TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Martin Luther King’

Morning Reading List, 01.09.09

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Morning Reading List, 04.01.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington. It’s Justice Alito’s bday, finally someone explains MoDo, Leon Harris likes baseball, The Deadline Club is out with its awards finalists, WRC’s Vickie Burns is heading to WNBC in New York, it’s the birthday of Redhead Fan Club favorite Jess Smith and don’t forget to not fall for April Fools jokes today.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Hillary vs. McCain…you think McCain will win.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because one of the finest, most talented journalists I’ve ever had the privilege to work with was forced to leave the paper last week. This senseless maneuver was attributed to flattening the management structure. I guess it’s OK to flatten structures, but when people get crushed in the process, that’s not OK”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The newspaper industry has experienced the worst drop in advertising revenue in more than 50 years. According to new data released by the Newspaper Association of America, total print advertising revenue in 2007 plunged 9.4% to $42 billion compared to 2006 — the most severe percent decline since the association started measuring advertising expenditures in 1950.”

  • Reuter’s Media File reports, “Former San Francisco Chronicle Editor Phil Bronstein has taken on a new role at parent company Hearst Corp. that will involve, among other things, finding ways to keep the news business viable at a time when most people have classified it as a dying industry.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. newspapers suffered their worst drop in print advertising sales since industry record- keeping began 57 years ago, hammered by the housing-market slump and competition from the Internet.”

  • Reliable Source reports, “For Washington VIPs, there were two hot tickets in town last night — not just an Opening Day seat at the new Nationals Park, but a coveted spot at the Lerner family’s pre-party, a little casual-dress affair for 800 of their closest friends. Folks like Michael Chertoff, Norah O’Donnell, Maury Povich and Connie Chung, MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato. Pretty much any boldface name not preoccupied with a presidential campaign or the NCAA regional finals showed up at the team owners’ shindig on the top floor of a new office building two blocks from the stadium.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “Wall St. Journal Makes Politics Its Business”

    Top of post

    TV

  • Politics benefits CNN.”

  • Rendell: ‘Fox Has Done the Fairest Job’

  • Kornheiser and Jaworski return to ESPN Monday Night Football

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN just announced that Wolf Blitzer’s day just got longer. Blitzer anchors a special Sunday night edition of The Situation Room at 8pmET ‘focusing on the presidential race’, said Blitzer during Late Edition. An interesting programming move considering this is the final day of March ratings and CNN holds a slim 1,000 viewer advantage over MSNBC in prime time (Mon-Sun, 8p-11p) in the key A25-54 demo.”

  • Media Post’s On Media reports, “Obsessing over Time Warner’s fate and fortune is a time-honored pursuit that usually ends with the same discouraging realization. Even after adding AOL, subtracting cable, tweaking filmed entertainment and contemplating an overall breakup, the $50 billion behemoth is a product of reactionary rather than visionary leadership-and is, at its core, a content company.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, must share control its Superman copyright with the heirs of the comic hero’s creator, Jerome Siegel, a federal judge ruled.”

  • TVNewser reports, “With April 16 marking his one-year anniversary as co-anchor of CNN’s American Morning, John Roberts is profiled by TV Guide. Asked by writer Stephen Battaglio about what he expects when AM gets a new executive producer, Roberts says, ‘We’ll take the opportunity to just tweak around the edges of the show. The show as it is right now is fairly heavily scripted. I think what we’re going to do going forward we’ll try to pare back the amount of scripting that we’ve got and introduce a little more of an ad lib aspect to it, which will make the show a little looser, a little more accessible…’”

  • A release announced, “CN8, The Comcast Network today announced its plans to provide extensive coverage of the critically-important April 22 Pennsylvania primary, offering comprehensive, interactive news and feature programming available on air, online and ON DEMAND throughout April. Unlike traditional networks which are sending teams to Pennsylvania, CN8 is already utilizing its more than 120 PA-based employees, its six studios across the state, and its dozens of hosts, contributors and political experts who cover Pennsylvania and presidential politics 365 days a year.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Media buyer ZenithOptimedia has lowered its forecast for U.S. advertising spending for 2008 as the effects of the housing crisis seep into the economy and consumer confidence droops. Zenith sees newspaper advertising taking a bigger hit while Internet spending grows even faster than previously expected. Overall, ad spending will rise 3.7% in 2008, said ZenithOptimedia, which in December had forecast a growth rate of 4.1%.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister writes,Dave Marash, a recent exile of Al Jazeera English, says his new book ‘certainly won’t be a ‘kiss and tell,’ ‘cut and whine’ about his former employer. The ex-’Nightline’ correspondent confirms he’s close to a deal for ‘The World Really is Watching,’ (working title), an analysis of the planet-wide expansion of television news. He’s been mulling the topic for a while.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This Friday marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and networks are set to mark the occasion in a variety of ways. CNN’s Soledad O’Brien anchors the special ‘Eyewitness to Murder: The King Assassination’ at 9pmET on Thursday. The special is the first in CNN’s Black in America series.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Arianna Huffington’s Dick Wiki

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Not much is booming in the American economy these days, but there’s a bull market in blame. All over the media, people are pointing fingers at those who supposedly got us into this mess. Some say that Alan Greenspan did it. Others fault, variously, President Clinton, President Bush, Congress, and, of course, Wall Street. And let’s not forget the foolish people who took out all of those crazy mortgages in the first place. But there’s one culprit the media don’t mention much: themselves. This is a little strange because the news business has become quite good at publicly whipping itself for all kinds of sins. Many outlets employ columnists whose sole duty is to scold colleagues for their errors.”

  • PressThink reports, “The Love Affair Between McCain and the Press Sprains the Brain of the Liberal Blogosphere”

  • The New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Wolf Blitzer, George Will, and other big names at Lerners party at opening night for Nats stadium, writes Harry Jaffe.

  • AdAge.com reports, “Reinforcing print publishers’ frequent assertions of relationships with readers, new research by MediaVest suggests that readers trust print more than the web in almost every area.”

  • USA Today reports, “Looking to snare a larger share of Internet ad dollars, traditional media companies are launching ‘vertical ad networks’ in which they sell ad bundles of space on their sites and on independent sites with complementary content. Forbes.com’s Business and Finance Blog Network, announced last week, includes more than 450 finance-focused blogs, such as Talking Biz News and Xconomy. Forbes will sell ad space across that network, earning a cut of the revenue from the sites.”

  • BBC launches redesign of its news site

  • TechCrunch’s Erick Schonfeld writes, “Six Months In, And 600 Posts Later … The Worlds Of Blogging and Journalism Collide (In My Brain)”

  • New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Innovation in College Media reports, “Journalism school graduates: How to increase your chance of finding a job and decrease your chance of having to vent on AngryJournalist.com”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • MediaWeek.com reports,John Micklethwait, editor of the highbrow British news and opinion weekly The Economist, knew his magazine had solidified its place in the American culture when The Simpsons’ beloved, hapless patriarch paid homage in an episode. But the magazine’s recent business successes on these shores are anything but a joke. It has achieved impressive gains in ad business and readership and scooped up industry accolades (most recently, a National Magazine Award nom for General Excellence), even as much larger news and business titles wither and as a certain high-profile launch — one promising ‘business intelligence’ on the front of every cover — doesn’t look so smart after all.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Still on Ann S. Moore’s to-do list: trimming the portfolio of Time Inc. titles. That’s the impression she left with many staffers after a quarterly management meeting March 27. Ms. Moore, Time Inc.’s chairman-CEO, told top managers that she is still looking carefully at the portfolio of magazines so the company — the country’s biggest magazine publisher, with brands such as Time, Sports Illustrated and People — can focus on the titles best positioned for growth in print and online.”

  • Business Wire reports, “For the first time ever, global news and business bible The Economist shoots to the No.1 spot on AdweekMedia’s annual ‘Hot List.’ Released today, the highly anticipated ‘Hot List’ honors the publications and creative talents that keep consumers coming back to the newsstands. Leaping from its No. 10 rank last year, The Economist marks the biggest jump on the list and proves that news and business titles remain contenders in a market dominated by women’s lifestyle titles.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Yomiuri Shimbun (Washington Bureau) is looking for a Reporter/Research Assistant.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It’s a close one, but it looks doubtful that Stephen Colbert’s presidential bid in SC will do any major damage.

  • Roll Call announced that Jay Heflin is going to be joining the CongressNow staff full-time beginning today. He will be covering taxes and trade.

  • An ACLU release announced, “The American Civil Liberties Union today expressed disappointment with the version of the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007 that passed in the House last night, but believes the reporters’ shield legislation is a step in the right direction. H.R. 2102, introduced by Rep. Mike Pence (R-IN) and Rick Boucher (D-VA), will lessen the chance that reporters will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources.”

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on the House floor on Tuesday, “Nearly all states have some form of a press shield protecting the confidentiality of journalists’ sources. However, that protection is lacking at the federal level and in federal courts. ‘It is for this reason that I have long supported a federal press shield law, without which freedom of the press is threatened. The federal government’s policies and actions should protect and preserve the press’s ability to speak truth to power. And this legislation does so with appropriate national security safeguards, striking a careful balance between liberty and security.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Today the U.S. Congress is slated to act on H.R. 2102, a proposed federal shield law. Not surprisingly, the White House has vowed to veto it, citing a fear of increased leaks. Here’s the full statement from the White House Office of Management and Budget, which has been circulated to reporters but not yet posted on OMB’s site.”

  • John Curley, the first editor of USA Today, and the man who succeeded Al Neuharth as president, chairman and CEO of Gannett Corporation and now a professor and distinguished professional in residence at Penn State University, and co-director of PSU’s Center for Sports Journalism, “says it’s time newspapers, instead of moaning and groaning about falling numbers, went back to doing more ‘enterprise reporting’ that they used to do and many still do.”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “NY Times Editorial Board Announces New Group Blog”

  • Radar Online reports, “Was Rowland Evans, Robert Novak’s conservative lifelong reporting partner, secretly gay? Richard Nixon and his chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, thought so, and according to internal memos obtained by Radar through the Freedom of Information Act, they tasked the FBI with proving it.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Morgan Stanley has sold its 7.2 percent stake in The New York Times Company, people close to the matter said today.”

  • Daily Northwestern reports, “The Medill School of Journalism is forming a committee to explore a possible name change. Dean John Lavine said the committee will consider altering the name to better represent the school and what it offers.”

  • Check out a new tool on the Kaiser Family Foundation’s health08.org website that allows for comparisons of the presidential candidates health care proposals.

  • There’s a game called Whack-A-Murdoch.

  • Huffington Post has “Video Proof: Bill O’Reilly Doesn’t Care About Black People”

  • Check out TNR’s The Stump. “We’ve conceived The Stump as the campaign blog you can consult to stay current without drowning in ephemeral detail.”

  • Roll Call reports, “With the House passage of a media shield bill yesterday, reporters across the country secured a legislative victory most were too uncomfortable to actually ask for.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The representatives voted by an overwhelming margin of 398 to 21 in favor of the bill. A similar bill in the Senate (S. 1267) was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now awaiting a vote by the full Senate. President Bush said yesterday he would veto the bill, but the margin of the House vote is wide enough to override a veto in that body.”

  • Oliver Willis writes, “Is it any wonder that the same publication that argued so strongly against Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King now attacks Al Gore?”

  • Washington Post reports, “The House yesterday overwhelmingly passed first-ever federal protections for journalists pressured to reveal confidential sources, as lawmakers from both parties backed legislation that advocates for the news media have sought for a generation.”

  • TVNewser reports, “It has hosted Britney Spears, the Bachelorette and the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition launch party. Tuesday morning New York City’s Gotham Hall hosted a political convention of sorts; a sales pitch for advertisers to buy time or space on CNN and CNN.com.”
  • Steven Webber joins the First Friday Collective as a guest blogger.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Extending an olive branch to restless TV and film writers, the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers said Tuesday that it had withdrawn an unpopular proposal on residual payments that had threatened to derail contract talks.”

  • IWR reports, “Google has damped down speculation that it will extend its Google Book Search platform to include magazines with an ISSN number. Technical difficulties with digitising magazines and a lack of existing archives were cited as the main reasons”.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “As much as one-fifth of the audience for television’s most popular shows are skipping the commercials, according to the first round of commercial data for the new fall season, released yesterday by Nielsen Media Research.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Obama Girl has found a new friend in Herb Scannell, whose online video startup Next New Networks has acquired BarelyPolitical.com, the site behind the viral-video hit.”

  • The BBC reports, “Plans for sweeping changes at the BBC over the next six years are being discussed on Wednesday by the BBC Trust, which represents licence-payers.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Murdoch To Times: I Will Bury You! Keller Bristles”

  • A Comcast release announced, “Comcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK), the nation’s leading provider of cable, entertainment and communications products and services, announced today that David Krone will join the company as Senior Vice President for Corporate Affairs, effective January 2, 2008.”

  • Compete reports, “Nearly a month after the New York Times shut down TimesSelect, the subscription-based service for premium content on NYTimes.com, traffic to areas of the site that were previously members-only is flowing fast and free. With popular columnists like Paul Krugman and Maureen Dowd drawing thousands of curious readers and fans, the Opinion section has more than doubled unique visitors, while the overall NYTimes.com site has grown by roughly 10% in the same period.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said third-quarter profit fell 10 percent as classified advertising sales and television revenue dropped.”

  • TVNewser reports, Tom Shales: ‘Matt Lauer Is No Mike Wallace’”

  • WWD.com reports, “Former Men’s Journal and Details editor in chief Michael Caruso signed on last year as a contributing editor at large at Portfolio and came back as planned from a two-week vacation on Monday, but by the end of the day, staffers were told his contract hadn’t been renewed.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co., the largest newspaper publisher in the country and owner of USA Today, said Wednesday that third-quarter earnings fell 10.5 percent, fueled in part by slumping real-estate ads and a tough comparison to year-ago results boosted by heavy political advertising.”

  • Media Newsline reports,Jefferson Morley, a 15-year veteran at the Washington Post, has joined the Center for Independent Media as its National Editorial Director, with overall responsibility for guiding the Center’s fast-growing network of 40 journalists, and overseeing the launch of a new Washington DC-based online news site with 10 reporters in late 2007.”

  • New York Post reports, “Time Managing Editor Rick Stengel once again is shuffling the deck among the magazine’s top brass now that Priscilla Painton, one of his three deputy editors, has opted out.”

  • Arts Technica reports, “House passes federal journalist shield, includes bloggers”

  • Washington Post reports, “Government repression in some countries has shifted from journalists to bloggers, with the vitality of the Internet triggering a more focused crackdown as blogs increasingly take the place of mainstream news media, according to Lucie Morillon, Washington director of the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders.”

  • New York Times reports, “Internet companies with funny names, little revenue and few customers are commanding high prices. And investors, having seemingly forgotten the pain of the first dot-com bust, are displaying symptoms of the disorder known as irrational exuberance.”

    Jobs

  • Atllantic Information Services, Inc. is looking for a Health Care Reporter/Editor.

  • The Frederick News-Post is looking for a Page Designer.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Freelance Writer for Telecom/Media.

  • Bloomberg is looking for an Economy Editor.

  • American Diabetes Association is looking for a Health & Wellness Staff Writer, a Science Writer and a Health & Wellness Features Editor.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Assistant Producer.

  • The Chronicle of Philanthropy is looking for an editorial intern.

  • The Progress-Index is looking for a sports reporter.

  • American Chemical Society is looking for Product Coordinators, Publishing.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext