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Posts Tagged ‘Kara Swisher’

WaPo Digital Revamp Continues: Taylor Swiped from BI; Rucker Promoted

WaPo has promoted Philip Rucker from White House correspondent to national politics reporter and has hired Adam Taylor away from Business Insider to contribute to its “WorldViews” foreign affairs blog.

Taylor had been an editor at BI since 2010. His addition to “WoldViews” is part of WaPo editor Marty Baron‘s plan to develop “verticals,” or areas of specialization, within the WaPo website to allow readers to browse content by subject matter.

Rucker’s promotion comes after 8 years of writing for WaPo, and in a memo from Cameron Barr, Anne Kornblut, and Steven Ginsberg announcing the move, he is described as a reporter who “files often and at all hours for our digital platforms, and  an enthusiastic user of social media.”

Both hires are in keeping with Baron’s efforts, announced Wednesday, to prioritize “digital transformation” at the paper. In recent weeks, WaPo has also given gossip column “Reliable Sources” as stronger digital presence, adding two young writers (Emily Heil and Helena Andrews) and a staffer to produce online video. They’ve also hired National Journal‘s Adam Kushner to start up an online magazine and tasked Jim Tankersley with heading a data-driven digital initiative focused on policy analysis.

All these changes come as WaPo repositions itself to compete with a number of new digital news ventures including Walter Mossberg‘s and Kara Swisher‘s Re/code, Nate Silver‘s new FiveThiryEight, and the as-of-yet untitled effort announced Sunday by former Wonkblogger Ezra Klein.

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Kurtz on Magical Self-Pimp Tour of ‘Reliable Sources’

Howard Kurtz, the Daily Beast‘s Washington bureau chief and host of CNN’s “Reliable Sources” may be the worst offender in D.C. when it comes to promoting his own show and the flattering comments he gets on Twitter. He seems to have gotten into a four-tweet routine, two pre-show and two post-show. Observe.

This weekend:

  • Lara Logan assault & the code of silence on Reliable Sources at 11et, with Donatella Lorch, Judith Matloff & Salon’s Mary Elizabeth Williams
  • “We’ll also talk budget, Wisconsin & political coverage on Reliable Sources, with Christina Bellantoni, Michael Medved & John Aravosis
  • “A heartfelt segment on Lara Logan & female journalists, w/ Donatella Lorch, Judith Matloff, Mary Elizabeth Williams http://thebea.st/erdX5I”
  • “On Reliable Sources, Michael Medved takes on Rush Limbaugh and Sarah Palin for their anti-Obama rhetoric. http://thebea.st/eRANAk”

Last weekend (we especially like the repetition with the Gawker story here):

  • Kara Swisher, Felix Salmon, Mark Potts on Reliable Sources at 11et on AOL/Arianna; plus Rachel Sklar, Matt Lewis and hard look at Egypt cove.”
  • “Also on Reliable Sources today: Gawker‘s Maureen O’Connor, whose shirtless-photos story brought down a congressman.”
  • “My CNN interview with Gawker‘s Maureen O’Connor, whose shirtless-photo story brought down a congressman. http://thebea.st/h5FOSn”
  • “What does Arianna bring to AOL, and will the deal change HuffPost? Video w/ Kara Swisher, Felix Salmon & Mark Potts. http://thebea.st/ha43jC”

Be on the lookout for Kurtz’s next four-part Twitter series, coming your way this (and likely every) Sunday morning. In the meantime, we’d like to see him in a pimp styled shoe like the one on display above.

See complimentary tweets regarding his hair and show…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 03.25.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Emily Lawrimore’s birthday (Hat Tip: Playbook), the 2008 Dart Award Winners have been announced, Dana Priest and Anne Hull have won yet another award, yesterday was Monica Lewinsky’s 34th birthday and on this day in 1634, the first colonists to Maryland found the settlement of St. Mary’s (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • We asked how your NCAA tourney bracket is doing and you said, “What bracket?”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mary Shaffrey of The Hill and Winston-Salem Journal fame is the new communications director at BIPAC.

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Katie Levinson has joined Edelman as senior vice president and political director in its New York Public Affairs practice. Levinson’s background includes serving as communications director and spokeswoman for the RNC, Bush-Cheney ’04, President Bush, Governor Schwarzenegger’s reelection and Mayor Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt asks, “So Much Sex, but What’s Fit to Print?”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Five Reasons Why Having a ‘Public Editor’ at the Times and Other Papers No Longer Makes Much Sense”

  • The New York Times’ David Carr reports, “Newspapers’ New Owners Turn Grim”

  • This “Washington Post Moment Of Zen” is brought to you by His Extreme-ness.

