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Posts Tagged ‘John Edwards’

Morning Reading List, 08.22.08

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Morning Reading List, 08.13.08


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Morning Reading List, 08.11.08

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Good morning Washington.

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Morning Reading List, 08.04.08

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Good morning Washington.

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Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

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    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

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    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

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    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t even wear a watch anymore.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • John Hendren and Jose Antonio Vargas shared a birthday this weekend.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said fourth-quarter profit declined 31 percent as advertisers cut holiday spending and its television stations sold fewer political ads.”

  • The AP reports, “The board of directors of The Associated Press gave final approval to a new pricing plan Thursday that will overhaul how the news cooperative’s services are packaged and sold to its newspaper members. The changes, which received initial approval from the board in October, will result in about $6 million in savings to AP’s newspaper members when they take effect Jan. 1, 2009, the company said in a statement.”

  • Press duels with Obama over access

  • Politico reports, “With presidential candidates dropping like flies, the television networks are pouring more resources into covering the most famous non-candidate on the campaign trail: Bill Clinton. Now, all the major players — NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and CNN — have producers on the President Clinton beat, most joining within the past two weeks.”

  • Silicon Alley Insider reports, “When News Corp. bought Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal last year, part of the rationale was that Rupert Murdoch could use the WSJ’s reporters to help bolster its fledgling Fox Businesss Network — but not for a while. That’s because the WSJ and GE’s CNBC had already signed a contract that gives the cable network the exclusive rights to the Journal’s talent through 2012. Or not. Fox Business now looks set on exploiting what it says is a loophole in the CNBC deal: Fox Business Network EVP Kevin Magee says he thinks he can use WSJ reporters and editors, after all.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Jan. 7 essay on Jewish identity, published on washingtonpost.com’s popular On Faith site, caused a furor and led to two public apologies, a lost job and much recrimination.”

  • New York Times’ readers react to William Kristol.

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “When I saw Dan Hellie walk into the media room this morning looking like he had just taken a few crosses to his temple, I immediately thought…..well, you all can guess what I thought. But no, it turns out Hellie was headbutted yesterday while playing pick-up hoops in Bethesda. The wound required 14 stitches to patch up.”

  • A release announced, “The Los Angeles Times editorial board has endorsed Senator John McCain and Senator Barack Obama in this year’s presidential primary election, marking the first such endorsement since 1972.” Check out the full endorsement here.

  • AlterNet’s Nick Bromell writes, “At some point in our lives, we all dream of playing in the big leagues. But what if our fantasies came true? What if we were suddenly plucked from our crabgrass and dead clover and dropped magically onto the emerald outfield of Yankee Stadium? What would we feel — ecstasy or terror? I suspect that something like this happened to David Brooks when he was summoned from the obscure nook of the Weekly Standard and asked to write a regular op-ed column for the New York Times. Here was someone who had edited a cranky right-wing journal and written a clever book poking fun at baby-boomer bohemians suddenly being required to render informed opinion on everything from global warming to stem-cell research. Is it any wonder that for the past three years we have watched a drowning man flounder in a froth of chatty drivel?Fortunately, his legions of exasperated readers don’t have to wonder whether he’ll ever get his just reward. The truth is that Brooks is already being punished. Deep beneath his protective sheath of psychic blubber, he knows what the Wizard of Oz knew — that he’s a fake and a failure.”

  • Washington Whispers reports on one journo’s opinion of Sen. Barack Obama. “Another reporter, Chicago Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet, has worked out beside the candidate and describes him as ‘studious and serious, thorough and businesslike.’”

  • Khaled Hosseini writes in the Wall Street Journal, “Ever since the post-9/11 American invasion, the Afghan government has taken great pains to distance itself from the oppressive and unforgiving rule of the Taliban. Afghan leaders have pointed to greater personal freedom and improvements in infrastructure, education and health care as successes of the country’s nascent democracy. But last week we learned that Sayed Parwez Kaambakhsh, a young journalism student, has been sentenced to death for distributing an article that, religious clerics in Afghanistan say, violates the tenets of Islam.”

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    TV

  • A Clinton campaign release announced, “veteran journalist Carole Simpson will serve as moderator for Hillary’s Voices Across America: A National Town Hall. The three-time Emmy award winner will join Hillary at the anchor event in New York. The town hall will be broadcast live on Hallmark Channel and online on the eve of Super Tuesday, Monday, February 4, 2008 at 9 p.m. EST.”

  • A release announced, “The Comcast Network on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. as CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special three-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of Super Tuesday and the 24 state primary elections taking place that day. The coverage follows CN8′s launch of ‘America’s Next President,’ the network’s most expansive election package to date tracking all major events leading up to the presidential election.”

  • ABC’s David Muir sat down with Sen. Barack Obama. The interview aired this weekend on ABC’s World News Saturday.

  • TVNewser reports, “In addition to coverage on BBC World News America, CNN International and Euro News, MSNBC is getting into the international game this Super Tuesday. NBC has signed an agreement with Channel NewsAsia to carry the network’s coverage from 6pmET Tuesday night to 6amET Wednesday morning.”

  • TVNewser reports, “From politics to parties; from Hooters girls to the President of the United States, FNC’s two hours on the Fox broadcast network this morning accomplished what it set out to do: ‘explore the social impact of the Super Bowl and how it intertwines with politics.’ That line from the press release is about as dry as the Arizona desert. Fox Super Sunday, however, was more exciting.”

  • B&C reports, “Nobody was happier to see John Edwards drop out of the presidential race last week than CNN. That’s because it set up what many Americans—and CNN—wanted to see last Thursday: a one-on-one debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. And while the debate didn’t turn into the slugfest many expected, it set the stage for a riveting Super Tuesday matchup between the top Democratic candidates.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Al-Jazeera’s troubled English language news channel is facing a ‘serious staffing crisis’ after scores of journalists left or have not had contracts renewed amid claims of a revolt over working conditions.”

  • From B&C, check out “some thoughts, notes and quotes that didn’t make it into this week’s Left Coast Bias column on spending the day with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer at Thursday’s Democratic debate at the Kodak Theater in Los Angeles.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last December, conservative author and CNN election analyst William J. Bennett gave over two thousand dollars to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, a fact that Bennett has not mentioned during any of his appearances on the network, according to a review of transcripts by the Huffington Post.”

  • TVNewser reports, Jon Stewart’s take on The Situation Room’s multitude of monitors, with a special appearance from Spongebob.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS and ABC joined Fox to ask the Supreme Court not to review a lower-court decision that essentially took the Federal Communications Commission to the woodshed for failing to justify its crackdown on fleeting profanity.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipster tells us about a situation in New Hampshire (which seems like a really long time ago, now) during the coverage of the primary there. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was talking with a New Hampshire politician about the state of things in Washington. Matthews told the local pol, ‘Nothing will get done in Washington until there is a large enough majority in the Senate — maybe I’ll run for Senate.’ After explaining he was from Pennsylvania, Matthews said, ‘Casey pulled it off so it’s do-able.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel ends January with 8 of the top 10 programs. CNN’s Larry King Live (8th) and Lou Dobbs Tonight (10th) filled out the top 10. MSNBC’s highest rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann came in 19th.”

  • CNN Dem Debate Most Watched in Cable History

  • His Extreme-ness wrote last week, “Send Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the freedom of speech woodshed. Boy, did they exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of C-SPAN during last night’s debate”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is going to begin Super Tuesday coverage a couple hours early” on Monday night. “The Super Tuesday preview will be anchored by Dan Abrams from 10-11pmET, and by Norah O’Donnell and David Shuster from 11-Midnight.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reid Wilson’s birthday was Saturday!

  • “KassyK” is leaving D.C.

  • Radar Online reports, “One of the joys of the presidential campaign season is that it allows the Washington press corps to ignore even more substantive stories than usual. With so many reporters detached to the campaign trail, dozens of big stories are either left to the wire services or ignored altogether. Last week the press buried two big stories about how many times the Bush administration has lied in public, and how it has covered up those lies in private. They belonged on the front page.”

  • Salon’s Joe Conason asks, “Will the press get over its love for McCain?”

  • AlterNet reports, James Glassman, the nominee for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, probably won’t have much of an impact on how the United States presents itself to the rest of the world. For one thing, he’ll only have 11 months in the post. For another — as his predecessor Karen Hughes proved — putting shinier lipstick on the pig of U.S. foreign policy doesn’t do much to assuage widespread anti-American sentiment. Still, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s January 30 hearing on Glassman’s nomination provided some insight into Washington’s evolving view of public diplomacy.”

  • A release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Super Tuesday Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage and the Politics section of ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue through at least 12:15 a.m., ET to report results across all time zones, including California, where polls close at 11:00 p.m., ET.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As j-schools struggle to keep the skills they teach relevant to the fast-changing media landscape, hundreds other journalists and students have mobilized to teach and support each other informally through a new online social network. Wired Journalists was recently created by Ryan Sholin of GateHouse Media, using Ning (a free set of tools for rolling your own social network). As of this morning, the group has 778 members. Many of them appear to be 20-somethings (j-school students or recent grads) — but there are some gray-hairs there, as well as some notable luminaries from the field.”

  • For Super Tuesday, washingtonpost.com will have six hours of live online-only video coverage and analysis of the results as they come in.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Media Life reports, “Magazine publishing in the U.S. may have become gloomy for certain categories, but worldwide it’s in healthy shape, with emerging markets making up for the slowdowns in mature markets like the U.S. And the picture for magazines worldwide looks brighter still going forward, even if they’re not seeing anywhere the growth in ad revenue as the internet. Worldwide ad spending on magazines grew 2.7 percent in 2007, and that pace is forecast to pick up to 3.4 percent a year through 2010.”

  • Newsweek is “Catching Up With ‘Obama Girl’”

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    RADIO

  • All Forgiven, WIMUS-AM Is on a Roll

  • A release announced, “XM Satellite Radio and SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT today announced that they have resolved the lawsuit brought by SONY BMG against XM over its Pioneer Inno, a portable satellite radio with advanced recording features. The companies did not disclose terms of the deal.”

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    BOOKS

  • Boston Globe reports, “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co. is laying off employees in Boston and other offices as it consolidates some of its operations in the wake of its $4 billion acquisition of Harcourt Education, Harcourt Trade, and Greenwood-Heinemann from Reed Elsevier.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes,Craig Silverman’s devotion to the correction as a literary form dates to 2004, when the Montreal-based writer launched his Web site Regret the Error, which traps and displays journalism’s best (and funniest) corrections, retractions, apologies, and clarifications. Silverman’s essential site spawned an equally essential book last fall titled Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, which tells you everything you need to know about the history of journalistic fallibility and the culture of corrections.”

  • The New York Times reports, “A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to a reporter of The New York Times, apparently to try to force him to reveal his confidential sources for a 2006 book on the Central Intelligence Agency, one of the reporter’s lawyers said Thursday. The subpoena was delivered last week to the New York law firm that is representing the reporter, James Risen, and ordered him to appear before a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 7.”

  • A Friday release from the ACLU announced, “After reports that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to New York Times reporter James Risen last week in an attempt to force disclosure of a confidential source, the American Civil Liberties Union today strongly objected to the subpoena, saying that basic First Amendment principles are at stake when reporters are called into the courtroom against their will. According to reports, a chapter in Mr. Risen’s book on the Central Intelligence Agency, ‘State of War,’ piqued the interest of the Justice Department and consequently he has been ordered to appear before the grand jury next week.”

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    JOBS

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR and Marketing Specialist.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Virilion, Inc. is looking for an Account Director.

  • The Gazette is looking for a sports reporter.

  • JBS International, Inc. is looking for Writer/Editors.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is offering Photo and Writing Internships.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter, Budget & Appropriations and a Managing Editor, CongressDaily PM.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for an Ambitious Digital Designer, a Design Developer and a Digital Storyteller.

  • The Martinsville Bulletin is looking for a News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.18.08

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    Good morning Washington. Today in D.C. history, Marion Barry said “bitch set me up.”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Ben Bradlee could take Robert Novak in a street fight.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has appointed the chief executive of Xerox Corp. to its board of directors. Ann Mulcahy, who has received national attention for turning around Xerox since she took the helm in 2001, will take the 11th post on the board of the D.C.-based company.”

  • Today is Jeff Marn’s last day at Foreign Policy magazine. He is joining the Washington, DC office of Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

  • Radar reports that Susan Estrich, ” the Harvard law professor who managed Michael Dukakis’s 1988 presidential bid straight into the ground’, is becoming chief of counsel to L.A.-based business-litigation firm Quinn Emanuel.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Check out E&P’s “Monthly Top 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites

  • The Dirksen Congressional Center annonced, “The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. A total of up to $30,000 will be available in 2008. Awards range from a few hundred dollars to $3,500. The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research.” All proposals must be received no later than February 1, 2008.

  • Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler, the author of The Confidante: Condoleezza Rice and the Creation of the Bush Legacy, is the guest of a brown bag lunch discussion held by the World Affairs Council of Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, January 22nd 2008 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM. Sign up here.

  • Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “There has been no shortage of drama in either party’s early presidential primaries, but in the public’s view the Democratic contest has been far more compelling. Four-in-ten Americans (40%) say they find the Democratic primary race very interesting, nearly double the proportion describing the Republican race as very interesting (21%).”

  • The AP reports, “The state of New Hampshire is getting out of the business of issuing identification cards to members of the news media. The man who handled the chore — Jim Van Dongen of the state Department of Safety — says the decision is based on the proliferation of online and specialty news outlets and technology that allows just about anyone to call himself a journalist. Van Dongen says that put him and his bosses in the uncomfortable position of issuing cards to all comers or having to decide who is a legitimate journalist. News organizations now will have to issue their own identification cards for events that require them.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “How much should a company’s culture reflect its chief executive, especially one who prides himself on being a blunt and innovative — some might say abrasive — businessman? If you’re new Tribune Co. CEO Sam Zell, the answer seems to be: A lot. At least that was the feeling workers got Wednesday with the distribution of a new employee handbook, a document that’s nothing like the mind-numbing, lawyered gobbledygook in most corporate manuals.”

  • Daniel Finkelstein writes “an open letter to readers of The New York Times” saying, “I understand that your newspaper of choice has asked William Kristol, the conservative commentator, to provide an opinion column for the paper. Since I am the op-ed editor of what you Americans call The Times of London, I have followed the controversy that the appointment has caused with great interest. And with my mouth wide open.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com achieved record-high unique visitors in December 2007. The site had 16.9 million uniques, an increase of 53% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC=92s measurements. The site also garnered 153
    million page views, up 24% from the previous year”

  • FNS:The Most Quoted Show, Again

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, January 13, 2008. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.714 million total viewers”

  • A CNN release announced, “As the nation honors the 79th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on Monday, Jan. 21, CNN delves deep into race and politics as it broadcasts the latest Democratic presidential primary debate from Myrtle Beach, S.C., and a live Anderson Cooper 360º special about the influence of race upon politics in America. From 8 p.m. to 10 p.m, CNN will host the two-hour debate with the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, live from the Palace Theater. CNN’s lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer will serve as moderator for the debate, and CNN correspondents Joe Johns and Suzanne Malveaux will serve as panelists questioning the candidates.”

  • FOX News Channel announced, “FOX News Channel (FNC) will provide live coverage of the Nevada Caucus and South Carolina Republican Primary on Saturday January 19, 2008. Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief, Brian Wilson, will host a special Nevada Caucus edition of Weekend Live from 3-5 PM ET. Managing Editor Brit Hume, will anchor You Decide 2008 South Carolina Republican Primary coverage from 6:30-9 PM. A special edition of Hannity & Colmes will follow. FNC’s daytime and primetime coverage will include reports from a team of anchors including Chris Wallace, Megyn Kelly, Bill Hemmer and Martha McCallum. FNC correspondents will be reporting live from both states, including Major Garrett, Steve Brown and Anita Vogel in Nevada, and Chief Political Correspondent Carl Cameron, Wendell Goler and Molly Henneberg in South Carolina. Overall analysis will be provided by The Weekly Standard’s Fred Barnes, National Public Radio’s Juan Williams; Roll Call’s Mort Kondracke; The Weekly Standard’s Bill Kristol and U.S. News & World Report’s Michael Barone.”

  • A CNN release announced, “On Saturday, Jan. 19, you can watch CNN’s live coverage of the Nevada caucuses from noon-3 p.m.* Later that evening from 7:00-10:00 p.m., the Best Political Team on Television will return with results from the South Carolina Republican primary. On Monday, Jan. 21, the CNN/Congressional Black Caucus Institute Democratic primary debate will air live from 8:00-10:00 p.m. out of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Wolf Blitzer moderates; CNN correspondent Joe Johns and White House correspondent Suzanne Malveaux serve as panelists. Anderson Cooper will follow the program with post-debate analysis, and then at 11 p.m., he and Soledad O’Brien will present a new special on race and politics. And, don’t forget, throughout this weekend and every weekend until Super Tuesday, you can watch the candidates uninterrupted and unmediated during Ballot Bowl! Ballot Bowl brings you the candidates’ significant live events in their entirety rather than in sound bite form. Here’s the schedule: Saturday: 3:00-6:00 p.m. (immediately following the Nevada caucuses coverage) Sunday: 1:00-3:00 p.m. AND 4:00-6:00 p.m.”

  • AJR reports, “The media’s addiction to polls and to predicting the future is obviously not new. Critics have railed against it for years. The compulsion to be ahead of the game even caused the television networks to make the wrong call on the 2000 presidential election. You’d think that humiliation was so huge that it would serve as a cautionary whale (hat tip to ‘Juno’ for that great line) as well as a cautionary tale for the political punditocracy. But no.”

  • Yesterday, “CREW and Media Matters for America sent a letter to CNN’s U.S. President Jonathan Klein, asking that former Christian Coalition head Ralph Reed, a proven liar with a deep bias against one of the major Republican candidates, no longer be afforded the opportunity to be a part of CNN’s self-proclaimed “best political team on television.’ Most recently, Reed provided commentary as a ‘Republican strategist’ during the New Hampshire presidential primary.”

  • Media Biz reports, “Are we in a recession or not? Well, investors in the big five media conglomerates seem to think so. Shares of my parent company Time Warner (TWX) are down nearly 5 percent. And it’s not alone. News Corp. (NWS) has fallen 7 percent this year. Walt Disney (DIS) is down nearly 8 percent in 2008. Viacom (VIAB) has shed 9 percent of its value while its former corporate sibling CBS (CBS) has plummeted 14 percent. CBS, Time Warner, Disney and News Corp. are all trading near 52-week lows, and each stock is down between 15 percent and 20 percent for the past three months. Viacom, 2007′s best-performing media stock, has held up slightly better over the past few months thanks to a rebound in ratings at the company’s cable networks, as well as strong box office performance from its Paramount and DreamWorks movie studios. Viacom’s stock is about 20 percent above its 52-week low.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN Correspondent Zain Verjee was hit in the back by a tear-gas canister while covering the protests in Kenya yesterday. Verjee was fired on by Kenyan police, in what she called an ‘unprovoked’ attack.”

  • Jon Stewart took MSNBC and the entire media to task last night on A Daily Show for their focus on, ‘America’s favorite fight starter: Race!’” For more, click here.

  • TVNewser reports, “As part of day-long coverage related to issues of race in America, CNN will present a Democratic candidate debate in Myrtle Beach, SC this Monday, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. day. So far three candidates have met the criteria to attend: Sen. Hillary Clinton, John Edwards and Sen. Barack Obama. A CNN insider tells TVNewser, ‘it still remains possible’ for Rep. Dennis Kucinich to meet the criteria of having 5% support in national polls.”

  • A tipster writes in, “Will the media matters campaign against Chris Matthews yield anything? Yes. A spike in ratings among the media. Let’s just admit it. HRC is never going to receive fair, objective coverage. There’s just too much history. Matthews is just more honest about it than others. We should give him an award.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tech Crunch reports, “Social travel site WAYN is allegedly in talks with AOL over a possible $200m sale to the consumer portal giant. A spokesperson for the UK startup denied that any sale talks are taking place.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “It’s good to see Upton Sinclair back in the news again amid the raves (which I don’t quite share) for the new film ‘There Will Be Blood,’ very loosely based on his 1927 novel ‘Oil!’ Even though Sinclair earned a nod in many of the articles and reviews of the film, which stars Daniel Day-Lewis, few have commented on the original source material.”

  • The Boston Phoenix’s Steven Stark writes, “If the surprise results in New Hampshire had an unanticipated benefit, it is this: they exposed the myth, once and for all, that the Internet has made political reporting and analysis far better than it once was. Alas, the opposite is true.”

  • Media Shift’s Mark Glasser asks, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

  • Chris Mooney writes, “As a journalist and especially as a blogger, I sure picked a hell of a time to move to Los Angeles. No sooner did I settle here late last fall than my fellow writers in the film and television industries went on strike. I’ve never done their kind of writing in a professional capacity, but the more I’ve engaged with the issues at the center of the current dispute between the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, the more I’m convinced that bloggers could soon find themselves making similar complaints against their own employers.”

  • Don Wycliff writes, “I don’t know whether YouTube.com is considered part of the ‘news media’ yet, but in the midst of the Obama-Clinton hoo-hah of the last several days the popular video Web site has performed perhaps the most basic and indispensable function of journalism: to serve, in the words of journalism educators Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Paul Waldman, as the ‘custodian of fact.’”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Call it a photo finish. A split decision. Too close to call: The leading online tracking firms are split over which Web property garners the most traffic. According to comScore, Yahoo — perennially ranked as the most visited destination on the Web — held onto its lead in December, staving off surging Google for at least another month.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “The editor of The Sun newspaper told a Lords’ Committee the internet edition can’t yet replicate the economic operations of the newspaper.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Google’s expanding lobbying operation scored two significant victories last year: It convinced federal regulators to approve its $3.1-billion purchase of online ad company DoubleClick Inc., and to partially open new wireless airwaves so the company could more easily make its products available on them. Though D.C. veterans say Google has a long way to go before its lobbying clout matches its market valuation, the company is no longer viewed as a wide-eyed Washington freshman.”

  • Business Courier reports, “A social networking Web site that will focus on the 2008 elections was launched Wednesday by E.W. Scripps Co. RedBlueAmerica will serve as a free public forum for user-generated content, including blogs, personal profiles and videos, Scripps said in a news release. It will also offer political news, e-mail service for subscribers, a daily public opinion poll and a feature called ‘Truth or Not’ that will examine ‘the veracity of factual claims made by high-profile newsmakers and others,’ according to the release.”

  • MediaShift reports, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Howard Mortman writes in the Weekly Standard, “Here’s an odd little Hillary Clinton proposal: She wants a government blogging team. At first blush, the idea could cut either way–nutty or silly. We might even call it ridiculous, if we weren’t busy laughing at it.”

  • Alex Kingsbury, associate editor for U.S.News & World Report, was featured Tuesday night on NBC Nightly News as part of a story about gender bias in college admissions, which cited a U.S. News June 2007 special report ‘Admittedly Unequal.’”

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    BOOKS

  • The Patriot Ledger reports that Roy Harris Jr., “a former Wall Street Journal reporter and now an editor at CFO magazine” wrote “Pulitzer’s Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism,” released yesterday, “is the first comprehensive chronicling of the human dramas, large and small, behind the coveted award.”

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    JOBS

  • Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company is looking for a Advertising Sales Executive, DC.

  • Platts is looking for a Senior Writer.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Associate Producer, Social Media.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Public safety reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Deputy Editor.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Online Coordinator.

  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education is looking for a Magazine Editor.

  • Defense Daily is looking for a Reporter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.17.08

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    Good morning, Washington. Did you forget to shave this morning? I certainly didn’t…just didn’t have the will power of Mr. Cillizza, no matter how unattractive my versions of the Chuck Todd goatee or Jeffrey Birnbaum mustache looked .

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You are ready to see this writer’s strike end already.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The New York Observer reports, “On Jan. 9, Wall Street Journal bureau chiefs from around the world gathered for a night of cocktails and dinner at the Marriott Hotel on West Street in the Financial District. It was the annual bureau chiefs’ meeting, and it gave Rupert Murdoch his first chance to speak to bureau chiefs and senior editors at Dow Jones en masse, and to answer some questions. It didn’t take long for Mr. Murdoch to start some controversy. At the meeting, according to three people who attended, Mr. Murdoch spelled out a theme he’s been emphasizing since last year, but in renewed terms: that front-page feature stories are too long and might be better suited for a weekend reader who has more time to read them.”

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    TV

  • Mixed Media reports,John Edwards wants you to ignore all that garbage coming out of Fox News — except when it makes him look good. Edwards was the first major Democrat to vow to sit out a debate originally scheduled to air on Fox News last August. ‘Fox News has already proven they have no intention of providing ‘fair and balanced’ coverage of any Democrat in this election,’ declared his campaign website. ‘Now it’s time for Democrats to stand together and send a clear message to Roger Ailes, Fox News and all the rest of them: bias isn’t balance, but turning tables is fair.’ Other Democrats also succumbed to pressure from MoveOn.org and other left-wing groups, and Fox ended up cancelling the debate.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • TVWeek reports, “A hungry online video audience offset the holiday traffic slowdown for video-sharing site YouTube, which grew its audience by nearly 9% in December. The site lured 68.6 million unique visitors last month, compared to 63.1 million in November, according to Nielsen Online. YouTube’s growth is particularly noteworthy given that Web traffic in general often slows in the last two weeks of the calendar year.”

  • Michael Chabon says that Richard Cohen of The Washington Post should be ashamed of himself for using smear and guilt-by-association to scare Jews about Obama.

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    RADIO

  • Media Biz reports, “And back in late November, investors were led to believe, courtesy of a Bear Stearns analyst report, that Department of Justice approval of the merger between Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) and XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) was ‘imminent.’ But it’s now more than a month and a half later and there has been no ruling from either the DOJ or the Federal Communications Commission, which must also give the deal its blessing, about the merger. So much for ‘imminent.’ Investors are getting increasingly nervous. Shares of Sirius have plunged nearly 26 percent since November 30 while XM’s stock has plummeted 31 percent.”

    BOOKS

  • Inside Higher Ed’s Scott McLemee writes, “The people running Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign probably haven’t made time to leaf through the University of Illinois Press’s most recent catalog. Too bad for them. They could have placed an early bulk order for Erika Falk’s Women for President: Media Bias in Eight Campaigns. The official publication date is next week. It seems like a book that Clinton’s staff would find useful — and not just as a projectile to bounce off the heads of members of the press corps.”

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    JOBS

  • The Economist Group is looking for a Sales Manager.

  • World Politics Review is seeking News About U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security.

  • DailyCandy, Inc. is looking for a Washington, D.C. Editor.

  • AARP is looking for a Deputy Editor.

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for a Managing Editor Multifamily Executive & Developer.

  • BizBash Media is looking for someone in Advertising Sales.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a Writer.

  • Capitol File is looking for a Sales Assistant and Administrative Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.14.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    On this day in 1952, the “Today” show premiered, in 1973 the Dolphins became the only one of only two NFL teams to go undefeated during the regular season, and in 2004, President Bush announced we’re going to Mars. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio).

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:
    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • You think Bono is both great and sorta annoying.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jim Pinkerton quit his Newsday column and resigned his Fox News contract to join Gov. Huckabee as a senior adviser to help fill out his policy proposals. Pinkerton tells Playbook he was lured by Ed Rollins, his boss in the Reagan White House political-affairs office, who said it was a chance to ‘restore the Reagan coalition,’ Pinkerton recalled. ‘I thought, ‘I’m not going to turn THAT down,’ Pinkerton recalled.”

  • Howell Raines joins Portfolio.

  • Sharon Waxman announced she is not returning to the New York Times.

  • Voxant, the new media network announced the appointment of Marcien Jenckes, formerly Senior Vice President of Messaging, Community and Voice at AOL, as its new CEO.

  • Chris Bodenner has joined The Hotline.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The National Press Foundation is hosting a free, half-day seminar on Thursday to help journalists make sense of the federal budget. Reservations are required by Wednesday. For more info, click here.

  • AP: Covering Britney Spears is a big deal, people.

  • PFAW reports that the Virginian-Pilot has reported that Pat Robinson is interested in purchasing the Norfolk based newspaper.

  • Fox Business reports, “The New York Times Company’s stock on Wednesday hit a price it hasn’t seen in almost two decades. Shares of the company known for its namesake flagship newspaper hit a low of $15.12 yesterday, a price the stock has not seen since 1988. The stock recovered slightly on Thursday, however.”

  • Business Week’s Jon Fine writes, “You’ve Got Tribune. Now Do Something — How new owner Sam Zell can breathe life into newspapers amid widespread malaise”

  • Reuters spoke with Gannett’s newspaper division chief Sue Clark-Johnson about her departure from the company. Check out the interview here.

  • The LA Times wonders if Mike Allen ever sleeps.

  • “The National Press Foundation welcomed three journalists to its Board in 2007, including Jim Brady of washingtonpost.com, Amy Walter of the National Journal’s The Hotline, and Wendy Wilkinson of NBC News.” For the full release, click here.

  • The Hill reports, “Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) is criticizing NBC for disinviting him from an upcoming Nevada presidential debate, and says he is considering legal action. NBC had invited the long-shot candidate on Jan. 9 but rescinded its decision Friday morning, when NBC Political Director Chuck Todd informed the Kucinich camp that the network was ‘redoing’ its participation criteria, according to the campaign”

  • Entries for the Thomas L. Stokes Award for Best Energy Writing are due on January 31. For more info, click here.

  • The Chronicle for Higher Education announced, “The Chronicle has joined with Gallup in a new partnership. The first venture of the Chronicle/Gallup Poll Alliance is designed to help colleges use polling to learn more about how they are perceived by the public.”

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    TV

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN, the political network of record, will air LIVE coverage of the House Oversight and Government Reform hearing on the Mitchell Report and the illegal use of steroids in Major League Baseball. Live coverage will begin Tuesday, January 15th at 9:30 AM ET on C-SPAN2 and C-SPAN Radio. The hearing will also be available LIVE through streaming video at: www.c-span.org.”

  • David Carr on Election 2008 being a runaway hit.

  • An NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams will moderate a debate among the Democratic presidential candidates Tuesday, Jan. 15, 9-11 p.m. ET, live on MSNBC from the Cashman Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sen. Barack Obama, Sen. Hillary Clinton and former Sen. John Edwards will participate. The debate, to focus on issues important to minority voters, is sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 100 Black Men of America, IMPACTO, the Democratic African-American Leadership Council, the College of Southern Nevada and the Nevada Democratic Party.”

  • “MASN grabs ‘Rookie of the Year’” writes The Examiner’s Jim Williams.

  • Media Matters on Chris Matthews’ “problem”: “Put simply, Matthews behaves as though he is obsessed with Hillary Clinton. And not ‘obsessed in a charming, mostly harmless, Lloyd-Dobler-with-a-boom-box kind of way. ‘Obsessed’ in a this-person-needs-help kind of way.” Feministing also joins the anti-Matthews movement. CJR reports on “The Anti-Chris Matthews Vote” and AP’s David Bauder also joins in.

  • Mixed Media writes,Bill O’Reilly thinks he knows why everyone gangs up Fox News: because it’s so darn successful.”

  • “If MSNBC anchor Keith Olbermann were to write a book about Office Politics 101, he’d call it ‘Do As I Write, Not As I Did for 20 Years.’ Olbermann discusses office politics and other issues in the February issue of Men’s Journal magazine, out yesterday.” TVNewser has the details.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, arranged $2 billion in three-year, unsecured financing to repay debt that will be coming due.”

  • Reuters reports, “CBS Corp will see growth in 2008 in ‘every single division’ and no short-term effects from a looming economic downturn or Hollywood’s writers strike, Chief Executive Les Moonves told analysts on Thursday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A group that includes Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp. accused broadcast-industry lobbyists of interfering with U.S. regulators’ tests of mobile Internet devices that operate on unused television airwaves.”

  • FOX News Channel tell us it had its highest-rated debate/event so far this ’07-’08 political season, according to Nielsen Media Research with the South Carolina Republican event from last Thursday. Check out the AP’s analysis of the debate. TVNewser reports, “In early Nielsen estimates, Fox News Channel’s airing of the GOP debate last night drew 3.6M Total Viewers and 1.04M in the A25-54 demo. If the numbers hold, it will be FNC’s highest rated debate yet and the 5th most watched of this election cycle.”

  • Kucinich Invited, Then Uninvited, to MSNBC Debate

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC Chief Political Correspondent ‘Campaign’ Carl Cameron tells TV Guide’s Stephen Battaglio he still thrives on Presidential campaign coverage: ‘There is absolutely no story anywhere in the world that is this significant. It’s the struggle for leadership in the free world. That’s better than any adrenaline or Red Bull you could possibly imagine.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Check out the special edition of American Observer put together by the AU journalism students while they were on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

  • Former Gannett-er Jim Hopkins tell us “10 things” about him.

  • Dow Jones reports, “News Corp. (NWS) denied Thursday making any offer for Monster Worldwide Inc. (MNST), calling a report on the Seeking Alpha blog untrue. Seeking Alpha reported that News Corp. head Rupert Murdoch sent a letter to the board of the online-recruitment company offering $4.8 billion for it. Monster has a market cap of $3.6 billion.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yell Group Plc, the publisher of the U.K.’s Yellow Pages phone books, had its biggest gain in London trading in a month on speculation about a bid from Google Inc. Yell rose as much as 4.4 percent, the biggest increase since Dec. 10. The stock climbed 5.50 pence, or 1.7 percent, to 331.25 pence at 8:37 a.m. in London, valuing the company at 2.6 billion pounds ($5.1 billion).”

  • Mickey Kaus continues to hate on Ezra Klein, asking “Is Ezra Klein young enough to be this pompous?”

  • Today, “MonkeySee.com (Great Falls VA) will officially launch a new how-to video site. Visitors to MonkeySee.com can access both free professionally-produced content as well as user-generated video of real experts sharing knowledge, demonstrations, and tips for more successful living on topics that range from fitness to finance and cooking to careers.”

  • Wonkette reports, “we were very pleased this morning to see that Peggy Noonan, our nation’s most beloved newspaper columnist since 1911, mentioned our New Hampshire coverage and a particularly Victorian bit of high-minded satire we dropped along the way”

  • E&P reports, “Calling it a “nationwide experiment,” The New York Times on Thursday launched a new program asking online readers to submit photos of polling places during the ongoing primaries and general election. Dubbed the Polling Place Photo Project, the online initiative hopes to get photos from every polling place in the nation, according to a release.”

  • Street Insider asks, “Could Microsoft (MSFT) Buy Yahoo (YHOO)?”

  • “After a year-long hiatus, NPR’s Office of the Ombudsman is back in business with a weekly Wednesday column, radio appearances and talks.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Washington Note reported Friday, “An American journalist, Nicholas Schmidle, who authored the article ‘Next Gen Taliban’ that appeared in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine has been deported from Pakistan. He was forced to leave today — Friday, 11 January.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Meet the new twit, same as the old twit. It’s the media, of course. They got it wrong again this week, covering the Democrats in New Hampshire. The think-tankers will be mulling this one for years. After all, they’ll say, we’re not just talking about a few bad predictions here and there. The best brands in the business led the public astray

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The HealthCentralNetwork.com is looking for an Executive Producer.

  • www.HealthCentral.com is looking for a Web content producer.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer (Washington Bureau.

  • Bloomberg is looking for a Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac Reporter.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Specialist, Renewals.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • Leading Authorities Inc is looking for a CEO Update Editor-in-Chief.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Manager, Group Planning.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Director, Associate Creative.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Marketing Manager, Digital Media.
  • The Chronicle Newspapers is looking for an Editor.

  • NPR is looking for a Producer 1, Digital News, News & Information, Editor l, ll, or lll, Digital News, News & Information and a Production Assistant, NPR Music.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

  • The Atlantic is offering an Editorial Internship.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Petersburg Progress-Index is looking for a Sports Reporter/Paginator.

  • FoxSports/Scout.com is seeking a Baseball Reporter.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.20.07

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    Good morning Washington. On this day in 2002, Sen. Trent Lott resigned as Senate Majority Leader.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think card games are “much fun.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader wonders, “Where did the Washington Times Christmas tree go? It was there but now it’s gone”

  • NPF president Bob Meyers writes, “Last year you supported us with many contributions so we could meet our Challenge Grant obligations. This year the challenge is equally important, but we’re doing this on our own, without any challenge grant to spur us on. … Could you help with a $25 contribution? A $50 contribution? We’re a 501-c-3, so you could deduct your gift. I’ve added a connection to our magical online giving icon (you can find it on our site as well).” For more info, click here.

  • FCC Eases Ownership Limits for Big Media

  • Politico has a caucus night bingo game for readers (no, it is not a drinking game, although we find that hard to believe).

  • New York Times Sees Boost from Web Sites

  • Tribune CEO Expected to Step Down in Buyout

  • From a Post insider: “what frustrates so many post reporters about today’s nytimes piece on the bacon fiasco is that, yet again, downie does not explain how editors edited the story and does not address the criticisms of the piece. instead, he takes the easy way out and defends the notion that young people can be big reporters too. he’s permitting daly to divert the discussion away from the real journalistic issue. he should have come out and explained what was wrong with the story, what was right with the story, and what the post will do to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

  • PEJ reports, “Americans received a grim picture of the war in Iraq in the first 10 months of 2007. Daily violence accounted for 47% of the stories studied. And of the stories that offered an assessment of the direction of the war, most were pessimistic, according to a new study of press coverage from Iraq from January to October.”

  • Newsday, Hoy to Pay $15 Million in Circ Case

  • Also from Pew, “Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007. Nearly half of Americans (45%) tracked news about the shootings at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “After weeks of bad news, Hillary Clinton and her strategists hoped that winning the endorsement of Iowa’s largest newspaper last weekend might produce a modest bump in their media coverage. But on Sunday morning, they awoke to upbeat headlines about their chief Democratic rival: ‘Obama Showing New Confidence With Iowa Sprint,’ said the New York Times. ‘Obama Is Hitting His Stride in Iowa,’ said the Los Angeles Times. And on Monday, Clinton aides were so upset about a contentious ‘Today’ show interview that one complained to the show’s producer. Clinton’s senior advisers have grown convinced that the media deck is stacked against them, that their candidate is drawing far harsher scrutiny than Barack Obama. And at least some journalists agree.”

  • Washington Post reports, Don Graham, “The chairman of The Washington Post Co., who separated from his wife last month, just closed on a 1896 semi-detached townhouse near Dupont Circle. The four-bedroom, four-bath Tudor underwent extensive work during the past year and is described as impeccable.” Ed Note: Wait, Post ombudsman Deb Howell says that Don Graham’s divorce isn’t appropriate for the Style section (it went in Business) but his house sales are?

  • CJR reports, “In an otherwise reasonable and spirited defense of a reporter, The Washington Post’s Leonard Downie Jr. trips by employing ad hominem attack and innuendo against a critic—the very tactics Downie seeks to criticize.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss was a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staffer when he broke through the chrysalis of Capitol Hill conventionality to become a musical satirist. Mr. Strauss, who died Dec. 18 of pancreatic cancer at his home in McLean, recalled the breakthrough in a phone interview shortly before his death at age 60.”

  • Politico reports, “New York Times columnist Frank Rich regularly chides political journalists for not thinking outside the Beltway in covering the presidential campaign. But what about venturing beyond the west side of Manhattan? Unlike his Times opinion-writing colleagues — Maureen Dowd, David Brooks and Gail Collins — Rich has yet to rack up an Iowa dateline this year, not to mention New Hampshire or South Carolina.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Inside the pressure-cooker that is live television, the name Barack Obama apparently becomes tricky.
    The Democratic presidential candidate’s name has been confused with the terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and even Omaha, Neb., in separate occasions on CNN recently.”

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    TV

  • “2007 Ratings: MSNBC has ‘Fastest Growing Primetime Lineup of any Top-50 Cable Channel,’” reports TVNewser.

  • TVNewser reports, “Bob Schieffer: 2008 Campaign Probably ‘My Last In The Role I Have Now’”

  • TVNewser reports, “You may have noticed World News with Charles Gibson and World News Now have been broadcasting form a different location this week. We are hearing construction is underway for a new set which is expected to debut in the next couple of weeks. We’re told the new set will also be HD-ready and that the Gibson broadcast is expected to be in HD sometime in 2008.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “CNN’s Jonathan Klein on Campbell Brown, Couch Potatoes and Plans for 2008″

  • Wonkette reports, “Joe Scarbrough and Friend Ridicule Huckabee’s Jesusery”

  • TVNewser reports, “Gore Vidal Has Beef With Wolf Blitzer, Apparently”

  • TVNewser reports, “The cable nets continue breaking news coverage of a fire at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which is part of the White House complex. Of the three cable news nets, CNN was first with the news at 9:42:30. MSNBC was next at 9:43:10 and FNC reported the story at 9:44:40.” Meanwhile, on broadcast, “ABC News’ Chris Cuomo anchored a network special at 9:51amET on the fire at the EEOB. The NBC network continued with the third hour of the today show and aired a special report at 10amET (MSNBC was already in breaking news coverage of the fire). CBS reported the fire with an update to the west coast feed of The Early Show at 10amET”

  • TVNewser reports, “In an opinion column in USA Today, titled ‘Does Al-Jazeera belong in the USA?’, Souhelia Al-Jadda, an associate producer at Link TV’s Mosaic: World News from the Middle East and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors, laments the fact that more than one year after the launch of Al-Jazeera English, ‘no major U.S. cable or satellite company is willing to carry the station.’”

  • Inside Cable News reported yesterday, “Bloomberg TV announced this morning that Terry Holt and Stephanie Cutter will be providing analysis for the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary.”

  • A CNN release announced, “The next stops for the CNN Election Express include Iowa for the state’s upcoming caucuses, New Hampshire for the nation’s first primary elections and visits to Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Los Angeles for CNN’s remaining presidential primary debates. To date, the CNN Election Express has served as the studio for interviews with top presidential candidates including Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The studio configuration includes a lighting grid with full power to allow quick set-up for interviews. The video equipment on board can also be used outside for interviews and live shots.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The NewsHour Gets New Set, Goes HDTV”

  • TVNewser reports, “It was good news all around for CNN yesterday, with a re-up for CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein and a memo from CNN Worldwide president Jim Walton discussing all the “fun” the network is having.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Once again, Obama has been confused with Osama. This time, by HLN’s Glenn Beck on Good Morning America.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Comcast Says FCC Limit Rule Is ‘Perverse’

  • FCC Accepts Google’s Auction Application

  • Check out www.2008ElectionProCon.org, “created to be a comprehensive source of information on the 2008 presidential election.” The site has “compiled the pro and con positions of all the presidential candidates on major policy issues, along with other resources related to the election, like a printable one-page summary of all the candidates’ positions on the issues and a history of political parties. All of the information is designed to help people determine for themselves which candidate would make the best president.”

  • A reader writes in, “Have you seen www.Whitehouse.com lately? (not .gov, BTW). Yes it is the same URL that was once the famed porn site. Now it has been reborn as some kind of uber-hip political blog. And word on the street is they’ve been phoning up reporters and inviting them to come and start work…resume, clips and references sight unseen. The site boasts 10 years of tradition (doesn’t mention that 9.5 of them are as a porn site)…and check out the ‘benefits’ page! 25 cent soft drinks and occasional Pizza Fridays!”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes, “How can I say this nicely? Oh, what the heck. If Ted Leonsis is going to be candid and bash mainstream media, then why can’t I? It’s not like I need a job. At this point in my career, I’d only be bought out at best or downsized in a restructuring at worst.”

  • A release announced, “Alive in Baghdad, a web news program reported and filmed by local Iraqis and distributed by independent US news agency Small World News lost correspondent Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi after he was killed over the weekend in Sadr City. The correspondent was found dead by a family member after being shot 31 times. Details as to motive and circumstances about the killing are undetermined.”

  • Check out the “major design” of Bloggingheads.tv.

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    MAGAZINES

  • A Democracy release announced, “It’s not chestnuts roasting on an open fire or ringing sleigh bells, but Christmas came early (or Hannukah came late) to Democracy this December. Just after we had released our winter issue and thought things would be winding down for the year, we were notified that Democracy has been named the Best New Publication of 2007 by the Utne Independent Press Awards.” For more on the awards, click here.

  • Check out a new video feature on newyorker.com, The Naked Campaign, “a series of short videos featuring the illustrator Steve Brodner as he draws the Presidential candidates and discusses the race for the White House. The videos are directed by Gail Levin, with animation by Asterisk.”

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    RADIO

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Carl Kasell — the National Public radio newscaster and the judge/scorekeeper/second banana on NPR’s weekly call-in quiz show ‘Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!’ — is running late for an interview. … Mr. Kasell, who’ll be moonlighting next week as the announcer for the 30th annual “Kennedy Center Honors” broadcast, was recording an answering machine message for a ‘Wait, Wait’ winner. Such is the highly coveted prize for callers who triumph in events like ‘Listener Limerick Challenge,’ ‘Bluff the Listener,’ and ‘Who’s Carl This Time?’ — wherein Mr. Kasell delivers highly flavored imitations of newsmakers from Paris to Britney to George W. and all points and poobahs in between.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Amos Snead is stepping down as Press Secretary to House Republican Whip Roy Blunt and is returning to FD Dittus.

  • Salon finally admits that Michael Scherer is leaving. Joan Walsh writes, “Some of you may have noticed the change to Michael Scherer’s bio at the bottom of his great Meghan McCain profile today, identifying him as our ‘former’ Washington correspondent. I’m sad to say that Michael has left us to cover the presidential campaign for Time magazine. He’s been a crucial part of our news resurgence over the last two years, breaking stories on Abu Ghraib, George Allen’s race problems and the 2008 presidential campaign. We miss him already. But we’re thrilled to welcome Mike Madden, who has covered politics, Congress and Washington for Gannett News Service since 2000. Mike has also written for Time.com, the New York Observer, USA Today and Wonkette, and he’ll join Walter Shapiro on the campaign trail shortly.”

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    JOBS

  • Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Feature Writer.

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is looking for a Washington Bureau Reporter.

  • PBS is looking for a Director, PBS Engage.

  • Heldref Publications is looking for a Marketing and Advertising Director.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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