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Posts Tagged ‘Katie Couric’

Couric on Palin: ‘She Was Done With Me’

Former CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric still doesn’t get why former Gov. Sarah Palin answered the infamous “What do you read?” question in a deer in headlights manner.

This morning at The Atlantic/Aspen Institute Ideas Forum her interviewer, The Week’s Washington Editor Margaret Carlson, asked Couric to reflect on that interview with Palin. “It does kind of bug me when people only remember that question,” she said. (Carlson chimed in, saying she didn’t mean to “bug” her.) Couric went on, “I spent 45 minutes talking to Palin about foreign policy issues. We talked about nation building, Iran, a surge and how it might be effective. It was at the height of the fiscal crisis. It’s funny to me that that one question got so much attention. She was so annoyed with me at that point and just wanted me to be gone. What can I say?”

Couric reasoned at that point Palin hadn’t done much press. “Charles Gibson got to go to Wasilla,” she said. “I was terribly jealous.” FNC’s Sean Hannity snagged the second interview and Couric the third. “When I asked the question about what do you read, I was curious. It was just kind of a spontaneous question. I thought, gee I’m interested. She has such strong political views. Her ideology is so [dramatic pregnant pause] specific. I wanted to know what she read on a regular basis that helped shape her world view.”

Later in the interview, Couric recalled, Palin told her that “People in Alaska read. I was quite aware that people in Alaska read. I still, to this day, don’t understand why she wouldn’t answer that question straight on. I think she was just done with me at that point.”

Read the infamous Couric-Palin exchange after the jump…

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Q: Where Were You on Sept. 11?

Today we ask Washington, D.C. journalists one question:

Where were you on Sept. 11?

Politico‘s Roger Simon: “I was just climbing in the car to drive to work when my wife came rushing into the garage to tell me of the attack on the first tower. Made phone calls and scribbled notes while driving into work, by which time second tower had been hit. Began making more calls, taking more notes and writing when the plane hit the Pentagon. More calls, more notes, more writing. Journalism can be a great anesthetic…until it wears off.”

The Hill‘s White House Correspondent Sam Youngman: “I was in college at Western Kentucky University. We had put the school paper to bed the night before, so I was sleeping in when my roommate woke me up. We sat there in silence watching the TV as the towers burned. He got up to get a beer, and I walked to the newsroom. A couple days later, my hillbilly buddies and I were ordering hundreds of bourbons at an all-you-can-drink bar. It seems silly, but listening to my drunk country buddies talk about what they would do to bin Laden gave me hope for the future of the country.”

Roll Call‘s John Stanton: “I was at the Inside Washington Office news room in Crystal City, which had a pretty great view of the Potomac and Pentagon. My desk faced out of a window, and I was just sitting down to check Drudge to see if he had any stories on the plane crashing into the building in New York. Something caught my eye over the top of my monitor. When I looked up you could see smoke and then flames coming from the Pentagon.”

HuffPost‘s Ryan Grim: “I was working at Chestertown Middle School on the Eastern Shore as an aide in a classroom of kids with behavioral problems (the same middle school I attended, actually). I remember giving a lesson about who Osama bin Laden was and why al Qaeda hated us. They actually sat and listened quietly to the entire thing, unpersuaded by my promises that Osama had no designs on Chestertown. My girlfriend, now wife, Elizan, was in Manhattan, and I was able to get a hold of her in the afternoon. Three weeks earlier, I’d turned down a job with Morgan Stanley on the 42nd floor of the second tower, a decision I’m very pleased with on a number of levels. Though I suspect I’d have been fine because I’m not one to be in the office by 9 a.m.”

Politico’s Julie Mason: “I drove with a coworker in a berserk, hurtling panic in a rental car from D.C. to NYC and covered the story from there for the Houston Chronicle for about 10 days. The thing that no one likes to say is that it was really the story of a lifetime — a huge challenge to try to understand and explain. And the trickiest part was writing about it clearly, without being overwrought — especially when you felt overwrought. I can’t believe it’s been 10 years.”