  • Variety reports, “Tribune owner hopes to revive embattled Times”

  • One reader wonders why this AP story never mentions Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick’s party (Democrat).

  • The Huffington Post asks, “Did Only Two Papers Feature 4,000 Iraq Deaths Across Their Front Pages?”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “For days, the Obama campaign refused to confirm where the senator and his family were heading on a short Easter vacation, even as rumors spread among the press corps that they were bound for the Virgin Islands. So that presented a conundrum for news organizations: Should they send a correspondent on the — presumably enjoyable — assignment to the Caribbean, to investigate the white sand beaches and clear blue waters? As it turns out, CNN was the lone cable network to play a game of ‘Where in the World is Barack Obama?’ Chris Welch, an off-air producer covering the Obama campaign since the Iowa caucuses, headed out to the islands.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser has a round-up of cable news coverage in “The 2008 Cable Watch”

  • Jake Tapper: ABC’s Man of the Hours

  • Politico: “Despite criticism, Fox’s Wallace keeps ‘Obama Watch’ ticking

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Fox Hosts Claim Friday’s Walk-Off Was A Joke”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports,Chris Wallace took some of his Fox colleagues to task, claiming that they took Senator Barack Obama’s comments about race out of context.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “One of the mysteries of television is why PBS’ Tavis Smiley continues to fly below the radar. He has an easy charm and a keen curiosity, and deserves to be better known.”

  • Variety reports, “While preparing to take Fox Television to the Supreme Court over a handful of expletives, the Federal Communications Commission let expire a separate indecency fine against the network for airing a movie with multiple repetitions of one of the same expletives. The FCC blamed a recent federal appeals court decision, saying it has created confusion over how the agency can enforce its indecency rules.”

  • The Kalb Report has the video of “Covering the World: A Conversation with Christiane Amanpour

  • New York Times reports,Bob Schieffer, right, the host of the CBS News Sunday morning program ‘Face the Nation’ since 1982, has agreed to postpone his planned retirement. ‘Yes, I’m going to remain with the show after the inauguration,’ Mr. Schieffer, 71, said Friday.”

  • A GWU release announced, “The George Washington University’s Prime Movers Program recently received a gift of $1,500 from the Washington, D.C.-area chapter of the Radio-Television News Directors Association to help purchase broadcast equipment and train students producing local high school radio and television programs. The Prime Movers Program is a partnership between Washington-area news media and local high schools in collaboration with GW’s School of Media and Public Affairs. Its goal is to provide journalism education and hands-on training in minority and diverse high schools.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Why are Web and Print STILL So Separate?”

  • A release announced, “Government Executive Media Group, a division of Atlantic Media Company, today launched NextGov, an interactive online platform serving the complete federal technology community. Breaking the traditional media model of one-way reporting by journalists toward readers, NextGov is designed to foster a multilayered dialogue between and among federal IT officials, program managers, private sector officials and outside observers about building the high-performance, results-driven federal agencies of the future. NextGov.com is designed specifically to support the needs of federal IT decision-makers, delivering three essential components to the decision-making process.”

  • All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher reports, “In February, for the first time ever, Arianna Huffington’s liberal political mega-blog and news site, the Huffington Post, has apparently surpassed the longtime mighty blog leader, Matt Drudge of the conservative/populist-leaning Drudge Report, according to recent traffic data reports from both comScore (SCOR) and Nielsen Online.”

  • Machinist reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site is already (secretly) free”

  • The AP reports, “Details on Some of the Online Ad Networks Formed by Traditional Media Companies.”

  • BeetTV reports, “The Washington Post, long an innovator in expanding its online presence, has created a popular application on Facebook with some 350,000 downloads, Jim Brady, Executive Editor of the washingtonpost.com tells Beet.TV. The application is a kind of political badge which members put on their Facebook pages, showing their political leanings from liberal to conservative.”

  • Billboard reports, “Search for an artist on any of the popular search engines, and the top three results are practically guaranteed: the artist’s official Web site, Wikipedia entry and MySpace page — often in that order. But while artists and their handlers devote massive attention to the Web site and MySpace, the Wikipedia page is often overlooked. Recent data suggests they may want to reconsider their priorities.”

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media companies trying to stem the flow of advertising dollars to Google and other large Internet companies are increasingly building ad networks of their own, anchored by their brands. The latest, Forbes Inc., announced Monday that it will start selling ads this spring for about 400 financial blogs. In recent months, Conde Nast, Viacom Inc., CBS Corp. and other major media companies also have unveiled topic-specific ad networks to lure advertisers that want to buy more ads than any single site can sell.”

  • Fortune reports, “As the United States slips into recession, advertising spending is set to fall — spelling trouble for traditional media companies already battered by Internet upstarts.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “A full-blown recession would probably take a substantial bite out of traditional media, according to a survey of industry analysts and independent researchers. But digital media will benefit from these draw-downs as financially strapped marketing executives shift dollars online, seeking more transparent measures of ROI. In many cases, a recession would simply accelerate a long-term trend that is already underway.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • In Washington Post Magazine, Gene Weingarten writes, “One man with more courage than brains sacrifices himself on the altar of punditry, and, in so doing, fails to redeem us all”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “During Sunday’s ‘This Week With George Stephanopoulos’ roundtable on Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright, Clarie Shipman offered some thoughts. Then came her husband, Jay Carney. He said, ‘I will agree with my wife.’ Good move. Probably smart to maintain peace in that household. But hardly unique for Jay Carney.”

  • CNet News.com has a Q&A with Wired founder John Battelle talking “blog roll-ups, Google, and Federated Media’s future”

  • Monocle: Mr. Magazine’s Notable International Launch of the Year + An interview with Tyler Brule

  • MinOnline reports, “min has put together a one-day program that’s all about the magazine brand and its relationship with new media, from improving your Web play to making the right call on mobile opportunities; from appealing to clients who want to see more than a banner/print bundle to engaging your customers with meaningful content offerings. Don’t miss out on the publishing event of the year! Go to www.minday2008.com for registration and Early Bird Rate details”

  • The New Yorker’s Eric Alterman chronicles “The death and life of the American newspaper.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Gore Vidal is wasting no time sticking knives in the corpse of his old foe William F. Buckley Jr. In an attack brutal even by Vidal standards, Gore writes on TruthDig.com that the National Review founder was ‘a hysterical queen’ and ‘a world-class American liar. … Buckley was often drunk and out of control.’ Vidal blames the ‘tired hacks’ at Newsweek for letting Buckley’s ‘creepy,’ ‘brain-dead’ son, Christopher, talk them into a reverential cover story on his father. Vidal concludes, ‘RIP WFB — in hell.’ We asked Christopher and Newsweek if they’d care to fire back. They declined.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “With BlogTalkRadio, the Commentary Universe Expands”

  • Washington Post reports, “As the audience for AM and FM radio declines, start-up entrepreneurs and giant media companies alike search for the ‘next radio’ — a way to make money by helping listeners discover new music. Online music providers such as Pandora, Imeem and Last.fm provide an early glance at that next chapter in radio history.”

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    JOBS

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer/Online Producer.

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is looking for a Desk Assistant.

  • The CATO Institute is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The Hill Newspaper is looking for an Advertising Executive.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • Roll Call TV is looking for an Intern.

  • AARP is looking for a Senior Manager, Media Relations.

  • Politico is looking for a National Account Executive.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning More Like Noon Reading List, 01.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

    We blame Iowa for the delay.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “Discovery Communications will announce today that company veteran Mark Hollinger will be promoted to the newly created job of chief operating officer, wrapping up a frenetic year of reorganization, acquisitions and layoffs at the Silver Spring cable television network.”

  • A release announced, “Macon Morehouse has joined the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) Department of Federal Affairs as an assistant director. She will be responsible for media relations and lobbying on issues such as Internet safety and the impact of advertising on children.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • LA Observed reports, “Times publisher David Hiller has let staffers know that he was back home for the holidays but has returned here refreshed and ready to carry out the Sam Zell agenda. Turns out Zell gets credit (or blame) for the banners hung inside the Times building that staffers have been rolling their eyes over.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the first time in polls since 1996, this ABC News/Facebook survey finds the Internet rivaling newspapers as one of Americans’ top two sources of news about the presidential election. It’s also the only election news source to show growth, doubling since 2000. One reason is the Internet’s advance overall: Seventy-three percent of adults now go online, the most in polls since the dawn of the Internet age. Forty percent use the Internet specifically for news and information about politics and the election, surpassing the previous high, 35 percent in a 2004 survey.” Check out the full analysis and results.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, has boosted the newspaper’s US-based news operation by purchasing an American site offering news and commentary on the money management industry. Money-Media, bought from its sole shareholder and CEO Michael Griffin, offers live news services on the American world of ‘high-net worth’ asset management and mutual fund trustees. Its Agenda section claims to be ‘the most influential source of intelligence for today’s corporate directors’.”

  • The National Legal and Policy Center reports, “The long-term decline in newspaper circulation presents the conservative movement with an excellent opportunity to increase its influence with the media. Falling readership and tighter budgets are forcing newspapers to dedicate fewer staff to investigative reporting. As a result, they are increasingly relying upon nonprofit organizations to fill the gap. A 2005 Arizona State University study found that 37 percent of the 100 leading daily newspapers had no full-time investigative reporters.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Paul Steiger thinks there’s a possibility Bloomberg LP and The New York Times Co. could merge sometime after the election, assuming Mike Bloomberg doesn’t win the presidency. Jim Cramer agrees.”

  • Secrecy News reports, “On December 31 President Bush signed into law the “Openness Promotes Effectiveness in our National (OPEN) Government Act of 2007,” which amends the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The new law makes several constructive procedural changes in the FOIA to encourage faster agency response times, to enable requesters to track the status of their requests, to expand the basis for fee waivers, and more.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage Sleepless in Seattle, Billich gets his TV job when he wants it, Playoff Preview”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It’s a very big win for Barack Obama, in part because he knocked off the former first lady and in part because the media have been hankering to write the upset story. But remember all the pundits taking Hillary Clinton’s inevitability for granted most of the year, and despairing during the summer and fall that Obama could never catch up because he wasn’t pummeling her? He never hammered Hillary all that hard, and he still caught up.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “CNBC, First in Business Worldwide,
    had robust ratings growth in 2007 and had its best year in Business Day programming (5 AM-7 PM ET) since 2003 in the key demographic of adults 25-54. In total viewers, CNBC had its best year since 2002.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser has learned the CBS News blog PublicEye, once described as a “de facto ombudsman” of CBS News, has ceased operations. CBS Interactive cut several staff members last month, including Matthew Felling who was editor of the site. A spokesperson for CBS Interactive tells TVNewser, ‘We weren’t able to find a sustainable business model for Public Eye. We are exploring ways to maintain a similar spirit of public discourse by engaging the CBSNews.com audience and building a community around multiple voices.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Writers Guild of America said it will picket the Golden Globe Awards, rejecting a call by the show’s owners to let a scripted show air on Jan. 13 without protests.”

  • Silicon Valley Insider reports, “We know several people who watch the Fox Business Network, but that’s because all of them appear on the newly launched cable channel from time to time. The rest of America, it seems, is soundly ignoring News Corp.’s newest offering: Nielsen says an average of 6,300 people a day watched FBN in the first two months of its launch last fall — a little more than 2% of CNBC’s audience of 283,000.”

  • DCRTV reports, “The still relatively new French ambassador to the US, Pierre Vimont, will be the guest on “The Q&A Cafe With Carol Joynt” on 2/7. It will air on NewsChannel 8 that weekend and DC Cable the following Friday. The cafe begins its new season next week with syndicated columnist Robert Novak”

  • The AP reports, “ABC News is eliminating Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter and Democrats Dennis Kucinich and Mike Gravel from its prime- time presidential debates Saturday night because they did not meet benchmarks for their support.”

  • Brian Stelter takes New York Times readers “Inside CNN’s Control Room, Balancing Projections With Patience”

  • TVNewser reports,Shepard Smith, talking with Greta Van Susteren and Susan Estrich went there during the late-night coverage of the Iowa caucuses. Smith was talking about Rep. Ron Paul’s 10% support from caucus-goers. ‘More than double’ what Rudy Giuliani got, Smith said. Then he asked the question: ‘Should Fox News reconsider’ and allow Paul in the GOP forum set for Sunday night?”

  • Also from DCRTV: “Landmark Communications, the parent company of the Annapolis Capital and the Bowie Blade-News newspapers, is exploring a possible sale of its businesses. That’s according to the Virginian-Pilot, the flagship newspaper of Norfolk-based Landmark, which owns a batch of media properties, including The Weather Channel”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When Jim Stewart stepped down from CBS News in November 2006 after some 16 years of reporting on a range of topics for the Tiffany Network, the longtime Washington-based correspondent retired to the warmth of Florida. Now, depending on a judge’s ruling in an ongoing case, Mr. Stewart could be spending a part of his golden years in a much less sunny position—namely in contempt of a federal court.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Television’s late-night impresarios burst back on the air Wednesday after a forced two-month hiatus, expressing support for the striking writers even though several of the hosts crossed the picket line to resume their shows.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Wednesday was not just the first trading day of the year. It was also the first working day for Jeffrey Bewkes in his role as the new chief executive of media octopus Time Warner. Mr. Bewkes’s move to the C.E.O. chair, recently occupied by Richard Parsons, comes amid rampant chatter about whether he might decide to sell some of Time Warner’s parts, such as AOL or its publishing arm. Much of this speculation is old. And so far, Mr. Bewkes hasn’t tipped his hand. But in a report Wednesday, an analyst from UBS sounded skeptical that a sale would come soon and argued that such a move might not add much value anyway.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “On Saturday, January 5, 2008 — only two days after the critical Iowa caucuses and three days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary — ABC News, Facebook, and ABC affiliate WMUR will team up for a historic debate night.” For more details, click here.

  • Eat The Press reports, “TVNewser has the confirm: CBS’ Public Eye Blog is no more (seriously, look for it — it’s gone from the list of blogs). After last month’s round of layoffs at CBS (joyeux noel!), we wondered if that meant ‘Bye to the Eye.’ We’d asked CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock who specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated and claimed that political reporter (and former PubEye co-editor) Brian Montopoli would be taking Felling’s spot.”

  • The Boston Herald reports, “Back in 2004, YouTube, the Internet-based video-sharing site, hadn’t been created. Now, the site, and the millions of the videos posted on it, has a coveted, influential spot in the current presidential campaign. On Monday night, the site and its owner, Google, plan on celebrating that role, by hosting an epic bash for all the reporters and photographers who are working the campaign trail. The party will be held at a Manchester, N.H., science center, the night before the state’s voters winnow down the list of presidential candidates.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “A new study found that many uses of copyrighted material in online video, including mash-ups and satire, are legal and could be endangered by new censorship practices.”

  • Based on the number of anonymous tips we’ve received, you’ve picked up on a change on Wonkette’s masthead. Ken Layne is no managing editor and John Clarke, Jr. has left the website.

  • Kara Swisher shares, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Learned to Love the Blog: Goodbye Dead Trees!”

  • CyberJournalist.net reports, “Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007″

  • Jon Friedman tell us, “How the media let us down at the Iowa caucus”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Less than three months after its much-ballyhooed launch, Fox Business Network is drawing an average of 6,000 daytime viewers. The Nielsen number, for the period Oct. 15 through Dec. 16, rises to 15,000 during prime time. Taken in isolation, the debut might be judged an abysmal failure. But no one — including Fox executives — expected the fledgling channel to make a serious run at the top business network, CNBC, until it had been on the air for at least a year.”

  • Eat The Press represents, “More Media Winners, Iowa Edition”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Age reports, “Time Inc to challenge Soeharto’s $125 million libel win”

  • A tipster tells us, “Sonny Bunch from Weekly Standard also sporting a ‘strike beard’”

  • Business Week reports, “As if media companies didn’t already have enough going on, now they have something else to look forward to in 2008: scarcity. I don’t mean the ‘scarcity’ media knew in easier times, back when owning printing presses or broadcast towers gave you a stranglehold on distribution, back when there was no newfangled noisy megaphone—the Internet—through which those whom traditionalists call ‘nonprofessionals’ could broadcast their own media.”

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    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

  • Matthew Felling to the The Kojo Nnamdi Show on NPR next Monday and Tuesday.

  • UPI reports, “For the first time, a national radio station will be devoted to the U.S. presidential race 24 hours a day, seven days a week, XM Satellite Radio said.”

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    JOBS

  • US News & World Report is looking for a Manager, Audience and Business Development: Health and a Manager, Audience & Business Development: Money

  • The Development Executive Group is looking for an Editor for Leading International Dev’t Website.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a
    Public Relations Coordinator.

  • Allison & Partners is looking for a Senior Account Executive and Account Manager.

  • Virilion is looking for a Copywriter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext