post by the editors of The New Republic released the same day, captured in its entirety by Google’s cache.” Check it out here.

  • Jeffrey Toobin chats with NPR about the new SCOTUS term. Check it out here.

  • American Thinker reports, “In what may be a preview of coming attractions in the newspaper business, Movie Gallery, the largest retail DVD rental operator has filed a prepackaged Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition.”

  • The Century Foundation reports, “ABC News executives have done something that should gladden the most hardened pessimist about the future of journalism. They have put seven young reporters around the world with all the equipment and skills they need to maintain a television news bureau in the digital age. The ‘bureaus’ are in Seoul, Rio de Janeiro, Dubai, New Delhi, Mumbai, Jakarta, and Nairobi. According to the announcement, the reporters will work out of their apartments, do their own laptop editing, and file by broadband or small satellites for use on the full range of ABC offerings-the Web, cable, and occasionally, broadcast shows.”

  • TVNewser tells us that Howard Kurtz was on Good Morning America this morning and on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Thursday night for his new book.

  • Multichannel reports, “Giving Comcast subscribers an online forum for complaints about the cable TV operator, media columnist and radio commentator Bob Garfield launched Web site ComcastMustDie.com on Friday.”

  • FT.com reports, “The BBC is poised to cut at least 12 per cent of its workforce, with the brunt of more than 2,000 redundancies falling on factual programming, senior staff have been told.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Now, the hottest names in online recruitment are increasingly specialized job sites. That poses a threat to the growth prospects of the broad-based online job boards and their newspaper partners, analysts said.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Wikipedia for politics? A new site gives it a try”

  • The Newseum enters Second Life.

  • Look at which Postie has his own blog! (hint: he has a new book out)

  • Multichannel reports, “The Nielsen Co. is teaming up with Dow Jones & Co. on a conference which will feature keynotes from Time Warner president Jeffrey Bewkes former Disney CEO Michael Eisner, Viacom chairman Sumner Redstone and publishing veteran and Caryle Group senior advisor Norman Pearlstine.”

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News has named Mara Schiavocampo as a digital journalist for ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,’ effective immediately it was announced today by executive producer Alexandra Wallace. Schiavocampo will report primarily for nightly.msnbc.com.

  • Take the Knight News Challenge!

  • Nine journalism leaders received the Missouri Honor Medal on Tuesday, the Columbia Missourian reports.

    Jobs

  • National Press Club is looking for a System Administrator

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.20.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Your bet is on Stephen Colbert over Jon Stewart in a fist fight.

  • Roll Call’s Moira Bagley celebrates a birthday today.

  • Media Matter’s Eric Boehlert reports, “Last Monday, on the same day that Gen. David Petraeus was testifying before Congress about how important progress was being made in Iraq, the Pentagon announced that nine American service members had died that day in Iraq. Given the death toll to date, the sad notice did not qualify as a blockbuster development. But such a high number of dead service members in one 24-hour span certainly qualified as news, especially on a day when so much attention had been trained on Iraq inside Washington, D.C., including its newsrooms. Yet among the four all-news cable channels (CNN, CNN Headline News, Fox, and MSNBC) last week, there were just two mentions of the nine dead soldiers, according to TVEyes.com.”

  • “CHBN is proud to announce the launch of our latest innovation for our growing politically active community. Our interactive ads give our viewers an immediate call to action and collect critical data from supporters directly from your videos.”

  • Tom Shales can only watch four screens at once.

  • This article claims that UPI is anti-gay. It is “owned by the media-arm of Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church. Moon himself has also called for the destruction of LGBT people. In a speech in 1997 he said: ‘What is the meaning of lesbians and homosexuals? That is the place where all different kinds of dung collect. We have to end that behaviour. When this kind of dirty relationship is taking place between human beings, God cannot be happy.’”

