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Posts Tagged ‘Marcus Brauchli’

Fusion to Host Massive Conference on Global Political Movements

FusionRiseUpFusion, in partnership with Brigade, Ryot, Summit, and UNICEF, today announced much of the agenda and participants for RiseUp, a November conference in DC with global activists and political leaders on recent political and social movements including those in Egypt, Hong Kong, and Ferguson, Mo.

The event will feature insight from U.S. Ambassador the United Nations Samantha Power, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ); Pussy Riot’s Nadya Tolokonikova and Masha Alyokhina; Yemeni cyber activist Walid Al-Saqaf; net neutrality activist Marvin Ammori; Egyptian internet activist Wael Ghonim, Fusion’s “America” anchor Jorge Ramos; Tim Pool; and Alicia Menéndez, host of Fusion’s “Alicia Menéndez Tonight,” among many others. Read more

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Quotes of the Day

Weekend understatement: “A Saturday free of news crises. #priceless” — USA Today Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page.

WHCD Prom Week begins with wrenching choice

“Okay I have two options for the WHCA dinner this Saturday and not one gown in hand. Oh No! I hope to have the one today. cross fingers.” — American Urban Radio’s Washington Correspondent April Ryan.

In a word: disturbing

“My mother is drunk texting me. So I guess I’m at the stage of life where that happens.” — Townhall Managing Editor Kevin Glass. Just out of curiosity, who else out there is in this “stage” with his or her mother?

The Eavesdropper

“Haha guy on this awful date literally just said ‘I love sandwiches.’” — BuzzFeed‘s Kate Nocera.

Driver splits from motorcade in Jerusalem

“We have the worst motorcade driver in recorded history here in Jerusalem. We are actually no longer in the motorcade.” — NBC News cameraman Jim Long, who was in Tel Aviv this weekend on travel with Sec. of Defense Chuck Hagel.

Parents advised to avoid press

“Were told Boston suspects’ parents would give us an interview. Then they canceled, saying were ‘advised’ not talk to press for a few days.” — ABC News Moscow correspondent Kirit Radia.

Important Q to Ponder:  “Would WaPo’s Boston coverage be as good if Brauchli was still in charge?” — D.C. resident and avid tweeter Kevin Reiss, referring to Blanched Marcus Brauchli, WaPo‘s previous Executive Editor. The current executive editor is Marty Baron, former editor of The Boston Globe.

Online brawling

“Your right. I should delete you, asshole.” — Seattle’s Scott Omli to Townhall‘s Derek Hunter, who replied, “It’s you’re and you blocked me, so why are you still tweeting me?”

Tagg feels pinch of sequestration

“Waiting in an airplane at Logan. Captain said FAA said we have to wait an extra hour to leave because of sequestration. It begins.” — Tagg Romney, son of Mitt.

Words of wisdom from a TV journo’s obviously religious wife and a journo tries to put herself in shoes of the Suspect #2… Read more

WaPo: Marty Baron In, Marcus Brauchli Out

WaPo gets a new leader today. It’s The Boston Globe‘s Marty Baron. As Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe and others predicted, Steamed Marcus Brauchli is out.

The publication has announced announced that Baron has been named executive editor of WaPo effective January 2, 2013.

Brauchli will step down on Dec. 31, and will step into a new role as VP of The Washington Post Company.

More on Baron…

Read more

Psst..WaPo in Market for ‘Big Thinker’

Just circulated in the Washington Post newsroom: WaPo management is on the prowl for someone with a human brain.

“With Carlos Lozada‘s coming move to enterprise editor, we’re in the market for a new Outlook editor. Outlook is one of the signature pieces of real estate in The Washington Post, a vital element of the Sunday newspaper and a major source of new ideas and debates in the Washington, national and global conversation. Outlook tackles all subjects — from politics, economics and foreign policy to sports, the arts and pop culture. We want an editor who can build upon the success of the section to take it in new and ambitious directions. Opinion and analysis journalism is as ubiquitous as it is competitive. We need a big thinker, a skilled editor and a creative force who can imagine visual, print and digital content in all their possibilities. To edit Outlook you must be knowledgeable and/or interested in every conceivable topic; you must be able to look around the corner and anticipate where Washington debates are headed; you must have a bottomless well of possible contributors; you must be able to identify the great, simple idea lost in otherwise dense prose; you must know how to combine provocation and point of view with reporting and rigor. Editing experience is essential; opinion editing is useful but not required. We’re interested in hearing from anyone with a clear and compelling vision for what Outlook can accomplish. Former Outlook editor Steve Luxenberg has graciously agreed to serve as interim editor until a full-time replacement is chosen. Interested candidates — from inside or outside the newsroom — should contact Marcus Brauchli, Liz Spayd, John Temple, Shirley Carswell, or Peter Perl.”

Washingtonian Points WaPo’s Brauchli Toward the Door: But is he Really Leaving?

Is WaPo‘s Executive Editor Steamed Marcus Brauchli on his way out, or does Washingtonian just have a lot of questions?

Makes us want to go on a question rampage. Namely, is this mere rumor or imminent? A story published this week by Washingtonian media writer Harry Jaffe, who has written at least a couple anti-WaPo management stories in his day, seems to think it’s just a matter of time before Brauchli gets blanched. Management formally denies that Brauchli is leaving anytime soon, but anonymous newsroom sources tell him the rumors are heating up and have been since the beginning of the year.

The headline: “Is Marcus Brauchli Soon to Be Out at the Washington Post?”

All in all, the short piece contains eight questions including the headline and takes stabs at who might replace Brauchli should he leave.

Might Washingtonian have more details on this soon? Will Brauchli read Jaffe’s story and start packing up his things or will he start throwing darts at his nifty Harry Jaffe office dartboard that he got in the last office Secret Santa gift exchange? Who knows?

We reached out to WaPo PR for comment. They promised to get check on Washingtonian‘s report and get back to us.

Intern Aftermath

Earlier in the week, we got tipped off by a WaPo staffer that management had released an internal document to the entire newsroom introducing the current crop of interns and what drew them to the paper.

One intern, Rosie Powers, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign graduate, proceeded to introduce her new WaPo colleagues to their own CEO Don Graham. She told them he’s the son of Katharine Graham, explained who she was and misspelled her first name. Rosie committed no crime here. Nor did we “attack” this young woman or say she committed a “sin.”

But as usual, when we do what the rest of Washington’s journalism community does — which is, we dig, report, we get leaked documents — some went into an apoplectic uproar. FishbowlDC is “loathsome” remarked James Grimaldi, a longtime investigative reporter who recently took WaPo‘s buyout and is headed to the WSJ. 1. We’re quite certain that the self-righteous Grimaldi has been leaked documents once or twice in his career. 2. We’re sure he appreciated it. 3. We’re convinced he didn’t give a rat’s ass about the person in question’s feelings. A day earlier, NBC’s Luke Russert said FBDC had reached a “new low” and PBS’s Gwen Ifill appeared to second him, calling him a “good man” — apparently for writing that. For starters, we have a history of defending Luke when his enormous army of detractors writes to say what scum he is for riding his father’s coattails. Funny, he never saw fit to praise us for that. But more fittingly, Luke likely never considered the feelings of others when he interviewed ex-New York Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner last summer and nailed him on that Weiner underwear shot because everyone was doing it. By Luke and other’s standards, he probably should have thought about Weiner’s poor wife, Huma Abedin, or the innocent, unborn Weiner who hadn’t yet breathed his first weinerous breath.

Journalism is not about protecting people’s feelings. And in Washington when it’s not journalists being covered, it isn’t about feelings. When President Obama recently goofed and called Mitt Romney “George” which is his dead father’s name, the news cycle went wild. Was it petty? Maybe. Did family members get their feelings hurt? Who knows? No one cared. And when Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) said first lady Michelle Obama had a large derriere in a private phone conversation, countless pubs (including and especially us) covered it. Were Michelle’s feelings on the line regarding the size of her rump? Again, it wasn’t an issue. But there’s a double standard. All reporting is fine as long as you’re dissecting the lives of government officials, their staffs and the White House. But dare to cover media in the same way that journalists here cover politics and that is preposterously off limits.

The outrage didn’t end with Grimaldi or Russert. WaPo‘s Gene Weingarten, who devotes much of his waking existence to poop, dubbed FBDC “petty” and called us “kindergarten muckrakers” who specialize in “phony” controversy. He spent actual time searching for FBDC stories he feels were particularly egregious. Meanwhile, Weingarten routinely calls up company administrators to harass them about a myriad of stupid things and then he writes about it. Half the time they don’t respond, the responses in his stories are blank spots and somehow this is considered humor. Meanwhile, FBDC is the lowest form of, to put in Weingarten terms, feces, out there. And for what? Getting leaked an odd piece of news about his own paper’s intern? Yes, suddenly there’s a huge moral problem here.

But what is more morally outrageous is the fragility with which this young woman, Rosie, is being treated by these longtime journos like Weingarten, Katharine Zaleski and Lauren Ashburn, Editor-in-Chief and founder of DailyDownload.com. They coddled her. Worse, they pitied her. Weingarten referred to her as a “kid.” Zaleski, formerly Executive Digital Director at WaPo, said an internship at WaPo was “preschool for interns” adding, “that’s what an internship is for.” She later said that was a typo and meant “press-school.” That’s SOME typo. Ashburn said this was “sad” that an “innocent” girl was being attacked. Russert, meanwhile, rode in on his white horse, saying, only “professionals” like him should be on the receiving end of supposed attacks. I’d like to think Rosie is well worth being considered a “professional” and not demean her as a weakling who needs swaddling. Whatever happened to grizzled editors who told you when your work wasn’t worth a damn? They cut your copy with brutal honesty and toughened you into being reporters who didn’t emote all day long. There were editors who killed your copy when it didn’t make sense. Or the ones who threw you out of their offices when you wasted their time with nonsensical chatter. Or the journalism profs who gave you big fat F’s for a single spelling error. Are today’s journalists expecting to have hands held and pacifiers in mouth every step of the way? Is the new mentality that media coverage must be gentle and Washington’s journalists must be protected from hurt feelings?

Seems the word “intern” caused some to go haywire this week as if the young woman’s age was reason enough to scrap the story. When a newspaper employs human beings, it is our beat to cover them, whether they are interns, reporters, editors or the blanched Marcus Brauchli himself. Chandra Levy was covered, but then again she was murdered and had been sleeping with a lawmaker. Monica Lewinksy, a low level White House aide, was covered. She gave the President a blowjob. What’s next, are reporters going to be forbidden from covering low-level staffers on Capitol Hill because they are fresh out of school? Next up: Jim Romenesko wrote a quick and dirty post wondering if FishbowlDC had reached a “new low.” His comments were minimal as is the Romenesko way. But he described what we wrote about Ms. Powers as “her sins” — his description not ours. Now there’s no doubt in our minds that Romenesko has never been leaked anything. To put the icing on the cake, The Guardian‘s Ana Marie Cox, who once made it her life’s mission to screw over many who helped her by giving them a good ass kicking on Wonkette, wrote in all caps, “Romenesko: HAS FISHBOWL REACHED A NEW LOW?” That’s rich, Ana. Call us when you get to that amends step.

Finally, where is the outrage for WaPo? Not only did they release internal documents about these youngsters to an entire newsroom of journalists, but they clearly didn’t carefully read what they had put out there. Or did they read it at all? WaPo Asst. Manager of Personnel Peter Perl wrote to say, “A new low today, picking on an intern. Really?” He didn’t bother with an email. He kept it all succinctly in the subject line. We certainly hope he’s coping in his paper’s post buyout haze with journalists leaving in droves this week and last. Maybe he was on a sugar high from all that goodbye caking? Clearly Perl wasn’t aware, but in a shocking twist of irony, WaPo went on Facebook this week to call for a public mocking of summer interns that they could meme-ify. They wrote, “Tell us about the questionable interns you’ve encountered and we’ll meme-ify your experience.” Urgent memo to Mr. Perl: Picking on an intern. Really? We’re not sure what’s worse — the word meme-ify or the fact that WaPo can’t apparently see its ass from its elbow or its own bullying mentality starting with Weingarten who devoted his entire Tuesday night to casting aspersions on FishbowlDC. Next Tuesday, Gene, we hope you will spend your evening doing something far more valuable such as changing the toilet paper roll or harassing a company spokeswoman. Let’s just hope she’s older than 22 and not an intern.

Politico’s VandeHei Won’t Talk to Own Reporter

Politico received a series of lashings from several publications after Executive Editor Jim VandeHei and Chief White House Correspondent Mike Allen ran a story criticizing perceived election news bias in WaPo and the NYT.

Dylan Byers, Politico‘s media reporter, wrote a post summarizing the whole thing. And it wasn’t vanilla. He laid out the criticisms, most of which were rather harsh against Politico, even writing about how Politico aggregated the work of the WaPo story VandeHei and Allen found to be biased.

“Allegations such as this led to a wave of criticism from outlets ranging from Talking Points Memo to GQ to the Washington Post’s media blog, as well as stern rebuttals from editors at both the Post and the Times.”

Byers requested comment from VandeHei, his boss, and Allen. Both declined (maybe they worried he’d twist their words?)… Read more

WaPo Reporters Meet in Secret

Against a backdrop of buyouts and plummeting circulation and a disappointing Pulitzers outcome, a group of prominent WaPo journos met secretly at the Bethesda mansion of Bradley Graham, a former WaPo reporter, to talk to Steve Hills, president and general manager of the newspaper. Adweek has the story this morning. The meeting transpired on April 17.

Although the 10 or so journalists who attended agreed not to talk about the meeting, Adweek‘s Lucia Moses got someone yapping. Hills is one of three WaPo employees quoted in the story. He downplayed the importance of the meeting. The others: Executive Editor Steamed Marcus Brauchli and WaPo Ombudsman Patrick Pexton, neither of whom attended the apparently not so hush-hush meeting.

As the magazine states, if the goal was to get assurances that there would be no more cuts and to convince Hills that the newsroom needs more to produce the high-quality journalism and investigations it’s known for, they left disappointed. Question swirled around the fate of the investigations unit, a permanent group started by Bob Woodward in 1982 and a crown jewel of the paper.

Brauchli insists he is committed to investigative journalism and will not dismantle the unit. Pexton spoke of newsroom pressure to pick up the pace of reporting.

WaPo to Host Pre-WHCD Reception

Finally. Our chance to rub elbows with WaPo‘s Executive Editor Steamed Marcus Brauchli. We cannot wait.

No crashers. This reception is private and invite-only.

WaPo Hires New Managing Editor

Today WaPo formally announces the hire of a new managing editor, John Temple, former editor and publisher of Rocky Mountain News and founding editor and GM of Honolulu Civil Beat. As a managing editor, Temple will oversee WaPo‘s local coverage and act as the newsroom’s senior digital editor. Politico‘s Dylan Byers reported Wednesday that he had been offered the job.

Specifics of his duties…As WaPo‘s managing editor, Temple will run Local, Sports, Weekend, the Going Out Guide, Local Living, Food, Travel, Sunday Arts, Sunday Style, The Washington Post Magazine and Capitol Business. He joins managing editor Liz Spayd, who will continue to oversee the day-to-day plans for the newspaper and manage the National, Foreign, Business, Style, Investigative, Outlook, Health & Science sections and Universal News Desk.

Executive Editor Steamed Marcus Brauchli welcomes him on board with this eye-glazing, bone dry quote: “As a reporter and editor with decades of experience running local newsrooms and as a leader who has successfully launched a number of pioneering digital news projects, John’s background is ideally suited to the role he’s taking on at The Post. As a managing editor for The Post, John will ensure that the coverage we provide to our print and digital audiences is smart, original and acutely attentive to our audience. He’ll help us to build on the rapid growth we’ve enjoyed recently with readers who come to us through our website, on mobile devices, or through new platforms like the incredibly successful Washington Post Social Reader on Facebook.”

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