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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Luther King Jr.’

Morning Reading List, 01.20.09

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Happy Inauguration Day Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Today is the birthday of Sam Dealey. Yesterday was the birthday of Ann Compton, Robert MacNeil and New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller. Check out the TamCam’s photos from The Root party and Mark Knoller‘s invaluable “Bush presidency by the numbers.” Washington Monthly has some suggestions on “What Obama Should Read.” Check out the recommendations here. The New York Times provides a game plan for “36 Hours in Washington, D.C.” Amazon’s Newsstand Blog shows us “a few of the newest entries into the Obamamania group of magazine covers.” TV Anchor Babes looks at “A Hot Norah O’Donnell on The Late Late Show.” Viva Chuck Todd tells us, “Chuck Todd Valentine’s Day e-Cards Now Available!” Check out today’s White House Photo of the Day from Time. Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “It found it rather ironic when the company, after laying off 20 people and announcing there will be no raises, distributed the United Way pledge cards and asked us to give.”

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include Intro to Magazine Writing, Health and Medical Writing and Writing and Editing for the Web.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Portfolio contributing editor Matt Cooper has joined Talking Points Memo as the site’s new editor-at-large. There, he will be covering the White House — a job he’d done previously at Time and Newsweek — and helping to launch TPM’s new politics blog, TPMDC.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Bloomberg reports, “Newspapers that scrambled to print extra issues after Barack Obama‘s election are ramping up presses to ensure they don’t miss out on an inauguration day windfall.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The embattled New York Times Co., trying to wriggle out from under a pile of debt as advertising revenue dries up, is talking to Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim about making a sizeable cash investment in the company.”

  • Big Think reports, “The founder of the Huffington Post blog says old media can survive.” Check out the video here.

  • Jeff Jarvis‘ Buzz Machine reports, “The World Association of Newspapers and the World Editors Forum just canceled their annual convention, which had been scheduled to take place in India in only two months”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “WaPo adding to White House team”

  • The Daily Cartoonist has a round-up of “Cartoonists covering the Obama Inauguration”

  • Matt Taibbi takes on porn-stached New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman‘s greenish ways.”

  • Ann Althouse writes, “Oooooh! Maureen Dowd goes to some Florida spa, and, I ask you: Was anything ever more ready-made for Stuff White People Like?”

  • Larry Kramer writes, “Newspapers are still the best-staffed news organizations and remain journalism’s brightest hope — if they can only break their addiction to print.”

  • FamousDC reports, “CQ Today: Correction, We Meant Public Not Pubic”

  • “The Gannett Company, publisher of 85 daily newspapers across the United States, is making all its employees take a weeklong unpaid furlough to avoid layoffs.” The Onion asks, “What do you think?” Check out some responses here.

  • Political Animal reports, “Barack Obama stopped by the Washington Post’s offices yesterday and covered a lot of ground with reporters and editors. There was one subject of particular interest — the Post’s front-page headline read: ‘Obama Pledges Entitlement Reform.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone asks, “Will WaPo close Book World?”

  • The Corner reports, “Somewhere along the way, Bob Woodward decided to transition from being a newspaper reporter to a Big Thinker. We see evidence of this in Woodward’s piece in the Washington Post ‘Outlook’ section, ’10 Take Aways From the Bush Years,’ in which Woodward informs us that ‘There’s actually a lot that President-elect Barack Obama can learn from the troubled presidency of George W. Bush.’ Rather than bore Cornerites with a point-by-point rejoinder, it might be instructive to take just one of Woodward’s ten take-aways and examine it with a bit of care.” For more, click here.

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    TV

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “Own a piece of history with this two DVD set commemorating the inauguration of Barack Obama. This special DVD set will include highlights from Inauguration Day 2009 and a compilation of Barack Obama’s speeches delivered on his road to the White House. The DVDs will contain nearly eight hours of programming. The speech compilation features Barack Obama’s 2004 Democratic National Convention address, his speech on race relations, the 2008 convention address, his election night victory remarks, and more. The inaugural highlights DVD will capture events from Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration, including the traditional arrival of the president-elect at the White House, the departure to the Capitol, and the complete inaugural ceremony. Pre-order the two disc collection for $19.95 online now.”

  • A release announced, “As part of ABC’s Presidential Inauguration coverage on January 20 ABCNEWS.com will live stream the ABC TV network’s special coverage beginning at 9:30AM EST/6:30AM PT. The comprehensive reporting will be embedded directly on ABCNEWS.com’s Homepage. Charles Gibson, Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos will anchor coverage of Barack Obama‘s Inauguration. Broadcast from the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue, coverage will include all events from the swearing-in ceremony and Obama’s Inaugural Address to the Inaugural Parade, as well reaction from around the nation and the world to this historic event. Gibson, Sawyer and Stephanopoulos will be joined by a team of ABC News anchors, correspondents and analysts covering the day’s events. The live streaming coverage, the first of its kind to be directly embedded on the Homepage, will be presented in 16 x 9 widescreen format and will be available on some ABC Affiliate stations’ websites.”

  • Johnny Dollar’s Place writes, “With six showings of Hannity into the record books, it’s clear that the original debate concept of Hannity & Colmes has been abandoned. Now Sean interviews like-minded folk who won’t challenge his points: Jonah Goldberg, Pat Buchanan, Fred Thompson, Elizabeth Hasselbeck, etc. Oh there was an interview with Don Imus (neither conservative nor a Republican) but it was a celebrity-style chat, barely touching on any political issues. This is all straight out of the playbook of Keith Olbermann. Or for that matter Rachel Maddow who, aside from an infrequent appearance of Buchanan, also proffers a parade of ideological soulmates.”

  • The New York Times reports, “When the White House changes occupants this week, it may also change channels. Barack Obama‘s inauguration on Tuesday marks the end of an era for the Fox News Channel, the cable news network of choice during the George W. Bush years.”

  • A Livestation release announced, “Our partner channels have lined up special inauguration coverage which you can flick between in your Livestation player to sample the different perspectives being offered. Livestation chat lets you interact with other viewers and some of the programme producers who might send your comments through to the studio to be read out and discussed live on air. To take part in a discussion you need to have your Livestation player open, click the downward pointing arrow at the top of the screen and enter the chat room.” For more information, click here.

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “John King Gets 1/6th of CNN Sunday”

  • WUSA reports, “As the nation looks forward to a historic inauguration, 60 years ago Friday night another historic inauguration took place. That’s when Channel 9, ‘Washington’s Eye on the World,’ began regular television service as the new CBS affiliate.”

  • Time reports, “Barack Obama wasn’t the only winner to emerge from last year’s historic presidential race. Chuck Todd has surged to TV prominence and Beltway influence since being tapped as NBC’s political director in 2007. For millions of NBC and MSNBC viewers, Todd’s analysis of election arcana, especially during the drawn-out Democratic primary, was an invaluable guidebook on the campaign trail. Recently named NBC’s chief White House correspondent, Todd has written a book on the race along with NBC’s Sheldon Gawiser, How Barack Obama Won. He spoke with TIME about where the media’s election coverage went wrong, how bloggers make him nicer and why his famed facial hair isn’t going anywhere.” Check out the full interview here.

  • Did you catch it? That was Al Roker broadcasting live from the plaza outside of NBC News at 400 N. Capitol Street on Monday.

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “Do you want to know what Fox News’ Megyn Kelly ate last week? She gives a detailed account to NYMag.com’s Grub Street blog.”

  • Mark your calendars. The 65th Annual Radio & Television Correspondents’ Dinner will be held on Thursday, June 4th, 2009 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington.

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “Blitzer: We Have ‘Some New Technology.’ Cooper: ‘Is This A Hologram?’”

  • Yesterday, NBC News’ Matt Lauer was the first to sit down live with Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III, in his first interview since he piloted the crash landing of US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson River in New York City. The interview aired on “Today,” Monday, January 19.

  • WTOP reports, “A Prince George’s County jury has reached a verdict in the case of a reporter who sued the county. A jury has found Prince George’s County Police used excessive force when they detained Channel 7 investigative reporter Andrea McCarren.”

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “Juju Chang Goes Guerilla Journalist For Inauguration”

  • A release announced that CNN replayed Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech in its entirety on Monday, Jan. 19, at noon (ET) as part of the network’s MLK Day programming.

  • Check out TVNewser’s Live Chat with Chuck Todd.

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “MSNBC held their Television Critics Association panel yesterday in Los Angeles, and the questions ranged from comparisons of MSNBC and FNC to comparisons of Obama and Bush. Variety’s Brian Lowry writes that MSNBC president Phil Griffin fielded questions about the network’s ‘windshield-wiper act’ of having Keith Olbermann and Chris Matthews again anchoring political coverage, Tuesday at the Inauguration, as well as whether MSNBC was the ‘left-leaning counterweight’ to Fox News. ‘We’re less about ideology than Fox is,’ said Griffin.”

  • WorldScreen.com reports, “Jeff Zucker, the president and CEO of NBC Universal, will be a keynote speaker at Media Summit New York, set to be held March 18 and 19. The 6th Annual Media Summit New York, presented by The McGraw-Hill Companies — the publishers of BusinessWeek — and produced by Digital Hollywood, is set for March 18 to 19 at the McGraw-Hill Building in New York.”

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens ponders, “What’s the State of Reliable Sources?”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “CNN President Jon Klein didn’t go light on the praise for John King this afternoon, shortly after the premiere of his new show, ‘State of the Union.’ King, he said, is ‘the best political reporter of his generation.’”

  • Reuters reports, “ABC feeling economic, digital pressures”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “Where To Watch The Obamas’ First Dance? ABC Only, For Now”

  • His Extreme-ness points us to this exchange spotted by Matthew Yglesias at Think Progress.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • A release announced, “For those who may not plan to visit Washington D.C. for the Inauguration, C-SPAN will debut Inauguration Hub on January 20th. C-SPAN’s Inauguration Hub features an online ‘control room’ that includes a Mogulus designed multichannel grid to webcast the inauguration activities. Visitors can access the Inauguration Hub at www.c-span.org, between 6:00 AM (ET) and Midnight (ET) on Inauguration Day.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Can CNN, the Go-to Site, Get You to Stay?”

  • ABC NewsNOW is livestreaming the coverage online through Tuesday — covering all the events, with Rick Klein and Sam Donaldson anchoring. Check it out here.

  • OJR reports, “Journalism ethics 2.0: As the Internet changes the market, some conventions must change as well”

  • washingtonpost.com will be offering live video coverage of the Inauguration and mobile alerts to anyone who will be in D.C. to help them avoid the expected gridlock.

  • A release announced, “CNN Worldwide plans to create the most unique view of the exact moment U.S. President-elect Barack Obama takes the oath of office on Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon (ET). Using Microsoft Photosynth technology, CNN and Microsoft Corp. will produce the first ‘synth’ of a major historical moment. Photosynth, part of the Microsoft Virtual Earth product family, enables users to create synths, detailed 3-D environments of photos that are identified by minute similarities and then fused together. In this case, the initial images comprise those captured on cell phones, cameras and mobile devices by inauguration attendees of the moment Obama is sworn in as president. From the vast sweep of the crowd to a close-up on the new president’s raised hand, every angle of this historic moment will be frozen in time. To see examples of synths, visit http://photosynth.com. CNN is inviting people witnessing ‘The Moment’ to take part in a special iReport assignment by e-mailing their pictures to themoment@CNN.com.”

  • CNN reports, “Obama poised to be first ‘wired’ president”

  • Chicago Reader reports, “Why Would a Pro Write for HuffPo? One freelancer explains why she’ll work gratis for a $200 million company”

  • Washington Flyer has joined Facebook! Become a friend here.

  • “MySpace has partnered with Katalyst Media, founded by Ashton Kutcher, on a project called The Presidential Pledge. Celebrities recorded videos in which they make a pledge of service to President-elect Barack Obama. The videos were directed, produced and edited by Demi Moore. The ultimate goal is to motivate the MySpace community to create their own pledges to help bring about the change inspired by Obama’s Campaign. … MySpace will have these videos exclusively beginning Monday 12:01am PT Jan.19. Users can watch the videos and create their own personal pledged at www.myspace.com/presidentialpledge. For more info, check out MySpace Celebrity.

  • Check out “Dear Mr. President,” where people can upload a video message to President-Elect Obama at Pepsi’s new site RefreshEverything.com.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The National Religious Campaign Against Torture urges readers to “Tell Newsweek No to Torture!”

  • Folio reports, “Hard-Hit Niche Publishers Rethink Strategies”

  • “This week The Atlantic devotes the homepage of TheAtlantic.com to its coverage of the inauguration. In addition to the latest dispatches and posts from writers including Andrew Sullivan, Marc Ambinder, Ta-Nehisi Coates and James Fallows, the site also features The Atlantic’s archival coverage of new presidencies reaching back to Abraham Lincoln.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The Popular Newsweekly Becomes a Lonely Category”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Rachel Maddow has reached a new agreement with Air America Media (www.airamerica.com) to extend her tenure with the company’s Radio Network and Interactive Division. ‘The Rachel Maddow Show’ will air as a one-hour program to be presented in morning drive time on the network’s affiliates and streamed on airamerica.com.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert looks at, “The media myth about the cost of Obama’s inauguration”

  • JammieWearingFool reports, “Perino Mocks Obama”

  • A release announced, “Change.org … announced the winners of its Ideas for Change in America competition at an event at the National Press Club and attended by nonprofit leaders, grassroots activists, and members of the Obama campaign and incoming administration. The competition was the first nationwide grassroots response to President-elect Barack Obama‘s call for greater citizen participation in government, and since Election Day more than 650,000 votes have been cast for more than 7500 ideas for how the Obama administration and 111th Congress should change America. The 10 winning ideas reflect the diverse interests of the millions of people calling for change across the country, including ideas for securing universal heath care, LGBT rights, and sustainable green energy. The list of winners also includes ideas often left off of the national agenda but with powerful grassroots support, including those for restoring civil liberties, ending the prohibition on medicinal marijuana, and advancing peace through new government institutions. All winning ideas can be viewed at www.change.org/ideas.”

  • Sam Dealey looks at “Racial Media Bias Meets Liberal Media Bias”

  • The Society of Professional Journalists is introducing the Journalists Toolbox. “With more than 10,000 listed Web resources and links, this site is a one-stop destination for any reporter or editor working on any story or beat, from crime to the environment to religion. This free site, edited by former Los Angeles Times reporter and DePaul University instructor Mike Reilley, is organized by beats and industry topics such as Public Records, Investigative, Crime, Legal Issues, Federal Government, State Government, Elections, Science, Environment, Public Safety, Journalism Jobs and much more.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer reports, “Obama’s New Press Strategy — Soon to be the ‘one president at a time,’ he starts schmoozing the press.”

  • New York Magazine reports, “Christopher Hitchens Blames Torture on Common Americans, Demands ‘Tongue’ From Andrew Sullivan

  • Politico’s Ben Smith reports, “A Democrat with knowledge of administration plans emails over the assignments for the Obama White House press shop, which looks more or less like the campaign press shop, perhaps on the principal of not tinkering with what works.”

  • A release announced, “Boston University today launched the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), the nation’s first university-based, multimedia investigative reporting collaborative focused on local and regional issues.”

  • AFP reports, “For White House aides, a ride off into an uncertain sunset”

  • Innovation in College Media has a round-up of “Student media covering the inauguration.”

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    JOBS

  • Association for Financial Professionals is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The National Recreation and Park Association is looking for a Managing Editor for Park & Recreation Magazine.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Marketing/Circulation Manager.

  • AAAS is looking for an Art Associate.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, Michael Calderone, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext, Mic Check Radio, New York Times’ On This Day

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    Morning Reading List, 04.07.08

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    Good morning Washington. Playbook tells us that Bloomberg’s Billy McQuillen, “who provides ‘adult’ supervision to Catholic University’s newspaper, is a birthday boy today.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | EVENTS | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Monica Lewinsky will vote for Obama in ’08.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “Went to yet another ‘retirement’ party for a couple of newspaper writer friends of mine taking the buy out and getting the hell out of Dodge. All while the losers ‘running’ the paper (In to the ground..) are staying.”

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include How to Write About Anything, Interviewing Techniques and Fact-Checking.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • DCRTV reports,Richard Willing has joined the Office Of The Director of National Intelligence as its director of public affairs. Willing covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to announce that David E. Kaplan has been named the new Director of its International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).”

  • News-Press.com reports,Kate Marymont, vice president and executive editor/Information Center at The News-Press and news-press.com, was named today as vice president/Information Center Content for McLean, Va.-based Gannett Inc., the paper’s owner.”

  • Business Wire reports,Jennifer Carroll, vice president of New Media Content and an architect of the company’s Information Center initiative, will become vice president of Digital Content for Gannett Digital.”

  • The Washington Post announced, “The Maryland desk is delighted to announce that we’ve hired Aaron Davis, an enterprise reporter for the Associated Press in Sacramento, Calif., to cover law enforcement in Prince George’s County. He succeeds Candace Rondeaux, who went to Foreign to cover Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of Society for Science & the Public, has named Tosh Arimura circulation manager.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Throughout the campaign, the media have treated Paul as a footnote. Snickering pundits all but dismissed him as a cranky kook, in the tradition of another Lone Star State insurgent, Ross Perot. Even when the mainstream publications covered him, you could imagine the assignment editors rolling their eyes in amusement, like parents patronizing a child. Yet anyone who looked hard enough knew that there was more to Paul than an inability to amass delegates. Most of the media, turned off by his shrill libertarian leanings, missed the real news value of Paul’s story — namely, the Texas congressman’s ability to connect intensely with voters.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows,Hillary Clinton’s retraction of her claim that she came under sniper fire while visiting Bosnia in 1996 was one of the main campaign storylines last week. But the controversy over her statements did not resonate as widely as the furor over statements made by Barack Obama’s pastor earlier in March. Four-in-ten Americans heard a lot about Clinton’s claim that she came under sniper fire, compared with 51% who had heard a lot about Rev. Wright’s sermons the week before.”
  • “Results from the Dow Jones Insight — 2008 Presidential Election Media Pulse show that Barack Obama’s pivotal race speech on March 18 may have helped mitigate that week’s controversy surrounding the remarks of Reverend Jeremiah Wright, shifting attention back to the issues of the economy and the upcoming Pennsylvania primary.”

  • CJR reports, “Business news is booming these days. Business-news sections not so much. They are disappearing and have been doing so regularly for months. The trend seems set to continue.”

  • Washington Blade editor’s Kevin Naff asks, “Why did editor Len Downie go to such lengths to hide the simple fact that a soldier was gay?”

  • Huffington Post has a “Eulogy for Dead Trees”

  • “As Katharine Weymouth, granddaughter of the legendary Katharine Graham, takes over as publisher of the Washington Post,” The Washingtonian has some “suggestions for her agenda, based on interviews with subscribers and Post staffers.”

  • Romenesko reports, “WSJ changes news desk structure”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Veteran newsman Roger Mudd” reports the “five best” “essential works about journalism.”

  • Joel Achenbach writes, “Let’s have a blog item today that’s not about me and my personal obsessions and neuroses. Instead, let’s talk about the general plight of all those middle-aged newspaper reporters out there who, at the age of 47, are just barely too young to get the buyout offer. Clearly it is time for these people to think about the next big career move.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “I’ve said many times that Barack Obama has gotten easy treatment from the news media, although that has changed a bit in recent weeks, particularly since the Rev. Jeremiah Wright became a household name, at least in households that watch plenty of cable. In fact, there’s a bit of a narrative about Obama as an elitist starting to take hold in the media, and that could prove troublesome for him.”

  • New York Time’s Public Editor writes, “Change Can Be Painful, but This One Shouldn’t Hurt”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Most regular local readers of The Post read it on newsprint. And when they want something in the paper and it’s not there, they usually don’t like me telling them to find it on washingtonpost.com.”

  • Washington City Paper’s Mike DeBonis asks, “Has Adrian Fenty reneged on his campaign tax pledge?”

  • Check out The Best of Cox 2008 winners.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 30, 2008 in all categories.”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for First quarter 2008, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Major television networks are privately saying that if they have to worry about a fine every time someone utters a profanity on air, they may have to stop real-time broadcasting of live events such as the Academy Awards and Grammys. At the same time, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and parents groups are saying that if the Supreme Court removes the threat, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox will seize the opportunity to make the airwaves more coarse and profane.”

  • 23/6 has the “Inappropriate Hottie Rundown: Racially Diverse Pundit Edition”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Forty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Tom Brokaw is making sure his legacy isn’t forgotten. In King, a two-hour television documentary premiering on the History Channel April 6, the award-winning newsman talks to everyone from Bill Clinton to Forest Whitaker to Dr. King’s son Martin Luther King III about the legendary civil rights figure.”

  • TVNewser reported on Friday, “Megan Henderson, morning anchor at Fox O&O KDFW, will be co-hosting Fox & Friends this weekend.”

  • The AP reports, “Early Mike Wallace interviews now online”

  • “TVNewser received several tips wondering what happened during the 6:30 feed of Friday’s NBC Nightly News. Brian Williams was anchoring from Memphis to mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Williams began the broadcast with a live interview with Sen. John McCain. What they didn’t expect was a crowd behind them with speeches blaring through loudspeakers.”

  • A tipster tells us from Friday, “Bill Press speaking to an irate caller on today’s ‘Washington Journal’: ‘Chris Matthews is in the tank for Barack Obama, but don’t blame it on me.’

  • “CNN Crosses Paths With Clinton, Grabs Impromptu Interview,” TVNewser reports.