NBC and MSNBC “The Daily Rundown” Host Chuck Todd: “I was at ‘The Hotline,’ our offices at The Watergate on the third floor. We decided to publish, didn’t know what else to do. We turned it into a public service of sorts. Just loaded it up with every bit of info we could get our hands on, whatever every network was reporting. I’ll never forget the visual of my staff racing to the big windows we had overlooking the Potomac and simply staring in the sky wondering if another plane was coming – total frozen fear. I wouldn’t let anyone take the Metro home. A few of us with cars took everyone home. The four issues of that week 9/11,9/12, 9/13 and 9/14 are the proudest issues I oversaw during my days there. I still have them, framed.”

WaPo Opinion Writer Jonathan Capehart: “On Sept. 11, I went to vote in the Democratic Primary and then headed to my desk at the Bloomberg for Mayor campaign. At one point, I looked up at the bank of televisions and said, ‘Look, the World Trade Center is on fire!’ The rest of the day was a literal nightmare.”

C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman: “Ten years ago I was still with ‘The Hotline,’ writing my online column.  Sept. 11, 2001 was the day of the New York City mayoral primary.  That morning, I boarded an Amtrak train to go cover the primary.  I even had an invite to Michael Bloomberg‘s election-night party.  The train left Washington around 8:30 a.m.  As I approached Baltimore headed north, my cell phone went off twice.  My wife of four months and a good friend both told me that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. Both warned me not to continue on to New York.  A minute later, the train arrived in Baltimore.  I decided to abandon the trip and got off.  The train left the station (I learned later that that train was one of many that became stranded that day).  In Baltimore, I saw on TV what was happening.  There were already huge lines for taxis.  No real options to head back south to D.C.  Back down on the train tracks, the light rail was still operating.  I got on a deserted light rail train. But it terminated at BWI airport.  About 30 minutes later I arrived at BWI airport.  By that point airports had stopped operating.  BWI was full of stranded — and dazed — travelers.  I saw on TV that the twin towers were gone.  I had no way of getting home, so I called my parents. They drove from Greenbelt and picked me up.  They took me back with them, where my wife met me.  We drove back to DC (we lived then at 22nd and L Streets, NW).  An eerie feeling getting into the city, when so many were leaving.  The city was empty.  Outside our building was a humvee and soldiers holding machine guns. We went out for a walk, toward the Pentagon, saw the fire and smelled the smoke, saw more soldiers, walked near the State Department and White House, then returned home and watched TV the rest of the day and night.”

Slate’s Dave Weigel: “No great story here — I was in my parents’ house in Delaware, a few days before heading back to school. My granddad was watching TV while I was upstairs updating my HTML blog. He called me down, and then we watched TV, and then my mother called from a barber shop to ask if we were watching. We picked up my dad from his evacuated building, and later my friends who’d also gotten the day off hooked up with me for a trip to buy the new Dylan album. Returning from that, I updated my blog again.”

The Washington Examiner‘s Nikki Schwab: “Sept. 11, 2001 was a day of immense sadness, but for those of us living in Southwestern Pennsylvania, it was also a day of massive confusion. I was a senior in high school at the time, having lived in the small town of Ligonier, Pa., my entire life. After the World Trade Center had been hit in New York City my friend Brea ran into Ms. Barr’s jazz band homeroom and said, ‘We’re being attacked.’ We threatened a mutiny against music that morning and informed Ms. Barr that we wanted to watch CNN. She finally obliged. We watched the Twin Towers collapse and heard the news about the Pentagon. I always carried my cell phone, what we nicknamed ‘the contraband,’ to school even though it was against school rules. Using that phone my friends secretly called their parents from the instrument storage room. That’s when we found out about how close Flight 93 was to where we lived. My friends’ moms had seen the plane wobbling through the air before it finally came down about 30 miles away in Shanksville, Pa. At the time we didn’t know why one of the hijacked planes was flying through our backyards. Rumor on the street was that it was on its way to attack Pittsburgh. (Yeah, right). Now we know that it was the heroism of the passengers and flight attendants that most likely saved countless lives right here in D.C.”

AP’s Phil Eillott: “I was a junior at Ohio University on Sept. 11, 2001, and the managing editor of our independent student-run daily newspaper, The Post. It was our first week of publishing for the academic year and I was the late editor the day before. I was at the office until after 4 a.m., making sure the edition got to print by the 6 a.m. deadline. I was still asleep when the first tower was hit. An early editor called with few details to wake me. I was getting ready for work when a second phone call came in with news of a second plane. Not quite understanding what was going on, I made a quick stop at the bookstore to pick up a textbook on my way to The Post. By the time I arrived in the newsroom, the significance of what had happened started to sink in.”

HuffPost‘s Christina Wilkie: “I was an intern at The Brookings Institution, and I arrived at work just after the first tower was hit. Twenty of us crowded around a TV in the conference room as we tried to absorb what was going on. There was another new intern, Tracee, who had never been in a big city before and didn’t know where to go, so I took her with me and we walked up Massachusetts Ave in the middle of the street, 30 blocks to my house. We sat together, virtual strangers, for the next six hours.”

Politico‘s Keach Hagey: “I was in Manhattan, on my way to work. I ran into a friend coming out of the subway at 23rd St. who said, ‘Turn around.’ I looked down Broadway and saw the first tower fall. People were just standing in the middle of the street, screaming.” [Hagey was writing for non-profits at the time.]

C-SPAN’s Steve Scully: “I was on C-SPAN doing a segment on President Bush’s education agenda when I received a note about a plane hitting the first tower of the World Trade Center. It was approximately 8:47. The House was in at 9 a.m. so I was off the air at 9. I turned the corner and saw the 2nd plane hit the 2nd tower LIVE at 9:02. Then immediately mobilized because I knew, we knew, this is not just an accident. We stayed on air for days after that.”

ABC White House Correspondent Jake Tapper: “I was in my apartment in Adams Morgan trying to figure out what I would write about that day when my then-boss at Salon.com, Kerry Lauerman, called. He told me to turn on the TV. I did just as the second plane hit. No one knew what was happening. Kerry soon called again because there were rumors that the Mall was on fire. In reality, it was smoke from the Pentagon. I hopped on my bicycle to go check it out; I didnt want to have to worry about traffic. Rumors were swirling — there was a bomb at the State Department, a car bomb at Treasury. At the Mall, traffic was insane, cars were at a standstill. I ran into a friend, Ellen Gamerman, then of the Baltimore Sun. Car radios were blaring news and people would gather around to listen. I decided to get out of there and gave Ellen a lift on the bike. When we got near the White House, a panicky policeman told us to get out of there as soon as possible since there were reports that a fourth plane was headed to the White House. Right around then is when the towers started to fall. The whole world had changed. No one knew what to do. I called around and made sure everyone I knew and cared about in NYC and New Jersey was OK.  My little brother was living in Cairo, so there was a whole new worry I immediately adopted. I was glued to the TV for hours. No one knew
how many people had died. Peter Jennings was great that day. A friend of mine and I went to go give blood. We just needed to do something. We walked to the Red Cross but they were overwhelmed so they sent us away. I think all that blood ended up getting spoiled anyway. Kerry kept calling me to ask me what I was going to write. [Read the story here.] It wasn’t easy to write that day. Looking back on it, I’m amazed at how dispassionate the story seems. I was overwhelmed with grief. The next day I went to the Capitol — I
worked in the Senate Periodical Press Gallery — and called Gary Hart
and Warren Rudman, who had chaired a commission warning of a terrorist
attack. Their warnings had been ignored. That day I got angry. It was a weird time to be a reporter.”

WaPo‘s Aaron Blake: “Getting ready for my first day of college at the University of Minnesota. I still went to class for some reason. I think that’s proof that this didn’t set in right away.”

Poshbrood Travel Blog Founder and blogger Elizabeth Thorp: ” On 9-11, I had a plane ticket to fly from IAD to Denver around 11 am. I was Executive Director of the National Campaign for Hearing Health and we had a board meeting in Denver. A few colleagues had gone out Monday. I don’t love to fly (ironic, huh since I’m a travel writer and founder of travel website and consultancy Poshbrood?) My grandfather was killed in a small plane crash and I grew up in a family of nervous fliers. Almus and I had been married a year and lived in a condo near the Cathedral. I had gotten up early to exercise, had come back and was making coffee, reading the paper and watching the news. I was extra nervous about flying that day, just had a bad feeling and was dragging my feet. My insomniac mom called from LA around 8:30 a.m. and I told her I was going to Colorado but really didn’t want to fly…she said the weather’s great today, you’ll have a smooth flight! Later I was watching the Today Show (way pre-George on GMA which is our new morning show) and they broke in to say a small plane had it the Tower and showed the footage. I had been in the building recently for a client meeting and thought ‘the building is huge, there is no way that’s a small plane.’ I got online (dial up!) and checked to see how many other United flights there were to Denver as I didn’t want to head to the airport yet (but should by 9:30 am). There were more flights and I decided to wait a bit before heading to airport. I kept watching the TV and live (I remember it was Katie Couric and Al Roker talking) watched as the second plane hit the Tower. My blood ran cold and I knew something deliberate, horrible and evil was happening and it didn’t matter if I went to the silly board meeting or not. My husband came in from his run and he said he knew by my face something was very, very wrong. My parent’s called me to make sure I didn’t get on the plane (duh!) and several people thought I might be going to LA from IAD and couldn’t get through to me because lines were jammed. We watched live as Jim Miklaszewski reported an explosion at the Pentagon which was the other IAD plane and got a text that the rest of the office downtown at 17th and K were evacuating. We went to the roof of our condo and saw the plume of smoke at the Pentagon and I couldn’t get my head around the malicious evil of “people” who would deliberately crash a plane of innocents. I still can’t. We then started hearing about the PA plane crash and acquaintances or classmates who were in planes or the Tower. I cried and watched TV all day. In the afternoon, I walked over to the Cathedral with our dogs and met some nice out of town visitors. They were seeking comfort because a colleague of theirs had been on the flight that went into the Pentagon. It was so very sad. Still is. I have my unused 9-11 plane ticket somewhere in a box of keepsakes. After that day for awhile I was always given extra searches, pulled out of line and had bags searched. Even when 8 months pregnant! Maybe because I was flying on 9/11?”

Roll Call‘s Paul Singer: “I was the head of AP’s bureau in Cleveland — we were in our statewide morning news conference call when the second plane struck, and everybody just said ‘Well, OK, scrap everything else we were planning’ and hung up. Shortly thereafter we got an alert that there was a hijacked plane with a bomb aboard that was being forced to land at the Cleveland airport. Apparently flight 93 was on the same flight path as another plane headed west, and there was air traffic confusion as they passed into Ohio (the regional FAA station is in Oberlin). Flight 93 did a buttonhook and went down in Shanksville; the other plane was sent to land in Cleveland. The airport is about 15 miles out of town, but the mayor decided to evacuate downtown Cleveland. It’s a small city with a few major roads and bridges which all instantly became parking lots with panicked people trying to flee. The mayor held a press conference and I had to basically climb over cars to traverse the four blocks from the AP bureau to city hall. I had taken the Cleveland job in May and I am pretty sure that the ‘hijacked plane/bomb/evacuation’ series was my first experience filing an URGENT series for the AP; I had no idea what codes to use or what format. I had our veteran sportswriter standing behind me basically dictating to me while I hammered on the keyboard. It was very nearly Sept. 12 before I was finally at my neighborhood bar with a drink in my hand watching reruns of the collapsing towers over and over again, and wondering what we had just lived through.”

The Daily Caller‘s David Martosko: “I was on my way up I-395 on my way to work in DC, listening to the radio with my wife Susan — who had a dentist appointment downtown that morning, when Flight 11 hit the North tower. By the time we made it to my office, the Pentagon had just been struck. It took me two hours to get to my where Susan was, just 6 blocks away. She was waiting on the curb since the dentist’s building had been evacuated. We spent another four hours in the car trying to cross the 14th Street Bridge. Eventually, when the bridge was opened to (outgoing only) traffic, we made our way home. Along the way we offered to pick up several people who said they were too scared to go underground into the Metro tunnels. I learned later on that some of my co-workers had gotten home to Virginia much faster by abandoning their cars and walking. As luck would have it, I was due for a blood donation — I had been giving a pint every two months since high school, since my own life was saved by an emergency transfusion when I was very young. I stood in line that night at a Red Cross donor center in Arlington, along with dozens of others. Many were first-time blood donors.  There simply wasn’t much else we could do at that point. Susan and I had  several lunches and dinners at the Afghan restaurant on Route 1 in Alexandria, since the owners had (literally overnight) covered the building’s roof-eaves with red, white, and blue bunting. It was the first of many signs that our neighbors of Middle Eastern descent would suddenly have to work twice as hard to demonstrate their love of country, and that they would need our support. The only other thing I remember vividly about that day was holding on to Susan, and she to me, and wondering if World War III had just begun.

A special note of thanks to all who responded.

Incest Desk: More Hints Emerge on Why Politico’s Mike Allen Avoids Weinergate

On Sunday Politico‘s Playbook writer Mike Allen included one item regarding the sex scandal embroiling Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.). Suspiciously it was only Allen’s third item in a scandal that has rocked Washington for a week and a half with new, sometimes shocking details emerging daily. The item linked to a Politico story on the latest details of what is happening and included an Allen translation of what is “really” going on. It was that House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi “does NOT believe rehab is an adequate alternative to resigning.”

All in all, hardly the insidery stuff for which Allen is known.

Today we learn why Allen may be avoiding the Weiner story. It involves his close ties to Sec. of State Hillary Clinton‘s longtime press aide Philippe Reines, the subject of a lengthy WaPo Style section profile today in which Reines is hailed as a ‘spinmeister” in recent weeks for his colleague and another longtime Clinton aide Huma Abedin. That profile secured a whopping space in this morning’s Playbook under the subject heading, TOP TALKER and BEHIND THE CURTAIN. Playbook made no mention of Weiner or his wife.  In the story, Reines’s close friendship to Allen is noted. In fact, outside of former CBS anchor Katie Couric, who was used as a scene setter for the story, Allen is the only Washington reporter mentioned in the piece. The story says: “At James Carville’s restaurant West 24, he ‘just hit it off’ with journalist Mike Allen, the future maven of Politico’s Playbook.”

We asked Allen: “Does the reason you are not writing much about the Weiner scandal involve your close ties to Clinton aide Philippe Reines as exemplified in the Washington Post profile you highlight in this morning’s Playbook?”

We look forward to his answer should it arrive.

FP, Nat Geo & The Atlantic Battle for “Mag of the Year”

Foreign Policy, National Geographic and The Atlantic have been named three of this year’s five finalists for American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) awards.  The local favorites are facing off against Wired and Backpacker for the title of “Magazine of the Year” which will be announced at a May 9th gala in New York City.  CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric has been tapped to host this year’s event. For more info, visit ASME’s site here.

Howard Kurtz Breaks Katie Couric Story, AP Creeps in a Week Later

On Monday the AP wrote that CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric will leave the network when her contract expires in June. The rest of their story was about the program’s slipping ratings. A buried graph speculated that Couric’s successor may be Scott Pelley of “60 Minutes,” but that CBS would seek replacements “both inside and outside of the company.”

The story cited a “network executive who spoke on the condition of anonymity because Couric has not officially announced her plans.”

But wait. Didn’t we hear this a week ago?

We did. From The Daily Beast‘s Washington bureau chief, Howard Kurtz.

On March 25, Kurtz reported that Couric was “very likely to leave in June, and Scott Pelley is a top contender to replace her – but CBS is looking both within and outside the network.”

The AP also reported that Couric was “expected to launch a syndicated talk show in 2012.” Ten days earlier, Kurtz wrote: “[Couric] is now exploring daytime or syndication deals” and mentioned a 2012 launch.

It’s odd that the AP wouldn’t reference Kurtz at all, given that he wrote what amounts to the same story more than a week earlier.

Kurtz told FishbowlDC: “I wrote on Mar. 25 that CBS was searching for a successor, that Couric’s departure ‘now seems almost certain and that Scott Pelley was a leading candidate to replace her. It was hard to miss, since Drudge bannered it. So the AP story, which used slightly stronger language, wasn’t news to me.”

Paul Colford at the AP said the reason their story seems to be getting attention is “because it attributed Katie Couric’s exit from the anchor chair to a…’network executive,’” citing HuffPost, which included that attribution in their headline.

Note to Readers: We’ve removed the word “more” from the above post to reflect that AP‘s Colford does not believe that the AP‘s story got “more” attention than Kurtz’s piece. On the larger, more important matter of why AP never cited Kurtz’s story? AP won’t talk about it. — BR

Diane Sawyer Talks Amanpour, Fox, and the Pope at Press Club

While her competitors Katie Couric and Brian Williams were chatting with late night hosts David Letterman and Jimmy Fallon respectively, ABC’s “World News” anchor Diane Sawyer sat down with veteran CBS journalist Marvin Kalb at the National Press Club to close the Kalb Report’s 17th season.

The program, “Diane Sawyer: A Life in News,” kicked off the International Women in Media Foundation’s week-long gathering.

What we learned:

  • Sawyer credits the the more conversational tone of “World News” not with any personal style of reporting, but rather with her lack of a strong speaking voice. “I always wish I had one of those,” she said.
  • Asked why she went to report from Japan (seems like a rather obvious question), Sawyer told Kalb it “was a story I had to experience tangibly.”
  • Sawyer doesn’t check the ratings for “World News.” She said: “I know you won’t believe this, but I don’t check them…I’d rather not. I simply don’t want to be held hostage.”
  • She has a lot of respect for Christiane Amanpour. Kalb asked her why she didn’t join Amanpour and other journalists in Egypt to report on location about the revolution. “I wanted to go there,” she said, “but I thought, ‘It’s Christianne Amanpour!’”
  • Of her early days at ABC co-anchoring with Sam Donaldson, Sawyer said: “We were actually a skit on ‘Saturday Night Live,’ we were so bad.” Kalb insisted she wasn’t that bad, to which Sawyer responded: “Then why did you call me and tell me to fix it?” (Kalb and Sawyer were colleagues at the beginning of her career.)

Find out what Kalb and Sawyer had to say about Fox News, Sawyer’s dream interview and the worst part of her day after the jump.

Read more

Morning Surprise: Gridiron Welcomes Bon Jovi

Jon Bon Jovi and his wife, Dorothea will attend this Saturday’s Gridiron dinner as the guests of Vanity Fair‘s Todd Purdum. The Gridiron Show includes a parody of “Livin’ on a Prayer,” which prompted in invitation, explained USA TODAY Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page, who is the club’s president this year.

Page reports that the dinner is sold-out with more than 650 guests. Among other notables: Hollywood director James Brooks. Chicago mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel. TV anchors Katie Couric, Jim Lehrer and Diane Sawyer. Plus Christiane Amanpour and Wolf Blitzer. The Republican speaker is Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels and the Democratic speaker is HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.

POTUS will offer the evening’s closing remarks.

Date Night Roundup

A number of pubs and media outlets wrote and created off-beat videos on last night’s love fest or “prom” on Capitol Hill in which lawmakers of opposing parties pretended to cozy up to one another for an hour. We watch and read so you can only if you feel like it.

Roll Call: Some D.C. journos hailed this as best video of the night by Andrew Satter. Watch here.

Best Part: The “Perfect Strangers” music and closeups of lawmakers twiddling their thumbs repeatedly. Just the truest depiction of how awkward this whole thing really was.

MSNBC: On today’s Jansing & Co, Richard Lui breaks down the “Date of the Union” into categories. Watch here.

Funniest details: Lui goes into great, in-depth detail about male lawmakers hugging one another. Great picture of the miserable match of New York Reps. Anthony Weiner and Peter King.

WaPo: “Reliable Sources” offers a guide to the hookups. Read here.

Best quote: “This is really stretching the outer limits of civility for Weiner and I to be sitting together,” Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) told Politico, saying it was his wife’s idea.

CBS News‘s Katie Couric. Watch here.

Worst line: “It all started when Billy passed Susie a note in home room.”

The Daily Caller: Two journos guide us through an evening of horrible, amusing dates. Read here. The more you read the lines below the more painfully awkward they get. Please, Wyden, stop.

Most awkward date moment: Walking toward the House floor, Republican Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley looked like he’d grudgingly picked up his date, Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon, at the last minute. Wyden, however, was beaming. A reporter called out to the awkward couple, “Are you sitting together?” “WE ARE!,” replied Wyden. “Is this your date?” the reporter asked. Wyden turned around and through a mile-wide smile exclaimed again:  “WE ARE!”

Politico: Story puts “snark of spark” on display. Read here.

He said what? Must have been a late night. MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough has a quote about “Ghostbusters!” and “dogs and cats” that is a head scratcher.  “This is out of Ghostbusters!” Joe Scarborough, “Morning Joe” host (and POLITICO contributor), noted on Wednesday morning. “Dogs and cats living together!”

Good Morning FishbowlDC Readers

QUOTES of the DAY


C-SPAN as a sleep aid

“No offense to C-SPAN, but if you have trouble falling asleep, it’s awesome.” — Ed Rendell, NBC News Political Analyst on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” this morning.

Politico allows ‘fart’ into feature

“All calls for bipartisanship should be responded to with a fart in Joe Lieberman’s general direction.” GQ‘s Ana Marie Cox in a quote in a Politico feature on SOTU drinking game. (Farting? Wow. Pretty edgy prose for Politico editors…)

CNN’s Henry distances himself from Kardashian

“haha to be clear i was RT’ing Piers NOT Kim” — CNN Senior White House Correspondent Ed Henry explained in a Monday tweet that he was RT new colleague Piers Morgan, not Kim Kardashian, a recent guest on Morgan’s show. (Morgan had writtten, “Come on, let’s help a damsel in distress RT @KimKardashian I’m soooo close to 6 Million followers! OMG Please RT and push me to 6 Milli.”)

Katie Couric does D.C.

“In D.C. for state of the union…watching Conan…Larry King, Sean White band called Iron and Wine. Nice show Conan!” — CBS News’s Katie Couric in a Monday night tweet.

Scribe on pins and needles waiting for Olbermann’s first words

“THE ANTICIPATION!! So this must be what it felt just before the first telegraph was sent #waitingforolbermann.” — Politico‘s Patrick Gavin in a Monday night tweet after fallen MSNBC host Keith Olbermann wrote, “At exactly 8 Eastern tonight I will issue my first tweet. Well, other than THIS.” Then later, “My humble thanks to all Friends of Keith for the many kind words. The reports of the death of my career are greatly exaggerated #FOK.”

Gossip writer has a request

“Can we please, please, please retire the word “nom”? It is meaningless and overused.” — Roll Call HOH writer Ali McSherry in a Monday tweet.

Is Politico paying him to write this?

“One of my favorite lines: ‘News…was first reported by Politico.’” — Politico reporter Jake Sherman in a Monday tweet.

FNC anchor boasts of ‘fair and balanced’ day ahead

“Having breakfast with Speaker Boehner and lunch at the White House. Nothing like a fair and balanced meal plan – SOTU comes once a year.” — FNC anchor Bret Baier in a Tuesday morning tweet.

Anticipating what POTUS won’t say

“Words no President has ever spoken in a State of the Union Address: ‘Please hold your applause till I finish speaking.’” — CBS White House Radio Correspondent Mark Knoller in a Tuesday morning tweet.

Incoherent quote (but we get the gist)

“Ms Holmes pls try to be truth [sic] on the tv when you are asked [sic] we are suprise [sic] when you are making your points.” – An Anonymous Tipster to FBDC tries to tell us (we think) that he or she doesn’t care for the words of conservative commentator Amy Holmes, who appeared on MSNBC’s “The Ed Show” Monday night.

Reporter amused by Coburn’s fresh shave

“Tom Coburn shaved for his date tonight with Chuck Schumer! #cute #SOTU” — Politico‘s Meredith Shiner in a Tuesday morning tweet.

Katie Couric Comes to Washington

CBS News’s Katie Couric will grace Washington for President Obama‘s State of the Union address early next week.

The live primetime coverage will be followed by a live webcast anchored by Couric featuring extended analysis from the CBS News political team, interviews and special guests.  Expect to see her live on air on Tuesday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.

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