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Posts Tagged ‘John Battelle’

Morning Reading List, 01.06.09

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 03.25.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Emily Lawrimore’s birthday (Hat Tip: Playbook), the 2008 Dart Award Winners have been announced, Dana Priest and Anne Hull have won yet another award, yesterday was Monica Lewinsky’s 34th birthday and on this day in 1634, the first colonists to Maryland found the settlement of St. Mary’s (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • We asked how your NCAA tourney bracket is doing and you said, “What bracket?”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mary Shaffrey of The Hill and Winston-Salem Journal fame is the new communications director at BIPAC.

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Katie Levinson has joined Edelman as senior vice president and political director in its New York Public Affairs practice. Levinson’s background includes serving as communications director and spokeswoman for the RNC, Bush-Cheney ’04, President Bush, Governor Schwarzenegger’s reelection and Mayor Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt asks, “So Much Sex, but What’s Fit to Print?”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Five Reasons Why Having a ‘Public Editor’ at the Times and Other Papers No Longer Makes Much Sense”

  • The New York Times’ David Carr reports, “Newspapers’ New Owners Turn Grim”

  • This “Washington Post Moment Of Zen” is brought to you by His Extreme-ness.

  • Variety reports, “Tribune owner hopes to revive embattled Times”

  • One reader wonders why this AP story never mentions Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick’s party (Democrat).

  • The Huffington Post asks, “Did Only Two Papers Feature 4,000 Iraq Deaths Across Their Front Pages?”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “For days, the Obama campaign refused to confirm where the senator and his family were heading on a short Easter vacation, even as rumors spread among the press corps that they were bound for the Virgin Islands. So that presented a conundrum for news organizations: Should they send a correspondent on the — presumably enjoyable — assignment to the Caribbean, to investigate the white sand beaches and clear blue waters? As it turns out, CNN was the lone cable network to play a game of ‘Where in the World is Barack Obama?’ Chris Welch, an off-air producer covering the Obama campaign since the Iowa caucuses, headed out to the islands.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser has a round-up of cable news coverage in “The 2008 Cable Watch”

  • Jake Tapper: ABC’s Man of the Hours

  • Politico: “Despite criticism, Fox’s Wallace keeps ‘Obama Watch’ ticking

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Fox Hosts Claim Friday’s Walk-Off Was A Joke”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports,Chris Wallace took some of his Fox colleagues to task, claiming that they took Senator Barack Obama’s comments about race out of context.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “One of the mysteries of television is why PBS’ Tavis Smiley continues to fly below the radar. He has an easy charm and a keen curiosity, and deserves to be better known.”

  • Variety reports, “While preparing to take Fox Television to the Supreme Court over a handful of expletives, the Federal Communications Commission let expire a separate indecency fine against the network for airing a movie with multiple repetitions of one of the same expletives. The FCC blamed a recent federal appeals court decision, saying it has created confusion over how the agency can enforce its indecency rules.”

  • The Kalb Report has the video of “Covering the World: A Conversation with Christiane Amanpour

  • New York Times reports,Bob Schieffer, right, the host of the CBS News Sunday morning program ‘Face the Nation’ since 1982, has agreed to postpone his planned retirement. ‘Yes, I’m going to remain with the show after the inauguration,’ Mr. Schieffer, 71, said Friday.”

  • A GWU release announced, “The George Washington University’s Prime Movers Program recently received a gift of $1,500 from the Washington, D.C.-area chapter of the Radio-Television News Directors Association to help purchase broadcast equipment and train students producing local high school radio and television programs. The Prime Movers Program is a partnership between Washington-area news media and local high schools in collaboration with GW’s School of Media and Public Affairs. Its goal is to provide journalism education and hands-on training in minority and diverse high schools.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Why are Web and Print STILL So Separate?”

  • A release announced, “Government Executive Media Group, a division of Atlantic Media Company, today launched NextGov, an interactive online platform serving the complete federal technology community. Breaking the traditional media model of one-way reporting by journalists toward readers, NextGov is designed to foster a multilayered dialogue between and among federal IT officials, program managers, private sector officials and outside observers about building the high-performance, results-driven federal agencies of the future. NextGov.com is designed specifically to support the needs of federal IT decision-makers, delivering three essential components to the decision-making process.”

  • All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher reports, “In February, for the first time ever, Arianna Huffington’s liberal political mega-blog and news site, the Huffington Post, has apparently surpassed the longtime mighty blog leader, Matt Drudge of the conservative/populist-leaning Drudge Report, according to recent traffic data reports from both comScore (SCOR) and Nielsen Online.”

  • Machinist reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site is already (secretly) free”

  • The AP reports, “Details on Some of the Online Ad Networks Formed by Traditional Media Companies.”

  • BeetTV reports, “The Washington Post, long an innovator in expanding its online presence, has created a popular application on Facebook with some 350,000 downloads, Jim Brady, Executive Editor of the washingtonpost.com tells Beet.TV. The application is a kind of political badge which members put on their Facebook pages, showing their political leanings from liberal to conservative.”

  • Billboard reports, “Search for an artist on any of the popular search engines, and the top three results are practically guaranteed: the artist’s official Web site, Wikipedia entry and MySpace page — often in that order. But while artists and their handlers devote massive attention to the Web site and MySpace, the Wikipedia page is often overlooked. Recent data suggests they may want to reconsider their priorities.”

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media companies trying to stem the flow of advertising dollars to Google and other large Internet companies are increasingly building ad networks of their own, anchored by their brands. The latest, Forbes Inc., announced Monday that it will start selling ads this spring for about 400 financial blogs. In recent months, Conde Nast, Viacom Inc., CBS Corp. and other major media companies also have unveiled topic-specific ad networks to lure advertisers that want to buy more ads than any single site can sell.”

  • Fortune reports, “As the United States slips into recession, advertising spending is set to fall — spelling trouble for traditional media companies already battered by Internet upstarts.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “A full-blown recession would probably take a substantial bite out of traditional media, according to a survey of industry analysts and independent researchers. But digital media will benefit from these draw-downs as financially strapped marketing executives shift dollars online, seeking more transparent measures of ROI. In many cases, a recession would simply accelerate a long-term trend that is already underway.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • In Washington Post Magazine, Gene Weingarten writes, “One man with more courage than brains sacrifices himself on the altar of punditry, and, in so doing, fails to redeem us all”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “During Sunday’s ‘This Week With George Stephanopoulos’ roundtable on Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright, Clarie Shipman offered some thoughts. Then came her husband, Jay Carney. He said, ‘I will agree with my wife.’ Good move. Probably smart to maintain peace in that household. But hardly unique for Jay Carney.”

  • CNet News.com has a Q&A with Wired founder John Battelle talking “blog roll-ups, Google, and Federated Media’s future”

  • Monocle: Mr. Magazine’s Notable International Launch of the Year + An interview with Tyler Brule

  • MinOnline reports, “min has put together a one-day program that’s all about the magazine brand and its relationship with new media, from improving your Web play to making the right call on mobile opportunities; from appealing to clients who want to see more than a banner/print bundle to engaging your customers with meaningful content offerings. Don’t miss out on the publishing event of the year! Go to www.minday2008.com for registration and Early Bird Rate details”

  • The New Yorker’s Eric Alterman chronicles “The death and life of the American newspaper.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Gore Vidal is wasting no time sticking knives in the corpse of his old foe William F. Buckley Jr. In an attack brutal even by Vidal standards, Gore writes on TruthDig.com that the National Review founder was ‘a hysterical queen’ and ‘a world-class American liar. … Buckley was often drunk and out of control.’ Vidal blames the ‘tired hacks’ at Newsweek for letting Buckley’s ‘creepy,’ ‘brain-dead’ son, Christopher, talk them into a reverential cover story on his father. Vidal concludes, ‘RIP WFB — in hell.’ We asked Christopher and Newsweek if they’d care to fire back. They declined.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “With BlogTalkRadio, the Commentary Universe Expands”

  • Washington Post reports, “As the audience for AM and FM radio declines, start-up entrepreneurs and giant media companies alike search for the ‘next radio’ — a way to make money by helping listeners discover new music. Online music providers such as Pandora, Imeem and Last.fm provide an early glance at that next chapter in radio history.”

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    JOBS

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer/Online Producer.

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is looking for a Desk Assistant.

  • The CATO Institute is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The Hill Newspaper is looking for an Advertising Executive.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • Roll Call TV is looking for an Intern.

  • AARP is looking for a Senior Manager, Media Relations.

  • Politico is looking for a National Account Executive.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.26.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You do not fake tan.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS announced today that Joe Trippi is officially joining CBS News as a political consultant. Trippi had served as a senior advisor to the John Edwards presidential campaign.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “Radio One Inc. has been dealt another blow. A day after the Lanham-based broadcaster announced fourth quarter losses, Radio One disclosed its vice president of operations has resigned. Zemira Jones has stepped down, and no replacement has been made, the company said Friday. Radio One did not release where Jones is going and could not be immediately reached for comment.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Anne Kornblut and Jess Yellin both celebrated birthdays yesterday.

  • The NAA Announces Digital Edge Award Winners. Check out the winners here.

  • NAJP reports, “Nobody’s reading newspapers anymore. And yet they are. And in record numbers. … The online audience is soaring”

  • The Nation reports, “Since the New York Times endorsed John McCain, the newspaper was obviously not biased in reporting on his conflicts of interest. That’s one view you won’t hear much in the raging debate over the Times article about McCain. Media insiders don’t say it, since they believe in a ‘wall’ separating news and editorial staff. Most readers overlook it, instead focusing on the substance of the actual article. And in the bizzaro world of the paper’s insatiable conservative critics, the endorsement is cited to demonstrate a media conspiracy against McCain. ‘The liberal Times had endorsed McCain as the best Republican in the presidential race. Were they just setting him up for the kill?’ asks Cliff Kincaid, an operative at the right-wing pressure group Accuracy in Media.”

  • Content Bridges asks, “Is it Time for the Times to Get Out of Local Paper Business?”

  • Michael Signer writes in the Washington Post, “challenges at the United States. We deployed an additional 30,000 troops to Iraq. Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad blustered their way across the world stage. Russian President Vladimir Putin flirted with a new cold war with Washington. Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in Pakistan. And, of course, we all continue to live in the chilly shadow of 9/11. You might imagine that such red-hot foreign policy issues, combined with a wide-open presidential election, would spark a journalistic fire so intense it would force candidates up into trees and out on limbs to defend their foreign policy positions. But you’d be dreaming.”

  • The Philadelphia City Paper’s Tom Namako says “Why Time Mag and Attytood are just plain wrong”

  • The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s Campaign Coverage Index shows, “Barack Obama (57%) won the race for media exposure and cemented his status as frontrunner in the Democratic primary fight, according to the campaign media narrative last week. Hillary Clinton was a close second, registering as a significant or dominant factor in 50% of the coverage. But much of that coverage suggested a campaign in trouble, one that might not be capable of stopping Obama’s momentum.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. fell for a second day on the New York Stock Exchange after a Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analyst said that asset sales advocated by hedge funds may not be financially practical.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “An investor group that has nominated four candidates to the New York Times Co.’s board plans to report it has raised its stake in the publisher, according people familiar with the matter.”

  • E&P reports, “They may not have the national attention of the Barack Obama/Hillary Clinton nomination fight, but to members of The Newspaper Guild, presidential candidates Linda Foley and Bernie Lunzer are waging a war of words, grassroots campaigning, and even music videos that rivals anything in the union’s recent history.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Who is this muscleman with the sword who wants to fight his way onto the board of the New York Times Co.? His name is Scott Galloway, he’s 43, and he was unknown to the Times Co. two weeks before Christmas. Since then, he has purchased more than 15 percent of the company’s stock and proposed a slate of four directors — including himself — that was effectively shot down by the company yesterday”

  • NMA reports, “The Financial Times this morning launched a social network aimed at senior business people from the media and technology sectors.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “As part of a special edition of ‘It’s Your Call With Lynn Doyle,’ CN8, The Comcast Network will get inside the minds of young voters at a Rock the Vote party held at Todd English’s Olives Restaurant and Lounge in Washington, D.C. The program will air on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 9 p.m. as CN8 Host and Political Director Lynn Doyle explores all aspects surrounding race and the 2008 election, addressing some of the tough questions and issues facing youth and minority voters today. Doyle will be joined in studio by a panel of experts who will discuss the influence of the youth vote in the 2008 election, as well as voter reaction to female and black candidates running for office.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC’s Bob Woodruff, in North Korea along with other U.S. reporters covering the New York Philharmonic’s concert in Pyongyang, became the first Western journalist to go inside the country’s Yongbyon Nuclear Facility, according to ABC News.”

  • Huffington Post’s Sam Stein reports, “MSNBC-Clinton Feud Continues: Tucker Goes Off”

  • Dow Jones reports, “The three Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission have voted to approve the transaction swapping effective control of DirecTV Group Inc. (DTV) from News Corp. (NWS) to Liberty Media Corp. (LCAPA), several agency officials said Thursday.”

  • 23/6 has The Situation reduced to one minute.

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN/U.S. president Jon Klein announced today that Ed Litvak is leaving American Morning as the executive producer. He’s also parting company with CNN. Insiders tell us Litvak was interested in moving on from the 2 a.m. wake-up calls. But American Morning has struggled to find an audience.”

  • Former CNN-er Chez Pazienza looks into Litvak’s departure from the network.

  • New York Times reports, “Looking to strike a blow against the proliferation of digital video recorders, the ABC network, its affiliated broadcast stations, and Cox Communications’ cable systems are establishing an on-demand video service that would allow viewers to watch ABC shows like ‘Lost’ and ‘Desperate Housewives’ any time they choose.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Only one of the regular Fox & Friends Weekend team was back on set this weekend, as it appears some of the moves may be more permanent than first thought. Last weekend, an entirely new crew graced the Saturday morning screen on FNC. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris occupied the morning show seats. This morning, Earhardt and Morris were back, as was Greg Kelly, who returned after a two week absence to his usual position.”

  • “Discovery Turns Its Spotlight Inward,” Washington Post reports.

  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler asks, “Is The New York Times Still Necessary?”

  • TVNewser’s Debate Ranker shows, “CNN Has Top Six Cable Debates”

  • New York Observer reports,Jim Lehrer Won’t Have to ‘Do Fisticuffs’ on Chip McGrath After All”

  • TVNewser looks into “Raised “Volume” in 2008 Election Coverage”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rove on CBS: ‘The National Enquirer of Network News’”

  • Dow Jones reports, “The Federal Communications Commission on Friday took the next step in an indecency enforcement action against News Corp. (NWS) over a 2003 episode of a short-lived reality TV show. The Commission said it would fine each Fox television station that aired an episode of ‘Married By America’ in April 2003 that resulted in a complaint against it.”

  • TVNewser reported after last week’s debate, “Last night’s Democratic duel in Austin was a ratings winner for CNN. 7,576,00 total viewers watched the debate, making it the second most watched debate in cable history (behind the last CNN debate, from Los Angeles). In the A25-54 demo, the debate drew 2,986,000 viewers, also enough for second place on cable. This means that CNN now has the top six debates on cable this season in total viewers, and the top seven in the demo.”

  • Politico’s Ben Smith calls into question CNN’s, umm, questionable question of the day. Huffington Post reports, “CNN Re-Legitimizes ‘Scurrilous’ Obama Email”

  • The New York Post reports, “Cablevision has been quietly working with Bear Stearns on ways to enhance shareholder value, including putting a value on its Rainbow Media unit ahead of a possible sale and drawing up a list of targets for potential acquisitions, The Post has learned.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “MSNBC serves political news with a side of opinion”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The AP reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL said Thursday that it launched a Web site for users in Mexico that combines its free e-mail and instant messaging features with local content in Spanish. AOL partnered with fixed-line company Alestra for distribution and Mexican magazine company Grupo Editorial Expansion for content. Grupo Editorial Expansion is owned by Time Warner’s magazine publishing unit, Time Inc.”

  • New York Times reports, “Of the many landmarks along a journalist’s career, two are among those that stand out: winning an award and making the government back down. Last week, Joshua Micah Marshall achieved both.”

  • MassLive’s Red Sox Monster reports, “In what came as quite a shock to me, Bruce Allen of Boston Sports Media Watch, the preeminent sports media critic in the market, named its Top 5 mainstream media sports blogs today… and Red Sox Monster placed third, beating out a few huge heavy hitters.”

  • CNet News talks toBill Gates on the future of journalism and more.”

  • Open Forum’s John Battelle writes, “Today, I’ll assert, no matter what business you think you’re in — be it making widgets or providing a service, you’re now in the media business, plain and simple. Those that recognize this shift will succeed, those that ignore it will atrophy and eventually become irrelevant.”

  • AP reports, “Yahoo Inc. said Thursday it added four publishers to its network of newspaper partnerships. The Internet search engine’s newspaper consortium now includes 634 newspapers. The company recently added Shaw Newspapers, The Buffalo News, the Times Publishing Co. and the Columbia Publishing Co.”

  • Military Times Photographer Sheila Vemmer was asked to delete pictures in Kenya and she reports, “When journalists like Michelle and I embed with the military, we are given a long set of rules and instructions that we have to initial and abide by. Whether it is in Iraq or Kenya, a ‘kinetic’ environment or not, the rules are pretty much the same.”

  • The Times Online reports, “Web socialites succumb to ‘Facebook fatigue’”

  • Beltway Confidential reports, “White House spokeswoman Dana Perino warned early in the day today that President Bush was in “a really good mood” and might do an interview on the AF1 flight home from Liberia. Sure enough, POTUS and Mrs. had the press pool brought to the front of the plane where he discussed his trip to Africa, fondness for napping, and plans to vote in the Texas Republican primary. And he expressed concern for Ben Feller of the AP, who is apparently puking his way across the continent.”

  • “Fox Said To Be Exploring Termination Of Google Advertising Deal,” Tech Crunch reports.

  • RTTNews reports, “The New York Times Co. is launching ShifD, an application that enables users to seamlessly shift content between their computers and mobile devices.”

  • Boston Herald reports, “Comcast and its critics are gearing up for a showdown that some say may determine the future ability of people to navigate freely around the Internet without corporate restrictions. In an unusual move, the full board of the Federal Communications Commission will hold a special hearing next week at Harvard Law School in Cambridge to review charges that Comcast has deliberately interfered with attempts by high-speed Internet subscribers to share files online.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Getty Images Inc., one of the world’s premier photo agencies, agreed to a $2 billion buyout from private-equity firm Hellman & Friedman LLC. Hellman will pay $34 a share, a 55% premium to its closing price on Jan. 18, the day before it announced it was exploring a possible sale. The offer is 39% higher than Friday’s closing price of Getty’s shares. Including debt, the deal is valued at $2.4 billion.”

  • Reuters reports, “The head of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said on Monday he is ‘ready, willing and able’ to stop broadband providers that unreasonably interfere with subscribers’ access to Internet content.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Could television be the next industry to become Internet roadkill? Online video has been a hit. Americans watched more than 300 million videos on Google’s YouTube in December alone, and the amount of time spent watching video online grew 34% last year.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader writes, “Oscar night was good for Atlantic Media: The Atlantic’s James Fallows was featured in one of the documentary clips, and Alex Gibney, brother of Atlantic Editor James, took home the prize for best documentary for Taxi to the Dark Side. Maybe Oscar can come visit the magazine’s Ellies…”

  • E&P reports, “USA Today has launched a new lifestyle magazine, Open Air, covering topics from workout tips to athletic gear to travel destinations. The magazine will publish quarterly in the Friday editions of USA Today. Open Air ‘geared towards the busy, well-informed, affluent consumer,’ as described in a statement. Content is designed for readers with a healthy, active lifestyle and a taste for adventure, with many articles about travel and outdoor activities.”

  • “The Washingtonian has obtained this industry planning memo documenting some of the cruise ideas that didn’t happen this year.” Check them out here.

  • Folio reports, “An attempt by The Economist to gain rights to the domain name TheEconomist.com has been denied by the World Intellectual Property Organization. The Economist filed its claim with WIPO on November 9, 2007. The magazine’s Web site is registered as simply economist.com.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “Newsweek and Time should end a stodgy practice”

  • The AP reports, “Time Warner Inc. said in its annual regulatory filing Friday that it expects to cut more jobs in its magazine publishing division in the first quarter, resulting in $10 million to $20 million in expenses.”

  • The American Spectator looks at “The Sources of Our Discontent”

  • MoveOn.org has “partnered with Mother Jones magazine — if you sign up as a monthly donor to Operation Democracy, you’ll get a year’s subscription to their excellent investigative reporting on progressive issues and the right wing”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will be “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm EST.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. radio broadcaster, is in talks with Providence Equity Partners Inc. about revising an agreement to sell its television stations, said two people briefed on the discussions.”

  • A release announced, “Talk show host Robert ‘Rob’ Redding Jr.’s brand new two-hour weekly radio show, named after his Web site Redding News Review, will go national on March 1st. Redding’s company Redding Communications, Inc. (RCI) is teaming with the Genesis Communications Network to distribute Redding News Review, now heard exclusively on the show’s flagship station Talk 540-AM KNOE in Monroe.”

  • DCRTV reports,Jeff King leaves his producer gig at the DC-based ‘Bill Press Show’ to be an account exec with DC’s Strauss Radio Strategies. King used to work for ABC (now Citadel) talker WMAL (630 AM), where he produced Michael Graham’s show. Press’s Jones Radio Network show is heard mornings on Clear Channel talker WWRC (1260 AM)…”

  • DCRTV tells us that Kornheiser may have been referring to one of his recent rants.

  • Radio Ink reports, “FCC Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate says the FCC is looking into how its indecency regulations could extend to the increasing availability of audio and video content delivered to mobile devices.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Los Angeles Times reports,Paul Haggis and Michael Nozik with Hwy61 Films, based at Paramount, option Joseph Weisberg’s ‘An Ordinary Spy,’ a novel about the realities of day-to-day work in the CIA, and the emotional damage participants can wreak on each other”

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    JOBS

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for Staff Writers for an Online Daily Health Publication.

  • API is looking for a Web Content Administrator.

  • Goldman & Associates Public Relations is looking for a Public Relations Associate.

  • Buffalo Communications (A Division of Billy Casper Golf) is looking for someone to work in Public Relations and for a PR Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext