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Posts Tagged ‘Marty Kaplan’

Morning Reading List, 01.09.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • You think the Clinton campaign is the least journo-friendly.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Chicago Sun-Times reports, “Sun-Times Media Group said Friday it is contemplating as many as 35 layoffs of Chicago Newspaper Guild newsroom staffers within the next four weeks. As many as 27 positions will be eliminated among the ranks of Guild copy editors, designers and reporters. No layoffs are contemplated of writers of major sports or photographers.”

  • Reuters reports, “A Sacred Heart University Poll found significantly declining percentages of Americans saying they believe all or most of media news reporting. In the current national poll, just 19.6% of those surveyed could say they believe all or most news media reporting. This is down from 27.4% in 2003. Just under one-quarter, 23.9%, in 2007 said they believe little or none of reporting while 55.3% suggested they believe some media news reporting.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes “Media Blow It Again”

  • The Beachwood Reporter looks back at the Monday papers.

  • The New York Observer reports, “After the crushing loss in the Iowa caucuses, the Clinton campaign has tried to improve relations with its discontented press corps by rationing out more access to the candidate. It’s not clear that it’s working.”

  • John Kass takes the fairy tale analogy to a new level. “Last Sunday, I dipped my fingertips into fairyland analogies, into C.S. Lewis’ land of Narnia, describing Obama as a gentle forest faun, the Mr. Tumnus of the Democratic primaries, the one national political character who gets media hugs from almost everybody. I like Obama, but I won’t apologize for comparing him to a kind and beloved faun. He is indeed the Mr. Tumnus of American politics, gently offering free tea and cakes to all Americans, all the free stuff that won’t cost us anything (unless you’re a taxpayer). … But, blinded by Obama, I foolishly used the “white witch” analogy for Sen. Clinton. So I apologize to her, and not just because my wife told me to.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Snyder Faced With Another Loss”

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    TV

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of December 31, 2007-January 6, 2008. During the week that saw the Iowa caucus and the political race heat up, the Williams-led newscast averaged 9.813 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “World News with Charles Gibson” averaged 9.00 million Total Viewers and a 2.2/8 among Adults 25-54 for the week of December 31, 2007-January 4, 200.”

  • Huffington Post’s Marty Kaplan writes, “No matter what you think about Hillary Clinton, no matter how this campaign turns out, there is undeniable satisfaction in watching the pundit class being forced to eat the words of its premature obituaries.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Analysts and anchors struggle to reconcile predictions and results”

  • The New York Times reports, “The late-night stars of the Comedy Central cable network, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, returned to their programs for the first time in nine weeks Monday night, ready to sling their satirical stones at a new target: the continuing strike by the Writers Guild of America, which is forcing the stars to find creative ways to perform without their writers.”

  • Forbes reports, “Thanks to the ongoing Hollywood writers strike, there has been little to celebrate in the media world. But a report released Monday had a bit of good news for the industry where it counts: ad spending. With the market buoyed by both the upcoming presidential election and the Beijing Olympics, overall ad spending in the U.S. is expected to rise 4.2% to approximately $156 billion in 2008, according to an annual report released by TNS, a division of Taylor Nelson Sofres that tracks ad spending across 20 media segments. The better part of that gain will come later in the year, with ad spending forecast to grow by 4.7% in the second half of 2008, compared to just 3.6% during the first half of the year.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin says consumer-electronics companies are doing an adequate job of educating consumers about the upcoming transition to digital television in February 2009.”

  • Beet.TV reports, “Wednesday will mark a milestone in broadcast journalism and in video on the Web as msnbc.com will offer clips from NBC Nightly News and other NBC news programs as sharable embed codes, Beet.TV has learned.”

  • From last night’s liveblogging, TVNewser reports, “McCain in, Clinton Ahead — Will … News Pundits and Pollsters Live Free or Die in N.H.?” More from TVNewser here, including “Where Did It All Go Wrong?”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comcast Corp. is looking to broadband site Fancast and a growing stable of high-definition VOD titles to headline the company’s tech efforts, following months of turbulence on Wall Street.”

  • New York Magazine reports, “CNBC and the ‘Times’: United Against Fox Business Network!”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Salon’s Glenn Greenwald writes, “The endless attempts to predict the future and thus determine the outcome of the elections — to the exclusion of anything meaningful — is a completely inappropriate role for journalists to play, independent of the fact that they are chronically wrong, ill-informed, and humiliated when they do it.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Wikia Inc., the Internet company started by Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales, opened its search engine to the public on Monday in a bid to challenge Google Inc. and Yahoo Inc. Wikia Search, which lets users edit and fine-tune its results, is now seeking contributors to help expand the service, according to a statement from the San Mateo, Calif.-based company. The system is open-source, meaning its underlying programming code can be shared freely.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Facebook’s tie-up with ABC News has helped fuel a massive surge in TV viewing of the pre-primary New Hampshire debates held at the weekend. ABC’s coverage of Hillary Clinton attempting to salvage her campaign hopes in a debate against Barack Obama attracted 9.36 million viewers, while 7.35 million watched the Republican head-to-head, according to Variety.”

  • The Times Online reports,Chris DeWolfe believes that high-quality content will keep Facebook at bay in the social networking wars”

  • The New York Times reports,Andrew Olmsted, a United States Army major who wrote an online blog for The Rocky Mountain News, prepared for the possibility of his death by writing a 3,000-word piece.”

  • CQ Politics sat down with New Hampshire’s Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlan on Monday, in the calm before the storm.

  • The New Yorker reports, “Google squares off with its Capitol Hill critics.”

  • FT.com reports, “MySpace, the internet site specialising in social networking, claims to be drawing young people away from television and video games as they use its web pages to make friends and money. A group of 18- to 24-year-olds drawn from 1,000 people surveyed by Future Laboratory said it would rather spend 15 minutes visiting social networking sites than watching television, reading, playing video games or talking on mobile phones.”

  • IHT and Reuters debut the Business News Alliance.

  • VNUNet.com reports, “2007 was widely touted as the year of social media, but analysts expect to see changes this year in the way social media is used and an increase in its effect on business. The advent of the social web has created such online interaction between consumers that traditional models to research a product or service will change fundamentally.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Reporters wanting to interview campaign staffers are having a hard time trying to get through. That’s because some campaigns are putting a tight lid on who gets to say what. The Deerfield Valley News, an independent weekly in southern Vermont, wanted to interview Brandon Riker, a former Deerfield Valley resident. Riker recently graduated from Twin Valley High School in Wilmington, VT and is taking a semester off from college to work for the (Barack) Obama campaign. The Deerfield Valley News wanted to recognize Riker and write a story on his efforts, but the Obama campaign is not permitting any interviews with full time staffers: no exceptions. Tim Foley, media liaison for Barack Obama’s New Hampshire campaign, did not know why that policy is in place and also could not specify why it was in place to begin with.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Jack Germond takes “A Cold, Hard Look” at the New Hampshire primaries.

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    JOBS

  • The National Council on Teacher Quality is looking for a Issues Director.

  • Population Reference Bureau is looking for a Multimedia Specialist.

  • Gensler, a global design firm, is looking for a Marketing & Communications Writer.

  • National Association of Home Builders is looking for a Communications Manager.

  • The Carroll County Times is looking for a Westminster Reporter.

  • Lucky magazine is searching for a Washington, DC-based reporter to cover local shopping and style news, emerging designers, stores, etc. for its monthly DC regional pages. Send resume and relevant clips to Marissa Patlingrao Cooley (marissa_cooley@condenast.com).

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Social Media 201

    Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

    Morning Reading List, 01.08.08

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    Happy New Hampshire Primary Day Washington! On this day in 1790, President George Washington delivered our first State of the Union. In 1992, Bush 41 puked on Japanese Prime Minister Miyazawa Kiichi, and, in 2006, Tom DeLay resigned as House Majority Leader.

    Happy 41st R Kelly!

    (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think the CW will be true — Obama and McCain win today in NH.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • ABC announced that Lee Kamlet is joining World News as head writer. Lee replaces Josh Landis, who is now a correspondent at CBS News.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • With Bill Kristol’s first New York Times piece yesterday, Marty Kaplan looks at the evolution of the Times’ op-ed page.

  • Politico’s Ben Smith reported, “Ted Nalbantian, 19, an Obama supporter from Ridgewood, N.J., has been stationed all afternoon outside the Des Moines media hangout Centro, where his task is to encourage Iowans to caucus for Obama. He approached, in quick succession, me, Maureen Dowd and Ana Marie Cox.” Awwwww.

  • The New York Times reports, “CNBC and The New York Times have agreed to share material on their Web sites, uniting the main competitive targets of the News Corporation’s new ventures, the Fox Business Network and The Wall Street Journal.”

  • Erik Wemple take a dig at a former City Paper reporter.

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Fourth quarter 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ delivered its best Fourth quarter in three years (2004). In addition, ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ among Adults 25-54 in the Fourth quarter for the first time in seven years (2000).”

  • Also from ABC, “Saturday’s ABC News/Facebook/WMUR-TV’s back-to-back Republican and Democratic debates were the most-watched of the 2008 presidential cycle. The Democratic debate averaged 9.36 million Total Viewers and a 2.9 rating among Adults 25-54. The Republican debate averaged 7.35 million Total Viewers and a 1.8 rating among Adults 25-54. Averaged together, the debates garnered 8.36 million Total Viewers and a 2.4 among the key Adult 25-54 demographic.” TVNewser has the full debate ranker for all of the debates to date.

  • NBC announced, “Chris Matthews and Keith Olbermann will anchor MSNBC’s live coverage of the New Hampshire presidential primary Tuesday, Jan. 8, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. MSNBC’s live primary coverage kicks off with a special edition of ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews’ at 5 p.m. ET.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 30, 2007 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 3.594 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Fourth quarter 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic. The last time ‘This Week’ beat ‘Face the Nation’ in the fourth quarter among Adults 25-54 was seven years ago (4th quarter 2000) and the last time ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers in the 4th quarter was 2002.”

  • A CNN release announced, “From the new CNN Election Center in New York and from around the state of New Hampshire, lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer and CNN’s political team will guide the network’s special coverage. CNN’s special programming will begin at 8 p.m. (ET)-following wall-to-wall politics on The Situation Room and Lou Dobbs Tonight—and run late into the night. The coverage will lead into a special edition of Larry King Live at midnight (ET) hosted by Larry King and featuring analysis and insight into the election results.”

  • Check out more coverage notes at TVNewser.

  • Is Lou Dobbs out of the CNN NH coverage?

  • The Seattle Times’ Ron Judd writes, “Scoreboard, Baby. That ought to be the election-coverage theme at cable-news giant CNN, which, for the occasion of Thursday’s Iowa caucuses, unveiled its latest Giant-Step-Backward innovation: A bewildering, omnipresent picture-frame graphical display festooned with BIG HEADLINES, multicolored, animated pie charts, spinning circles and zipping text.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “In Fox’s flock, Shepard Smith rises to anchor of choice”

  • Check out Nielsen’s Presidential Scorecard for New Hampshire, “reporting on the total number of TV advertising spots run by the Presidential candidates in New Hampshire and the surrounding markets from January 1, 2007 through January 4, 2008.”

  • Did you catch the midnight broadcast of the CNN Election Express on Larry King Live from a town called Dixville Notch in New Hampshire? It is the site of the first voting in the state.

  • Journal-isms reports, “Pundits likened Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., to everyone from Ronald Reagan to Harold Washington as New Hampshire voters prepared to go to the polls Tuesday for their first-in-the-nation primary, five days after Obama’s decisive victory in the Iowa caucuses.”

  • The Washington Examiner reports, “A former BET network personality was charged with possession of a .37 mm launcher after authorities said he used it to shoot flares into the sky during a New Year’s celebration in Northwest Washington.”

  • TVNewser reported Monday, “CBS Evening News EP Rick Kaplan slipped on some ice while walking to a plane in Des Moines last Friday heading back from covering the caucus. CBS tells us Kaplan ‘suffered a fracture in the hip area but is recovering well.’ In fact, Kaplan is back to work in New York today.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage to include CSN’s guest Pete Taylor, Billick career to be TV for now”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Check out Major Garrett’s blog — The Bourbon Room.

  • Poynter reports, “Seems like some leading thinkers in the journo world are getting impatient with the pace of change in this business.
    Tidbits founding editor and current contributor Steve Outing started it with his Jan. 2 Editor & Publisher column, What’s Needed in 2008: Serious Newsroom Cultural Change.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes on improved relations between the Pentagon and the news media.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The AP reports, “An interview with Benazir Bhutto before the former Pakistani prime minister was assassinated was important enough to keep on the cover of Parade magazine, the magazine’s publisher said Sunday — even though the publication had already gone to print when Bhutto was killed.”

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    JOBS

  • Media Matters for America is looking for a Researcher.

  • Campaign for America’s Future is looking for a Senior Communications Associate.

  • National Public Radio .is looking for a Editor (I, II, or III), Afternoon Rundown.

  • Atlantic Media Company is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • Tax Analysts is looking for a Reporter and a Copy Editor.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • Access Intelligence, LLC is looking for a Reporter.

  • The Maryland Gazette is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

  • FOX Business Network is looking for a Newsgathering Producer — Business News.

  • A Washington, DC-based luxury lifestyle publication seeks a writer with experience covering fashion, beauty, and retail. Must have experience and be able to meet deadlines promptly. Send resume, cover letter, and clips to dcfashionwriter@yahoo.com.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.29.07

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    Good morning Washington.

  • Fine, fine … we’re sucking it up and joining Facebook.

  • Your folks are Democrats, well, mostly.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • “Four years into the war, Iraq correspondents would give their reporting mixed, but generally positive reviews and think they have covered the U.S. military more effectively than they have covered the citizenry of Iraq,” a Pew release announced.

  • Harry Jaffe writes, “How to Poke Don Graham and Not Get Fired for It (Hint: Try Facebook)”

  • One Mediabistro reader wants to know, “Does the Washington Post really drug test?”

  • This morning check out “a special video series entitled, ‘A Nation Divided,’ illustrating the Iraq war’s influence on the presidential campaign by award-winning producer Travis Fox” on washingtonpost.com. “The three-part series focuses on populations in three primary states: Iowa, South Carolina and New Hampshire.”

  • The AP reports, “A Banc of America analyst downgraded shares of the New York Times Co. Wednesday, saying Wall Street expects unrealistically strong spending from luxury and national advertisers.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 90 percent of U.S. journalists in Iraq say much of Baghdad is still too dangerous to visit, despite a recent drop in violence attributed to the build-up of U.S. forces, a poll released on Wednesday said.”

  • E&P reports, “Nearly two-thirds of Americans do not trust press coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign, according to a new Harvard University survey, which also revealed four out of five people believe coverage focuses too much on the trivial — and more than 60% believe coverage is politically biased.”

  • CJR reports, “Just when you thought it was safe to spread open The New York Times and eat a turkey and cranberry sandwich, Mark Halperin turns in a Week in Review op-ed that kills the appetite. He’s decided that the national press spends too much pushing horse race manure, while ignoring leadership and character, which he says can be found in the oats of candidates’ ‘full lives and public record.’ Points for originality!”

  • AJR reports, “As U.S. news organizations have backed away from foreign news coverage, the Associated Press’ international report has become increasingly vital.”

  • The New York Observer reports,Bill Keller announced moments ago in a memo that there will be layoffs at The New York Times. He wrote that it will not affect reporters, but a hiring freeze will be strictly enforced.”

    RADIO

  • USA Today reports, “Friendly satellite radio rivals Sirius (SIRI) and XM (XMSR) enter the final month of 2007 with reasons to be wary. They have to worry whether the softening economy will hurt new car sales — the largest generator of new satellite radio subscribers.”

    TELEVISION

  • Another Disclosure Debacle for CNN

  • DNC Cancels Democratic Debate; Was To Be Moderated by Katie Couric

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of November 19-27, 2007. The NBC broadcast posted its best total viewer delivery since February 12, 2007 and its best advantage since December 18, 2006.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “Last Friday marked something of a milestone for ABC’s widely acclaimed news program Nightline when it aired a detailed look at life inside the chaotic emergency room at the 28th Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad. The significance? It was the first time since July 18 that Nightline had broadcast a firsthand news report from Iraq examining the on-the-ground effects of the still-unfolding war there.”

  • Media Week reports, “More than 18 months after The New York Times pulled out of its joint cable venture with Discovery Communications, the Discovery Times Channel is shedding its outdated moniker.”

  • TVNewser tells us that Fox News has pimped their “Election Newsgathering Vehicle.”

  • Think Progress pointed out yesterday, “Coal Industry Sponsoring Tonight’s CNN/YouTube Republican Presidential Debate”

  • Presidential Debate Canceled Amid CBS Strike Plans

  • TVNewser reports, “November marked 14 months in a row that Countdown with Keith Olbermann has topped CNN’s 8pmET program in the A25-54 demo; and the 12th month in a row in the total viewer category.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN says Headline News continues to have ‘its best year on record.’”

  • Bill Hemmer On The Difference Between FNC And CNN

  • The Examiner reports, “The news of the untimely death of Redskins star Sean Taylor traveled quickly Tuesday morning. CNN was the first to break the news around 5am Tuesday but soon after that local outlets WTOP, WMAL, NBC4, FOX5, ABC7 and CBS9 all were reporting the sad news of death of Taylor as the lead news story.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commissions voted for a set of watered-down cable regulations late last night, as increasing tensions among the agency’s five members allowed the industry to largely avoid tough rules.”

  • St. Petersburg Times takes a “Peek inside CNN’s inner sanctum”

  • Marty Kaplan writes, “CNN spokeswoman Christa Robinson wrote HuffPo’s media relations vp saying that my post about how the CNN/YouTube Republican Debate was rigged was ‘pretty infuriating.’”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s newest pics here.

    BOOKS

  • Huffington Post reports, “Writing on Editor and Publisher this morning, Public Affairs Books founder and editor-at-large Peter Osnos addresses the media frenzy that’s greeted the announcement of Scott McClellan’s forthcoming volume, What Happened. In summation, Osnos is seemingly shocked–shocked!–that the marketing strategy his company pursued with regard to McClellan’s book has actually worked in the manner that was intended.”

    MAGAZINES

  • Mixed Media asks, “What is Peter Carlson’s beef with Details?”

  • Karen Tumulty shares what it is like to write for a newsweekly.

  • Niche Media announced, “With a Holiday 2007 launch, Niche Media will debut Trump Magazine, the quintessential guide to luxury living and the entrepreneurial spirit. Trump Magazine will be published quarterly with a distribution of over 100,000 copies that will be hand-delivered to Trump properties, residences, and golf courses and sold in select cities across the country.”

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • A release announced, “Sen. John McCain will be the third presidential candidate, and first Republican, to participate in the groundbreaking MySpace/MTV Presidential Dialogue series. The interactive Dialogue will take place at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, NH with an in-person audience of university students, and for the first time, be simultaneously broadcast live on MTV, MySpace (www.myspace.com/election2008), MTV’s www.ChooseOrLose.com, cross-carriers on MTV Mobile, and translated live into Spanish via ImpreMedia’s LaVibra. Today www.myspace.com/election2008 and www.ChooseOrLose.com will begin accepting user-submitted video questions (30 seconds or less) on the issues that matter most to young voters in the upcoming elections. Submissions will be accepted through Sunday, December 2, and the video with the highest ratings and community response on Monday will be posed to Sen. McCain during the evening Dialogue.”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes on the coverage of Sean Taylor’s death, “It is, however, to point out that when it came down to keeping up with the story, the best and timeliest source of information was La Canfora’s blog.”

    JOBS

  • Federal News Radio AM 1050 is looking for a Web Writer.

  • American Association for Justice is seeking Legal Content Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.11.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you didn’t watch The Sopranos, but for the true fans, you thought Tony would live.

  • Check out the 2006 IRE Award Winners here.

  • Dan Gillmor writes, “Journalism’s old guard is in a panic. With the latest bad news … it’s no wonder that people who care about the traditional journalism business are frightened.”

  • Reuters reports, “An Internet entrepreneur and a Wall Street group have joined a list of potential rivals to News Corp.’s $5 billion bid for Wall Street Journal publisher Dow Jones & Co. Inc., an adviser to the Dow Jones employee union said on Thursday.”

  • Eric Rauchway tells us what he learned at the blogging panel, a.k.a “Historical Scholarship and the New Media.” Ben Adler gives his own take on the experience.

  • The National Press Club is hosting a travel writing trade panel June 28 7 – 8:30 p.m. in the Lisagor Room. The event is open to the public. Reserve online or by calling is 202-662-7501.

  • FT.com reports, “Nielsen, the US-based audience measurement firm, is to begin tracking mobile phone users’ media consumption as part of an effort to provide wireless carriers, advertisers and entertainment companies with more accurate data about mobile phone usage.”

  • Ben Affleck loves to yell during “Hardball.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “It’s almost a footnote in some of the news stories and press releases on News Corp.’s negotiations to take over Dow Jones & Co., but the inclusion of Rupert Murdoch’s son, James, at the bargaining table could be sending a significant signal on where News Corp. is heading.”

  • Gay Programming Steps Out On Satellite and Digital

  • E&P reports, “With the exception of exports leveling off and producer inventories rising, April newsprint statistics released this week by the Pulp and Paper Products Council (PPPC) were all negative.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Trading in options to buy Netflix Inc. shares surged to the most since January 2004 on speculation the largest provider of movie rentals via the mail may be acquired.”

  • Christian Post reports, “Americans who watch more hours of television tend to be less committed to classical virtues such as honesty and fairness and less likely to value religious principles, according to a conservative media watchdog.”

  • MediaBiz reports, “Sirius announced after the market closed Tuesday that it had received a $250 million loan from Morgan Stanley (MS).”

  • A reader writes:
      wemple: The problem with Kornheiser is that he’s in great demand. Late this month, he’ll leave the Post airwaves and won’t return in full force until next January, following his season in ESPN’s Monday Night Football booth. Gulland won’t say what the station will do to fill the programming void that he’ll leave. farhi: Kornheiser has become so valuable to the station, executives said, that his show will continue, with his name, even after he leaves it at the end of this month — as he prepares for his second season as an analyst on ESPN’s ‘Monday Night Football.’ WTWP morning man David Burd will host ‘The Tony Kornheiser Show,’ along with Kornheiser’s current sidekicks. Kornheiser will call in to the show from time to time, Farley said, but will not have a regular slot on the program; Kornheiser is committed to ESPN until the end of the football season.

  • A reader writes, “Shouldn’t the Washington Times intern know how to proof before posting and not just rely on spell check?? ‘getting soar muscles from carrying heavy bags’.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “Time Warner Inc. chairman and CEO Richard Parsons on Thursday signaled more clearly than ever that he might drop at least his CEO title in the next year or two and again backed president and COO Jeffrey Bewkes as his heir apparent.”

  • Since becoming the Discovery Channel’s chief three years ago, Jane Root “has helped pull the nature channel out of a ratings slump with shows featuring, in no particular order, people battling nature, people living in prison, people saving the planet, and so on,” reports BusinessWeek.

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column.

  • A Harris Interactive poll on newspapers and their online sites, that was released at the World Association of Newspapers conference in Cape Town, shows that “five years out, readers expect online to overtake TV networks as their main source of news in four of the seven countries.”

  • Jeffrey F. Rayport writes, “To judge from ad-industry publications, advertising is in crisis. The stories of upheaval in how agencies serve clients, create value and get paid might readily suggest that advertising as a profession and business is dead, or dying. Nothing could be further from the truth.”

  • Marty Kaplan writes, “Within 24 hours, no primate on the planet will be unaware of Paris Hilton’s transfer from the pokie to the ankle bracelet, but it is a safe bet that within weeks or even months, relatively few Americans will know the big news going down now in Iraq. That’s because journalism is distributed in two flavors: push and pull.”

  • AP reports, “Twelve major universities will digitize select collections in each of their libraries — up to 10 million volumes — as part of Google Inc.’s book-scanning project.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “The head of the National Association of Broadcasters is urging Sirius Satellite Radio CEO Mel Karmazin to end his attempt to merge the nation’s two satellite radio companies and accusing the executive of misleading the public about the deal’s benefits.”

    Jobs

  • AAAS is looking for a Communications Officer and a Communications Associate.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer/Online Producer for NationalJournal.com and a Staff Correspondent for Government Executive Magazine.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for an Editorial intern.

  • A downtown DC publishing company is looking for a Graphic Designer.

  • Smithsonian Publications is looking for a Production Coordinator.

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is looking for a NewsHour Administrative Assistant.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer and a Sports Producer.

  • The Map Network/NAVTEQ is looking for a Copy Editor, a Financial Analyst/Accountant, a Senior SQL Developer, a Director of Marketing, a Director of Business Development a Manager Destination and Event Sales and an Ad Sales Representative.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for an Account Manager.

  • C-SPAN is hiring a temporary Political Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext