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Posts Tagged ‘Kit Seelye’

Morning Reading List, 11.01.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington. This is the longest Morning Reading List in FishbowlDC history.

  • You think Tim Russert should be The Joker.

  • ABC announced, “During a week dominated by news of the fires in Southern California, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. For the week, the ABC broadcast averaged 8.95 million Total Viewers and a 2.3/9 among key demo viewers. This marks ‘World News” highest delivery in both categories in eight months (week of 2/26/07).”

  • Joe Kildea has left ABC’s “This Week.”

  • The Politico announced a new staffer. “Jeffrey Ressner, who will be reporting for Politico — from L.A. — on the nexus of Hollywood and politics, wrote and/or edited for publications including L.A. Weekly, Hollywood Reporter, Rolling Stone, Us Weekly and Time Magazine.”

  • More Halloween costumes, from Playbook:

      MORE COSTUMES: Riley was a kangaroo. J.T. was a fireman. Rob was Sarkozy, complete with aviators and French flag lapel pins, carrying a baguette. Lily was a pink witch/princess, and stole the show on M Street. Richard was Malcolm X. Tom Toles had a wide stance. Matt David was Papa Smurf and Kildea was Baby Smurf. Dana Milbank had a very short green dress with fishnets and a black wig.

    And…

      The Playbook “Best Costume” award goes to Rajiv Chandrasekaran, who went as a GRATEFUL IRAQI, wearing an Iraqi Olympic jacket and handing out candy.

  • A release announced, “The Society of American Travel Writers
    announced winners of the Aaron D. Cushman Travel Public Relations award at their convention in Manchester, England on October 6. Among the top honors, the Gold Award for Best Publicity for a Single Entity or National Brand, went to Willard 2006 — A Hotel’s Legacy, A Nation’s History — Barbara Bahny-David, Director of Public Relations for the Willard InterContinental — on behalf of Willard 2006.”

  • Check out FishbowlNY’s full coverage of the 2007 American Magazine Conference.

  • Gridskipper Washington D.C has a D.C. Punk Crawl, the Best Cheap Italian Restaurants and the Suburban Girl’s Guide to Shopping in the District.

  • You have to be major for ‘Meet’

  • A release announced, “Entrepreneur Risë Birnbaum is being honored as one of the Washington Business Journal’s 2007 “Women Who Mean Business.” Her company, Z Communications Co. (better known as zcomm), was recently recognized by the same publication as one of the top 15 public relations agencies by revenue in the D.C. Metro area.”

  • Did you miss the Center for Responsive Politics’ Massie Ritsch on Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report” Tuesday night. Check out the video on Conmedy Central’s website.

  • His Extreme-ness says, “The Note’s Insidery Readers Are So Jaded And Cynical These Days”

  • The new Onion book, Our Dumb World, went on sale Tuesday.

  • A release announced, “Maria Hinojosa, award-winning journalist and host of NPR’s Latino USA, will be the featured speaker at the next Latino Leaders Luncheon Series, taking place from 12:00 pm-2:00 pm on Tuesday, November 6th at the Capital Hilton Presidential Ballroom, 1001 16th Street, NW, in Washington, DC. The series is a quarterly event hosted by Latino Leaders Networkâ„¢ and founder, Mickey Ibarra, to provide a platform for prominent Latino leaders to share their personal story of obstacles overcome to achieve success.”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for October 21-26 shows, “The wildfires that raged in Southern California last week featured numerous tales of bravery, tragedy, and plenty of missing pets. But one reason the disaster became such a major story was that journalists couldn’t resist raising the comparison—fair or not—with the 2005 fiasco on the Gulf Coast.”

  • PRNewser has the details Pat Philbin’s going-away. Check it out here, here and here.

  • From The Huffington Post: “FEMA Offers New Guidelines Governing Press Conferences That Look Suspiciously Like The Old Guidelines That Should Have Governed Press Conferences In The First Place”

  • Christina Bellantoni is doing regular stints on Tony Kornheiser’s show talking about ’08 politics.

  • Huffington Post reports, “In recent weeks, Republican presidential candidates have found time in their busy schedules to speak or debate before the Republican Jewish Coalition, “Value Voters,” conservative Floridians, even Wyoming Republicans, who hold virtually no sway in the primary race. They’ve also agreed to appear at the CNN/YouTube debate they at one point shunned. But it appears that some GOP frontrunners are once again letting an opportunity to appear before African-American voters lapse, just as they decided to sit out a black voter forum hosted last month by Tavis Smiley. The Congressional Black Caucus Institute announced in September that it had scheduled a debate for November 4 on Fox News for Republican presidential candidates. But a spokeswoman for the group confirmed to the Huffington Post that it has now been postponed, with no new date set.”

  • A release announced that yesterday marked, “the official relaunch of the Nightline webcast which will be featured on ABCNews.com, ABC News Now, and iTunes.”

  • From a reporter who wishes to remain anonymous: “as one of the few journalists in town who does not believe russert walks on water, i have to say he did a good job last night at finally getting under hrc’s skin. the fact that she is now calling his demeanor unprofessional is absurd and quite telling about her thin skin…”

  • A tipster asks, “what is benjamin wallace-wells doing on the front of the post?”

  • For anyone wondering why Politico’s Crypt logo has changed, it’s because it is a group effort, of more than eight reporters, and they could not fit all those caricature on the box. Seriously.

  • Jossip tells us how to “Dress Up As Your Favorite Media Meanie.” Ok, so a day late, but stil funny.

  • The Guardian’s Cory Doctorow writes, “It’s all the rage these days: crackpot proposals to automatically police the internet for copyright violations, stopping them even before they occur. From YouTube’s promise to find and stamp out copyright infringing uploads to the counterproposal from the motion picture studios and Microsoft to find and stamp out infringing uploads, everyone is getting in on the act. The problem is, it’s all lies, wishful thinking and irresponsible promises.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Portfolio.com has tapped Larry Kramer, founder of MarketWatch, as a Web consultant for the next few months.”

  • “The Parents Television Council released its annual ranking of the 20 most popular prime time broadcast television shows among children ages 2-17, based on Nielsen Media Research rankings. … Of the 20 shows most-watched by children, only seven were scripted series, and six of those appeared on the worst list. Fox’s Family Guy was named the worst program for young audiences.” For the full result, click here.

  • The Nation announced that the magazine’s syndication policy at the magazine has changed; all rights and syndication are now handled by Agence Global.

  • Pajamas Media “announced actor Ron Silver, author Dr. Phyllis Chesler, and cultural critic Roger Kimball as new PajamasXpress bloggers. These contributors now have a permanent space at PajamasMedia.com where readers can view their most recent web postings on a range of issues and current events and engage them in conversation.”

  • A release announced, “Society of Professional Journalists, National Arab American Journalists Association join forces”

  • TV Decoder reports,Brian Lamb Says an Award for Him Is an Award for Us All”

  • A release announced, “The Hollywood Reporter … announced the release of Hollywood Reporter Direct, a free and easy-to-install application that provides subscribers with immediate and exclusive delivery of customized news, alerts and video from The Hollywood Reporter directly to their desktop. With this launch, The Hollywood Reporter becomes one of the first news outlets in the U.S. to offer this kind of desktop news delivery system to its global readership.”

  • A reader writes asks, “Uh, is the ‘Time 100′ peer-reviewed or something? Aren’t ALL magazine lists essentially subjective and built-to-entertain/sell-ads?”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The clever host of Comedy Central’s ‘The Colbert Report’ is holding the usually clear-eyed media in the palm of his hand and bringing out the worst in some star-struck journalists who should know better.”

  • Washington Times reports, “Comcast this week debuted its Digital Voice service in Frederick County, Md., making the cable provider’s ‘triple play’ — cable, Internet and phone services –available to subscribers there.”

  • Poynter Online answers the burning question, “What Does a ‘Data Delivery Editor’ Do?”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “If you harbor a sneaking suspicion that the 2008 campaign is all about Hillary, you’re right”

  • Advertising Age announced, “Advertising Age unveils its annual A-List, where we name the year’s top 10 magazines. Womens’ magazines dominate this year’s list, as titles that focus on home, health, hunger and handbags all found a place, as did one British newsweekly. Other awards include editor of the year, launch of the year and publishing company of the year, which can be found in this special report.”

  • E&P reports, “News coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign has centered predominantly on just five candidates, offered very little information about their public records or what they would do in office, and focused more than 60% of stories on political and tactical aspects of the race, according to a joint study released Monday.”

  • The New York Times’ Kit Seelye covers Huffington Post’s OffTheBus presidential campaign citizen journalism project.

  • We hear the following people will be Note at tonight’s Time magazine party for Mark Halperin’s “The Page”: Managing Ed Richard Stengel, Wash Bureau Chief Jay Carney, TIME.com Managing Editor Josh Tyrangiel, Mark Halperin, Sen Sherrod Brown, Ron Brownstein, Sen Bob Corker, Tom DeLay, Rep Rahm Emanuel, Mandy Grunwald, Tammy Haddad, Jim Jordan, Chris Matthews, Sen Robin McCain, Terry McCullough, Norah O’Donnell, Kevin Sheekey, George Stephanopoulos, Howard Wolfson and Judy Woodruff.

  • Hotline has finally finally hired a new On Call Editor in Jennifer Skalka.

  • Mark your calendars! NPR Music is set to launch November 5.

  • Check out Carol Joynt’s latest edition of the Washington Social Diary.

  • The HealthCentral Network, Inc. “announced that breast cancer survivor Laura Zigman, a best-selling author regarded as the progenitor of the ‘Chick Lit’ genre, will join MyBreastCancerNetwork.com as an expert.”

  • A reader writes in, “Know who’s a big winner in Microsoft’s investment in Facebook that values the company at $15 billion? The WashPost’s Don Graham, who was an early investor in Facebook”

  • New York Times reports, “The Fox News Channel sent notices to the campaigns of the leading Republican presidential candidates yesterday ordering them to stop using images from their Fox appearances in campaign advertisements.”

  • Place your bid for an “Amazing One Month Internship with Harper’s Bazaar Magazine”

  • Gawker reports, “Last night Graydon Carter’s Waverly Inn was host to a party for Napeolonic media mufti Michael Wolff and former New York mag honcho Caroline Miller’s new project Newser, the web 1.0 news aggregator. Ten years ago, Michael Wolff wrote Burn Rate; it chronicled the spectacular failure of his first web venture, NetGuide. Along the way, Wolff seriously burned his backer Alan Patricof and nearly everybody else he worked with. So when if Newser fails, will there be a Burn Rate II?”

  • Public Eye wonders, “Stephen Colbert, Mock Debater?”

  • Seattle Business Journal reports, “Motivational speaker and corporate-ethics author Lynn Brewer said she will ask USA Today for an apology for its recent article questioning her credentials as an Enron whistle-blower.”

  • CJR reports, “Nightline proves PEJ study right”

  • Inside Cable News has “a chart in Live numbers comparing the channels in Total Day and Primetime in October 2007 to October 2006.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “Conservative columnist and pundit Robert Novak came to the Dole Institute of Politics on Tuesday to talk about his 50 years covering Washington politics. Novak also made the trip to sign copies of his new book, The Prince of Darkness: 50 Years Reporting in Washington.”

  • The Triangle, Drexel’s newspaper, reports, “Chris Matthews, host and star of news shows Hardball with Chris Matthews and The Chris Matthews Show, was at Drexel University for a book signing early during the day of the Democratic Debate Oct. 30. Matthews held a brief talk in which he addressed the student audience and answered a few questions. He began his address to students with his view of the modern-day political situation.”

  • Connie Lawn is the “skiing White House Reporter.” In addition to writing about politics, she travels and writes intensively about skiing during the season. Much of Connie’s work can be seen on dcski.com.

  • New York Post reports, “AOL and MTV Networks are unveiling new services that will allow consumers to search for and view the lyrics to popular songs. The initiatives are the latest examples of music publishers cashing in on song lyrics by licensing the words to popular tunes for reproduction on Web sites and television.”

  • Fortune introduces us to “Arianna Huffington 2.0″

  • The Associated Press reports, “Plans fell into place Monday for CNN to hold a major Republican debate on Nov. 28, while MSNBC postponed their Nov. 6 debate because of conflicts with the GOP contenders’ schedules.”

  • A release announced, “The Democratic National Convention Committee (DNCC) today announced that Emmy Award winning producer Ricky Kirshner and long-time Democratic Party strategist Mark Squier will serve as Executive Producers for the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. Together, Kirshner and Squier will craft and implement a program that supports the DNCC’s commitment to bring down the Pepsi Center walls and make this Convention as inclusive, accessible and engaging as possible using new technology and other creative means. As Executive Producers, the pair will be responsible for the overall look and execution of the Convention program including the design, staging, lighting, audio and entertainment.”

  • A release announced, “CNN, YouTube and the Republican Party of Florida … announced that the eight major Republican candidates running for president … will participate in their first-of-its-kind Republican primary debate scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Mahaffey Theatre in St. Petersburg, Fla. CNN’s Anderson Cooper will moderate this program designed to allow voters, no matter where they live, ask questions of the candidates for this country’s highest office.”

  • “Nearly 11 months before anyone could cast a vote, the press had already narrowed the presidential horserace to five candidates. And while the coverage provided ample information on political tactics and fundraising, it offered citizens relatively little information on the candidates’ records or where they proposed to take the country,” according to a joint study released by the Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ) and the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.

  • What are the biggest social events of the season? Washingtonian tells us.

    Jobs

  • The Gazette is looking for Staff writers

  • mergermarket is looking for an energetic DC-based reporter.

  • Kiplinger’s Personal Finance is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • Spectrum Science Communications is looking for a Healthcare PR Account Supervisor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 04.17.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Overwhelmingly, you think the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner/Weekend is sorta sad and pathetic.

  • Tom Shales on the national coverage of the Virginia Tech tragedy.

  • Pew Research Center wants to test your news knowledge with this quiz.

  • To do tonight: “To celebrate Doublethink’s spring issue, join us for a launch party at the Science Club tomorrow, Tuesday, April 17th at 6 p.m. The editors and writers of the magazine will be there, so come by and raise a glass. The address is 1136 19th Street NW, and the nearest Metro stops are Farragut North on the Red Line and Farragut West on the Orange and Blue. We’ll be on the second floor. As always, there is no cover and there are beer, wine, and rail drink specials.”


  • The Extreme-ness catches an Imus oldie, but goodie.

  • Best-Informed Also View Fake News, Study Says

  • Norah O’Donnell has a baby shower and is pretty close to selecting “incredibly Irish” names.

  • The case against citizen journalism (from TNR, natch).
  • New York Times’s Kit Seelye takes a look at Conde Nast’s new Portfolio.

  • A reader points out that the “daily notebook from NEWSWEEK’s political team” hasn’t been updated in two weeks.

  • Portfolio calls “enigmatic asset manager” Bruce Sherman “the scariest guy in journalism.”

  • Portfolio editor-in-chief Joanne Lipman tells Jon Friedman, “We’re not comparing ourselves to anybody,” she said. “She underscored that Portfolio won’t seem like a ‘homework’ assignment.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Readers were the first to abandon U.S. newspapers. Then advertisers and investors. Now analysts are joining the exodus.”

  • AP reported that Daniel Pearl “was added to the 30,000 names etched on the Holocaust Memorial Wall” in Miami Beach on Sunday “to honor the American journalist who was abducted and killed by terrorists in 2002.”

  • A Pew nationwide survey shows, “Americans are no more or less likely now than in 1989 to be able to identify political leaders or know key details about major events in the news.”

  • Smithsonian Magazine is looking for a Six-Month Writing Intern.

  • Tom Curley, the chief executive of The Associated Press, explains “why the newspaper industry is so nervous — some say paranoid — about Yahoo and Google.”

  • Washington Whispers reports Gen. George Casey, the new Army chief of staff who has known Martha Raddatz “for years,” called her book, “Terrific job on the book … especially for a girl!”

  • AP’s David Bauder reports, “Democrats, Fox News Channel lock horns”

  • Washington Post reports, “Richard Dawkins, the famed Oxford scientist who had a bestseller with ‘The God Delusion,’ … recently he has ramped up his atheist message, further mixing his defense of evolution with his attack on belief.”

  • David Weinberger, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, warns that “A lot of the blogosphere does not make sense if viewed from the point of view of a business model.”

  • New York Times reports Al Jazeera English is now available on YouTube.

  • Media Week notes that the demise of TeenPeople.com “as a standalone raises questions about” the “sustainability” of an online only magazine.

  • Eat The Press looks at how Politico doesn’t let “the absence of actual facts get in the way of a story.”

  • New York Times reports that AOL Founder, Stephen M. Case, “plans to unveil his new company’s Web site for consumers, RevolutionHealth.com , which has built a growing audience since a test version went online in January.”

  • Washingtonian has chef/owner of Marcel’s, the French-Belgian dining room in Foggy Bottom, and the soon-to-open Brasserie Beck at 11th and K, Robert Wiedmaier participating in an online chat today at 11 a.m. You can submit questions here.

  • A tipster tells us, the “dude who resigned from the toledo blade under fire, once worked for the blade and pittsburgh post-gazette’s washington bureaus.”

  • A panel of journalists discussed the future of newspapers at the Society of Professional Journalists Region 8 conference March 31 in Clear Lake and found that the “future of newspapers uncertain.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko

  • Morning Reading List, 03.30.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You laughed at Karl Rove. Not with him.

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet The Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending March 25 in all categories, both nationally and in Washington, D.C. “Meet” attracted 44% more viewers than CBS “Face the Nation,” 66% over ABC “This Week” and 248% more than FOX “News Sunday.”

  • Michael Getler didn’t love the “News War” finale.

  • Rachel Sklar has a “Dispatch From The ASNEs.”

  • From a reader: “Don’t ask why I remember this, but I recognize that NYT photo from the Kyle Sampson story: it’s from a Kit Seelye article from winter 2003ish about snowmobilers in Yellowstone.”

  • Another NBC release announced that “The Chris Matthews Show” was “the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show for the week ending March 25, 2007.”

  • The Pew weekly News Interest Index shows that while public interest in the Iraq war remained high last week, the fallout from the firing of eight U.S. attorneys by the Justice Department “failed to gain much traction with the public.”

  • Cousin TVNewser reports that David Gregory, and Don Imus had a friendly debate over which really is the number one nightly news show.

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media are seen to be fighting an uphill battle against Internet news and citizen journalists, despite questions over the credibility of the Web.”

  • Media Matter reports that Drudge has linked “to Politico 45 times during its two-month existence.”

  • Jay Rosen reports that Tim Porter and Michele McLellan have “change or die” findings from their tour of American newsrooms.

  • Paul Bedard reports that Bernadine Healy was giving her future son-in-law a hard time at her book party on Tuesday for his dangerous habit — rugby.

  • The Washingtonian’s write-up of last night’s Media Research Center awards gala.

  • BBC reports, “Among those calling for a bloggers’ code of conduct is Tim O’Reilly — one of the web’s most influential thinkers.”
  • Huffington Post’s Ankush Khardori asks, “Do Newspapers Need Ombudsmen?”

  • Poynter released the results of the EyeTrack07 study this week to the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Check out the results here. E&P has more on the study.

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC’s Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz reported from the North Arabian Gulf on Wednesday, where she was the only Western journalist aboard the USS Eisenhower.”

  • Jonathan Chait, the new author of TRB, “talked with TNR Editor Franklin Foer about the role of a column and the challenges of writing one.”

  • From Cynopsis:

      Discovery Communications yesterday announced it would buy the 25% ownership stake in Discovery held by Cox Communications in exchange for $1.275 billion in cash, and the Travel Channel and its related business pieces. It is likely Cox will spin the network and put it up for sale. The end result for Discovery is it will now be owned by Liberty Media with a now 66% stake, and Advance/Newhouse with 33% ownership. The deal is expected to close in early third qtr 2007.

  • Theodora Blanchfield has been promoted from staff writer to Associate Editor at Campaigns & Elections magazine

  • IANS reports, “The murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan will be the subject of an investigative journalism seminar being planned by Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies.”

  • “The Loudoun Times-Mirror was honored March 24 as the best weekly newspaper in Virginia for its circulation size.”

  • Salon’s Rebecca Traister takes a look at Fox’s “Conserva-babe and star-in-the-making Rachel Marsden.”

  • Check out the 2007 RTNDA Regional Murrow Award recipients, including two awards for WTOP.

  • The Washington Times reports, that House lawmakers “said they are committed to a Feb. 17, 2009, deadline for transitioning to digital TV.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc. will offer international news from reporters working with U.S. newspaper publisher McClatchy Co., including a blog written by Iraqi staffers, the companies said on Wednesday.”

  • The AP is looking for a photographer in the Baltimore bureau.

  • E&E Publishing is seeking a Production Assistant for E&ETV.

  • No-Va Living Magazine is seeking a freelance Statistician/Researcher.

  • And we have some photos from the Week Opinion Awards:
      Bill_Falk_Chip_Bok_Michael_Kinsley_and_Josh_Fruhlinger.jpg
      Bill Falk, Chip Bok, Michael Kinsley and Josh Fruhlinger

      Bill_Falk_Justin_Smith_Terry_McAuliffe.jpg
      Bill Falk, Justin Smith and Terry McAuliffe

  • And more:

    cbn1.JPG
    (L to R) Rhoda Glickman, former Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Beth E. Dozoretz, Senior Vice President, Value Options Healthcare join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine, Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications and Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

    cbn2.JPG

    (L to R) Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications, Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research, Patricia de Stacy Harrison, President and CEO, Corporation for Public Broadcasting join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

  • Morning Reading List, 03.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington

  • The hometown team is favored to win it all.

  • FishbowlDC has learned that Ben Giliberti is no longer a wine writer at the Washington Post.

  • A reader comments, regarding this, “There is also a major standoff between ABC and WGAE, which covers productions types in the Washington bureau.”

  • ThinkProgress documents what they call “A Bad Week For The Politico

  • Comedian Sheryl Underwood gets a daily talk show on XM

  • Check out the winners of the 2006 VPA News, Editorial & Photo Contest.

  • AirCongress has launched a new feature called the Monster Media MashUp. It will “keep tabs on the latest policy- and politics-related audio and video produced by outlets like Bloomberg, C-SPAN, the major television networks and more, and pull them together in recurring entries like this one.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah notes that, “Robert Novak remains bizarrely in denial about whether he unmasked a covert employee of the Central Intelligence Agency.”

  • A reader notes, “Breaking news can’t wait around for spell check. I guess CNN beating them today took a toll. Breaking News from ABCNEWS.com: ‘CORONER: ANNA NICOLE HAD NINE PERSCRIPTION DRUGS IN HER SYSTEM AND AN INFECTION IN HER BUTTOCKS CONTRIBUTED TO HER DEATH.’”

  • TVNewser tells us how President Bush interrupted Chris Matthews’ schmoozing.

  • Frank Ahrens reports, “The Washington Post Co. has nominated Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger to the company’s board of directors to replace longtime director George W. Wilson, who will retire at the May 10 board meeting.”

  • Ahrens also reports that TMZ is “the fastest-growing Internet news site.”

  • Arlington based buySAFE.com is popping up everywhere, from the Today Show, to Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal.

  • The Extreme-ness looks back at Life magazine.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “As the 2008 presidential campaign gets rolling, Google is forming a political sales team. Political campaigns are expected to shift more of their advertising dollars to the Web.”

  • Reuters reports, “A little under one-third of U.S. households have no Internet access, with most of the holdouts seeing little use for it in their lives, says a survey by Park Associates, a Dallas-based market research firm.”

  • USAToday’s Peter Johnson writes, “Media experts say that the way ‘Hillary 1984′ video clip made its way into the national discussion serves as a cautionary tale for traditional news outlets, which risk spreading material that may be damaging or untrue to wider audiences — all for the sake of staying current with the Web.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “ABC.com and NBC.com are trading blows in the race for top broadcast portal.”

  • The New York Times reports, “U.S. newspaper companies are reporting steep declines in advertising revenue for February, as classifieds continue to shift from print to online.”

  • WWD.com reports that Conde Nast’s Portfolio.com “is adding three bloggers: Lauren Goldstein Crowe, who helped launch Time Style & Design, will blog about fashion; Felix Salmon will blog on finance, and Tim Swanson, formerly of Premiere, will have an entertainment news blog.”

  • DCRTV has a rant.

  • Jeff Patch loves to spotattorneys general on the weekend.

  • DCRTV reports that Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Deputy Western Finance Director Anne Brady “joins the DC-based National Association Of Broadcasters as VP of the trade organization’s political action committee. Previously, Brady served as director for the Capitol Hill Heart Health Campaign.”

  • Kit Seelye reports, “For newspapers, February was the cruelest month. So far. Revenue from advertising was in striking decline last month, compared with February a year ago, and were generally weaker than analysts had expected.”

  • “The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk, The News & Advance of Lynchburg and the Northern Virginia Daily of Strasburg have been honored as the best daily newspapers in Virginia.”