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Posts Tagged ‘Marc Tracy’

Afternoon Reading List 10.01.13

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Hill-dawg miniseries scrapped by NBC: According to The Hill’s Rebecca Shabad, NBC’s plans to air a Hillary Clinton miniseries starring Diane Lane were tossed out due to Republican pressure to stay off the topic before the 2016 election time frame. Hillary’s camp also reportedly opposed the idea, as they’ve always been aggressively protective of her image.

Why you should read it: Whether you love or hate Hill-dawg, NBC went ahead and decided for you whether you will ever see this miniseries. Read more here. The NYT also tackled this story. No doubt Clinton Land is in a state of bliss.

Larry King is BACK!: Well sort of. According to Marc Tracy of TNR, Larry King will be covering for Keith Olbermann on ESPN this week from Wednesday to Friday. In an interview with Tracy, King reveals his favorite baseball teams, his dream world series, and his early days in radio.

Why you should read it: Even though the government has all but shut down, that doesn’t mean ESPN will have crummy coverage. Check out the entire interview to catch up on what King is up to. Read more here.

More on the government shutdown…

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Afternoon Reading List 08.19.13.

What NYT‘s mayoral endorsement means — The NYC mayoral race is nearing a much-awaited point. No, not the election. As TNR’s Marc Tracy reports, NYT’s endorsement of mayoral candidates is often telling of who the winner will be. Endorsements in past races show not only NYT’s influence on the races, but also publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.’s influence on his newspaper’s editorial board. He has the final say over who NYT endorses and has been known to exercise that power. With Anthony Weiner now limping along in fourth place, NYT’s endorsement could have a heavy hand in election results. Tracy thinks City Council Speaker Christine Quinn is most likely to secure the endorsement, but he notes it’s still anyone’s guess.

Why you should read it: In a race that seems like it’ll never end, this piece inches the ordeal along just a little more.

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Afternoon Reading List 08.15.13.

HuffPost‘s contingency plans? NYT had some trouble with their website yesterday. In fact, the entire website was down for several hours. As The Daily Caller’s Jim Treacher reports, NYT staff editor Juliet Lapidos took the opportunity to take a jab HuffPost, tweeting “How is the Huffington Post handling the NYT outage? Do they have contingency plans?” This struck a nerve in HuffPost’s Sam Stein, who fired back with a tweet of his own. The exchange eventually devolved into an ordeal among TNR’s Marc Tracy and HuffPost’s Michael Calderone. Lapidos eventually apologized by tweeting “Did not mean to wound. It was just a dumb joke.” Stein immediately forgave her, writing that it’s all “water under the bridge.”

Why you should read it: Just seeing Stein’s childlike retort makes reading this worth it.

The world without NYT Also spawned by NYT’s online troubles was a hilariously satirical piece by WaPo’s Alexandra Petri. Following the lede of “OH MY GOD, THEY’VE DONE IT, THEY’VE ACTUALLY DONE IT,” Petri writes that “chaos erupted in the streets.” Petri also describes NYT digital subscribers who didn’t know what Paul Krugman was thinking and wondered if skinny jeans were still in style. They “became baffled and disoriented when they were allowed to read the entire paper without a notice popping up in the lower corner of the screen to tell them they had reached their article limits.” The piece closes with a desperate plea to read WaPo, which “is a lovely paper, with lots of award-winning video content, available in print in online editions!”

Why you should read it: Petri does an excellent job satirizing NYT culture. Also there’s a picture of a groundhog.

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Afternoon Reading List 07.22.13.

Washington goes nuts over Nate Silver’s switch to ESPN — After the news broke that NYT’s Nate Silver was leaving the NYT for ESPN and ABC News, TPM editor Josh Marshall wrote a short blog post Saturday about it for TPM’s editor’s blog, calling it a “massive blow for the Times.” Other than that, it was a pretty standard post about what he’ll be doing at his new workplace and what will happen to FiveThirtyEight, his blog that has essentially been leased to the Times since 2010. Apparently Marshall had more to say. On Sunday afternoon, he published another post that was mostly an excerpt from Sunday’s Playbook, pulled from Politico’s Mike Allen. Surrounding the lengthy excerpt were some of Marshall’s feelings on matter, including that he, “as a news consumer,” finds Silver’s new focus on weather, economics, and education more fascinating. He also confirms suspicions that Silver was getting bored of politics as an exclusive realm.

Why you should read it: Marshall provides some insight into Silver’s move, but honestly most of the information comes from the Playbook excerpt, which has a lot of information in it and is worth a read itself.

How realistic is “The Newsroom?” — Aaron Sorkin’s widely popular HBO show “The Newsroom”, set two years in the past, follows the fictional ACN News Night team as it covers events that grabbed real headlines, such as Occupy, Troy Davis’ execution and Anwar Al-Awlaki‘s death by drone strike. The Atlantic’s Ashley Fetters compares the depiction of events in the second episode of the second season to real news coverage of the events. Fetters notes the similarity of the quick rise of coverage of the Occupy Wall Street rally in Zuccotti Park and ACN’s coverage of Occupy on the show. Down to the day, Sorkin portrayed the coverage of the rally with accuracy. Fetters continues through more examples, including a scene where two control room operators watch decade-old footage of anchor Will McAvoy’s first shift as anchor on September 11, 2001, which lasted 16 hours. Fetter compares this with Peter Jennings’ roughly 17-hour shift that day.

Why you should read it: Let’s be honest, you probably anxiously awaited season two and watched the second episode as soon as it came it out. And for those of you who don’t regularly watch it (or more accurately, just don’t admit to it), this may convince you to start.

 

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Afternoon Reading List 07.11.13.

Why MSNBC’s ratings suck — MSNBC has been the subject of news rather than just a broadcaster of it lately, due to its sharp decline in ratings in the first half of 2013. National Journal’s Matthew Cooper examines why the network has been grasping for air and ratings and why they keep slipping away. To start with, the second quarter of 2013 was full of breaking news — the Boston Marathon bombings, Cleveland kidnappings and the Oklahoma tornadoes. Known as “The Place for Politics,” MSNBC was struggling to keep up with CNN, known as the place for breaking news, and the network’s ratings dropped 10 percent.. And with Jeff Zucker at the helm, CNN looks like it will continue to draw more viewers. MSNBC’s evening line-up, according to industry insiders, has become too sophisticated for their audience, as well as completely lacking in diversity. On Fox News, Sean Hannity, Greta Van Susteren and Bill O’Reilly are, while all conservative, very different. Some right-wingers are saying the network is falling apart or collapsing, but Cooper suggests it’s just in a vulnerable place at the moment.

Why you should read it: MSNBC’s struggles this summer have been making headlines, and Cooper offers insight into why the network’s ratings have plummeted.

Another fishy list of journalists — A year after the infamous JournoList was shut down (hello Dave Weigel and Ezzy Klein!), a new secret discussion forum made up of political journalists came into being. No, they’re not conspiring to create talking points for their political parties. In fact, they’re completely bipartisan and never discuss politics. The common thread holding them together is their undying and unquenchable love for the band Phish. As TNR’s Marc Tracy reports, the forum began two years ago by Bloomberg TV’s Jake Beckman after he noticed references to the band by political journalist Phishheads on Twitter. Called “Journophish,” its now made up of about two dozen political journalists—and only journalists, no political operators, press secretaries, etc. The group chats about upcoming shows, trades tickets and shares songs and Phish trivia. Some of the list includes National Review’s Robert Costa, Politico’s Jake Sherman (of course), CNN’s Stephanie Gallman, social media folks at MSNBC and The Daily Beast, along with a few others. In addition to his own application to be included in “Journophish” Tracy manages to slip in a “This Town” reference.

Why you should read it: Phishheads are relentless in their efforts to find other Phishheads, and this is quite an entertaining look something that some political journalists probably spend way too much time doing.

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