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Posts Tagged ‘Marc Thiessen’

Morning Reading List 06.12.13.

Whoa. Benjamin Hart hates Twitter cliches — Twitter has become full of overused and cliched phrases, and Benjamin Hart is sick of it. The HuffPost front page editor wrote a must-read for The Awl in which he unloads his hate toward the “dulling sameness of phraseology” running rampant on Twitter, with the phrase “not the Onion” seemingly sparking the rant. Hart says exaggeration and dull, overused catch phrases are the two types of cliches “currently poisoning our Twitter discourse.” He uses examples like starting a tweet with “whoa” or ‘must-read,” or using phrases like “well-played, sir,” “that thing where,” “I see what you did there” or the new trend of using the phrase “in which” to lead off a tweet. Nothing, Hart argues, is a “must read,” the Anchorman movie that spawned “stay classy” is old and “I see what you did there” has been around for far too long. What this flood of repetitive phrasing is inevitably about, Hart says, is comedy. And twitter has become a massive stage for improv, where “everyone has to prove their joke bona fides, even if there’s nothing particularly funny to say.”

Obama surprises reporters in off-the-record meeting — When a select group of reporters were invited to a private meeting with White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough on Monday, they knew that the meeting would be off the record. What they didn’t know, as BuzzFeed’s Evan McMorris-Santoro reports, was that President Obama would be making a surprise appearance. About two dozen reporters were invited to the meeting, including those from the NY Times, WaPo, HuffPost, Time, Politico, McClatchy, Tribune, NPR, Bloomberg, USA Today, AFP and Yahoo! News, among others, where the president unexpectedly entered to address them, off the record of course. NYT’s Peter Baker, who attended, said he and his editors would have reconsidered if they had known the President would be present. Baker said the NY Times is concerned about off-the-record sessions with the President because they want to make sure “that they not become substitutes for opportunities to ask questions and get answers on the record, which after all is our job.” Though not expected, Baker did say the meeting was valuable.

See our third pick…

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On Pareene’s 2012 ‘Hack’ List: Oh, Everyone

“Who’s Pareene?” asked Michael Goldfarb of The Free Beacon. He tweeted the question yesterday linking to a Salon column that named The Drudge Report‘s Matt Drudge as 2012′s No. 5 biggest media “hack.”

Assuming it was a serious question from Goldfarb, Alex Pareene, whose mustache sometimes makes him look like a porn star, is a writer at Salon and the news world’s favorite ginger. Each year he names his personal 10 “hacks” in news media that are “hurting America.” While the not-that-much-anticipated list is harmless, it causes a buzz for directly and brazenly (or, as brazenly as can be done sitting at a keyboard) calling out big names in news.

Over the last two days, the list trickled out full of the kind of angst generally reserved for misunderstood teenagers in high school courtyards. In the end, we couldn’t help but think that in a few places, Pareene colored outside the lines.

No. 1 on the list is Politico, which Pareene said is founded on “a myth” that its reporting is “exclusive” when in fact it’s the same old Beltway journalism.

He specifically named Executive Editor Jim VandeHei and White House Correspondent Mike Allen as the driving forces behind Politico‘s hackery. Of Allen, who writes the widely-read Playbook tip sheet, Pareene said he is “paid a fortune” for emailing out “a bunch of links to day-old news stories.” It’s a business model Pareene has apparently mastered so well, it’s a wonder he’s not making his own fortune copying it. Or, maybe he’s pissed he didn’t think of it first?

Pareene dismissed all of Politico‘s election coverage. “No one reading any of these pieces … gained any genuine insight into the state of the presidential race,” he said. And yet, even after the election, Politico maintains high web traffic (though on election night, traffic climbed to 2.2 million page views an hour) which brings in money and allows the publication to expand.

In case Pareene wasn’t aware, it turns out there’s an audience for people who want to read about politics– in fact, every teeny tiny detail on the subject. Pareene doesn’t understand it. He’s kind of like a gorilla frustrated that he can’t make the star-shaped block go through the square-shaped hole.

It’s the audience he should hate. They’re reading Politico. Even if he doesn’t see why they should.

Moving on to No. 2 on the list… Read more