  • From a TVNewser tipster: ‘I understand that there is a move afoot to develop a legal television network in place of CourtTV.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart featured a glance at Sen. Barack Obama’s recent media tour. Some got snubbed, some got cozy and some were ‘thrilled’ to spend an hour with the candidate…until hearts were broken.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com continues to achieve record-breaking traffic in March 2008. In March, ABCNEWS.com scored another high traffic month, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 69% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 207.4 million page views, up 44% from the previous year and marked four consecutive months of record page view growth. In March, the site increased video views by 123% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • This Wednesday is the Blogger’s Happy Hour Bash at Velocity Five Restaurant. For more info, click here.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “Is the Huffington Post really a $200 million company? Monday’s New York Times story about the fast-growing group blog/news aggregator left a lot of people wondering about that eye-catching number, reportedly the price the company uses in its internal discussions about the possibility of a sale. The consensus, among those who know about some matters: No, the Huffington Post is not remotely worth $200 million.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Google Inc. confirmed Thursday it bid in the recent government spectrum auction in an effort to wring higher competing bids out of Verizon Wireless and open up a large chunk of the airwaves to outside Internet devices.”

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp’s Fox Interactive Media Internet division could fall short of its fiscal 2008 revenue target of $1 billion, as it reorganizes its divisions to better exploit the online advertising market.”

  • ABC.com asks, “Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?”

  • The Swamp reports, “It’s an introspective week for The Swamp. First we rolled out a new look and invited critiques. Now, some university researchers are asking whether we — and newspaper political blogs across the Web — should exist at all.”

  • Guardian’s greenslade reports, “I have argued for some time that the internet will free us from media mogul domination. Oddly, Rupert Murdoch has said much the same thing, a clue that I was being more than a shade optimistic. Now comes evidence that the democratising force of the net is anything but a given.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “The non-profit Freedom Forum’s most recent tax return shows that it paid Founder Al Neuharth $225,000 in 2006, plus gave him a $200,545 expense account — the biggest such account of any officer, director or trustee. Neuharth, 84, who recently groused about his diminished mental capacity, worked 40 hours a week for Freedom Forum, the return shows.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The weekly newsmagazines have been declared dinosaurs as far back as the late 1980s. But now that 111 employees at Washington Post Co.’s Newsweek have taken buyouts, including many longtime editors, it’s clear that their cultures are finally being blown up and reinvented. And some say that’s not such a bad thing.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will host “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today. The show can be heard on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm.

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a letter to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) notes that, although the Department of Justice has unconditionally approved the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, ‘serious concerns remain as to how this merger will impact consumers if it is permiited to go forward.’”

  • FBLA Exclusive: Interview with Randi Rhodes’ Ex-Writer Barry Crimmins

  • NPR announced, “A special edition of NPR’s news-talk program Talk of the Nation will broadcast live from the Newseum on Tuesday, April 8, 2:00-4:00PM (ET). This broadcast — the first live national program from the new Washington, D.C.-based interactive museum of news – is part of the Newseum’s press preview day, in advance of its public opening on Friday, April 11, and will have a studio audience.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Just as the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal became the ultimate water-cooler conversation topic — if only for a few days — Sirius Satellite Radio launched Client 9 Radio, a 24/7 all-Spitzer channel, but just for a few days.”

  • New York Times reports, “In what would be the latest twist in the increasingly contentious battle over the $20 billion buyout of Clear Channel Communications, hedge fund clients of the banks balking at financing the deal are reportedly threatening to pull their business if the banks don’t move ahead with the deal for the radio broadcaster.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • E&P reports, ” In a harsh press release, The White House slammed The New York Times for a Thursday column that criticized President Bush’s reaction to the economic crisis.”

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    EVENTS

  • Julie Ocean played at the Rock n Roll Hotel saturday night. Teh band’s CD comes out May 13. Check out their website here.

  • A release announced, “Andrea Rodgers, President and CEO of The Courage Cup, an IRS designated 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation established to help at-risk urban youth, is pleased to announce that Legal Times is inviting Washington law firms to attend Meadow Matches and participate in a Charity Segway Polo Challenge. This exciting day of polo matches will bring Washington’s legal community together for a day of charity in the picturesque Virginia Piedmont.”

  • PDN Pulse offers, “A Sneak Peek At The Newseum”

  • USAToday reports, “Massive Newseum opens window on journalism”

  • Kurtz reports, “At Sparkly Newseum, The Glory Of the Story Goes Above the Fold”

  • Lorraine Ahearn writes, “Determined to make the news ‘fun’ and ‘fresh,’ the Newseum has something for everyone. A 100-foot-wide screen lets visitors experience for themselves what it’s like to be interviewed by, say, Charlie Rose — with the help of 3-D glasses and complimentary Breathe-Right strips.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Unlike that bombastic structure, the journalism museum makes no attempt to bow and scrape to classical traditions. It is sheathed in glass, not masonry, to reveal some of its activity inside and counter the sealed-up monumentality so prevalent in Washington.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Washington City Paper writes, “For decades, D.C. has been hurting for a classic novel all its own. Some suggestions on how to make it.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Latin America Deputy Regional Editor and a Global Media Services (GMS) Unit Manager.

  • YMCA of Metropolitan Washington is looking for a Communications Specialist.

  • Greenpeace Inc. is looking for a Media Relations Director and a Graphic Designer.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist ,Group Retention & Billing.

  • Forbes.com is looking for an Unpaid Intern.

  • Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.18.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington. Today in D.C. history, Marion Barry said “bitch set me up.”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Ben Bradlee could take Robert Novak in a street fight.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has appointed the chief executive of Xerox Corp. to its board of directors. Ann Mulcahy, who has received national attention for turning around Xerox since she took the helm in 2001, will take the 11th post on the board of the D.C.-based company.”

  • Today is Jeff Marn’s last day at Foreign Policy magazine. He is joining the Washington, DC office of Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

  • Radar reports that Susan Estrich, ” the Harvard law professor who managed Michael Dukakis’s 1988 presidential bid straight into the ground’, is becoming chief of counsel to L.A.-based business-litigation firm Quinn Emanuel.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Check out E&P’s “Monthly Top 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites

  • The Dirksen Congressional Center annonced, “The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. A total of up to $30,000 will be available in 2008. Awards range from a few hundred dollars to $3,500. The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research.” All proposals must be received no later than February 1, 2008.

  • Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler, the author of The Confidante: Condoleezza Rice and the Creation of the Bush Legacy, is the guest of a brown bag lunch discussion held by the World Affairs Council of Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, January 22nd 2008 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM. Sign up here.

  • Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “There has been no shortage of drama in either party’s early presidential primaries, but in the public’s view the Democratic contest has been far more compelling. Four-in-ten Americans (40%) say they find the Democratic primary race very interesting, nearly double the proportion describing the Republican race as very interesting (21%).”

  • The AP reports, “The state of New Hampshire is getting out of the business of issuing identification cards to members of the news media. The man who handled the chore — Jim Van Dongen of the state Department of Safety — says the decision is based on the proliferation of online and specialty news outlets and technology that allows just about anyone to call himself a journalist. Van Dongen says that put him and his bosses in the uncomfortable position of issuing cards to all comers or having to decide who is a legitimate journalist. News organizations now will have to issue their own identification cards for events that require them.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “How much should a company’s culture reflect its chief executive, especially one who prides himself on being a blunt and innovative — some might say abrasive — businessman? If you’re new Tribune Co. CEO Sam Zell, the answer seems to be: A lot. At least that was the feeling workers got Wednesday with the distribution of a new employee handbook, a document that’s nothing like the mind-numbing, lawyered gobbledygook in most corporate manuals.”

  • Daniel Finkelstein writes “an open letter to readers of The New York Times” saying, “I understand that your newspaper of choice has asked William Kristol, the conservative commentator, to provide an opinion column for the paper. Since I am the op-ed editor of what you Americans call The Times of London, I have followed the controversy that the appointment has caused with great interest. And with my mouth wide open.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com achieved record-high unique visitors in December 2007. The site had 16.9 million uniques, an increase of 53% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC=92s measurements. The site also garnered 153
    million page views, up 24% from the previous year”

  • FNS:The Most Quoted Show, Again

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, January 13, 2008. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.714 million total viewers”

  • A CNN release announced, “As the nation honors the 79th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on Monday, Jan. 21, CNN delves deep into race and politics as it broadcasts the latest Democratic presidential primary debate from Myrtle Beach, S.C., and a live Anderson Cooper 360º special about the influence of race upon politics in America. From 8 p.m. to 10 p.m, CNN will host the two-hour debate with the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, live from the Palace Theater. CNN’s lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer will serve as moderator for the debate, and CNN correspondents Joe Johns and Suzanne Malveaux will serve as panelists questioning the candidates.”

  • FOX News Channel announced, “FOX News Channel (FNC) will provide live coverage of the Nevada Caucus and South Carolina Republican Primary on Saturday January 19, 2008. Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief, Brian Wilson, will host a special Nevada Caucus edition of Weekend Live from 3-5 PM ET. Managing Editor Brit Hume, will anchor You Decide 2008 South Carolina Republican Primary coverage from 6:30-9 PM. A special edition of Hannity & Colmes will follow. FNC’s daytime and primetime coverage will include reports from a team of anchors including Chris Wallace, Megyn Kelly, Bill Hemmer and Martha McCallum. FNC correspondents will be reporting live from both states, including Major Garrett, Steve Brown and Anita Vogel in Nevada, and Chief Political Correspondent Carl Cameron, Wendell Goler and Molly Henneberg in South Carolina. Overall analysis will be provided by The Weekly Standard’s Fred Barnes, National Public Radio’s Juan Williams; Roll Call’s Mort Kondracke; The Weekly Standard’s Bill Kristol and U.S. News & World Report’s Michael Barone.”

  • A CNN release announced, “On Saturday, Jan. 19, you can watch CNN’s live coverage of the Nevada caucuses from noon-3 p.m.* Later that evening from 7:00-10:00 p.m., the Best Political Team on Television will return with results from the South Carolina Republican primary. On Monday, Jan. 21, the CNN/Congressional Black Caucus Institute Democratic primary debate will air live from 8:00-10:00 p.m. out of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Wolf Blitzer moderates; CNN correspondent Joe Johns and White House correspondent Suzanne Malveaux serve as panelists. Anderson Cooper will follow the program with post-debate analysis, and then at 11 p.m., he and Soledad O’Brien will present a new special on race and politics. And, don’t forget, throughout this weekend and every weekend until Super Tuesday, you can watch the candidates uninterrupted and unmediated during Ballot Bowl! Ballot Bowl brings you the candidates’ significant live events in their entirety rather than in sound bite form. Here’s the schedule: Saturday: 3:00-6:00 p.m. (immediately following the Nevada caucuses coverage) Sunday: 1:00-3:00 p.m. AND 4:00-6:00 p.m.”

  • AJR reports, “The media’s addiction to polls and to predicting the future is obviously not new. Critics have railed against it for years. The compulsion to be ahead of the game even caused the television networks to make the wrong call on the 2000 presidential election. You’d think that humiliation was so huge that it would serve as a cautionary whale (hat tip to ‘Juno’ for that great line) as well as a cautionary tale for the political punditocracy. But no.”

  • Yesterday, “CREW and Media Matters for America sent a letter to CNN’s U.S. President Jonathan Klein, asking that former Christian Coalition head Ralph Reed, a proven liar with a deep bias against one of the major Republican candidates, no longer be afforded the opportunity to be a part of CNN’s self-proclaimed “best political team on television.’ Most recently, Reed provided commentary as a ‘Republican strategist’ during the New Hampshire presidential primary.”

  • Media Biz reports, “Are we in a recession or not? Well, investors in the big five media conglomerates seem to think so. Shares of my parent company Time Warner (TWX) are down nearly 5 percent. And it’s not alone. News Corp. (NWS) has fallen 7 percent this year. Walt Disney (DIS) is down nearly 8 percent in 2008. Viacom (VIAB) has shed 9 percent of its value while its former corporate sibling CBS (CBS) has plummeted 14 percent. CBS, Time Warner, Disney and News Corp. are all trading near 52-week lows, and each stock is down between 15 percent and 20 percent for the past three months. Viacom, 2007′s best-performing media stock, has held up slightly better over the past few months thanks to a rebound in ratings at the company’s cable networks, as well as strong box office performance from its Paramount and DreamWorks movie studios. Viacom’s stock is about 20 percent above its 52-week low.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN Correspondent Zain Verjee was hit in the back by a tear-gas canister while covering the protests in Kenya yesterday. Verjee was fired on by Kenyan police, in what she called an ‘unprovoked’ attack.”

  • Jon Stewart took MSNBC and the entire media to task last night on A Daily Show for their focus on, ‘America’s favorite fight starter: Race!’” For more, click here.

  • TVNewser reports, “As part of day-long coverage related to issues of race in America, CNN will present a Democratic candidate debate in Myrtle Beach, SC this Monday, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. day. So far three candidates have met the criteria to attend: Sen. Hillary Clinton, John Edwards and Sen. Barack Obama. A CNN insider tells TVNewser, ‘it still remains possible’ for Rep. Dennis Kucinich to meet the criteria of having 5% support in national polls.”

  • A tipster writes in, “Will the media matters campaign against Chris Matthews yield anything? Yes. A spike in ratings among the media. Let’s just admit it. HRC is never going to receive fair, objective coverage. There’s just too much history. Matthews is just more honest about it than others. We should give him an award.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tech Crunch reports, “Social travel site WAYN is allegedly in talks with AOL over a possible $200m sale to the consumer portal giant. A spokesperson for the UK startup denied that any sale talks are taking place.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “It’s good to see Upton Sinclair back in the news again amid the raves (which I don’t quite share) for the new film ‘There Will Be Blood,’ very loosely based on his 1927 novel ‘Oil!’ Even though Sinclair earned a nod in many of the articles and reviews of the film, which stars Daniel Day-Lewis, few have commented on the original source material.”

  • The Boston Phoenix’s Steven Stark writes, “If the surprise results in New Hampshire had an unanticipated benefit, it is this: they exposed the myth, once and for all, that the Internet has made political reporting and analysis far better than it once was. Alas, the opposite is true.”

  • Media Shift’s Mark Glasser asks, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

  • Chris Mooney writes, “As a journalist and especially as a blogger, I sure picked a hell of a time to move to Los Angeles. No sooner did I settle here late last fall than my fellow writers in the film and television industries went on strike. I’ve never done their kind of writing in a professional capacity, but the more I’ve engaged with the issues at the center of the current dispute between the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, the more I’m convinced that bloggers could soon find themselves making similar complaints against their own employers.”

  • Don Wycliff writes, “I don’t know whether YouTube.com is considered part of the ‘news media’ yet, but in the midst of the Obama-Clinton hoo-hah of the last several days the popular video Web site has performed perhaps the most basic and indispensable function of journalism: to serve, in the words of journalism educators Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Paul Waldman, as the ‘custodian of fact.’”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Call it a photo finish. A split decision. Too close to call: The leading online tracking firms are split over which Web property garners the most traffic. According to comScore, Yahoo — perennially ranked as the most visited destination on the Web — held onto its lead in December, staving off surging Google for at least another month.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “The editor of The Sun newspaper told a Lords’ Committee the internet edition can’t yet replicate the economic operations of the newspaper.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Google’s expanding lobbying operation scored two significant victories last year: It convinced federal regulators to approve its $3.1-billion purchase of online ad company DoubleClick Inc., and to partially open new wireless airwaves so the company could more easily make its products available on them. Though D.C. veterans say Google has a long way to go before its lobbying clout matches its market valuation, the company is no longer viewed as a wide-eyed Washington freshman.”

  • Business Courier reports, “A social networking Web site that will focus on the 2008 elections was launched Wednesday by E.W. Scripps Co. RedBlueAmerica will serve as a free public forum for user-generated content, including blogs, personal profiles and videos, Scripps said in a news release. It will also offer political news, e-mail service for subscribers, a daily public opinion poll and a feature called ‘Truth or Not’ that will examine ‘the veracity of factual claims made by high-profile newsmakers and others,’ according to the release.”

  • MediaShift reports, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Howard Mortman writes in the Weekly Standard, “Here’s an odd little Hillary Clinton proposal: She wants a government blogging team. At first blush, the idea could cut either way–nutty or silly. We might even call it ridiculous, if we weren’t busy laughing at it.”

  • Alex Kingsbury, associate editor for U.S.News & World Report, was featured Tuesday night on NBC Nightly News as part of a story about gender bias in college admissions, which cited a U.S. News June 2007 special report ‘Admittedly Unequal.’”

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    BOOKS

  • The Patriot Ledger reports that Roy Harris Jr., “a former Wall Street Journal reporter and now an editor at CFO magazine” wrote “Pulitzer’s Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism,” released yesterday, “is the first comprehensive chronicling of the human dramas, large and small, behind the coveted award.”

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    JOBS

  • Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company is looking for a Advertising Sales Executive, DC.

  • Platts is looking for a Senior Writer.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Associate Producer, Social Media.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Public safety reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Deputy Editor.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Online Coordinator.

  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education is looking for a Magazine Editor.

  • Defense Daily is looking for a Reporter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.16.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you do use supplements regularly.

  • An ABC release announced, “‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ will produce the first Democratic presidential debate of the 2008 presidential election to be aired on broadcast television. The debate will be moderated by ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos with additional questioning from David Yepsen of The Des Moines Register and will be held at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa on Sunday morning, August 19, 2007.”

  • Don’t forget that The Washington Blogger Meetup is today! You can see who’s coming and RSVP here.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC’s SVP of programming, Bill Shine announced the network ‘will not continue the Half Hour News Hour beyond its current 15 episode run.’”

  • “Channel 9′s Tracey Neale, who is headed to Africa to pick up her kids. The WUSA anchor announced the news on Tuesday’s broadcast: ‘I’ll be adopting 1-year-old twins, so I’m going to have my hands full,’ she told viewers.”

  • Why is there a Black journalism organization?”

  • A tipster writes in, “Good for Plante for shouting an intelligent question–and a valid one, and an important one, and a relevant one. Good for Plante. He was doing his job. The question was a good one.”

  • From CJR: “The WSJ editorial page launches baseless attacks on its competitors’ motives—it will fit right in at News Corp.”

  • Slate’s Christopher Beam tells us, “How to mash together the ultimate search engine”

  • Julian Friedland writes in the Denver Post, “Last week, the New York Times reduced the width of its pages by an inch and a half — joining a trend that has reduced both the space devoted to news and commentary and the staff sizes of many daily newspapers throughout the country. And, recently, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation won its fight to buy The Wall Street Journal.”

  • Denver Post reports, “At an Aspen forum, executives in media new and old say papers are staying relevant by changing their mind-set about delivery”

  • From The Hollywood Reporter: “Sirius Satellite Radio — more popular in automobiles than in living rooms — is making it easier to get Howard Stern, along with dozens of commercial-free channels, on home-based radios.”

  • Ad Week reports, “Since Facebook opened its site to developers in May, it has been flooded with mini-programs that let users throw virtual food at one another, post movie reviews and share YouTube videos. The influx of applications, now up to over 2,800, is leading to the creation of ad networks designed to let developers profit from their work and help advertisers reach Facebook’s growing user base.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The October issue of Condé Nast Portfolio is already closing and it looks like it will rack up a nice, healthy 121 ad pages for its third issue. That’s only one ad page down from the magazine’s September issue, which went on sale today with 122 ad pages – the third-best ad-page tally for a second issue in magazine publishing history, behind O, The Oprah Magazine and the late John F. Kennedy Jr.’s now-defunct George magazine, which racked up 125 ad pages in its second outing.”

  • CNN reports, “He’s a veteran statesman and hard-hitting chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. But Sen. Patrick Leahy is set to leave the marble halls of Washington for the bright lights of Hollywood — at least briefly. Vermont’s senior senator has landed a speaking role in the newest Batman movie, CNN affiliate WPTZ reports and confirmed by Leahy’s office.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. and its YouTube video- sharing site staved off the threat of legal action from Belgium’s soccer association by offering a technology that will allow the group to monitor where its matches are broadcast.”

  • Variety reports, “Viacom has pledged $1 million in cash and more than $500,000 in media value to support the construction of a memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.”

  • Fortune reports, “Readers of the The Sun, a British tabloid best known for its bare-breasted Page Three girls, opened their newspapers to see a young woman named Keeley Hazell wearing only green paint. Ms. Hazell is the face — well, not just the face — of the paper’s campaign against global warming.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yahoo! Inc., fighting Google Inc. for local advertisers, added more city-specific Web pages with information on movies, events and neighborhood restaurants.”

  • MediaLife reports, “Since April, more than 900 newsroom jobs have been cut in these days of declining circulation and shrinking ad revenues. Now the paper cuts are extending even to those who’ve made an effort to avoid them in the past.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “This summer has been an unusual hunting season for the start-up world, with nascent Internet companies firmly in the crosshairs of major media conglomerates.”

  • Poynter Online points us to this gem from ABCnews.com: “CIA recently updated its FOIA requests policy to allow bloggers to get special treatment once reserved for old-school reporters. Last August, the NSA issued a directive to report leaks of classified info to the media — ‘including blogs.’”

  • American University School of Communication professor Kathryn Montgomery has new book, Generation Digital: Politics, Commerce, and Childhood in the Age of the Internet. Check it out here.

  • Express reports, “Since 2003, many people have been confused about the restaurant at the corner of 21st and M streets NW. Is NBC News’ chief White House correspondent and sometime ‘Today’ show fill-in David Gregory, at right, also a restaurant owner? The answer has always been an emphatic no; after all, the restaurant’s name has one ‘g’ more than the journalist’s. And now, David Greggory — named after chefs and onetime business partners David Hagedorn and Greggory Hill — is no more.”

  • BtoB reports, “As it prepares to celebrate its 25th anniversary in September, Gannett Co.’s USA Today is bucking the downward trend in U.S. newspaper circulation and branching out online to offer the kind of user-generated content that has growing appeal for b-to-b marketers.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “Gawker gets respectable — and remains humorous”

    Jobs

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a Advertising Sales Representative.

  • Vandenburgh Media is looking for an Advertising Database Manager.

  • AARP is looking for a Web Content Producer and an Online Copy Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext