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Posts Tagged ‘Jonathan Kaplan’

Morning Reading List 05.12.09

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

It is day 113 covering the Obama administration and week 15 for us. Happy birthday to Brian Walsh (yesterday) and Jonathan Kaplan (today). What we know and what we’re reading this Tuesday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Slate’s Jack Shafer on life after newspapers: What would life without newspapers be like? When I consider the dead and dying newspapers of our time, and the post-newspaper world everybody is predicting, I can’t help but think of the 114-day New York newspaper strike of 1962-63.

TV

PBS’ The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, is getting a makeover, according to NYT, “designed to bring it more fully into the digital era, give it a livelier look and nudge it, however slowly, toward the day when its longtime anchor decides to retire.”

LAT reports viewers are doing a 180 on 360: Anderson Cooper‘s ratings have been in a sharp decline all year, and so far the month of May is no exception. According to Nielsen, the audience for the 10-11 p.m. hour of his show so far this month is 933,000 viewers. This is the first time he’s fallen below the one-million mark since last August.

CBS’ Sunday Morning is going hi-def this weekend.

Bloomberg TV anchor Betty Liu joined the Morning Media Menu today and you can listen in here.

NBC’s David Gregory is a Caps fan and NYT caught up with the “Meet the Press” anchor to ask about parallels between sports and politics? “You know, in politics and in sports, we tend to be drawn to personalities, drawn to the people. That’s what we find most animating. And you have these outsize personalities that sort of transcend the teams.”

ONLINE

Slate launched an online magazine directed at women, Double X, a “provocative, irreverent analysis of politics, culture, family, fashion and more,” according to the release. We’re intrigued. ABCNews.com will also be collaborating with Double X for content.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro

JOBS after the jump…

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Kaplan Joins Washington Independent

Former Hill and Portland Press Herald reporter Jonathan Kaplan will be working for the Washington Independent through the election as a political reporter.

Kaplan: “We’re the men and women who cover politics in Washington … and we’re disappearing fast.”

Former Portland Press-Herald reporter Jonathan Kaplan pens a piece in today’s Washington Post Outlook section about the closings of various D.C. bureaus:

    The biggest losers in these cutbacks, of course, are the citizens of Maine and the other states where newspapers have closed their Washington bureaus. My main gripe is that the loss of regional reporters just gives one more advantage to incumbents seeking reelection. Even in 2006, a year in which a Democratic tide swept Republicans out of office, 94 percent of incumbents in the House were reelected, as were 79 percent of those in the Senate, according to OpenSecrets.org, a nonpartisan Web site that keeps track of election spending and data.

    The downsizing in mainstream newspapers does not, of course, spell disaster for the Constitution. We reporters, as much as we might want to think otherwise, are not the last line of defense against the misuse of government power in the republic. These days, people get their news from plenty of other sources, including television, radio and the Internet. So the problem isn’t that all those press releases that lawmakers send out will go unchallenged, although they might go unread in standard newsprint.

    But readers will miss some nuance simply because there’s nobody in the Capitol. They won’t know how Sen. Olympia Snowe’s eyes light up when she recalls being selected as an intern for the state’s Democratic governor in the summer of 1967, even though she considered herself a Republican. They’ll probably never learn that, at a press conference in May, just minutes before a vote on a massive farm bill, Collins praised a provision in the measure to close the so-called Enron loophole. She then headed straight to the Senate floor and voted against the bill.

Read the full thing here.

It’s Cheaper Because It’s Only Every Four Years

Lots has been written about the closing of various bureaus around town and what this means for readers.

So, how about this: Although the Portland Press Herald recently closed its D.C. bureau (meaning reporter Jonathan Kaplan), it did decide to send a reporter to Beijing to cover the Olympics.

Smart decision? Have at it in the comments…

Thrush Heads To Politico

Politico has hired Glenn Thrush away from Newsday.

The internal announcement, obtained by FishbowlDC:

Our congressional team, which is rapidly and rightly becoming known as the best in the business under Tim Grieve‘s leadership, is about to get a valuable new addition.

Glenn Thrush is a reporter at Newsday who drew wide notice (including from his competitors here at Politico) for his standout work covering Hillary Clinton‘s presidential campaign.

His work at Newsday showed he can deliver what we want: Aggressive reporting, sophisticated analysis, speed. Our conversations made plain that he understands Politico’s mission and is ready to advance it.

Plus, we like his taste in hats.

In addition to plunging in on the Hill, we expect Glenn to be a vigorous participant in our presidential campaign coverage through the fall.

He starts Aug. 4. It’ll be nice to start reading Glenn’s work and say “I’m glad we had that” instead of “I wish we had that.”

VandeHarris

Newsroom sources say Politico plans to hire at least one more big name Capitol Hill reporter before the end of the year. (Jonathan Kaplan?!?)

Kaplan Leaves The Hill

From an internal email, obtained by FishbowlDC:

    After five years at The Hill, Jonathan Kaplan will be leaving us at the end of the year to become Washington correspondent of the Portland Press Herald. In his time here, Jonathan has covered the House majority both when the GOP was in charge and now that the Democrats are in control. He has also been a Business & Lobbying reporter and a Campaigns reporter. Jonathan has impressive news antennae and I have always admired his eclectic range or stories. He will be missed here, but I am sure you join me in wishing him the best in his new work. Thanks, Hugo

How Do You Spend Your Weekends?

The Hill’s Jonathan Kaplan, Hotline’s Amy Walters and Rep. Jim Moran chat up Miss Virginia at this weekend’s Clarendon bike race. Because they can.

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Taking Out The Trash, 03.16.07

  • Valerie Plame on Capitol Hill today.

  • More Money, Less Booty For BET

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending Sunday, March 11, 2007 in all categories both nationally and in Washington, D.C. The show attracted 3.599 million total viewers, a 28% advantage over “Face the Nation”, a 31% lead over “This Week” and 159% more than “News Sunday”.

  • TNR also had a story recently on the Comedy Central/Rahm Emanuel story.

  • CJR’s Paul McLeary outlines, “How TalkingPointsMemo Beat the Big Boys on the U.S. Attorney Story.”

  • E&P reports that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s confession that he killed former Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, “brought back powerful memories of Pearl’s horrific death” for Paul Steiger, the Wall Street Journal’s managing editor.

  • American Journalism Review senior contributing writer Lori Robertson spoke with Dana Priest and Anne Hull about their Walter Reed series.

  • Priest discussed the story yesterday in a WashingtonPost.com chat.

  • Eric Alterman looks at why the Bush administration’s firing of eight federal prosecutors won’t just go away.

  • Meanwhile, Powerline doesn’t think it is a story, or rather a scandal, at all.

  • Afternoon Roundup

  • Tourney pools are cool.

  • The Post’s Elizabeth Williamson goes there.

  • Find out more about that PR Newswire “Pitching National Media” event here.

  • More on a potential Rome Hartman move to D.C.

  • An ABC release announced that the fifth installment of the Emmy Award-winning series “Iraq: Where Things Stand,” ABC News will report extensively on how the country and its people are faring four years after the US-led invasion. The show will begin airing across ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms beginning Sunday, March 18.

  • Patricia Cohen reports that to bridge the gender gap on the op-ed pages, Catherine Orenstein “has been training women at universities, foundations and corporations to write essays and get them published.”

  • Jonathan Kaplan reports that Democratic Caucus chairman Rahm Emanuel “has told new Democratic members of Congress to steer clear of Stephen Colbert, or at least his satirical Comedy Central program, ‘The Colbert Report.’”

  • The Reliable Source ladies report that the BBC was had by a fake Patrick Fitzgerald blog.

  • A reader writes in on this, “Some of us out here in Journalismland believe that the comments should remain just as they’re written at the end of Post stories–it’s called freedom of speech and non-censorship. I think some more liberal Post writers probably get upset because many of the comments tear apart and rip to shreds and bring back to reality some of the articles that are obviously more liberal-leaning, and some of them can be pretty liberal-leaning, let’s face it. The comments represent all views, they represent reality, and they provide a great feedback from the real world to some of these stories, which sometimes appear written by guys who aren’t exactly in tune with many aspects of the real world. The comments should stay!”

  • Washington Gardener Magazine is hosting the first annual photo contest exhibition in downtown Silver Spring, MD. The opening reception is Friday, March 23 from 7-9pm at the Adams Bank Lobby in the World Building on Georgia Avenue in downtown Silver Spring, MD. The reception is open to the public and is free to attend. After the opening, you may come by and view the photos any time during the normal bank lobby hours (M-F 9am-4pm, Sat 9am-12noon). The show runs through May 25.

  • AP reports, “Turner Broadcasting will rename its Court TV channel to reflect a more action-driven lineup. The new name will not be revealed until summer and will take effect at the start of next year. What is now Court TV will become the home to a form of action-oriented reality programming.”

  • PBS reports that the Project for Excellence in Journalism
    “plans to start a Blogger Index, which will survey several hundred blogs for quality of content and topic areas.” “The landscape is changing so rapidly,” says PEJ director Tom Rosenstiel. “The term ‘blog’ might be obsolete.”

  • His Extremeness has the real news from yesterday’s White House briefing.

  • DCist reports, “Local NPR station WETA-FM recently completely reversed course a second time, switching back to a classical format after two unsatisfactory years as a news station.” And listeners are offering to help out with CD donations.

  • NRO’s Bruce Bartlett notes, “If, as I believe, the major media tilted left and have moved toward the center, then this means they moved to the right. It is this movement that the left has picked up on and is complaining about. But the idea that the media now tilt toward conservatives is absurd.”

  • Drudge reports that CNN “has barred former U.S. Senator Mike Gravel from their New Hampshire debate, without giving a reason. … This decision calls into question media censorship and goes against a fundamental American belief in ‘Fairness,’ which is especially critical in the political process.”

  • B&C reports, “The Radio-Television News Directors Association Wednesday praised passage of a bill (HR 1309) that strengthens the Freedom of Information Act.”

  • A Zogby poll shows, “The vast majority of American voters believe media bias is alive and well — 83% of likely voters said the media is biased in one direction or another, while just 11% believe the media doesn’t take political sides.”

  • The AP reports, “Advertising revenues at U.S. newspapers edged down 0.3 percent last year as gains in online revenues weren’t enough to compensate for a worsening downturn in print ads.”

  • Julie Mason has no one to play with.

  • Sunday Show Preview

  • “Meet The Press”: Tom Brokaw, Bob Woodward and Michael Beschloss, E.J. Dionne, Kate O’Beirne, Eugene Robinson and William Safire.

  • “The Chris Matthews Show”: HD Net’s Dan Rather, Chicago Tribune’s Clarence Page, BBC’s Katty Kay and MSNBC’s Norah O’Donnell.

  • Face The Nation: Gen. Alexander Haig, Washington Post’s Ben Bradlee, Ford Historian James Cannon and New York Daily News’ Tom DeFrank.

  • “This Week”: John and Elizabeth Edwards, Time’s Jay Carney, former Bush advisor Dan Senor, ABC’s Claire Shipman and Donna Brazile.

  • C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers”: Newly appointed chairman for the DCCC, Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD). The Hill’s Jonathan Kaplan and Roll Call’s David Drucker participate in the questioning.

  • Fox News Sunday: Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN), Governor Tom Vilsack (D-IA), Charles Krauthammer, Mara Liasson, Bill Kristol, Juan Williams