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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Walton’

CNN Drops AP

In a memo to staff today, CNN Worldwide President Jim Walton announced that the news organization will no longer use AP materials or services.

Walton said, “The content we offer will be distinctive, compelling and, I am proud to say, our own. Beyond the obvious business reasons for this operating shift – the content we spend our money to create should be the content we present, and less reliance on outside sources will mean more to invest in our organization-there are other important motivations.”

The full memo obtained by FishbowlDC after the jump.

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CNN Remembers Novak, And More

Embedded video from CNN Video

CNN shared this memorial to Robert Novak today and CNN Worldwide President Jim Walton released this statement:

“We are saddened by the passing of Robert Novak. He was a journalist of the old school, hard-working, practical and passionate about our profession. From its earliest days and for some 25 years, Bob shared generously with CNN and with CNN viewers his authority, credibility, humor and towering presence. We’re grateful to have worked alongside him and send our respect and sympathy to his family.”

TWT‘s Carrie Sheffield also share the “softer side” of Novak here.

And executive producer Betsy Fischer notes on Twitter that Novak appeared on NBC’s “Meet the Press” 248 times over his career.

Peabody Awards Announced

The Peabody Awards were announced today and we have many recipients in town. The awards ceremony takes place May 18 at NYC’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and is hosted by NBC’s Brian Williams.

CNN and “Washington Week with Gwen Ifill” are both honored for their election coverage. From CNN’s press release: “A tremendous amount of innovation, commitment, quality journalism and hard work stand behind this honor,” said Jim Walton, president of CNN Worldwide. “CNN provided unrivaled coverage around the world across every platform possible, including television, radio, the Internet, and mobile.”

NPR is recognized for three pieces- “All Things Considered” for coverage of the May 2008 earthquake in China, the three-part report “36 Years in Solitary: Murder, Death and Justice on Angola” and “The Giant Pool of Money,” a collaboration with Chicago Public Radio and Public Radio International.

From the release: “I’m incredibly proud that the Peabody committee recognized these deserving works – which truly demonstrate the range and breadth of what we do here at NPR,” says Vivian Schiller, NPR’s President & CEO. “It’s validation of NPR’s continuing commitment to investigative and explanatory journalism, as well as foreign coverage.”

Check out TVNewser’s coverage of ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and others here and check out the complete list of winners after the jump.

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Morning Reading List, 12.20.07

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Good morning Washington. On this day in 2002, Sen. Trent Lott resigned as Senate Majority Leader.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think card games are “much fun.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader wonders, “Where did the Washington Times Christmas tree go? It was there but now it’s gone”

  • NPF president Bob Meyers writes, “Last year you supported us with many contributions so we could meet our Challenge Grant obligations. This year the challenge is equally important, but we’re doing this on our own, without any challenge grant to spur us on. … Could you help with a $25 contribution? A $50 contribution? We’re a 501-c-3, so you could deduct your gift. I’ve added a connection to our magical online giving icon (you can find it on our site as well).” For more info, click here.

  • FCC Eases Ownership Limits for Big Media

  • Politico has a caucus night bingo game for readers (no, it is not a drinking game, although we find that hard to believe).

  • New York Times Sees Boost from Web Sites

  • Tribune CEO Expected to Step Down in Buyout

  • From a Post insider: “what frustrates so many post reporters about today’s nytimes piece on the bacon fiasco is that, yet again, downie does not explain how editors edited the story and does not address the criticisms of the piece. instead, he takes the easy way out and defends the notion that young people can be big reporters too. he’s permitting daly to divert the discussion away from the real journalistic issue. he should have come out and explained what was wrong with the story, what was right with the story, and what the post will do to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

  • PEJ reports, “Americans received a grim picture of the war in Iraq in the first 10 months of 2007. Daily violence accounted for 47% of the stories studied. And of the stories that offered an assessment of the direction of the war, most were pessimistic, according to a new study of press coverage from Iraq from January to October.”

  • Newsday, Hoy to Pay $15 Million in Circ Case

  • Also from Pew, “Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007. Nearly half of Americans (45%) tracked news about the shootings at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “After weeks of bad news, Hillary Clinton and her strategists hoped that winning the endorsement of Iowa’s largest newspaper last weekend might produce a modest bump in their media coverage. But on Sunday morning, they awoke to upbeat headlines about their chief Democratic rival: ‘Obama Showing New Confidence With Iowa Sprint,’ said the New York Times. ‘Obama Is Hitting His Stride in Iowa,’ said the Los Angeles Times. And on Monday, Clinton aides were so upset about a contentious ‘Today’ show interview that one complained to the show’s producer. Clinton’s senior advisers have grown convinced that the media deck is stacked against them, that their candidate is drawing far harsher scrutiny than Barack Obama. And at least some journalists agree.”

  • Washington Post reports, Don Graham, “The chairman of The Washington Post Co., who separated from his wife last month, just closed on a 1896 semi-detached townhouse near Dupont Circle. The four-bedroom, four-bath Tudor underwent extensive work during the past year and is described as impeccable.” Ed Note: Wait, Post ombudsman Deb Howell says that Don Graham’s divorce isn’t appropriate for the Style section (it went in Business) but his house sales are?

  • CJR reports, “In an otherwise reasonable and spirited defense of a reporter, The Washington Post’s Leonard Downie Jr. trips by employing ad hominem attack and innuendo against a critic—the very tactics Downie seeks to criticize.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss was a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staffer when he broke through the chrysalis of Capitol Hill conventionality to become a musical satirist. Mr. Strauss, who died Dec. 18 of pancreatic cancer at his home in McLean, recalled the breakthrough in a phone interview shortly before his death at age 60.”

  • Politico reports, “New York Times columnist Frank Rich regularly chides political journalists for not thinking outside the Beltway in covering the presidential campaign. But what about venturing beyond the west side of Manhattan? Unlike his Times opinion-writing colleagues — Maureen Dowd, David Brooks and Gail Collins — Rich has yet to rack up an Iowa dateline this year, not to mention New Hampshire or South Carolina.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Inside the pressure-cooker that is live television, the name Barack Obama apparently becomes tricky.
    The Democratic presidential candidate’s name has been confused with the terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and even Omaha, Neb., in separate occasions on CNN recently.”

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    TV

  • “2007 Ratings: MSNBC has ‘Fastest Growing Primetime Lineup of any Top-50 Cable Channel,’” reports TVNewser.

  • TVNewser reports, “Bob Schieffer: 2008 Campaign Probably ‘My Last In The Role I Have Now’”

  • TVNewser reports, “You may have noticed World News with Charles Gibson and World News Now have been broadcasting form a different location this week. We are hearing construction is underway for a new set which is expected to debut in the next couple of weeks. We’re told the new set will also be HD-ready and that the Gibson broadcast is expected to be in HD sometime in 2008.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “CNN’s Jonathan Klein on Campbell Brown, Couch Potatoes and Plans for 2008″

  • Wonkette reports, “Joe Scarbrough and Friend Ridicule Huckabee’s Jesusery”

  • TVNewser reports, “Gore Vidal Has Beef With Wolf Blitzer, Apparently”

  • TVNewser reports, “The cable nets continue breaking news coverage of a fire at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which is part of the White House complex. Of the three cable news nets, CNN was first with the news at 9:42:30. MSNBC was next at 9:43:10 and FNC reported the story at 9:44:40.” Meanwhile, on broadcast, “ABC News’ Chris Cuomo anchored a network special at 9:51amET on the fire at the EEOB. The NBC network continued with the third hour of the today show and aired a special report at 10amET (MSNBC was already in breaking news coverage of the fire). CBS reported the fire with an update to the west coast feed of The Early Show at 10amET”

  • TVNewser reports, “In an opinion column in USA Today, titled ‘Does Al-Jazeera belong in the USA?’, Souhelia Al-Jadda, an associate producer at Link TV’s Mosaic: World News from the Middle East and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors, laments the fact that more than one year after the launch of Al-Jazeera English, ‘no major U.S. cable or satellite company is willing to carry the station.’”

  • Inside Cable News reported yesterday, “Bloomberg TV announced this morning that Terry Holt and Stephanie Cutter will be providing analysis for the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary.”

  • A CNN release announced, “The next stops for the CNN Election Express include Iowa for the state’s upcoming caucuses, New Hampshire for the nation’s first primary elections and visits to Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Los Angeles for CNN’s remaining presidential primary debates. To date, the CNN Election Express has served as the studio for interviews with top presidential candidates including Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The studio configuration includes a lighting grid with full power to allow quick set-up for interviews. The video equipment on board can also be used outside for interviews and live shots.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The NewsHour Gets New Set, Goes HDTV”

  • TVNewser reports, “It was good news all around for CNN yesterday, with a re-up for CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein and a memo from CNN Worldwide president Jim Walton discussing all the “fun” the network is having.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Once again, Obama has been confused with Osama. This time, by HLN’s Glenn Beck on Good Morning America.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Comcast Says FCC Limit Rule Is ‘Perverse’

  • FCC Accepts Google’s Auction Application

  • Check out www.2008ElectionProCon.org, “created to be a comprehensive source of information on the 2008 presidential election.” The site has “compiled the pro and con positions of all the presidential candidates on major policy issues, along with other resources related to the election, like a printable one-page summary of all the candidates’ positions on the issues and a history of political parties. All of the information is designed to help people determine for themselves which candidate would make the best president.”

  • A reader writes in, “Have you seen www.Whitehouse.com lately? (not .gov, BTW). Yes it is the same URL that was once the famed porn site. Now it has been reborn as some kind of uber-hip political blog. And word on the street is they’ve been phoning up reporters and inviting them to come and start work…resume, clips and references sight unseen. The site boasts 10 years of tradition (doesn’t mention that 9.5 of them are as a porn site)…and check out the ‘benefits’ page! 25 cent soft drinks and occasional Pizza Fridays!”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes, “How can I say this nicely? Oh, what the heck. If Ted Leonsis is going to be candid and bash mainstream media, then why can’t I? It’s not like I need a job. At this point in my career, I’d only be bought out at best or downsized in a restructuring at worst.”

  • A release announced, “Alive in Baghdad, a web news program reported and filmed by local Iraqis and distributed by independent US news agency Small World News lost correspondent Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi after he was killed over the weekend in Sadr City. The correspondent was found dead by a family member after being shot 31 times. Details as to motive and circumstances about the killing are undetermined.”

  • Check out the “major design” of Bloggingheads.tv.

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    MAGAZINES

  • A Democracy release announced, “It’s not chestnuts roasting on an open fire or ringing sleigh bells, but Christmas came early (or Hannukah came late) to Democracy this December. Just after we had released our winter issue and thought things would be winding down for the year, we were notified that Democracy has been named the Best New Publication of 2007 by the Utne Independent Press Awards.” For more on the awards, click here.

  • Check out a new video feature on newyorker.com, The Naked Campaign, “a series of short videos featuring the illustrator Steve Brodner as he draws the Presidential candidates and discusses the race for the White House. The videos are directed by Gail Levin, with animation by Asterisk.”

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    RADIO

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Carl Kasell — the National Public radio newscaster and the judge/scorekeeper/second banana on NPR’s weekly call-in quiz show ‘Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!’ — is running late for an interview. … Mr. Kasell, who’ll be moonlighting next week as the announcer for the 30th annual “Kennedy Center Honors” broadcast, was recording an answering machine message for a ‘Wait, Wait’ winner. Such is the highly coveted prize for callers who triumph in events like ‘Listener Limerick Challenge,’ ‘Bluff the Listener,’ and ‘Who’s Carl This Time?’ — wherein Mr. Kasell delivers highly flavored imitations of newsmakers from Paris to Britney to George W. and all points and poobahs in between.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Amos Snead is stepping down as Press Secretary to House Republican Whip Roy Blunt and is returning to FD Dittus.

  • Salon finally admits that Michael Scherer is leaving. Joan Walsh writes, “Some of you may have noticed the change to Michael Scherer’s bio at the bottom of his great Meghan McCain profile today, identifying him as our ‘former’ Washington correspondent. I’m sad to say that Michael has left us to cover the presidential campaign for Time magazine. He’s been a crucial part of our news resurgence over the last two years, breaking stories on Abu Ghraib, George Allen’s race problems and the 2008 presidential campaign. We miss him already. But we’re thrilled to welcome Mike Madden, who has covered politics, Congress and Washington for Gannett News Service since 2000. Mike has also written for Time.com, the New York Observer, USA Today and Wonkette, and he’ll join Walter Shapiro on the campaign trail shortly.”

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    JOBS

  • Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Feature Writer.

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is looking for a Washington Bureau Reporter.

  • PBS is looking for a Director, PBS Engage.

  • Heldref Publications is looking for a Marketing and Advertising Director.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.18.07

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    Good morning Washington. Don Rumsfeld resigned a year ago today and Brad Pitt, Keith Richards and Christina Aguilera all turn a year older today. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think it is harder to write well as opposed to report well.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Legal Times announces the Lobbying Campaigns of the Year. Check out who made the cut.

  • Variety reports, “In the Wall Street Journal newsroom on Dec. 13, the day the paper officially became News Corp. property, Rupert Murdoch and new publisher Robert Thomson addressed hundreds of reporters who came loaded with plenty of questions. Murdoch understatedly acknowledged the ‘nervousness’ caused by his purchase of the privately run Dow Jones, and Thomson, rather enigmatically, cautioned, ‘While it’s right to be respectful of the past, these days it is certainly fatal to be haunted by history. He who stands still will be overrun.’”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Sun-Times Media Group Inc., hit hard by worsening newspaper industry conditions, said Friday that directors approved a plan that will reduce operating costs by $50 million in 2008 and involve layoffs.”

  • The Denver Post reports, “On the docket at the FCC this week is a rule that would allow newspapers and TV stations to buy each other, at least in larger markets. The rule would apply to the country’s top 20 markets (including Denver, No. 18). A proviso would prevent newspapers from buying any of the top four TV or radio stations, based on audience size. The FCC has been attempting to lift the restrictions on media consolidation for years and now is in a hurry to get it done Tuesday.”

  • Roll Call has more on Birdgate.

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “The stiffest penalty for the crimes Conrad Black and his henchmen committed while running the company now known as Sun-Times Media Group came down Friday, four days after Black received 6 1/2 years in federal prison and before Monday’s sentencing of his turncoat lieutenant, former Sun-Times Publisher F. David Radler. This punishment hit the very people trying to make a go of Black’s old scandal- scarred enterprise, seeking to overcome his crippling legacy at a time when even media companies not haunted by past criminal leadership are struggling.”

  • The New York Times reports,Bilal Hussein, an Iraqi photographer who had a hand in The Associated Press’s 2005 Pulitzer Prize for photography before being jailed without charges by the United States military, finally had a day in court last week. But his story, which highlights the unprecedented role that Iraqis are playing in news coverage of the war, is really just beginning.”

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    TV

  • For all of you journos heading to HDTV, maybe this should make your Christmas list. They now offer gift certificates! We kid because we love.

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the entertainment industry’s ongoing strike, getting writers back to work will require the two sides to make peace in cyberspace.”

  • A CNN release announced, “CNN will marshal its extensive resources and political expertise for wall-to-wall coverage of the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3, 2008. Lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer, along with Anderson Cooper and Lou Dobbs, will lead the network’s special coverage of the Iowa caucuses out of the new CNN Election Center in New York. Special programming will begin at 4 p.m. (ET) and run late into the night.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “Political reporters, as a rule, are an industrious band of road warriors who work hard to get people to speak on the record. But under deadline pressure, they sometimes succumb to the lure of the juicy quote dished out by operatives trying to damage rival candidates. Perhaps it’s time to rethink the practice.”

  • Also from Kurtz, “A handful of Mormon journalists have risen to national prominence, from the late muckraking columnist Jack Anderson to former CBS “Early Show” co-host Jane Clayson. And they make up a majority of the staff at Salt Lake City’s Deseret Morning News, which is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.”

  • DCRTV reports, “DCRTV hears from a 9er: ‘Tracey Neale (left) out, Leslie Foster (right) in.’ From another 9er: ‘Tracey Neale ‘relinquishes’ 6 PM and 11 PM anchor job at 9 to devote more time to adopted children. Leslie Foster gets 6 PM and 11 PM anchor slot.’ And another 9er: ‘Tracey Neale gone from 6 PM and 11 PM, Leslie Foster now anchors both shows and is consumer reporter. (New anchor) Anita Brikman is new health reporter.”

  • TVNewser reported yesterday, “Today comes word of the 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award winners in broadcast journalism, with NBC News and CBS News garnering honors.”

  • And, also from DCRTV, “DCRTV hears that Channel 7/WJLA news anchor Alison Starling is in the midst of negotiations for a new contract with the Allbritton ABC affiliate. The word is that she’s asking for more money. Duh”

  • B&C reports, “CNN/U.S. president Jon Klein signed a new four-year deal to remain at the helm of the TV-news operation, according to sources familiar with the situation. Klein will continue to report to Jim Walton, president of CNN/Worldwide.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • His Extremeness announced, “a huge milestone was reached today for Extreme Mortman — we passed over a unique million visitors for the year.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “The title of most-visited online news site continues to be a hotly contested, with CNN, Yahoo News and MSNBC all vying for the throne. Last month, the CNN Digital Network had the largest unique audience in its 11-year history, according to Nielsen Online. The Time Warner-owned news source received nearly 33 million unique visitors, beating out Yahoo News and the MSNBC Digital Network, which had about 31 million and 30 million visitors, respectively.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As painful as corrections are to journalists, the screw-ups they reflect do damage on a far greater scale to the news organizations they work for.”

  • The AP reports, “Online advertising jumped 25 percent this year, raking in a cool $20 billion, but Internet executives say that figure could have been even higher if advertisers had reliable and consistent ways to measure online audiences.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “The stated mission of Google Inc. is to ‘organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.’ But media moguls from around the world converged on Harvard Business School recently to learn more about Google’s unstated mission which, as Harvard professor Thomas R. Eisenmann put it, is to ‘sell targeted advertising in every medium everywhere.’”

  • Portfolio tries to calculate, “What’s Drudge Worth?”

  • Newsmax.com reports, “The mainstream media have consistently treated Hillary Clinton with kid gloves, ignoring Clinton scandals and refusing to ask tough questions even as she seeks the presidency, charges Brent Bozell, president of the Media Research Council.”

  • NewsFactor.com reports, “The common consensus in the media is that Google’s new ‘knol’ tool will be aimed squarely at Wikipedia, and in fact the sample Web page on display in Udi Manber’s blog post does bear some passing resemblance to a typical Wikipedia page. But other features suggest Google’s target is less Wikipedia than it is About.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Trusted Internet political bastion Right Wing News held its 6th annual Conservative Blog awards, and your Wonkette is a winner! Well, at least we placed. In the ‘Most Overrated Blog’ category, Wonkette tied with frienemy Redstate and something called Power Line for fourth place. Fourth place, of course, is the new first place, so huzzah for our internets!” Check out the full details of the contest here.

  • Gateway Pundit reports, “Its a Quagmire!… Media Reports 6 Bogus Stories in 6 Weeks!”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins reports, “David Gregory Does Battle With Talking-Point Dispensing Robot” (a.k.a Sen. Clinton).

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    RADIO

  • A CNN Radio release announced, “As 2007 comes to a close, CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer and CNN Radio are offering affiliates a special year-end review of the past 12 months – one minute at a time – and then in a two-hour special called ’2007 Rewind.’ Hosted by Blitzer, the two-hour ’2007 Rewind’ takes a look at some of the biggest stories of 2007 while moving some of the stories forward into the New Year. CNN journalists including Lisa Desjardins, A.J. Hammer, Ed Henry, Amanda Moyer, Miles O’Brien, Kyra Phillips, Jim Ribble, Larry Smith, Gary Tuchman and others will contribute to the program. The one-minute features, also anchored by Blitzer, examine the biggest stories of 2007 including such topics as the Virginia Tech shootings, the Minnesota bridge collapse, the resignation of U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Barry Bonds, Michael Vick, Don Imus, Britney Spears, the California fires, drought, immigration and more.”

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Crain’s New York reports, “The auction for Karl Rove’s memoir drags on a month after the Republican strategist made the rounds of publishers with Washington power lawyer Robert Barnett at his side.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Matthew Felling fell victim to the cuts at CBSNews.com saying in an email, “It’s with mixed feelings that I share the information that — effective as of mid-afternoon last Friday — I have been let go at CBSNews.com in a ‘restructuring’ of the Interactive division.” TVNewser weighs in here.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press has this to say on the Eye situation: “Today the Public Eye blog has a post by Brian Montopoli, current CBS political reporter and previous Public Eye co-editor with Felling, who, according to CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock, will be ‘taking his spot.’ Though McClintock specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated, in an accelerating political season it seems unlikely that Montopoli would revert back to media criticism after deliberately switching beats — just as it seems unlikely that CBS would be hiring a replacement for Felling.”

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    JOBS

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Reporter and an Economics and Finance Editor.

  • The New Republic is looking for reporter-researchers.

  • Independent Agent Magazine is seeking a Managing Editor.

  • The News Leader is looking for a Sports Reporter.

  • Media Matters for America is looking for a Deputy Editorial Director.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Sales Coordinator, BusinessWeek (DC Bureau).

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Editor, All Things Considered.

  • Legal Times is seeking an Editorial Assistant.

  • NomadsLand is looking for a Video Producer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 05.31.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the fifth consecutive week, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. The last time that ABC won five straight weeks in these categories was more than ten years ago in October 1996.” “World News” also won the May sweep among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54, marking the broadcast’s second consecutive sweeps win. “The last time the broadcast won back-to-back sweeps among both Total Viewers and the demo was eleven years ago in 1996 (February and May).”

  • Dodd, Richardson Decline CBC/Fox Debate

  • An NBC release announced “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams” was “the most watched network evening newscast during the 2006/2007 television season.” From September 18, 2006-May 25, 2007, the NBC program averaged 8.834 million total viewers, 2% more than ABC “World News” and 23% more than CBS “Evening News”. The show “has now been the top-rated network evening newscast for 11 straight seasons.”

  • According to the New York Observer, “Carl Bernstein’s new biography of Hillary demanded reviewers who are married, like the Clintons, but … there is nobody else married like the Clintons.” Check out Chris Lehmann and Ana Marie Cox’s review of the book.

  • CNN’s Jim Walton sent a note to the staff thanking those who contributed to the Memorial Day weekend promotion of the Fisher House Foundation. “Preliminary figures show that the miles contributed and the matching miles from Fisher House’s airline partners has equated to more than 8,000 flights for service personnel and their families. My sincere appreciation and congratulations to all of those on-air, online and behind the scenes who made this special event happen as part of our continuing efforts to raise awareness of Fisher House.”

  • The AP reports, “The parent of MySpace is buying the media-sharing site Photobucket for about $300 million, bringing together two of the Internet’s most popular hangouts. The deal announced Wednesday will give MySpace and sister sites under News Corp.’s Fox Interactive Media access to Photobucket Inc.’s photo and video technologies, while Photobucket gets Fox’s resources to accelerate development of its tools.”

  • Dave Fay, “who has been with The Times since its inception in 1982 and has covered the Caps for more than two decades,” was named the winner of the Elmer Ferguson Award for hockey journalism, “earning him a place in the Hockey Hall of Fame.”

  • The AP reports, “USA Today, which is published by Gannett Co., said Tuesday it signed licenses with six U.S. book publishers to extend its brand. The agreements will include books on various subjects branded with USA Today and featuring graphics and content from the country’s biggest paper by circulation.”

  • “Ever since President Bush’s January 10 speech announcing the “surge” option in Iraq, the Washington-based debate over U.S . war policy has been the biggest story in the news, according to PEJ’s weekly News Coverage Index.”

  • From a reader: “i think that if this stokke character really wanted to be left alone, she would not have cooperated with a washington post story. certainly, if she had refused to cooperate on the grounds that she wants less attention, not more, the post would not have done the story.”

  • From another reader: “The Post story on the 18-year-old pole vaulter was ridiculous, a bit of a non-story. And it was NOT A-1 material–literally. Why is that an A-1 story? Pop culture, trend, internet, zeitgeist, privacy, information spreading fast, etc., etc., etc.? Yawn. Old story. Non-news. Yes, a picture, and stories, and videos, and information spreads across the web fast. Guess what? They also spread fast 30 years ago–via the wires. Really. It’s not really news anymore that information spreads fast. Does anyone not know that now? And, really, all you can do is scratch your heads at this stupidity: If the family does not want attention–THEN DO NOT GIVE AN INTERVIEW AND PICTURES TO THE WASHINGTON POST. Gawd almighty, it makes many readers think this: The family, and the girl, who is 18 years old and knows better, really DO want the attention. Why else would they give an interview and pictures to the Post? The whole thing is just dumb.”

  • The Guardian’s Richard Byrne notes, “When Al Gore bemoans the sad state of TV news, he’s ignoring an inconvenient truth about his own role in its creation.”

    Jobs

  • DBC Public Relations is looking for a Senior Account Executive.

  • MacNeil/Lehrer Productions is looking for a NewsHour Reporter, National Affairs.

  • Campaigns & Elections magazine “is looking for a hard-working, enterprising staff writer to join our growing network of publications.” To apply please send a cover letter, writing samples and resume to mfelchner@campaignline.com.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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