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Posts Tagged ‘John McCain’s’

Morning Reading List, 02.22.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t know a journo cheating on his/her spouse, but just barely.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A reader tells us, “There has been no mention of the fact that Marilyn Thompson left the NYT in protest over them not running the McCain story. She is now back at the Washington Post. Wheels within wheels.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Check out CQ’s video “Losing Pretty or Winning Ugly” where Craig Crawford gives his take on what Hillary Clinton’s options are going forward, and some wrestling moves are in the forecast.

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “The public remains highly engaged in the presidential campaign, and strong majorities say the campaign is important, easy to follow, interesting and informative. Relatively few Americans (28%) say the campaign has been too negative thus far. Two-thirds (66%) say it has not been too negative. By comparison, nearly half of the public (47%) found the campaign to be too negative at a comparable point in the 2004 election.”

  • Scripps Howard Foundation Names Judges for Annual Journalism Awards

  • A reader asks, “Oh, Posties … did you get your Diaz-Balarts confused? Today’s ‘In the Loop’ Washington Post pg A13 Photo of Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart with caption — ‘Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart still considers Fidel Castro a threat’. Then a quote from Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart — ‘We’ve been waiting, hoping for the moment of Castro’s death …’ So, who was it? Okay, let’s take it from the top: Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R–FL–21st) Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R–FL–25th) Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D–CA–47th) Rep. Linda Sanchez (D–CA–39th).”

  • TVNewser has a round-up for FBNY’s reporting on The New York Times story on John McCain’s relationship with Telecom lobbyist Vicki Iseman.

  • Romenesko also has a round-up of NYT related chatter from MSNBC’s First Read, WashingtonPost.com and Horse’s Mouth.

  • And, Wonkette asks, “Why Did The Times Publish This Funny Story About John McCain’s Sex Affairs?”

  • Mark your calendars! Len Downie will be on the Q&A Café April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel finished as the fourth most-watched basic cable news channel in prime time last week, after USA, TNT and TBS. This was the sixth week in a row that FNC has finished in the top 5. CNN finished at #20 while MSNBC was #28. This comes one week after Super Tuesday, when FNC finished at #3, CNN was #8 and MSNBC was #26 in prime time. Only CNN saw a significant drop week-to-week. FNC also ranked in seventh place in the total day, with CNN (#23) and MSNBC (#29) trailing for the week.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comcast shares have been on the upswing since last week when the firm unveiled a dividend, but at least one analyst thinks the run-up has gone too far. The dividend and a stock-buyback update ‘were positive developments, but they have little to do with valuation or fundamentals, yet the stock is up 15% since the earnings report,’ Credit Suisse analyst Bryan Kraft said in downgrading the cable giant’s stock from ‘outperform’ to ‘neutral.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “PBS viewers have spoken. Thousands of them. It was on February 17 that a story by the The New York Times’ Charles McGrath asked Is PBS Still Necessary?. ‘There are not only countless more channels to chose from now,’ McGrath wrote, ‘but many offer the kind of stuff that in the past you could see only on public TV, and in at least some instances they do it better.’ Public response was fierce, with readers posting hundreds of comments online at the Times. PBS’ Jim Lehrer mentioned the article on The NewsHour, inviting viewers to share their thoughts. A NewsHour spokesperson tells TVNewser that the program has received, to date, almost 5,000 comments via phone, email, and online postings.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “News Networks Bump Clinton Out of Picture”

  • TVNewser warns,Anderson Cooper Better Watch Out For Mike Gravel

  • New York Post reports,Daryn Kagan’s ‘Breaking the Curse’ won the 2008 Gracie Award for Outstanding Documentary. It aired on PBS.”

  • O’Reilly Unintentionally Questions Whether FNC is ‘Responsible News Agency,’” reports TVNewser.

  • Up next Thursday on WETA’s Author, Author! is Jane Austen panel discussion with Carol Pippen, Professor of English at Goucher College and editor of the Jane Austen Society of North America newsletter. Text interviews with Laurie Viera Rigler (Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict), Margaret Sullivan (The Jane Austen Handbook) and Syrie James (The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen).

  • FCC Relaxes Digital-TV Transition Order

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “Due to an overwhelming amount of requests, the final EPpy Awards entries deadline has been extended to Friday, February 29th”

  • Adotas reports, “Perhaps the death of newspapers has been greatly exaggerated. It seems website audiences are actually growing, Scarborough Research, a newspaper audience ratings service reports.”

  • NMA reports, “Facebook has suffered its first ever drop in unique users after 17 months of growth. The figures from Nielsen Online revealed a 5% drop in UK numbers between December 2007 and January 2008.”

  • Wonkette reports,Helen Thomas Still Hates Bush, Loves (John) Kennedy

  • The New York Observer reports, “In the spring of 2005, when asked about Arianna Huffington’s plan to launch a news-aggregating blog to compete with the Drudge Report, Matthew Drudge did not seem too impressed. … It took a while, and surely the brighter prospects on the left side of the aisle have changed things since Mr. Drudge was acting as the steam vent for a country fed up with the Clinton White House. But, nearly three years into its existence, Huffingtonpost.com is getting there, with unique visitors logging on at three times the rate they did just six months ago.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Time Managing Editor Rick Stengel asks, “Should Newspapers Still Be Taking Sides?”

  • Reuters reports, “Reed Elsevier announced the acquisition of U.S. risk-management business ChoicePoint Inc for $4.1 billion, including debt, and said it would intensify a cost-saving drive and sell an advertising-dependent information business.”

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    RADIO

  • Tony Snow accepts job with O’Reilly.”

  • Radio Business Report reports, “Fox News Radio fed the press pool this time down in Africa for President Bush’s visit this week. But in Tanzania, there are no ISDN lines. Fox News found a solution and was able to transmit the broadcasts over the Internet and provide that ability to the other networks-ABC, AP, CBS, NPR and VOA. This is the first time that a network news pool had access to an internet transmission.”

  • DOJ Merger Decision Shadows XM, Sirius

  • Huffington Post’s Sam Stein reports, “Air America, one of the country’s more powerful radio networks and a major progressive megaphone, is switching ownership.”

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    JOBS

  • Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America is looking for a Business Writer/Editor.

  • A DC-based website is looking for an Editor-in-Chief. The site deals with the personalities, business and news of Washington. The Editor-in-Chief will oversee the entire editorial process from story assignment to publication for 7+ electronic newsletters. News experience and a sense of humor are a must and knowledge of one or more of the following local business communities is desirable: commercial real estate, legal, technology/government contracting, trade association, finance, and medical. For more info, contact KDSearch.com

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Social Media 201

    Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

    Morning Reading List, 02.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t even wear a watch anymore.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • John Hendren and Jose Antonio Vargas shared a birthday this weekend.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said fourth-quarter profit declined 31 percent as advertisers cut holiday spending and its television stations sold fewer political ads.”

  • The AP reports, “The board of directors of The Associated Press gave final approval to a new pricing plan Thursday that will overhaul how the news cooperative’s services are packaged and sold to its newspaper members. The changes, which received initial approval from the board in October, will result in about $6 million in savings to AP’s newspaper members when they take effect Jan. 1, 2009, the company said in a statement.”

  • Press duels with Obama over access

  • Politico reports, “With presidential candidates dropping like flies, the television networks are pouring more resources into covering the most famous non-candidate on the campaign trail: Bill Clinton. Now, all the major players — NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and CNN — have producers on the President Clinton beat, most joining within the past two weeks.”

  • Silicon Alley Insider reports, “When News Corp. bought Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal last year, part of the rationale was that Rupert Murdoch could use the WSJ’s reporters to help bolster its fledgling Fox Businesss Network — but not for a while. That’s because the WSJ and GE’s CNBC had already signed a contract that gives the cable network the exclusive rights to the Journal’s talent through 2012. Or not. Fox Business now looks set on exploiting what it says is a loophole in the CNBC deal: Fox Business Network EVP Kevin Magee says he thinks he can use WSJ reporters and editors, after all.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Jan. 7 essay on Jewish identity, published on washingtonpost.com’s popular On Faith site, caused a furor and led to two public apologies, a lost job and much recrimination.”

  • New York Times’ readers react to William Kristol.

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “When I saw Dan Hellie walk into the media room this morning looking like he had just taken a few crosses to his temple, I immediately thought…..well, you all can guess what I thought. But no, it turns out Hellie was headbutted yesterday while playing pick-up hoops in Bethesda. The wound required 14 stitches to patch up.”

  • A release announced, “The Los Angeles Times editorial board has endorsed Senator John McCain and Senator Barack Obama in this year’s presidential primary election, marking the first such endorsement since 1972.” Check out the full endorsement here.

  • AlterNet’s Nick Bromell writes, “At some point in our lives, we all dream of playing in the big leagues. But what if our fantasies came true? What if we were suddenly plucked from our crabgrass and dead clover and dropped magically onto the emerald outfield of Yankee Stadium? What would we feel — ecstasy or terror? I suspect that something like this happened to David Brooks when he was summoned from the obscure nook of the Weekly Standard and asked to write a regular op-ed column for the New York Times. Here was someone who had edited a cranky right-wing journal and written a clever book poking fun at baby-boomer bohemians suddenly being required to render informed opinion on everything from global warming to stem-cell research. Is it any wonder that for the past three years we have watched a drowning man flounder in a froth of chatty drivel?Fortunately, his legions of exasperated readers don’t have to wonder whether he’ll ever get his just reward. The truth is that Brooks is already being punished. Deep beneath his protective sheath of psychic blubber, he knows what the Wizard of Oz knew — that he’s a fake and a failure.”

  • Washington Whispers reports on one journo’s opinion of Sen. Barack Obama. “Another reporter, Chicago Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet, has worked out beside the candidate and describes him as ‘studious and serious, thorough and businesslike.’”

  • Khaled Hosseini writes in the Wall Street Journal, “Ever since the post-9/11 American invasion, the Afghan government has taken great pains to distance itself from the oppressive and unforgiving rule of the Taliban. Afghan leaders have pointed to greater personal freedom and improvements in infrastructure, education and health care as successes of the country’s nascent democracy. But last week we learned that Sayed Parwez Kaambakhsh, a young journalism student, has been sentenced to death for distributing an article that, religious clerics in Afghanistan say, violates the tenets of Islam.”

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    TV

  • A Clinton campaign release announced, “veteran journalist Carole Simpson will serve as moderator for Hillary’s Voices Across America: A National Town Hall. The three-time Emmy award winner will join Hillary at the anchor event in New York. The town hall will be broadcast live on Hallmark Channel and online on the eve of Super Tuesday, Monday, February 4, 2008 at 9 p.m. EST.”

  • A release announced, “The Comcast Network on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. as CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special three-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of Super Tuesday and the 24 state primary elections taking place that day. The coverage follows CN8′s launch of ‘America’s Next President,’ the network’s most expansive election package to date tracking all major events leading up to the presidential election.”

  • ABC’s David Muir sat down with Sen. Barack Obama. The interview aired this weekend on ABC’s World News Saturday.

  • TVNewser reports, “In addition to coverage on BBC World News America, CNN International and Euro News, MSNBC is getting into the international game this Super Tuesday. NBC has signed an agreement with Channel NewsAsia to carry the network’s coverage from 6pmET Tuesday night to 6amET Wednesday morning.”

  • TVNewser reports, “From politics to parties; from Hooters girls to the President of the United States, FNC’s two hours on the Fox broadcast network this morning accomplished what it set out to do: ‘explore the social impact of the Super Bowl and how it intertwines with politics.’ That line from the press release is about as dry as the Arizona desert. Fox Super Sunday, however, was more exciting.”

  • B&C reports, “Nobody was happier to see John Edwards drop out of the presidential race last week than CNN. That’s because it set up what many Americans—and CNN—wanted to see last Thursday: a one-on-one debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. And while the debate didn’t turn into the slugfest many expected, it set the stage for a riveting Super Tuesday matchup between the top Democratic candidates.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Al-Jazeera’s troubled English language news channel is facing a ‘serious staffing crisis’ after scores of journalists left or have not had contracts renewed amid claims of a revolt over working conditions.”

