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Posts Tagged ‘Katie Couric’

Breastfeeding Prof to Appear on Katie

American University’s breastfeeding professor and single mother Adrienne Pine will appear on Katie Couric‘s daytime talk show on Wednesday.

Pine will discuss the controversy created recently when she fed her sick toddler while teaching. Katie discusses the heated topic: is breastfeeding okay in class?  As an irrelevant aside, Modern Family star Sofia Vergara gets candid as she chats about her long road to her success. Here’s to hoping she’ll discuss her wardrobe malfunction during the Emmys in which her teal gown came apart to reveal her butt crack and panties. See the picture here.

WJLA will air the episode at 4 p.m.

Note to readers: This is not Pine’s breast.

Politico’s Mike Allen: Drenched in Power

Keep those birthday announcements coming!

Politico‘s newsroom is downright giddy and reporters, publicists and brass are patting each other on the back today as Playbook author Mike Allen lands himself in the #19 slot of Vanity Fair‘s “The New Establishment & The Powers That Be” list. Last year he rolled in with #39 ranking.

So not only is he the man the White House, Katie Couric and HuffPost‘s Jon Ward wake up to, but he’s that much more powerful than he was in 2011.

Congratulations to Mikey! Oh, er, may we call you that?

Vanity Fair writes, “Allen lives a famously spartan life—he doesn’t own a house or a car—and usually starts working long before sunrise. But in May the renowned workaholic took his first day off, after having written Playbook for 990 straight days (weekends included).”

Others notables who made the power list: Alec Baldwin (#25), Joe Scarborough and Mika Brezezinski (#20), George Clooney (#17), FNC Prez Roger Ailes (#15), HuffPost-AOL’s Tim Armstrong and Arianna Huffington (#12), Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert (#11), News Corp’s Ruper Murdoch (#3) and Michael Bloomberg (#1).

Fmr. First Lady Bush To Get Alice Award

First Lady Michelle Obama is clearly today’s It Girl, so what better timing than this morning to announce that former first lady Laura Bush is scheduled to receive the Alice Award?

Bush will be honored by the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum on Capitol Hill at its Alice Award luncheon on Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at noon.  Each year, explains a release, “the Alice Award honors women who have broken barriers and set new precedents for women. Through her work on education, health care and human rights, Mrs. Bush has influenced women’s lives in the United States and around the world. Like Alice Paul, she believes that a world that is good for women is good for everyone.”

The canned but pleasant quote: “We are thrilled to honor such a worthy recipient with this year’s Alice Award. The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum is proud to celebrate Mrs. Bush’s ongoing commitment to improving women’s lives at home and abroad. We are excited to celebrate her achievements and honor her with our Alice Award,” said Lucy Calautti and Peggy Cifrino, 2012 Alice Award Co-Chairs.

Find out who Alice was, and who else has won the award…

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Brokaw’s Painfully Awkward Replies on BookTV

Tom Brokaw is on fire. In the hot seat today for trashing the White House Correspondents’ Dinner over the weekend for its infestation of Hollywood stars, Brokaw also managed responses to two long-winded, hothead listeners on C-SPAN’s BookTV Sunday. They demanded his thoughts on the lack of diversity in hosts of NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Brokaw was on BookTV’s three-hour “In Depth” program, which must have felt a hell of a lot longer.

Q: Why does [host of MTP] always have to be a white male?

“That’s not a condition of the job,” Brokaw said. “It’s just htat we try to pick the best journalist that is available to us. … In this case, David Gregory turned up on top. It was not a decision I made. … We do have more female participation going on.” Brokaw mentioned ABC’s Diane Sawyer and former CBS News’ Katie Couric in top news spots.

Q: Why aren’t there any black journalists in any permanent Meet the Press seat?

Brokaw replied, “Yes, in fact, that has been the case and it probably won’t be that forever. He said he had Mary Mitchell on when he took over after Tim Russert died. “Look this is a slow rising tide. David Gregory did not get the job just because he was a white male … he had the skills necessary to be a good broadcaster.” Brokaw said he believed a day could come when the host could be Black, Asian or Hispanic.

Watch here and here.

 

Mike Allen Has Cheney on His Mind

Attention Katie Couric: In Politico Mike Allen‘s famous “Playbook” this morning, he writes that V.P. Dick Cheney will be on the morning shows. We know you read Allen before you even get out of bed, Katie. So we wanted to let you know that he didn’t actually mean that Cheney, he meant V.P. Joe Biden. It’s easy to confuse the two. Both are balding.

Allen, of course, corrected the matter. But not before some media reporters went hunting for Cheney on the morning circuit, thinking the shows had booked him to comment on Pres. Obama’s State of the Union address.

Politico Turns 5. Let the Roasting Begin.

Five years isn’t really that long, but Politico has seen rapid growth and a lot of success since it first began in 2007. So on a highly self-congratulatory note on Monday, Politico released a video with clips of several high-profile political players roasting the publication on its half-decade mark.

“Five years, it’s a long time. You’re doing generally a great job,” says Donald Trump.

Politico is “truly a news organization that acts its age: a petulant five-year-old concerned with only trivial matters,” host of “MTP” David Gregory says with a smile.

With a few repeats and some intensive listening, Arianna Huffington can be understood as saying, “Just as I was sitting down to write this, I saw that Mike Allen had already broken what I was going to say.”

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” host Willie Geist remarks, “I’ve gotta recuse myself because I don’t care for Politico, inside the Beltway gossipy garbage. And CBS “Face the Nation” host Bob Schieffer cracks, “The next thing you know, you’ll be getting your driver’s license.”

Politico‘s Mike Allen‘s note to Politico readers as well as Politico staff is so sweet we think we’ve already contracted Diabetes… “THANK YOU to all of you who believed in us from Day 0. And we’re so grateful to our gifted, inspiring colleagues who make POLITICO so essential, enjoyable and illuminating.”

Other notables in the video include former CBS news anchor Katie Couric, “Morning Joe’s” Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, FNC’s Greta Van Susteren and host of “Hardball” Chris Matthews, who says he enjoys reading the print version because it’s printed on such “thick stock.”

Watch the full video here.

Morning Chatter

Quotes of the Day – Home for the Holidays Edition


“Merry Christmas from Ft. Lauderdale” — Syndicated columnist and Bullfight Strategies’ Karl Frisch.

Digital journo overextends herself

“2011: The year I decided to do all my shopping, and cook a meal for six people, on Christmas Eve. (Obvious postscript: I’M AN IDIOT.)” — Kiplinger‘s Caitlin Dewey.

Writer misses old holiday escape

“I miss going to Tower Records on Xmas Day to hang with the other losers escaping their families.” — ReutersJack Shafer.

TV reporter attracts staring babies

“Lately babies staring at me. Neighbor’s kid did thru dinner. Today, another baby STARING. Asked mother why? She said ‘YOUR TEETH’… huh?” — ABC7′s Stephen Tschida.

WaPo‘s Karen Tumulty: “Christmas cookies for breakfast. Again.”

NO MORE FATTY TENDERLOIN!

“After yrs of war finally convinced mom not to cut fat off the beef tenderloin. Had to explain @noreservations would murder her in the face.” — Roll Call‘s John Stanton.

A Christmas miracle…

“I dropped my wallet at Costco and an unknown Good Samaritan turned it in – nothing missing. It’s a Christmas miracle!” — TWT‘s Emily Miller.

Uh oh.

“Elks are At the point of the night where we are threatening to beat each other up – booze.” — Labor Journo Mike Elk. Earlier, he wrote, “I’m drunk and can’t figure out how to watch any of the TV’s in my parents’ house – I just wanna see a Christmas story.”

Please, shhh….

“Cabbie knew a lot about the etymology of my last name. #tooearly” — LAT‘s James Oliphant.

Journo gets gipped on fortune

“Shocked by the fortune cookie we got post Jewish Xmas.” — HuffPost‘s Sam Stein.

Taxi Co. ruins church trip

“Alas, @BarwoodTaxi fails us this morning. Daughter can’t go to church…. (Thinking of updating The Grinch Who Stole Christmas.)” — WaPo‘s Book World Editor Ron Charles.

‘Merry Methmas

“News from Florida: Cousin’s cousin died of a crystal overdose on Friday. #rip #merrymethmas.” — Reason Assoc. Editor Mike Riggs. In a later tweet, he added, “Merry Shitfaced.”

Also shitfaced…

“Santa? Did you leave me all of these empty liquor bottle and this terrible headache?” — National Review Online‘s Jonah Goldberg.

Maybe wishes she was shitfaced?

“Not saying I’ve haven’t found my hubby a good Xmas present, but about to walk around looking for something shiny from a street vendor. #fail” — USA TODAY Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page.

What’s really important…

“Merry Christmas friends! Remember that this day is about two things: CHRIST & spiked eggnog. Reflect on and enjoy both!” — Human EventsJason Mattera.

Don’t hate me because I’m covering Obama’s Hawaiian Xmas

“Good morning from Honolulu. Keep the “tough duty” comments. Heard em all during 8 yrs of Santa Barbara w/ Pres Reagan.” — CBS Radio White House Correspondent Mark Knoller.

Note to God: Your kids are annoying

“Making my list for the dreaded Christmas Eve grocery store trip. Lord grant me the patience to deal with all your irritating children today.” — Co-Founder of GOProud Jimmy LaSalvia.

Convo Between Two Journos

Roll Call‘s Stanton: “Whatever my dogs ate it has come back with an olfactory vengeance.”

TPM‘s Brian Beutler: “Your underwear.”

“7 y.o. daughter reading farm book: “What does castration mean?” the age old Christmas day question.” — CBS Political Director John Dickerson.

Unnecessary Tweet of the Day

“Decorating the tree is my favorite part of #christmas! Do you prefer white or colored lights?” — Katie Couric.

 

Katie and Brooks Break Up

Washington D.C. journos may be sad to hear that Katie Couric and her beau of five years Brooks Perlin are splitting up. NYP’s Page Six broke the news just after midnight Tuesday. Pictured below is the couple in happier times. They attended a number of events together, including the White House Correspondents’ Assoc. Dinner and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2009. Perlin, 17 years Couric’s junior, is CFO of Eco Supply Centre, a green materials distributor.

 

Couric on Palin: ‘She Was Done With Me’

Former CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric still doesn’t get why former Gov. Sarah Palin answered the infamous “What do you read?” question in a deer in headlights manner.

This morning at The Atlantic/Aspen Institute Ideas Forum her interviewer, The Week’s Washington Editor Margaret Carlson, asked Couric to reflect on that interview with Palin. “It does kind of bug me when people only remember that question,” she said. (Carlson chimed in, saying she didn’t mean to “bug” her.) Couric went on, “I spent 45 minutes talking to Palin about foreign policy issues. We talked about nation building, Iran, a surge and how it might be effective. It was at the height of the fiscal crisis. It’s funny to me that that one question got so much attention. She was so annoyed with me at that point and just wanted me to be gone. What can I say?”

Couric reasoned at that point Palin hadn’t done much press. “Charles Gibson got to go to Wasilla,” she said. “I was terribly jealous.” FNC’s Sean Hannity snagged the second interview and Couric the third. “When I asked the question about what do you read, I was curious. It was just kind of a spontaneous question. I thought, gee I’m interested. She has such strong political views. Her ideology is so [dramatic pregnant pause] specific. I wanted to know what she read on a regular basis that helped shape her world view.”

Later in the interview, Couric recalled, Palin told her that “People in Alaska read. I was quite aware that people in Alaska read. I still, to this day, don’t understand why she wouldn’t answer that question straight on. I think she was just done with me at that point.”

Read the infamous Couric-Palin exchange after the jump…

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Q: Where Were You on Sept. 11?

Today we ask Washington, D.C. journalists one question:

Where were you on Sept. 11?

Politico‘s Roger Simon: “I was just climbing in the car to drive to work when my wife came rushing into the garage to tell me of the attack on the first tower. Made phone calls and scribbled notes while driving into work, by which time second tower had been hit. Began making more calls, taking more notes and writing when the plane hit the Pentagon. More calls, more notes, more writing. Journalism can be a great anesthetic…until it wears off.”

The Hill‘s White House Correspondent Sam Youngman: “I was in college at Western Kentucky University. We had put the school paper to bed the night before, so I was sleeping in when my roommate woke me up. We sat there in silence watching the TV as the towers burned. He got up to get a beer, and I walked to the newsroom. A couple days later, my hillbilly buddies and I were ordering hundreds of bourbons at an all-you-can-drink bar. It seems silly, but listening to my drunk country buddies talk about what they would do to bin Laden gave me hope for the future of the country.”

Roll Call‘s John Stanton: “I was at the Inside Washington Office news room in Crystal City, which had a pretty great view of the Potomac and Pentagon. My desk faced out of a window, and I was just sitting down to check Drudge to see if he had any stories on the plane crashing into the building in New York. Something caught my eye over the top of my monitor. When I looked up you could see smoke and then flames coming from the Pentagon.”

HuffPost‘s Ryan Grim: “I was working at Chestertown Middle School on the Eastern Shore as an aide in a classroom of kids with behavioral problems (the same middle school I attended, actually). I remember giving a lesson about who Osama bin Laden was and why al Qaeda hated us. They actually sat and listened quietly to the entire thing, unpersuaded by my promises that Osama had no designs on Chestertown. My girlfriend, now wife, Elizan, was in Manhattan, and I was able to get a hold of her in the afternoon. Three weeks earlier, I’d turned down a job with Morgan Stanley on the 42nd floor of the second tower, a decision I’m very pleased with on a number of levels. Though I suspect I’d have been fine because I’m not one to be in the office by 9 a.m.”

Politico’s Julie Mason: “I drove with a coworker in a berserk, hurtling panic in a rental car from D.C. to NYC and covered the story from there for the Houston Chronicle for about 10 days. The thing that no one likes to say is that it was really the story of a lifetime — a huge challenge to try to understand and explain. And the trickiest part was writing about it clearly, without being overwrought — especially when you felt overwrought. I can’t believe it’s been 10 years.”

NBC and MSNBC “The Daily Rundown” Host Chuck Todd: “I was at ‘The Hotline,’ our offices at The Watergate on the third floor. We decided to publish, didn’t know what else to do. We turned it into a public service of sorts. Just loaded it up with every bit of info we could get our hands on, whatever every network was reporting. I’ll never forget the visual of my staff racing to the big windows we had overlooking the Potomac and simply staring in the sky wondering if another plane was coming – total frozen fear. I wouldn’t let anyone take the Metro home. A few of us with cars took everyone home. The four issues of that week 9/11,9/12, 9/13 and 9/14 are the proudest issues I oversaw during my days there. I still have them, framed.”

WaPo Opinion Writer Jonathan Capehart: “On Sept. 11, I went to vote in the Democratic Primary and then headed to my desk at the Bloomberg for Mayor campaign. At one point, I looked up at the bank of televisions and said, ‘Look, the World Trade Center is on fire!’ The rest of the day was a literal nightmare.”

C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman: “Ten years ago I was still with ‘The Hotline,’ writing my online column.  Sept. 11, 2001 was the day of the New York City mayoral primary.  That morning, I boarded an Amtrak train to go cover the primary.  I even had an invite to Michael Bloomberg‘s election-night party.  The train left Washington around 8:30 a.m.  As I approached Baltimore headed north, my cell phone went off twice.  My wife of four months and a good friend both told me that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. Both warned me not to continue on to New York.  A minute later, the train arrived in Baltimore.  I decided to abandon the trip and got off.  The train left the station (I learned later that that train was one of many that became stranded that day).  In Baltimore, I saw on TV what was happening.  There were already huge lines for taxis.  No real options to head back south to D.C.  Back down on the train tracks, the light rail was still operating.  I got on a deserted light rail train. But it terminated at BWI airport.  About 30 minutes later I arrived at BWI airport.  By that point airports had stopped operating.  BWI was full of stranded — and dazed — travelers.  I saw on TV that the twin towers were gone.  I had no way of getting home, so I called my parents. They drove from Greenbelt and picked me up.  They took me back with them, where my wife met me.  We drove back to DC (we lived then at 22nd and L Streets, NW).  An eerie feeling getting into the city, when so many were leaving.  The city was empty.  Outside our building was a humvee and soldiers holding machine guns. We went out for a walk, toward the Pentagon, saw the fire and smelled the smoke, saw more soldiers, walked near the State Department and White House, then returned home and watched TV the rest of the day and night.”

Slate’s Dave Weigel: “No great story here — I was in my parents’ house in Delaware, a few days before heading back to school. My granddad was watching TV while I was upstairs updating my HTML blog. He called me down, and then we watched TV, and then my mother called from a barber shop to ask if we were watching. We picked up my dad from his evacuated building, and later my friends who’d also gotten the day off hooked up with me for a trip to buy the new Dylan album. Returning from that, I updated my blog again.”

The Washington Examiner‘s Nikki Schwab: “Sept. 11, 2001 was a day of immense sadness, but for those of us living in Southwestern Pennsylvania, it was also a day of massive confusion. I was a senior in high school at the time, having lived in the small town of Ligonier, Pa., my entire life. After the World Trade Center had been hit in New York City my friend Brea ran into Ms. Barr’s jazz band homeroom and said, ‘We’re being attacked.’ We threatened a mutiny against music that morning and informed Ms. Barr that we wanted to watch CNN. She finally obliged. We watched the Twin Towers collapse and heard the news about the Pentagon. I always carried my cell phone, what we nicknamed ‘the contraband,’ to school even though it was against school rules. Using that phone my friends secretly called their parents from the instrument storage room. That’s when we found out about how close Flight 93 was to where we lived. My friends’ moms had seen the plane wobbling through the air before it finally came down about 30 miles away in Shanksville, Pa. At the time we didn’t know why one of the hijacked planes was flying through our backyards. Rumor on the street was that it was on its way to attack Pittsburgh. (Yeah, right). Now we know that it was the heroism of the passengers and flight attendants that most likely saved countless lives right here in D.C.”

AP’s Phil Eillott: “I was a junior at Ohio University on Sept. 11, 2001, and the managing editor of our independent student-run daily newspaper, The Post. It was our first week of publishing for the academic year and I was the late editor the day before. I was at the office until after 4 a.m., making sure the edition got to print by the 6 a.m. deadline. I was still asleep when the first tower was hit. An early editor called with few details to wake me. I was getting ready for work when a second phone call came in with news of a second plane. Not quite understanding what was going on, I made a quick stop at the bookstore to pick up a textbook on my way to The Post. By the time I arrived in the newsroom, the significance of what had happened started to sink in.”

HuffPost‘s Christina Wilkie: “I was an intern at The Brookings Institution, and I arrived at work just after the first tower was hit. Twenty of us crowded around a TV in the conference room as we tried to absorb what was going on. There was another new intern, Tracee, who had never been in a big city before and didn’t know where to go, so I took her with me and we walked up Massachusetts Ave in the middle of the street, 30 blocks to my house. We sat together, virtual strangers, for the next six hours.”

Politico‘s Keach Hagey: “I was in Manhattan, on my way to work. I ran into a friend coming out of the subway at 23rd St. who said, ‘Turn around.’ I looked down Broadway and saw the first tower fall. People were just standing in the middle of the street, screaming.” [Hagey was writing for non-profits at the time.]

C-SPAN’s Steve Scully: “I was on C-SPAN doing a segment on President Bush’s education agenda when I received a note about a plane hitting the first tower of the World Trade Center. It was approximately 8:47. The House was in at 9 a.m. so I was off the air at 9. I turned the corner and saw the 2nd plane hit the 2nd tower LIVE at 9:02. Then immediately mobilized because I knew, we knew, this is not just an accident. We stayed on air for days after that.”

ABC White House Correspondent Jake Tapper: “I was in my apartment in Adams Morgan trying to figure out what I would write about that day when my then-boss at Salon.com, Kerry Lauerman, called. He told me to turn on the TV. I did just as the second plane hit. No one knew what was happening. Kerry soon called again because there were rumors that the Mall was on fire. In reality, it was smoke from the Pentagon. I hopped on my bicycle to go check it out; I didnt want to have to worry about traffic. Rumors were swirling — there was a bomb at the State Department, a car bomb at Treasury. At the Mall, traffic was insane, cars were at a standstill. I ran into a friend, Ellen Gamerman, then of the Baltimore Sun. Car radios were blaring news and people would gather around to listen. I decided to get out of there and gave Ellen a lift on the bike. When we got near the White House, a panicky policeman told us to get out of there as soon as possible since there were reports that a fourth plane was headed to the White House. Right around then is when the towers started to fall. The whole world had changed. No one knew what to do. I called around and made sure everyone I knew and cared about in NYC and New Jersey was OK.  My little brother was living in Cairo, so there was a whole new worry I immediately adopted. I was glued to the TV for hours. No one knew
how many people had died. Peter Jennings was great that day. A friend of mine and I went to go give blood. We just needed to do something. We walked to the Red Cross but they were overwhelmed so they sent us away. I think all that blood ended up getting spoiled anyway. Kerry kept calling me to ask me what I was going to write. [Read the story here.] It wasn’t easy to write that day. Looking back on it, I’m amazed at how dispassionate the story seems. I was overwhelmed with grief. The next day I went to the Capitol — I
worked in the Senate Periodical Press Gallery — and called Gary Hart
and Warren Rudman, who had chaired a commission warning of a terrorist
attack. Their warnings had been ignored. That day I got angry. It was a weird time to be a reporter.”

WaPo‘s Aaron Blake: “Getting ready for my first day of college at the University of Minnesota. I still went to class for some reason. I think that’s proof that this didn’t set in right away.”

Poshbrood Travel Blog Founder and blogger Elizabeth Thorp: ” On 9-11, I had a plane ticket to fly from IAD to Denver around 11 am. I was Executive Director of the National Campaign for Hearing Health and we had a board meeting in Denver. A few colleagues had gone out Monday. I don’t love to fly (ironic, huh since I’m a travel writer and founder of travel website and consultancy Poshbrood?) My grandfather was killed in a small plane crash and I grew up in a family of nervous fliers. Almus and I had been married a year and lived in a condo near the Cathedral. I had gotten up early to exercise, had come back and was making coffee, reading the paper and watching the news. I was extra nervous about flying that day, just had a bad feeling and was dragging my feet. My insomniac mom called from LA around 8:30 a.m. and I told her I was going to Colorado but really didn’t want to fly…she said the weather’s great today, you’ll have a smooth flight! Later I was watching the Today Show (way pre-George on GMA which is our new morning show) and they broke in to say a small plane had it the Tower and showed the footage. I had been in the building recently for a client meeting and thought ‘the building is huge, there is no way that’s a small plane.’ I got online (dial up!) and checked to see how many other United flights there were to Denver as I didn’t want to head to the airport yet (but should by 9:30 am). There were more flights and I decided to wait a bit before heading to airport. I kept watching the TV and live (I remember it was Katie Couric and Al Roker talking) watched as the second plane hit the Tower. My blood ran cold and I knew something deliberate, horrible and evil was happening and it didn’t matter if I went to the silly board meeting or not. My husband came in from his run and he said he knew by my face something was very, very wrong. My parent’s called me to make sure I didn’t get on the plane (duh!) and several people thought I might be going to LA from IAD and couldn’t get through to me because lines were jammed. We watched live as Jim Miklaszewski reported an explosion at the Pentagon which was the other IAD plane and got a text that the rest of the office downtown at 17th and K were evacuating. We went to the roof of our condo and saw the plume of smoke at the Pentagon and I couldn’t get my head around the malicious evil of “people” who would deliberately crash a plane of innocents. I still can’t. We then started hearing about the PA plane crash and acquaintances or classmates who were in planes or the Tower. I cried and watched TV all day. In the afternoon, I walked over to the Cathedral with our dogs and met some nice out of town visitors. They were seeking comfort because a colleague of theirs had been on the flight that went into the Pentagon. It was so very sad. Still is. I have my unused 9-11 plane ticket somewhere in a box of keepsakes. After that day for awhile I was always given extra searches, pulled out of line and had bags searched. Even when 8 months pregnant! Maybe because I was flying on 9/11?”

Roll Call‘s Paul Singer: “I was the head of AP’s bureau in Cleveland — we were in our statewide morning news conference call when the second plane struck, and everybody just said ‘Well, OK, scrap everything else we were planning’ and hung up. Shortly thereafter we got an alert that there was a hijacked plane with a bomb aboard that was being forced to land at the Cleveland airport. Apparently flight 93 was on the same flight path as another plane headed west, and there was air traffic confusion as they passed into Ohio (the regional FAA station is in Oberlin). Flight 93 did a buttonhook and went down in Shanksville; the other plane was sent to land in Cleveland. The airport is about 15 miles out of town, but the mayor decided to evacuate downtown Cleveland. It’s a small city with a few major roads and bridges which all instantly became parking lots with panicked people trying to flee. The mayor held a press conference and I had to basically climb over cars to traverse the four blocks from the AP bureau to city hall. I had taken the Cleveland job in May and I am pretty sure that the ‘hijacked plane/bomb/evacuation’ series was my first experience filing an URGENT series for the AP; I had no idea what codes to use or what format. I had our veteran sportswriter standing behind me basically dictating to me while I hammered on the keyboard. It was very nearly Sept. 12 before I was finally at my neighborhood bar with a drink in my hand watching reruns of the collapsing towers over and over again, and wondering what we had just lived through.”

The Daily Caller‘s David Martosko: “I was on my way up I-395 on my way to work in DC, listening to the radio with my wife Susan — who had a dentist appointment downtown that morning, when Flight 11 hit the North tower. By the time we made it to my office, the Pentagon had just been struck. It took me two hours to get to my where Susan was, just 6 blocks away. She was waiting on the curb since the dentist’s building had been evacuated. We spent another four hours in the car trying to cross the 14th Street Bridge. Eventually, when the bridge was opened to (outgoing only) traffic, we made our way home. Along the way we offered to pick up several people who said they were too scared to go underground into the Metro tunnels. I learned later on that some of my co-workers had gotten home to Virginia much faster by abandoning their cars and walking. As luck would have it, I was due for a blood donation — I had been giving a pint every two months since high school, since my own life was saved by an emergency transfusion when I was very young. I stood in line that night at a Red Cross donor center in Arlington, along with dozens of others. Many were first-time blood donors.  There simply wasn’t much else we could do at that point. Susan and I had  several lunches and dinners at the Afghan restaurant on Route 1 in Alexandria, since the owners had (literally overnight) covered the building’s roof-eaves with red, white, and blue bunting. It was the first of many signs that our neighbors of Middle Eastern descent would suddenly have to work twice as hard to demonstrate their love of country, and that they would need our support. The only other thing I remember vividly about that day was holding on to Susan, and she to me, and wondering if World War III had just begun.

A special note of thanks to all who responded.

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