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Posts Tagged ‘Kathleen Parker’

Weekend Show Preview, 4.4 – 4.6

SundayShows12Who’s on the talk shows this weekend? Glad you asked:

Sunday:

CBS’s “Face the Nation”: Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), Dan Pfeiffer, Thomas Friedman of Showtime’s “Years of Living Dangerously,” Heidi Cullen, Chief Climate Advisor for “Years,”  Todd Purdum of Politico, Amy Walter of Cook Political Report, John Dickerson of CBS

“Fox News Sunday”: Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA), Gen. Michael Hayden, Brit Hume, Elise Viebeck of The Hill, Liz Cheney, Juan Williams

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Fmr. Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen, Shaun McCutcheon, Robert Weissman of Public Citizen, Kathleen Parker of WaPo, Fmr. Sen. John Sununu (R-NH), Fmr. Rep. Harold Ford Jr. (D-TN), Steve Case of America Online, author Michael Lewis, Kevin Tibbles of NBC, 

ABC’s “This Week“: Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Rep. John Carter (R-TX), Gen. Peter Chiarelli, Donna Brazile, Newt Gingrich, Bill Kristol, Alicia Menendez of Fusion

Univision’s “Al Punto”: Rep. Joe García (D-FL), activists Jaime Valdez and Marisa Franco, radio host Fernando Espuelas, activists Jersey Vargas and Mario Vargas

CNN’s “State of the Union“: 9:00- Rep. Nancy Pelosi (R-CA), Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI), Rep. Dutch Ruppersberg (D-MD), Kitty Higgins from  NTSB, Nick Sabatini from FAA, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA); 12:00- Penny Lee of Democratic Governors Assoc., Ross Douthat of NYT, Corey Dade of NPR, satellite expert Ken Christensen, pilot Karlene Petit

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Weekend Show Preview, 2.28 – 3.2

SundayShows12Who’s on the public affairs shows this weekend? Glad you asked:

Sunday:

CBS’s “Face the Nation“: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand‎ (D-NY), Michael O’Hanlon of Brookings, Danielle Pletka of AEI, CBS’ Margaret Brennan and David Martin

“Fox News Sunday”: Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), George Will, Elise Viebeck of The Hill, Scott Brown, Evan Bayh

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Kathleen Parker, Tina Brown, Rep. Raúl Labrador (R-ID), Chuck Todd of NBC/MSNBC

ABC’s “This Week“: Ben Affleck, Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), CNN’s Van Jones, Rich Lowry of National Review, ABC’s Cokie Roberts, Nate Silver

Univision’s “Al Punto” : President of Mexico Enrique Peña Nieto, Michelle Obama, wife of a Venezuelan political prisoner Lilian Tintori, Roni Kaplan of Israeli Defense Force, actor Eduardo Verastegui

CNN’s “State of the Union“: Rick Santorum, Former WH Deputy Press Sec. Bill Burton, NYT‘s Ross Douthat, Amy Walter of Cook Political Report

More guest listings after the jump…

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Sunday Show Preview

Image courtesy of Salon.com.

Image courtesy of Salon.com.

Who’s on the weekend shows this week? Glad you asked:

–CBS’s “Face the Nation“:  LBJ daughter Luci Baines Johnson Turpin; reporter Hugh Ainesworthy, who witnessed the assassination of JFK, arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald, and assassination of Oswald by Jack Ruby; former AP reporter Mike CochranDr. Ronald Jones of Parkland Hospital who treated Kennedy AND Oswald; Historians Douglas Brinkley and Thurston Clarke; Poli-scientist Larry Sabato; the eminently reasonable David Gergen; and the eminently whimsical Peggy Noonan

–”Fox News Sunday“: WY Senate Candidate Liz Cheney; Former MD Lt. Gov Kathleen Kennedy Townsend; former Representative and current JFK nephew Patrick Kennedy (RI-D), “Power Player” (whatever that means) Scott Hartwig; and the Panel: Brit Hume, Bob Woodward, and George Will (Mumbles, Grumbles, and Doc)

–NBC’s “Meet the Press“: House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (CA-D) (Did we mention we’re getting wasted with her Tuesday?), Republican Lifeboat Sen. Kelly Ayotte (NH); and the Roundtable: Tom Brokaw (BOOM), Kathleen Parker (sans Spitzer), Mike “Sexy and He Knows It” Murphy, and Chris Matthews (now with washable bib!)

–ABC’s “This Week“: Sen. Kirstin “Stop the Madness” Gillibrand (NY-D); (Do You Recall ) Gov.Scott Walker (WI-R); and the Roundtable: Just Back from Afghanistan Rep. Adam Kinzinger (IL-R), Washington’s Busiest Lady Gwen Ifill, Matthew “No Friend of Karl Rove” Dowd, Bizarro Karl Rove David Plouffe, Howard “I Don’t Need No Footstool” Dean, Pulitzer Prize Winning Bret Bret Stephens, and, again, Patrick Kennedy; also Documentary Legend Ken Burns, and Future Warlord Erik Prince

–CNN’s “State of the Union“: To be announced.

–PBS’s “Washington Week“: The crane-like Danz Balz of WaPo; the dashing John Harwood of CNBC and NYT; and the lovely Jeff Zeleny of ABC News

We’ll update as we know more.

What You Should Think, Straight From WaPo

This week we perused the opinion section at Washington Post, mostly so you don’t have to. Here’s a sampling of what we found:

Step Right Up and See the Show

WaPo’s Kathleen Parker, with an admittedly heavy heart, thinks it’s time to get cameras out of the courtroom. She cites as exhibit A ”the carnival trial of George Zimmerman.” While we agree the trial has had its… dramatic moments, we can’t blame it all on the cameras, can we? Parker thinks so. She argues that the mere presence of a camera makes people act different and thereby, without the cameras, this particular trial would be going differently. Maybe. Sometimes the drama is just inherent in the characters playing it out, camera or not. Really, it’s a special kind of person who has no qualms about saying “creepy ass cracker” on the witness stand and it’s a special kind of lawyer who opens with a knock knock joke. Do we really think it’s just the cameras that’s making them do this? Now, if you want to get into a discussion about how the networks are covering this particular trial — ahem, CNN — then we should talk.

If you’ve never agreed with Jennifer Rubin before, read on…

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FishbowlDC Interview With Knight Kiplinger

Say hello to Knight Kiplinger, Editor in Chief, Kiplinger publishing (Kiplinger Letters, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, Kiplinger.com). We spoke by phone this morning just after he did his ritualistic yoga exercises. He spends 20 minutes each morning doing stretches and poses to put himself in a good frame of mind. “I don’t watch much TV,” he noted quickly into the call, saying the Fishbowl interview wasn’t necessarily ideal for someone who doesn’t watch a lot of TV. (We’ll keep that in mind.) “I’m not older than dirt, but I came up through newspaper journalism and print journalism so that’s kind of my bias in my news diet.” Asked about the current state of journalism, Kiplinger’s thoughts are enlightening. POLITICO reporters, you may want to stop reading now. “I think we’ve seen the decline of careful consideration, the emphasis is on quick response, the immediate reaction,” Kiplinger said. “The best journalism is not always the fast journalism. The first analysis is often not carefully considered. Good journalism takes time. It takes reporting. We’ve seen a decline of in-depth reporting. A newspaper reporter had eight or ten hours to do hard reporting, deep reporting, talking to many, many sources before writing a story. The internet has forced everyone to work faster and that sometimes undercuts journalistic quality. So that is the problem.” Here’s the point where WaPo‘s Ezra Klein should stop reading. “These days a lot of young journalists, they all want to be columnists, giving the world their opinions,” he said. “Journalists try to build themselves into a brand, into a marketable entity that can move from periodical to periodical. Of course, that’s what columnists have always done.” Kiplinger sees danger signs. “With too much emphasis on celebrity, the content of journalism gets short shrift. A bigger threat to quality journalism is the unwillingness of young adults to pay for journalism. Older adults will still pay for content. They comprise the subscription-paying readership.” Kiplinger still gets two newspapers at home: WaPo and TWT. At the office he reads WSJ and NYT. “I look through them very rapidly,” he says of WaPo and TWT, saying he prefers to read them in print than online and can do so faster. He particularly enjoys WaPo‘s Metro section. He’s also a relentless reader of obituaries. “In my next life I am going to be an obit writer,” he says. Moving along, he has grave concerns about the industry: “Revenue on internet is not sustaining high quality journalism,” he said. But on a positive note, he added, “the internet has given everyone [a medium]…that is a powerful force, a positive force. This trend will continue.” On the future of journalism: “There will be fewer jobs in traditional journalism for young journalists who want to be the reporter, who want to tell the story of modern life. I don’t want to sound like a curmudgeon. We’re in the throws of a great democratization of media. Editing today is a luxury many media feel they can’t afford. You don’t have the level of trust that you once had. Traditional media were gatekeepers to information. They were the mandarins who selected what they thought the public needed to know.” Kiplinger is on Twitter, but he’s not enthralled by it. “Yeah I tweet,” he said. “If you went to my Twitter account you’d see I tweet infrequently. I try to restrain my tweets to kind of broader observations about things going on in the economy. I work very hard to condense and distill. I don’t have a Twitter support staff as a lot of semi-celebrity journalists do.” As an aside, he notes…“There are some people who think I am a celebrity. I just think I’m an ink-stained wretch. I’m not a hyperactive tweeter.” On family…He’s a longtime choral singer and met his wife in the Washington Chorus in 1979. Incidentally, his daughter also met her fiance in the Washington Chorus (a detail reported in WaPo earlier this week). Facebook? “I don’t do Facebook at all. I don’t think the world is that interested in my daily life, and even if they are, I don’t want to share it with them.” Finally, I asked…what one piece of wisdom should every journalist know? He replied, “There’s no substitute for hard reporting.”

If you were a carbonated beverage, which would you be?  

Schweppes Tonic Water (with real quinine), my teenage favorite, even before I started adding gin.

How often do you Google yourself?

Rarely (Just noticed they now have photos of the search subject, too!)

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor/boss (or vice versa)?  

To the owner of the first newspaper I worked for, at 22 years old: “Reporters ought to earn as much as the layout guys with their razor blades and paste pots.”  (He disagreed.)

You have an intriguing name. What is the story behind it?

It was my maternal grandmother’s maiden name (full name: Daphne Knight). No relation to the Knight publishing family, darn it.

Who is your favorite working journalist and why?

David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.  No one explains complex economic issues with more clarity and common sense than Wessel.

Do you have a favorite word?

I’m told I overuse “unconscionable,” so maybe that’s it.

Who would you rather have dinner with – CNN’s Candy Crowley, ABC’s Martha Raddatz or Fox News’ Megyn Kelly? Tell us why.

I’m sure each of them would be a fine dinner companion, but I’d rather dine with Renee Montagne of NPR, co-host of “Morning Edition.”  She’s a brainy journalist (Phi Beta from Berkeley), award-winning correspondent in South Africa and Afghanistan, adept anchor—and she sounds like a very nice person (based on interviews I hear regularly, and ones I’ve done with her while I was in the DC studio and she was at NPR West in California).

The Earth’s human population is dying out and you must save it. You will spend a romantic evening with either Scandal’s Kerry Washington, any of the women from FNC’s “The Five” or MSNBC’s S.E. Cupp. Who will it be? (None is not an option.)

I don’t know any of these women on sight (don’t watch much TV), so you pick one for my blind date, and I’m sure she and I will be able to save the Earth together. [Okay, we'll play your game. We pick Helen Thomas. That's what you get for not answering.]

What swear word do you use most often? “Damn!”…used sparingly.

You’ve just been told the big news: You get to have your own Sunday morning talk show. Who will be on your roundtable? (Pick four journalists or pundits types.)

Cokie Roberts, David Frum, Kathleen Parker, David Brooks. (Back-ups for when someone is traveling or out sick: Peggy Noonan and E. J. Dionne.)

On a serious note for a moment, if you could have dinner with a person who has died, who would it be?

My zany and wise mother, Gogo Kiplinger (1919-2007)

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Kathleen Parker Fetes ‘Brash’ Author in Georgetown Home, Hems and Haws About Eliot Spitzer

WaPo columnist Kathleen Parker hosted guests at her Georgetown home Tuesday to celebrate author and freelance writer Robert Draper‘s book, Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives.

Draper’s book largely focuses on the Republicans who swooped into Congress “intending to shake things up” in 2010. “This was my interest,” Draper told FBDC, “to see whether all these guys, all these freshmen, about a third of whom had no political experience, would succeed in changing the institution or be changed by it.” He said the jury is still out on this one.

What Good We Do was completed over the course of 14 months. Draper conducted about 300 interviews with several freshmen in the House along with some high-level Republicans and Democrats. He said he was surprised to see how much pressure Republican congressmen are under from activists and Tea Partiers in their districts. “Even after the debt ceiling [vote], when the approval rating for Congress as a whole plummeted and there was a reason to work together, they still lived in mortal fear of the activists who would show up to their town halls and scream at them and say ‘why did you vote for the debt ceiling? We should shut the government down, we should learn how to live within our means and if that’s the consequence so be it.’”

Draper’s book was published in late April.

Extras

Parker’s home is beautiful but we ran into a few oddities; this giant pear set on a decorative table, for example.

Parker has a pet poodle that she saved from a shelter. His name is Ollie and he’s completely blind in both eyes.

We asked Parker what she thought about her short-lived CNN co-host and former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer replacing Keith Olbermann on Current TV. “No, I’m not going to answer that,” she quickly said… before actually answering. “Well, I sent him an email and I said, ‘congratulations, I think you’ll do well there.’ I’ll say that.”

In his Wikipedia entry Draper is described as being “known for his brash and self-confident personality.” He was self-confident but didn’t come off as brash. He told us that part of the entry came from a former editor who made a toast at Draper’s wedding rehearsal, saying “Robert’s a great writer and if you don’t believe me, ask him.” Draper said Wikipedia “seized upon” the quote and “deduced from that that I’m brash or have a  healthy estimation of my abilities or something.”

Parker Opens Her Georgetown Abode to Draper

Conservative columnist Kathleen Parker, NPR Digital Editorial Coordinator Elise Hu and Lara Andre are hosting a book party for GQ Correspondent and NYT Magazine Contributor Robert Draper‘s new book at Parker’s Georgetown home Tuesday night. (Parker and Draper pictured above. Andre is Draper’s longtime girlfriend.)

Draper’s new book, Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives, is about Congress, so you can be sure the guest list is chock full of political and media types.

 

 

 

 

In Defense of Hilary Rosen

As Washington journalists waded through the muck of self-righteousness last week, you’d have thought Hilary Rosen was a pariah for saying that “Ann Romney has never worked a day in her life.” WaPo‘s Chris Cillizza declared that she had the “Worst Week in Washington” after the White House and even President Obama denounced her remarks. And likely that’s true. But another undeniable truth is that, but for CNN, many from both sides of the aisle came rushing to the CNN Contributor’s defense.

The network never ordered or asked her to apologize — she did that on her own. But we had to sit through Wolf Blitzer scolding her like she was a stay at home child. Isn’t there something she’d like to say to the camera to Ann Romney? We also had to witness the inevitable online degenerates who took to skanky commenting on both Hilary and Ann’s physical appearance, including how Hilary smells and her sexual orientation. (Anything that goes viral typically enters a sick phase of ugliness.) Rosen, who also works for SKDKnickerbocker, ultimately declined an invitation to appear on NBC’s “Meet the Press” this past Sunday. Host David Gregory said she had planned to be on the panel, but backed out because she didn’t want to ignite another firestorm. It appears abundantly clear they will have her back. We also had to endure Breitbart.com’s Dana Loesch praising presumed GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney for the “handling” of his wife, because what woman doesn’t want to be shown the ultimate respect by being handled by her husband? Now if only he could learn how to handle the media, she also jabbed. Take that, Bret Baier.

Let’s look at the rundown of those who came to Rosen’s defense:

1. WaPo‘s Ruth Marcus called her a friend and defended her remarks while Kathleen Parker, in what was perhaps the strongest condemnation of Rosen being turned into an outcast, wrote, “Women and men should be angry, all right, but not at Ann Romney or Hilary Rosen, who are entitled to both their opinions and their choices without fear of censure or condemnation.” 2. The Daily Caller‘s Tucker Carlson personally sung her praises on a conservative radio show. 3. FNC’s Greta Van Susteren argued with former top Bush aide Karl Rove about her, saying she is “a friend” and not anti-stay at home moms. 4. HBO’s Bill Maher defended her in a sarcastic rant about how this obviously means the Democrats are anti-stay at home moms. 5. Bay Buchanan defends Rosen, calling her “savvy” and “passionate” and “loyal” to the Obama administration. “She has been too good to them for them to treat her this way,” she said on CNN. 6. TIME‘s Judith Warner who wrote, “Hilary Rosen Was Right: Ann Romney Is Out of Touch with Most Women.” 7. The Nation‘s Jessica Valenti, who wrote, “Why Hilary Rosen is Right.” 8. A variety of journos explained that Rosengate is a “manufactured controversy” including WaPo‘s left-wing blogger Greg Sargent, who wrote an essay entitled, “The Hilary Rosen Controversy is Absurd.”

FishbowlDC Interview with TWT’s Marybeth Hicks

Say hello to TWT Columnist Marybeth Hicks. Metaphorically, you can find her at the intersection of politics and parenting. Literally, you can find her on the opinion page and in book stores.

Hicks lives in East Lansing, Mich., and is the author of three books, most recently “Don’t Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid: Confronting the Left’s Assault on Our Families, Faith and Freedom.” She also pens a weekly column which she started in 2004 focusing on politics and culture and their impact on the American family.

Before writing for TWT, Hicks, a graduate of Michigan State University, worked as a writer in the Reagan White House and in corporate communications. But family life reeled her in. She wanted to work from  home “among the four most important machines in a woman’s life… a laptop, a slow cooker, a washer and a dryer.”

She compares the process of writing her latest book to popping out a baby. “It took about nine months, was painful especially at the end, and a few weeks after it comes out, you stop staring at it all the time and start wishing you could sleep through the night,” she told FBDC. The research put her in uncharted territory, she said, leading her to read up on things like “heteronormativity in Disney movies.” (Google it. We did.)

Hicks is a mother of four. Her daughter Kate Hicks is an editor at TownHall.com.

If you were a combined carbonated beverage, which would you be? A gin and tonic. And never diet tonic. That stuff is disgusting. Extra lime.

How often do you Google yourself? Hardly ever anymore. Early on I used to check to see if my column was getting any traction, but stopped once my daughters were looking over my shoulder and I discovered my name had been trolled and put on a porn site. Cost me hundreds to get it removed! These days it sends me to radical leftist blogs where I’m routinely called an idiot. Tell me something I don’t know.

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor/boss (or vice versa)? Very early in my career, I was reminded by a boss not to have too much fun at work. In retrospect, that was clearly a nice way of telling me to quiet down. At the time I was confused.

Who is your favorite working journalist and why? Probably Peggy Noonan. I don’t always agree with her. She was pretty gaga over Obama early on, which annoyed me. But that woman could write about sawdust and her sentences would be lovely and lyrical and use alliteration. Her prose rolled through thoughts like a cloud of literary perfection. It would only be a sawdust essay, but it would be a thing of beauty and I would be jealous. As usual.

Do you have a favorite word? Finished. As in, “I am finished with yet another column. Time for a gin and tonic.” Deadlines haunt me.

Who would you rather have dinner with – Salon’s Joan Walsh, WaPo‘s Kathleen Parker or NYT‘s Maureen Dowd. Tell us why. Really? You’re going to make me look like a mean girl in the Fishbowl interview? Because the honest answer is Jonah Goldberg. But if I must, Kathleen Parker, so I can tell her how much I loved her old stuff, back when she was a conservative, and ask if it was a bigger sellout to endorse President Obama or co-host with [Eliot] Spitzer. See, that just makes me seem mean and I’m not.

What’s your funniest TV blooper moment (or radio or print interview moment)? Well, while promoting Kool-Aid, [ex-Human Events journo] Jason Mattera told me during a radio interview that he wished I was his mom. Then he implied that for a mom, I was hot. That was awkward. I changed the subject.

What swear word do you use most often? You’re trying to ruin my Catholic mom image, aren’t you? Okay, well, it depends. The “s” word when I drop or break things; stronger language as the situation warrants. But I’m Irish, so once I vent, it’s over and we’re having a beer.

Read about Hicks’ edamame problem after the jump…

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Top 10 Most Memorable Media Breakups

By Betsy Rothstein, Peter Ogburn, Eddie Scarry and Piranhamous

Relationships are funny. They can last nights, years, or a lifetime. That can mean an eternity of laughs and love and mutual respect. It can also mean that you get stuck in a rut where it just drags on and on and you can’t stand the way the other person fake laughs at your jokes or crunches their cereal in the morning or never actually FOLDS the laundry, they just throw it on the floor. But, breakups happen. Sometimes, it’s no one’s fault — just simple, obvious incompatibility. Other times, it’s personal. Two people united in a vile hatred for each other. Heated blowups, spitting in food, infidelity, rage-filled silence and threats of lawsuits are all common symptoms of a relationship gone south. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, today we bring you the Top 10 Most Memorable Media Breakups of recent times. Enjoy!

10. Keith Olbermann and MSNBC  — Calling Keith Olbermann a “big fish in a small pond” overstates the ratings at MSNBC. He was more like a goldfish in a cereal bowl. But still, he was MSNBC’s biggest fish. So when they split last year, it came as a shock to his fan(s). It was an abusive relationship, for sure. Tales of Olbermann’s temper tantrums are the stuff of legend. The world in which his ego lives is one in where he his popular and influential, the world in which his body lives is the real world. When Olbermann abruptly announced on January 21, 2011, that that night’s Countdown was his last, his fan(s) cried, and throngs of Americans he painted as enemies, laughed. Both knew he would be back, his ego wouldn’t allow him to keep his opinions to his favorite and most loyal audience – himself. He returned to basic cable last fall, on something called Current TV. With production values just this side of public access and an audience almost as small, Keith quickly returned to his abusive habits. After some couple’s therapy, things seem to be going more smoothly. Not audience wise, no one watches Current TV, but at least Keith isn’t abusing the staff anymore.  Winner: MSNBC. They unloaded an angry man for whom no one enjoyed working. Loser: Olbermann. He’s now in the basement (both in ratings and, from the looks of it, his set). His contract with Current TV is technically larger, but based on company stock which, if the black hole that is his ratings don’t improve, is less valuable than a plastic bag filled with chewed gum. — Piranhamous

9. Pat Buchanan and MSNBC — As the closest thing to a Republican as MSNBC will allow on its air, you’d think Pat Buchanan would’ve had some job security simply based on the network’s desire to hold on to the last thread of a plausible claim of credibility and objectivity. If you thought that you’d be wrong. Buchanan, a former Republican and Reform Party candidate for President, was suspended for having opinions that strayed from the progressive orthodoxy MSNBC has sacrificed its objectivity for. Color of Change, the race-based thought police group, with the help of other left-wing groups, paid for an Astroturf campaign against Buchanan, to which MSNBC brass was only too willing to cave. Buchanan has a long history of saying stupid things, but had comfortably settled into the role of “right-wing” dancing monkey for MSNBC’s left-wing organ grinders. When the pennies stopped flowing he was cast aside for a newer, incredibly stupid model – Meghan McCain. While Pat is smart, McCain is not. Pat would probably call it  “affirmative action,” but it’s really, like our credit rating, a downgrading. Pat could make points and use facts that would stump and contradict MSNBC hosts, Meghan confuses the words “modicum” and “emoticon.” Winner: No one. They’re like the couple that should’ve broken up years ago, but stayed together for the kids. The kids are grown now, though they still live at home, so this break-up was a long time coming. Buchanan is ready to retire, and he’d actually have a larger audience if he retired to The Villages and just gave speeches in the rec room. MSNBC now has a pure line-up of progressive mouthpieces, so their audience won’t be threatened by being exposed to opposing viewpoints. It’s win-win. Well, technically it’s lose-lose, but who’s counting? — Piranhamous

8. Eliot Spitzer and Kathleen Parker–  Almost immediately after ex-New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and WaPo‘s Kathleen Parker were teamed up for a primetime show on CNN, there were rumors that things just were cooling between the two. The show, titled “Parker Spitzer,” started in October 2010. Ratings were terrible, usually putting the show in last place in the cable news race. Then,  just four months after its debut, Parker announced she was leaving. A report in the New York Post said that Parker often felt upstaged by Spitzer who was more adversarial in his questioning of guests. The report said Parker “stormed off the set” during one taping of the program in November. But who ever thought Parker and Spitzer, who once had a thing for prostitutes, would make good bedfellows? After Parker scrammed for good, Spitzer was back the following week flying solo with a new program, “In the Arena.” That show itself was canceled nine months later. — Eddie Scarry

7. Politico and EVERYONE – Few media outlets have broken more hearts than the behemoth that is Politico. Last year alone, we saw them lay waste to several high profile reporters. Amie Parnes left her perch as FLOTUS-ass-kisser-in-Chief to cover the White House for The Hill. Chris Frates left Politico last year and jumped to NJ. This was particularly heartbreaking, since Frates had been with Politico since the beginning. Soon enough Politico threatened with threats of a lawsuit after Frates allegedly used a reader list for his new job — a charge NJ has always denied. Nonetheless, he pulled names to appease the situation. Kendra Marr resigned after she was busted plagiarizing the work of NYT writer Susan Stellin. We could go on and on and on with all the reporters that left Politico last year, but the most notable was Ben Smith, who left to become Editor-in-Chief at BuzzFeed. Sure, he’s still associated with Politico, but let’s not kid ourselves. They’re friends with benefits at best. — Peter Ogburn

6. David Shuster and MSNBC – This one goes back to 2010. MSNBC just didn’t know WHAT to do with David Shuster. He was their utility man, filling in for Keith Olbermann and various MSNBC shows. He had his own show with Tamron Hall, but no one could decide on which time slot to put him in. All of the back and forth and non-committal behavior from MSNBC prompted Shuster to explore his options. He filmed a pilot with CNN, which is a HUGE no-no. When MSNBC boss Phil Griffin heard of the news, Shuster was “suspended indefinitely” and later, sent packing. Shuster has landed on his feet after the ordeal. Or maybe he’s just landed. He is at Current TV as the primary substitute host for Olbermann and he hosts a weekend radio show on 1480AM. He also has plans to launch an investigative journalism website. Shuster gushed about MSNBC. Think warm fuzzies. “The breakup with MSNBC was amicable,” he told FishbowlDC. “We parted on mutually respectful terms… and I continue to have many close friends there.  Furthermore, leaving MSNBC opened up some amazing doors for me — a rewarding internet venture, weekly radio gigs that are as much fun as one can have in broadcasting, and the opportunity on Current TV to deliver the kind of analysis/commentary that I’ve always desired.  So, I have no regrets and wish the best to everybody at MSNBC.” — Peter Ogburn

See the five remaining breakups…

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