  • From B&C, check out “some thoughts, notes and quotes that didn’t make it into this week’s Left Coast Bias column on spending the day with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer at Thursday’s Democratic debate at the Kodak Theater in Los Angeles.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last December, conservative author and CNN election analyst William J. Bennett gave over two thousand dollars to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, a fact that Bennett has not mentioned during any of his appearances on the network, according to a review of transcripts by the Huffington Post.”

  • TVNewser reports, Jon Stewart’s take on The Situation Room’s multitude of monitors, with a special appearance from Spongebob.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS and ABC joined Fox to ask the Supreme Court not to review a lower-court decision that essentially took the Federal Communications Commission to the woodshed for failing to justify its crackdown on fleeting profanity.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipster tells us about a situation in New Hampshire (which seems like a really long time ago, now) during the coverage of the primary there. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was talking with a New Hampshire politician about the state of things in Washington. Matthews told the local pol, ‘Nothing will get done in Washington until there is a large enough majority in the Senate — maybe I’ll run for Senate.’ After explaining he was from Pennsylvania, Matthews said, ‘Casey pulled it off so it’s do-able.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel ends January with 8 of the top 10 programs. CNN’s Larry King Live (8th) and Lou Dobbs Tonight (10th) filled out the top 10. MSNBC’s highest rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann came in 19th.”

  • CNN Dem Debate Most Watched in Cable History

  • His Extreme-ness wrote last week, “Send Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the freedom of speech woodshed. Boy, did they exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of C-SPAN during last night’s debate”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is going to begin Super Tuesday coverage a couple hours early” on Monday night. “The Super Tuesday preview will be anchored by Dan Abrams from 10-11pmET, and by Norah O’Donnell and David Shuster from 11-Midnight.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reid Wilson’s birthday was Saturday!

  • “KassyK” is leaving D.C.

  • Radar Online reports, “One of the joys of the presidential campaign season is that it allows the Washington press corps to ignore even more substantive stories than usual. With so many reporters detached to the campaign trail, dozens of big stories are either left to the wire services or ignored altogether. Last week the press buried two big stories about how many times the Bush administration has lied in public, and how it has covered up those lies in private. They belonged on the front page.”

  • Salon’s Joe Conason asks, “Will the press get over its love for McCain?”

  • AlterNet reports, James Glassman, the nominee for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, probably won’t have much of an impact on how the United States presents itself to the rest of the world. For one thing, he’ll only have 11 months in the post. For another — as his predecessor Karen Hughes proved — putting shinier lipstick on the pig of U.S. foreign policy doesn’t do much to assuage widespread anti-American sentiment. Still, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s January 30 hearing on Glassman’s nomination provided some insight into Washington’s evolving view of public diplomacy.”

  • A release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Super Tuesday Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage and the Politics section of ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue through at least 12:15 a.m., ET to report results across all time zones, including California, where polls close at 11:00 p.m., ET.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As j-schools struggle to keep the skills they teach relevant to the fast-changing media landscape, hundreds other journalists and students have mobilized to teach and support each other informally through a new online social network. Wired Journalists was recently created by Ryan Sholin of GateHouse Media, using Ning (a free set of tools for rolling your own social network). As of this morning, the group has 778 members. Many of them appear to be 20-somethings (j-school students or recent grads) — but there are some gray-hairs there, as well as some notable luminaries from the field.”

  • For Super Tuesday, washingtonpost.com will have six hours of live online-only video coverage and analysis of the results as they come in.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Media Life reports, “Magazine publishing in the U.S. may have become gloomy for certain categories, but worldwide it’s in healthy shape, with emerging markets making up for the slowdowns in mature markets like the U.S. And the picture for magazines worldwide looks brighter still going forward, even if they’re not seeing anywhere the growth in ad revenue as the internet. Worldwide ad spending on magazines grew 2.7 percent in 2007, and that pace is forecast to pick up to 3.4 percent a year through 2010.”

  • Newsweek is “Catching Up With ‘Obama Girl’”

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    RADIO

  • All Forgiven, WIMUS-AM Is on a Roll

  • A release announced, “XM Satellite Radio and SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT today announced that they have resolved the lawsuit brought by SONY BMG against XM over its Pioneer Inno, a portable satellite radio with advanced recording features. The companies did not disclose terms of the deal.”

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    BOOKS

  • Boston Globe reports, “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co. is laying off employees in Boston and other offices as it consolidates some of its operations in the wake of its $4 billion acquisition of Harcourt Education, Harcourt Trade, and Greenwood-Heinemann from Reed Elsevier.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes,Craig Silverman’s devotion to the correction as a literary form dates to 2004, when the Montreal-based writer launched his Web site Regret the Error, which traps and displays journalism’s best (and funniest) corrections, retractions, apologies, and clarifications. Silverman’s essential site spawned an equally essential book last fall titled Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, which tells you everything you need to know about the history of journalistic fallibility and the culture of corrections.”

  • The New York Times reports, “A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to a reporter of The New York Times, apparently to try to force him to reveal his confidential sources for a 2006 book on the Central Intelligence Agency, one of the reporter’s lawyers said Thursday. The subpoena was delivered last week to the New York law firm that is representing the reporter, James Risen, and ordered him to appear before a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 7.”

  • A Friday release from the ACLU announced, “After reports that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to New York Times reporter James Risen last week in an attempt to force disclosure of a confidential source, the American Civil Liberties Union today strongly objected to the subpoena, saying that basic First Amendment principles are at stake when reporters are called into the courtroom against their will. According to reports, a chapter in Mr. Risen’s book on the Central Intelligence Agency, ‘State of War,’ piqued the interest of the Justice Department and consequently he has been ordered to appear before the grand jury next week.”

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    JOBS

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR and Marketing Specialist.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Virilion, Inc. is looking for an Account Director.

  • The Gazette is looking for a sports reporter.

  • JBS International, Inc. is looking for Writer/Editors.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is offering Photo and Writing Internships.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter, Budget & Appropriations and a Managing Editor, CongressDaily PM.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for an Ambitious Digital Designer, a Design Developer and a Digital Storyteller.

  • The Martinsville Bulletin is looking for a News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.29.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you did plan on watching the SOTU last night.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Joe Peyronnin has joined Gibraltar Associates as Senior Advisor for Global Communications and New Media. Based in New York City, Mr. Peyronnin brings over 35 years of broadcast news experience to Gibraltar, including as head of news for Telemundo/NBC and Fox News, and as the number two executive at CBS News from 1989 to 1995. He is also the former Washington bureau chief for CBS News and an award winning news producer. Most recently he has worked as a full time corporate advisor to VFinity, creators of innovative digital content management software.”

  • Jossip reports, “Reuters media reporter Robert MacMillan is leaving the wire service for what we’re assuming is a bigger payday at Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal.”

  • John Fialka is joining the E&E staff on Feb. 6. “He will be leading development of — and then managing — our planned climate publication. John is a superior reporter who has led the Wall Street Journal’s environmental coverage for many years.”

  • CQ announced that Jon Weinstein “has been promoted to senior marketing manager. In this new role, Jon will oversee the circulation marketing team”

  • A release announced, “A Stanford graduate student has been chosen as the 2008 Daniel Pearl Memorial Journalism Intern. Jennifer Martinez is working toward a master’s degree in communication, specializing in journalism, after earning a bachelor’s degree with honors in international relations at Stanford in 2007. She will work in the London bureau of the Wall Street Journal this summer.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The WSJ may get a sports section?!?

  • Is journalist burnout on the rise?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners plans to nominate directors for New York Times Co. and Media General Inc., both family-controlled newspaper companies. Harbinger will try to place four directors on the board of New York Times and three on Media General’s, according to statements and regulatory filings yesterday.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Metro International has announced 27 redundancies at its free newspapers in the US. It has been reported that Metro was planning to put the titles up for sales. But Metro announced today it was embarking on a restructuring plan to move the titles into profit — in agreement with joint venture partner The New York Times Company.”

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    TV

  • The New York Post reports, “The $27 billion leveraged buyout of radio giant Clear Channel Communications appears to be on solid footing despite scores of jittery investors who feared the deal could fall apart.”

  • The AP reports, “Comcast Corp., the nation’s largest cable operator, said Friday it is pulling the plug on AZN Television, its Asian American channel.”

  • TVNewser reports, “All three cable networks are taking the announcement of Sen. Edward Kennedy’s endorsement of Sen. Barack Obama.” How packed was the rally? Metroblogging DC tell us just how big.

  • The Washington Post reports, “More than 4,000 of the office building’s incandescent light bulbs were changed to fluorescent. Three large water tanks were installed in an underground parking garage to collect rainwater to irrigate a one-acre patch of lawn. Workers held contests to see who could save the most energy by turning off computers and lights. Those efforts were part of a year-long initiative at Discovery Communications’ headquarters in downtown Silver Spring to save energy, and reduce water usage and pollution. Last month, the nonprofit U.S. Green Building Council recognized Discovery’s efforts by certifying its 540,000-square-foot building as “platinum,” the highest designation under the council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program.”

  • The Tampa Tribune reports, “If you’ve been watching Fox News Channel’s election coverage of the primary season, you have seen the beginning of a new era in televised live shots. The live streaming image of chief political correspondent Carl Cameron as he cruises along the nation’s highways in a colorful Ford Expedition may look a little primitive, but it is revolutionary. ‘This is going to change the way breaking news is covered in the future,’ says Brian Wilson, Fox’s Washington bureau chief. After tinkering with various new technologies and video equipment, he says the network has converted a couple of sport utility vehicles into roaming live news centers.”

  • National Journal reports, “Psst! ‘They just spin you up on this and you happily go along,’ fumed Bill Clinton as he glared at CNN reporter Jessica Yellin. She had asked him to respond to Barack Obama and former South Carolina Democratic Party Chairman Dick Harpootlian, who likened the former president to the late bare-knuckle GOP operative Lee Atwater and charged that his wife’s campaign was engaging in ‘the politics of deception.’ Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaigner-in-chief accused Yellin and other reporters of stoking the controversy. ‘This is what you live for,’ Clinton huffed. Not always. Back in 1994, Yellin worked for Bill Clinton in the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Chris Cillizza will be a co-moderator for MySpace, MTV and the Associated Press’ ‘Closing Arguments: A Presidential Super Dialogue’ with Hillary Clinton, Mike Huckabee and other presidential frontrunners that will be presented on-air, online, and on mobile phones, Saturday, February 2, 2008 at 6:00 pm ET.”

  • Check out Tammy Haddad’s video with Hayden Panettiere on Newsweek.com

  • Instapundit points to “an unfortunate turn of phrase at Time Magazine”

  • Bloomberg reports,Peter Thiel, the first outside investor in closely held Facebook Inc., said Sarbanes-Oxley rules make it difficult for technology companies in the U.S. to go public.”

  • Check out The Baltimore Sun’s new military blog.

  • The Local Onliner reports, “Former AOL President and MTV founder Bob Pittman has lately focused on investments as head of the Pilot Group (he is a pilot). In an interview with broadband consultant Will Richmond’s VideoNuze on the eve of the NATPE show in Las Vegas, Pittman says he is bullish on small market TV stations — and their online prospects.”

  • Check out the Facebook Group, “Make Top Reporters Stop Ignoring the Top Issue”

  • The AP reports, Nigel Eccles, a news junkie and former online betting site employee, wanted to try pursuing both interests at once. Thus was born Hubdub — a new Web site Eccles and three colleagues in Edinburgh, Scotland, assembled — where customers will bet for fun, not money, on the outcomes of real news stories.”

  • News and Tech.com reports, “The 13th annual Digital Awards, to be handed out later this month at the Newspaper Association of America’s Marketing Conference, reflects the breadth and depth of video now available on newspaper Web sites.”

  • On Media reports, “Media, tech and Internet companies, and the Wall Street analysts who cover them, are looking beyond the current tumult to the rest of this year and into 2009. Unfortunately, many don’t like what they see.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Gannett Co. (GCI) acquired Banquet, which operates an action sports Web site and advertisement network. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.”

  • The Independent reports, “What has been the greatest shock so far in the American election? Barack Obama’s meteoric Iowan rise? Hillary Clinton’s tearful comeback in New Hampshire? John McCain’s resurrection in South Carolina? No. The biggest surprise thus far has been the relative insignificance of the internet in determining the outcome of the election.”

  • A release announced, “For its first recent foray into longer-format video, Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. has won a 2007 Aegis Award for ‘Who Cares? Kiplinger’s No-Nonsense Look at Long-Term Care.’ The 22-minute educational video offers an informative, consumer-friendly review of long-term care—explaining what it is, what it costs, and how to pay for it.”

  • A release announced, “The U.S. Chamber of Commerce today announced the launch of its blog, ChamberPost. The Chamber’s blog provides a real time public platform for issues of importance to the business community.”

  • Reuters reports, “Google-DoubleClick deal likely to win EU go-ahead”

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    MAGAZINES

  • PR Week reports, “A new survey suggests that trust in business is higher than trust in government in the US and other countries. The results of the ninth annual Edelman Trust Barometer show that the trust gap was greatest in the US, where 58% of respondents said they trust business to do the right thing versus 39% for government.”

  • Fortune’s David Kirkpatrick reports, “European companies like Germany’s Burda are driving toward a software-powered future of blended professional and amateur content.”

  • The New York Times reports,Evan G. Galbraith Jr., a former ambassador to France and a Republican contender for governor of New York in 1994, died Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his wife, the former Marie Rockwell. For 15 years before accepting the ambassadorship in 1981, Mr. Galbraith, who was also an international banker, had been chairman of National Review”

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    RADIO

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

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    JOBS

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for an Advertising Copywriter.

  • Washington Examiner is looking for freelance Real Estate Reporters.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.22.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. Eleven years ago today, the Senate confirmed Madeleine Albright as secretary of state. And it’s Diane Lane’s birthday! (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

    See more after the jump.

    Read more

    Chris & Keith Continue To Laugh At GOP Speeches

    Remember when MSNBC laughed at John McCain’s victory speech in New Hampshire?

    Well, Chris Matthews and Keith Olbermann (and the MSNBC folks that can be heard in the background) were equally unimpressed with Fred Thompson’s speech:

    Morning Reading List, 01.11.08

    4345057.jpg

    It’s a good morning, Washington, even with the Dupont 5 closing. In honor of Mary J. Blige’s birthday, please have a drama-free day. And Playbook reminds us that it’s Mark Halperin’s birthday today. Which means that Ana Marie Cox has a prank planned. Those crazy Time.com’ers…

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you do not drink DC’s tap water.

    REVOLVING DOOR

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Poynter Online reports, “The big news this week was that, despite predictions, Sen. Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in N.H. But a few major U.K. papers went to press with a different story — that Sen. Barack Obama won the election.”

  • Jon Fine says, “You’ve Got Tribune. Now Do Something

  • The AP introduced “‘Ask AP,’ a Q&A column where The Associated Press answers your questions about the news — anything from ‘What’s a subprime mortgage?’ to ‘What ever happened to Linda Tripp?’ to ‘How does a reporter prepare to be embedded with the military in Iraq?’ AP editors will choose some of the questions sent in by readers like you and get answers from AP reporters and editors — the people who spend their days covering the very issues you’re curious about.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “The presidential campaign dominated news coverage last week, with roughly half of the newshole (49%) devoted to the tight nomination contests in both political parties. Public interest in the campaign has increased but campaign news has not necessarily dominated the public’s focus to the same extent. Just over a third (34%) say the campaign is the story they followed most closely last week, up 12 points from early December (Dec. 2-7). But many also say the assassination of Benazir Bhutto (21%), was the story they followed most closely. Her untimely death was among the top foreign news interest stories over the last year.”

  • WSJ opinions…for free!

  • Regarding this a reader writes in, “Don’t forget the Southwest 7 p.m. flight from Manchester to Baltimore. There were the last two presidents of the National Press Club. Jerry Zremski and Jon Salant, chatting it up with Houston Chronicle political reporter Ben Roth.”

  • ‘NY Times’ Wants Your Polling Place Photos For The Web

  • Washingtonpost.com will be featuring animated cartoons by Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist Ann Telnaes two to three times per week starting yesterday. Check out the first one here.

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “One of the enjoyable subplots in Christopher Buckley’s book ‘Boomsday’ is what essentially is a Google zapper — a device that eliminates bad, harmful, or embarrassing links on Google. I was reminded of that all-too-real fictional tool when reading this in Howard Kurtz’s piece today about how the media embarrassed itself in New Hampshire”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, January 6, 2008, ABC News’ ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘This Week’ grew an impressive 24% among the key Adults 25-54 demographic compared to last year, the program’s best A25-54 delivery in almost a year (week of February 25, 2007).”

  • Is Obama warming up to Fox News?”

  • Brian Williams Drops Yiddish, Loves His Nickname

  • Comments Abound After Williams Blog Post

  • A NBC release announced, “Just two days before the New Hampshire
    primary, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning on Sunday, January 6, 2008 in all categories.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook:

      The “CBS Evening News” investment in politics — including substantial airtime, new correspondents, sharp embeds and an evident passion for the topic by anchor Katie Couric — is paying off.

      On Jan. 8, the night of the New Hampshire primary, Katie’s live broadcast from Manchester beat the “NBC Nightly News” in the 25-54 demo in New York, San Francisco, Atlanta and Houston, per CBS.
      And the “CBS Evening News” was the Des Moines ratings leader in the November sweeps among households, views and the demo, per CBS.

  • NewsBusters reports, “To riff off the Alice Roosevelt Longworth line: if you don’t have anything nice to say about Rupert Murdoch, go sit next to David Shuster. The MSNBCer and former Fox Newser has no love lost for his old employer.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports,Doug Byles has had it with his cable-television bill. The 44-year-old Walnut Creek, Calif., home builder said he’s paying more than $130 a month for basic service with two premium and eight high-definition channels.”

  • Comcast announced three major content initiatives at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show. “Comcast CEO Brian L. Roberts unveiled the Company’s plan to give consumers more than 1,000 HD choices in 2008, its strategy to begin adding additional HD movies, and announced Project Infinity — its vision to give consumers the ability to watch any movie, television show, user generated content or other video that a producer wants to make available On Demand.”

  • “MASN grabs ‘Rookie of the Year.’”

  • A Weather Window: Timing May Be the Key to the Battens’ Offer of Landmark”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN’s Klein: FNC ‘Almost Seems Downright Despondent in Their Coverage’”

  • Daily Show’s Take on N.H. Primary Coverage

  • Variety reports, “Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin J. Martin affirmed his commitment to a la carte cable subscriptions and to striking a balance between the need to protect digital content and ensure consumer rights to fair use of it.”

  • The AP reports, “U.S. TV broadcasters will be ready to start transmitting signals for portable electronics like cell phones next year, the developers of the technology, LG Electronics Inc. and Harris Corp., said Sunday. The technology represents a chance for broadcasters to challenge cell-phone carriers, who are trying to sew up the market for mobile TV with their own transmissions.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Wonkette presents “the first-ever dance competition between a White House Correspondent and a candidate for the White House: David Gregory vs. Barack Obama! Once you view the video, please play judge and vote in our poll.” So far, Gregory is in the lead.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Celebrity interviewer Rob McGibbon has launched a website business which aims to provide a comprehensive index of journalistic interviews. McGibbon, a freelance who has previously written celebrity interviews for Press Gazette, launched the aggregation website AccessInterviews.com last week.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity has assembled an award-winning team of journalists and researchers to build one of the most comprehensive, illuminating, and frequently updated websites on presidential politics and fundraising, The Buying of the President 2008. The site provides current and historical facts and figures, along with stories that explore a variety of issues related to money in presidential politics.”

  • WebProNews reports, “Video sharing websites watched their typical daily traffic double through 2007, with nearly half of US Internet users stopping by YouTube and similar sites.”

  • Online Media Post reports, “A majority of journalists say that blogs and other forms of social media are not affecting the quality of traditional news — for better or worse — but that the blogosphere is definitely having an impact on the speed, tone and editorial direction of their reporting. Almost 180 reporters and editors across multiple industries responded to the e-mail survey sent out by Omnicom’s Brodeur in mid-December. And while roughly 43% of respondents said that “new media” (blogs and social networks) had a ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ significant impact on the quality of news coverage, most journalists (56%) said that the impact of new media was ‘not very’ or ‘not at all’ significant.”

  • ABC’s Nitya Venkataraman was mistaken for John McCain’s 16-year-old adopted daughter of Bangladeshi origin. Check out the split screen here.

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    MAGAZINES

  • From Mediabistro.com: “One Rolling Stone writer offers a primer on tackling long-form journalism”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Eagle Publishing Inc. is looking for an Assistant Managing Editor for Regnery Publishing.

  • Moment Magazine is looking for a Web Master.

  • The Council for Advancement and Support of Education is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Producer, News & Information.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a web developer/technical journalist, an Economics and Finance Editor, an Editorial Assistant, a Legislative Researcher and an Assistant Editor, Schedules.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.05.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, October 28.”

  • Vote now in the 2007 Weblog Award Poll. His Extreme-ness is up for best political coverage.
  • Slate V just announced the winner and finalists from their Comedy News Contest. Check out the results here.
  • Mediabistro is bringing award-winning author Stephanie Elizondo Griest down from New York to teach her seminar on Memoir Writing on Tuesday, November 14. For more info, click here.

  • Fox’s Wallace Jumps the Gun on Bias Charge

  • Michael Getler’s latest ombudsman column for PBS.

  • The Politico’s Ben Smith and the Edwards campaign go at it … again.

  • FNC changes up daytime.

  • Fire at FNC.

  • Check out Martha Raddatz’s latest Reporter’s Notebook. Raddatz, is in Pakistan and filed this after Musharraf declared a state of emergency.

  • Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s Imperial Life in the Emerald City makes the Guardian First Book Award shortlist.

  • Huffington Post reports that Talking Points Memo’s Greg Sargent reported on Friday that the Romney campaign has fired a broadside at Fox News, which issued a directive in the wake of John McCain’s ‘Woodstock ad’ forbidding the use of their footage for campaign advertisements.”

  • Yahoo in apology on China

  • Deb Howell on “A Story Punctuated By Death.”

  • Justice Department Asks Supreme Court to Review FCC Profanity Decision

  • Washingtonian tell us “what local celebrities gave children this year.”

  • Did you miss Sally Bedell Smith at Q&A Café on Tuesday? Check out the audio here.
  • “On October 31, Google stock passed through $700 a share, becoming the 5th largest listed company in the United States,’ reports Tech Crunch.

  • CNBC reports, “Two years after it successfully fought off the efforts of Carl Icahn and the plan authored by Lazard Frères to break apart Time Warner, the company seems ready to embrace it.”

  • NPR Music is launching today!

  • News.au.com reports, “MEDIA insiders yesterday dismissed market speculation that former News Ltd executive Lachlan Murdoch was doing a deal to acquire 25 per cent of PBL Media.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “MySpace and Google have issued a press release that, confirming rumors, announces that the News Corp.-owned social networking site will be part of Google’s new OpenSocial developer initiative.”

  • Gawker reports, “The New York Times is now carefully allowing comments on some articles, not just blog posts.”

  • “60 Minutes” outs Curveball.

  • Associated Press reports,Tom Curley, CEO of The Associated Press, called on news executives Thursday to ‘stop pining’ for the past and adapt to the new ways that news is being distributed and consumed.”

  • Huffington Post’s Etan Thomas writes, Barack Obama has been bombarded with a list of complaints in regards to the way he has been conducting his campaign. These criticisms have been mounting for some time, and seem to be growing more and more as we near the primary elections.”
  • Associated Press reports, “A coalition of consumer groups and legal scholars on Thursday formally asked the Federal Communications Commission to stop Comcast Corp. from interfering with its subscribers’ file sharing.”
  • Webpronews reports, “Long after other major networks have relented and permitted the use of their debate videos, Fox News wants all the Republicans running for the Oval Office to stop using theirs.”

  • R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. on “Four Decades of Conservative Journalism

  • “In all, the wildfires in Southern California were the dominant story on the cable and radio talk shows last week, just as they were in the broader News Coverage Index of all media. The blazes across hundreds of thousands of acres of Southern California hillsides accounted for 36% of the airtime, as measured by PEJ’s Talk Show Index for Oct. 21-26.”

  • Clark Hoyt on “Civil Discourse, Meet the Internet

  • More tidbits from Time magazine’s Thursday night party:

      “The Page” producer Katie Rooney updated The Page with the scoop of the new Romney commercial while drinking white wine in the bar — love 24/7 news

      Col Bob Bateman stood in the corner teaching Ana Marie Cox how to salute

      Oh, and that Ana Marie Cox prank planned for the party? Sorry, it had to be called off.

  • The Atlantic today released online an early preview of ‘Goodbye to All That,’ a profile of Senator Barack Obama by popular conservative blogger and Atlantic senior editor Andrew Sullivan. This is Sullivan’s first cover since joining the magazine in February 2007.’

  • The American Spectator will celebrate its 40th Anniversary in publication with a black tie gala tomorrow at The Mandarin Oriental.

  • NLGJA is hosting a Primary Party, ‘a kick-off event for NLGJA Goes to Washington, our 2008 National Convention & 5th Annual LGBT Media Summit,’ tonight. For tickets and more info, click here.

  • Check out washingtonpost.com’s alternatives to snowflakes.
  • A network insider brings this to our attention that Chris Wallace said this weekend, “‘We are reinventing sunday talk shows this morning — or this week. We are going to, of course, cover the big stories and get the big guests. but in addition we’re going to expand the conversation, get out of the beltway. Newsflash Chris, George Stephanopoulos has been going on the road for years.”

  • The National Review presents a panel discussion, Women Voters and the Right Guy, moderated by NR Washington Editor, Kate O’Beirne at the National Press Club 1-3 on Tuesday.

  • “The Media Research Center (MRC) has just released No Fairness Doctrine for PBS, an in-depth report documenting and detailing how the taxpayer-funded network has become even more blatantly and boldly liberal since the Democrats won control of Congress in November of 2006.” For more info, click here.

  • A reader tells us, “two dc journalists were among the four audience contestants at the putnam county spelling bee at the national theater tonight. doug hill and a young woman from the post.”
  • Poynter Online reports, “The Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University is turning out journalists, but the IT school is working on technology that could replace the news anchor with talking avatars. Click here to see what it looks like. Users can completely customize what they want in their show. The delivery is stiff and fairly unwatchable, but the idea is interesting.”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for an Intelligence/National Security Reporter.
  • The American Association of Airport Executives is looking for a Manager, Meetings Marketing and a Flash/Web Developer.

  • EEI Communications is looking for a Desktop Publishers, Graphic Designers.

  • American Federation of Teachers is looking for a Spring Intern.
  • Congress Daily is looking for a Reporter.
  • Arcom Publishing, Inc is looking for a sales manager.

  • Fairfax County Times is looking for a news editor.

  • Bristol Herald Courier is looking for an Inquisitor with a velvet writing touch.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is looking for a Baltimore General Assignment News Reporter.

  • Public Citizen is looking for a Press Officer.
  • National Public Radio is looking for a Vice President, Legal Affairs and General Counsel.
  • Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond is looking for a Managing Editor.
  • Avalon Publishing Group is looking for a Baltimore Guidebook Writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 05.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Snoop wins.

  • An NBC release announced a new feature, “Today on the Trail.” “The series, which will air regularly leading up to the ’08 elections, will feature ‘Today’ anchors and correspondents backstage with the candidates and their staffs.” The feature will be part of “Today’s” comprehensive coverage of the 2008 Presidential race and will kick-off next Tuesday, May 29 with NBC News’ Meredith Vieira interviewing Sen. Barack Obama.

  • Lots of stuff this morning on Kimberly Dozier.

  • CNN.com’s Subscription Model Is Dead

  • And now, the correction:

  • From a reader (regarding this):

      Funny, that sounds like she’s been using a form letter she’s been using for years. (I remember getting something similar from her back in 2000-2001.) Newspaper recruiters and public relations officers might be on the opposite spectrum, but cut from the same cloth. In the case of recruiters, I think they get a passive-aggressive high from dashing the dreams of journalists with a one sentence slam … and Joe Grimm of the Detroit Free Press is the ringmaster. (Why former Knight-Ridder groupies worship him is beyond me …)

      Down with Midwesern metropolitan dailies and their recruiters! Can’t they all be centralized by Gannett?

  • An update from yesterday’s post…Here’s how the Washington Times chimed in:

  • One reader writes in wondering whether this Politico Breaking News alert deserved the “Breaking News” email:

      Republicans launch ad blitz aimed at vulnerable freshman Democrats, dipping into their own pockets because of campaign committee debt. NRCC aims to tie opponents to Speaker Nancy Pelosi, depicting her as an out-of-touch liberal. Campaign is modest in scope but ambitious in targeting Pelosi to try to knock out her supporters.

    Said the reader: “is this worthy of breaking news, let alone such an e-mail? Let me know if the House rebukes Murtha (maybe), or if the Senate passes immigration reform (out of nowhere), but not if the NRCC is doing business as usual.

  • Media Matters Eric Boehlert writes, “Murdoch’s bid has opened the door to a very public and bruising examination of the crass brand of journalism his properties often practice, and why he would be the wrong person — too irresponsible, too unprincipled — to own the venerable Wall Street Journal.”

  • FT.com reports, “The surge in traffic at Facebook comes amid continued interest in the site from numerous media companies. Facebook has been the subject of buy-out speculation since last year, when Yahoo was rumoured to be mulling a bid of more than $1bn for the company.”

  • His Extremeness writes, “If John McCain’s [expletive deleted] exchange with John Cornyn has taught us anything, it’s the Washington Post’s policy on [expletive deleted] and what not and shit.”

  • From the Providence Journal, “‘Prince of darkness’ sheds light on politics”

  • The AP reports, “Shares of newspaper publishers were mixed Tuesday after two of the largest chains in the country, Gannett Co. and McClatchy Co., said revenue dropped in April.”

  • TVWeek reports, “National Geographic inked a deal with YouTube to offer a series of short-form videos that it has produced for NationalGeographic.com to YouTube’s users.”

  • The Chicago Sun-Times reports, “Some 54 Chicago Tribune newsroom staffers want to take the newspaper’s buyout offer — far short of as many as 100 jobs that the newspaper publisher said it wants to eliminate companywide, sources said Monday. But workers from other departments were also eligible to put in for the buyouts, which could eliminate the need for layoffs.”

  • According to Biz Report, “If you thought that the younger generation only read digital print, think again. According to new research from McPheters & Company the younger generation not only reads digitally, they also read traditional print publications.”

    Jobs

  • NPR is looking for a Supervising Senior Editor, National
    Desk and an Associate Producer, OnAir Fundraising & Promotion.

  • Military Officers Association of America is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • The Gazette is looking for a Copy/layout editor.

  • New America Foundation is looking for a Media Relations Associate.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.12.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Roll Call’s Emily Pierce has been named a Senior Staff Writer.
  • CJR reports, “the present wave of cost- cutting, job-eliminating, and bureau-closing is just one reason journalism is widely believed to be an industry in crisis. But a pair of university studies concerning the profession’s past and future may slightly temper fears of its imminent demise.”
  • A reader points out that Senator Barack Obama spoke with Carl Cameron this afternoon regarding McCain’s announced position on the Iraq war. A few heads are scratching about Obama’s appearance, since he pulled out of the Fox debates two days earlier…
  • The Corner’s reaction to Ana Marie Cox pulling out of the “Imus” show: “And I Thought She Was, Like, Soooo Un-PC…”
  • moneylaundering.com is looking for a reporter for Money Laundering Alert.

    Loads more when you click below…

    Read more

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.22.07

  • An ABC release announces that “World News with Charles Gibson” will air a special series — “Key to the World” — reported by ABC News’ Bill Weir. “The series will take Weir on reporting assignments around the globe, and in conjunction, ‘World News’ will have a single commercial sponsor the first four Mondays in April — April 2, 9, 16, and 23.”

  • John Kelly uncovers “some surprises” at the Radio & Television Museum in Bowie, “a labor of love by members of the Radio History Society that opened in 1999.”

  • Charles Babington reports, “The proposed merger of the nation’s two satellite radio companies came under sharp criticism” Tuesday from Sen. Herb Kohl.

  • From The Hill:

      Reporters have a lot of access on Capitol Hill, but the Standing Committee of Correspondents made it clear this week that such access has its limits.

      Following an incident in which a reporter mistakenly walked onto the House floor, the standing committee issued a memo Tuesday stating, “Reporters are not allowed on the floor of the House or the Senate.”

  • 1M Comcast Subs Face C-SPAN2 Cutback

  • Tom Friedman celebrates 100 weeks of his book’s success.

  • In Memoriam: Catherine Seipp.

  • DCRTV reports, “XM Satellite Radio will launch a special radio channel featuring a mix of music and vintage audio dedicated to the sport. Play Ball will air from 3/30 through the end of opening day on 4/2 on XM-200.”

  • Politico’s Jonathan Martin reports how advances in media technology advances could make Sen. John McCain’s second bid for president a bumpier ride than his first run.

  • New York Times looks at how Iraq has changed the face of television “since the early, heady days of shock and awe.”

  • A tipster tells us about PBS: “You should know that there’s been some moving and shaking there. They hired a new SVP of Interactive — Jason Seiken, formerly executive editor of washingtonpost.com and something or other at AOL. Also, they hired Angela Morgenstern as new director of interactive. She used to head MTV News interactive (and before that produced for PBS).”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced that it is naming its internship program after former Vice President Whayne Dillehay, “in honor of more than 15 years of dedication and passion.”

  • Today at Nathan’s, Mark Plotkin will give an update on all things political before DC Police Chief Cathy Lanier.

  • Did the Edwards / Fox flap backfire? Either way, Paul Begala says it’s time to go Fox hunting

  • Michele McLellan and Tim Porter, authors of the new book News, Improved: How America’s Newsrooms Are Learning to Change, will present the findings from new national survey on training for U.S. midcareer journalists. Check it out at the news conference at the J.W. Marriott Tuesday, March 27 at 9 a.m. Eric Newton, Vice President/Journalism Program, of the Knight Foundation, will also be present.

  • The Northern Virginia Daily in Strasburg, Va., “needs a copy editor who knows the basics and is ready to take the next step.”

  • CQPolitics.com probably having a ton of fun with the Congress-March Madness nexus. Check out this, this, and this.

  • Don’t forget to check out the 2007 Reel Journalism: Screenings and Symposia which starts tonight. Check out the full schedule here.

  • GW announced the creation of a master’s degree program in strategic public relations through the Graduate School of Political Management. The program begins fal 2007.

  • Josh Gerstein discovers how a “New Technique Lets Bloggers Tackle Late-Night News Dumps.”

  • David Brooks got the shaft from Rudy Giuliani, who instead gave some love to Nicholas Kristof.

  • Sign the petition to make The Colbert Report a full hour.

  • John Hughes makes his pitch to keep Voice of America’s budget in tact.

  • The staff of the forth coming Portfolio have been given a gag order on Conde Nast’s new business magazine.