  • USNews.com reports, “The Wikipedia model makes it tempting to see the site as a battleground for legions of political junkies making the case for or against a candidate. As the Post writes, ‘every day thousands of them are engaging in fierce battles over the life stories of the 2008 presidential candidates.’ The data tell a different story. Figures provided to U.S. News Monday by Compete.com, a site that monitors and analyzes Internet traffic, show that the majority of the edits to most of the candidate pages are made by a small group of devoted editors who largely determine what information is and is not included on a page.”

  • The National Press Club’s Professional Development Committee is hosting a panel event on blogging on the campaign trail. The panelists include Tom Edsall, The New Republic; Jonathan Martin, Politico; Antonio Vargas, The Washington Post; and David All, GOP adviser. Ellen Shearer, co-director of the Medill News Service, will moderate. To RSVP to the September 24 event, call (202) 662-7501.

  • A follow up to this post…A tipster tells us, “one journalist — portuguese, i think — was turned away from the same event due to the white house press dress code. he was wearing sandals. i guess women can bare feet but men can’t.”

  • Reuters reports, “CBS Corp is happy with its deal with iTunes and won’t join a battle against Apple Inc over the pricing of television shows on the online store, CBS Chief Executive Les Moonves said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “Fox Business Network will rely heavily on The Wall Street Journal work force for commentary and color, Rupert Murdoch told a room full of investors at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference here Tuesday morning, and the channel will appeal to a broader audience than CNBC when it debuts next month.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Andy Berndt, co-president of Ogilvy & Mather’s New York office, has left his post at the agency to go to Google, where he will helm a new global unit dedicated to collaborating with marketers, agencies and entertainment companies.”

  • Venture Beat reports, “Today, Comscore released numbers showing GodTube, a YouTube for Christians, to be the fastest growing site on the internet in August. It grew 973 percent and ranked among the top 1000 web properties by unique visitors — the same month it officially launched, as Mashable’s Kristen Nicole points out.”

  • Business Week reports, “When Jay Adelson and Kevin Rose launched Digg three years ago, the Web site attracted a community of like-minded people. Digg users were technophiles, not unlike the company’s founders. Rather than pay attention to the news dominating the national headlines, many early Digg users were more apt to respond to articles that Rose posted on new Web companies, open-source software, and even stories about mental illness that can haunt mathematicians after they solve complex puzzle.”

  • U.S. presidential campaigns are increasingly favoring bloggers over traditional news media with breaking news, some observers say.

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp chief Rupert Murdoch on Tuesday sketched out early plans for Dow Jones & Co Inc, saying he leaned toward making the online Wall Street Journal free but had not yet made a decision.”

  • Media Ink reports, “We hear that some folks at McGraw-Hill are getting a little nervous about a new tome about former GE chief Jack Welch that’s being written by former Welch speech writer Bill Lane.”

  • Jack Myers writes, “Betsy Frank the chief research and insights officer for Time Inc., offers an interesting perspective on the state of magazine advertising today and how media companies are both applying and ignoring lessons of the past. The key question for media companies, Frank suggests, is ‘how can media, whether invented yesterday or 100 years ago, create and maintain relevance to consumers and demonstrate and communicate that value to advertisers?’”

  • The 2007 American Spectator Annual Pig Roast is coming up! It is September 29 in Madison, Virginia.

  • Tom Sietsema reveals in his online chat that his fall dining guide is out October 14.

  • There is a “new breed of news junkie” on the loose in Chevy Chase.

  • Linda Perlstein writes, “When I left a reporting job at The Washington Post several years ago, I lost an institution I loved—not to mention free LexisNexis and an affiliation that pretty much guaranteed that my phone calls were returned right away. But I gained the opportunity to immerse myself in a project that I’m sure could never have been created for the newspaper.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Officer Richard Parsons said the media company’s board will decide on the timing for Jeffrey Bewkes to succeed him.”

  • As a follow up to Deborah Howell’s column about the controversy over comics in the Washington Post (and other papers), Ralph Hanson put together a round up of items about comic strip controversies since 2004.

  • Check out the results of the CJR panel, “The Case of the Vanishing Book Review”

  • American University’s Center for Social Media presents Foreign Correspondence and the Future of Public Media, “a series that addresses the future of reliable, sober, unbiased information from abroad at a time when our nation is engaged in two foreign wars — and when the number of mainstream foreign correspondents is actually diminishing. The series, organized by AU’s Bill Gentile, is comprised of internationally-recognized foreign correspondents. Each speaker brings unique and valuable insight into the current state of foreign correspondence, and especially its future.” Each lecture is in the University’s Mary Graydon Center Room 324, from 12:45 until 2 pm.

  • Poynter Online reports, “It’s pretty much a foregone conclusion that WSJ.com will be free soon.”

  • The Duke Cunningham case will be discussed during 2007 SPJ Convention & Journalism Conference. For more info, click here.

  • No more wondering. The editors of TNR offer a Scott Beauchamp Update.

  • Community Journalism Interest Group writes, “There has been very little coverage of the New York Times’ decision to cut the space it allots for printed letters in its paper edition. That’s a shame. The move further exemplifies the disdain the ‘mainstream’ media has for its audience, and, by extension, the communities they serve.”

  • Daily Kos has a piece of advice for the Politico: “Memo to Jim VandeHei and John Harris: this is 2007, not 1992.”

  • Web 2.Oh … really reports, “This from Maureen Dowd’s column in the New York Times, which has finally been liberated from behind the pay wall the company had built around its marquee columnists under its ill-fated TimesSelect plan: ‘Nobody wants to simply admit they made a mistake and disappear for awhile. Nobody even wants to use the weasel words: ‘Mistakes were made.’ No, far better to pop right back up and get in the face of those who were savoring your absence.’ Such a striking confession about her employer’s embarrassing capitulation to reality! From such a proud woman! Oh, wait, my mistake. The column’s about Alan Greenspan’s new book.”

  • The Huffington Post is hiring journalist Marc Cooper to head up its OffTheBus citizen journalism project. Cooper, a columnist for LA Weekly, will work with approximately 15 “campaign correspondents” to cover the 2008 campaigns from their own perspectives.

  • In response to this post…A reader tells us, “‘A strong internal candidate has emerged; if you are interested in this or future National bureau jobs, please contact’ That actually means…don’t bother applying we have already picked someone but we are legally required to post this notice”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Business News Desk person.

  • WWICS — Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies is looking for a Public Affairs Specialist.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter and a Photographer.

  • Energy Intelligence Group is looking for a Market Reporter.

  • Human Rights Campaign is seeking a Sr. Editorial & Web Content Manager.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.11.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you didn’t watch The Sopranos, but for the true fans, you thought Tony would live.

  • Check out the 2006 IRE Award Winners here.

  • Dan Gillmor writes, “Journalism’s old guard is in a panic. With the latest bad news … it’s no wonder that people who care about the traditional journalism business are frightened.”

  • Reuters reports, “An Internet entrepreneur and a Wall Street group have joined a list of potential rivals to News Corp.’s $5 billion bid for Wall Street Journal publisher Dow Jones & Co. Inc., an adviser to the Dow Jones employee union said on Thursday.”

  • Eric Rauchway tells us what he learned at the blogging panel, a.k.a “Historical Scholarship and the New Media.” Ben Adler gives his own take on the experience.

  • The National Press Club is hosting a travel writing trade panel June 28 7 – 8:30 p.m. in the Lisagor Room. The event is open to the public. Reserve online or by calling is 202-662-7501.

  • FT.com reports, “Nielsen, the US-based audience measurement firm, is to begin tracking mobile phone users’ media consumption as part of an effort to provide wireless carriers, advertisers and entertainment companies with more accurate data about mobile phone usage.”

  • Ben Affleck loves to yell during “Hardball.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “It’s almost a footnote in some of the news stories and press releases on News Corp.’s negotiations to take over Dow Jones & Co., but the inclusion of Rupert Murdoch’s son, James, at the bargaining table could be sending a significant signal on where News Corp. is heading.”

  • Gay Programming Steps Out On Satellite and Digital

  • E&P reports, “With the exception of exports leveling off and producer inventories rising, April newsprint statistics released this week by the Pulp and Paper Products Council (PPPC) were all negative.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Trading in options to buy Netflix Inc. shares surged to the most since January 2004 on speculation the largest provider of movie rentals via the mail may be acquired.”

  • Christian Post reports, “Americans who watch more hours of television tend to be less committed to classical virtues such as honesty and fairness and less likely to value religious principles, according to a conservative media watchdog.”

  • MediaBiz reports, “Sirius announced after the market closed Tuesday that it had received a $250 million loan from Morgan Stanley (MS).”

  • A reader writes:
      wemple: The problem with Kornheiser is that he’s in great demand. Late this month, he’ll leave the Post airwaves and won’t return in full force until next January, following his season in ESPN’s Monday Night Football booth. Gulland won’t say what the station will do to fill the programming void that he’ll leave. farhi: Kornheiser has become so valuable to the station, executives said, that his show will continue, with his name, even after he leaves it at the end of this month — as he prepares for his second season as an analyst on ESPN’s ‘Monday Night Football.’ WTWP morning man David Burd will host ‘The Tony Kornheiser Show,’ along with Kornheiser’s current sidekicks. Kornheiser will call in to the show from time to time, Farley said, but will not have a regular slot on the program; Kornheiser is committed to ESPN until the end of the football season.

  • A reader writes, “Shouldn’t the Washington Times intern know how to proof before posting and not just rely on spell check?? ‘getting soar muscles from carrying heavy bags’.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “Time Warner Inc. chairman and CEO Richard Parsons on Thursday signaled more clearly than ever that he might drop at least his CEO title in the next year or two and again backed president and COO Jeffrey Bewkes as his heir apparent.”

  • Since becoming the Discovery Channel’s chief three years ago, Jane Root “has helped pull the nature channel out of a ratings slump with shows featuring, in no particular order, people battling nature, people living in prison, people saving the planet, and so on,” reports BusinessWeek.

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column.

  • A Harris Interactive poll on newspapers and their online sites, that was released at the World Association of Newspapers conference in Cape Town, shows that “five years out, readers expect online to overtake TV networks as their main source of news in four of the seven countries.”

  • Jeffrey F. Rayport writes, “To judge from ad-industry publications, advertising is in crisis. The stories of upheaval in how agencies serve clients, create value and get paid might readily suggest that advertising as a profession and business is dead, or dying. Nothing could be further from the truth.”

  • Marty Kaplan writes, “Within 24 hours, no primate on the planet will be unaware of Paris Hilton’s transfer from the pokie to the ankle bracelet, but it is a safe bet that within weeks or even months, relatively few Americans will know the big news going down now in Iraq. That’s because journalism is distributed in two flavors: push and pull.”

  • AP reports, “Twelve major universities will digitize select collections in each of their libraries — up to 10 million volumes — as part of Google Inc.’s book-scanning project.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “The head of the National Association of Broadcasters is urging Sirius Satellite Radio CEO Mel Karmazin to end his attempt to merge the nation’s two satellite radio companies and accusing the executive of misleading the public about the deal’s benefits.”

    Jobs

  • AAAS is looking for a Communications Officer and a Communications Associate.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer/Online Producer for NationalJournal.com and a Staff Correspondent for Government Executive Magazine.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for an Editorial intern.

  • A downtown DC publishing company is looking for a Graphic Designer.

  • Smithsonian Publications is looking for a Production Coordinator.

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is looking for a NewsHour Administrative Assistant.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer and a Sports Producer.

  • The Map Network/NAVTEQ is looking for a Copy Editor, a Financial Analyst/Accountant, a Senior SQL Developer, a Director of Marketing, a Director of Business Development a Manager Destination and Event Sales and an Ad Sales Representative.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for an Account Manager.

  • C-SPAN is hiring a temporary Political Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext