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Posts Tagged ‘Matt Welch’

Morning Chatter

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Something heartening…

“Awaiting my oldest friend — we were 3 when we met — as he makes DC stop on his 1st family trip to the US. #psyched” — Yahoo! News‘ D.C. Bureau Chief Olivier Knox.

Important Q to Ponder: “Skakel was an adult in charge of his own defense. Why would he deserve a new trial based on ineffectiveness of his own lawyer?” — Commentary‘s John Podhoretz.

Uh oh.

“4:42am and it’s already ‘one of those days.’” — ABC7′s Sara Van Aernum.

images-3SHOTS FIRED!

“Yo, @CarlosLozadaWP read your paper’s Jofi Joseph tick-tock today. Search the words ‘Daily Beast’ or ‘Rogin.’ Speak truth to power!” — Politico‘s Glenn Thrush to WaPo Outlook Editor Carlos Lozada. This was in response to Lozada’s recent assertion that Thrush had failed to give Daily Beast‘s Josh Rogin his deserved credit for breaking the anonymous NSC tweeter  story. Lozada didn’t respond to Thrush’s Twitter water balloon, but he did what any self-respecting journalist would do — he retweeted it. For a backgrounder, see our writeup on this situation.

Journo has stress dream

“Woke up from 5 am stress dream that I was going on @FBNStossel unprepared to precisely explain Medicare funding mechanisms.” – Reason Editor-in-Chief Matt Welch.

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Morning Chatter

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Politico Playbook Publish Time: 6:56 a.m.

A media incentive to end the shutdown

“Incentive for GOP to take deal: media coverage is gradually shifting from shutdown to Obamacare rollout disaster. Default wd step on that!” — The New Yorker‘s Ryan Lizza.

imagesvineyard-vines-sweater-352936-1Convo Between Two Journos

This morning’s conversation is by BuzzFeed Washington Bureau Chief John Stanton and BuzzFeed reporter Rosie Gray.

Stanton: “Trolling @RosieGray about her secret passion for sweater sets and vineyard vibes apparel is the reason twitter exists.”

Gray: “U suck.”

Journo looks into gargling coconut oil

“Just googled ‘gargling with coconut oil’ so even if my twenties aren’t actually over yet, I’ve basically surrendered already.” — TNR‘s pathologically fascinating and Luke Russert-loving Noreen Malone. In case you care, the process of “oil pulling” or swishing coconut oil in your mouth, reportedly removes bacteria, toxins and parasites from your throat. It’s also alleged that the practice strengthens gums and relieves congested sinuses.

The Instigator

“Oh I got Twitchyed. I see. Anyway time for bed where I will dream sweet dreams of single payer and TAKING ALL YOUR GUNS AWAY.” — The Guardian‘s Ana Marie Cox.

images-3Editors bag shutdown, chat about Beach Boys

“Watching the Beach Boys (w Brian Wilson!) on Full House singing Kokomo. Please kill me.” – Reason‘s Nick Gillespie. Gillespie later took time to practice his sarcasm, writing, “Can’t wait to hear Charles Krauthammer‘s take on the Redskins name controversy tomorrow on O’Reilly. How can I sleep?”

“I am seriously listening to weirdo Beach Boys 1973 songs while watching Yasiel Puig rock it silently on my TV. Life could be worse.” — Reason‘s Matt Welch.

Necessary Tweet of the Day

“Fun fact: ‘Chou chou’ means cabbage, a term of endearment in French. #RHOM” — Politico‘s Olivia Petersen.

Reason Mag Turns 45, Editors Have Managed Not to Kill Each Other

Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch fucking hate each other. Put them in the same air space and you’re likely to hear them discuss their persisting feelings of blind rage for each other. Without even a trace of a smile, Gillespie, dressed head to toe in his signature black frock, explains the dynamic between the two. “We have a tight relationship that usually ends in physical violence,” he says.

Welch, who is editor-in-chief of the magazine, casts a weary glance in Gillespie’s direction: “He’s from New Jersey.”

The editors of Reason Magazine, Reason.com and Reason TV flaunted their hatred Wednesday night at a party in the company newsroom off Dupont Circle to celebrate the mag’s 45-year anniversary. The scene wasn’t raucous. It was peaceful, pleasant and a rarity in Washington parties in that you could breathe, hear and get a drink easily.

One senses that the above scene between Gillespie and Welch has played out in variations before. No less funny, whatever the case. Gillespie, who edits the online publication and Reason TV, has been at Reason for 19 years. Welch, since 2002. “I took two years off for bad behavior at the LA Times,” says Welch.

When I bring up their searing hatred to another employee, it’s explained that they couldn’t possibly have that much friction between them — Gillespie spends a portion of the month in Ohio, where his kids live, and Welch moved to Brooklyn a year ago, but visits D.C. often.

Weave around the newsroom and there is a relaxed vibe along with a mix of various accented employees. A week old intern with spiky hair and English accent greets us outside. Ahh…he’s Guy Bentley, the greeter and the guy whose key fob card is letting guests upstairs. “Great, fantastic, really well,” he says, when asked how his internship is going. “UK is a little depressing,” he adds, explaining that he wants to move to the United States. He says he would’ve been here a week early but for a visa issue.

Later on we run into Guy again who’s chatting with another intern named Zenon Evans. He’s blond, sort of exotic looking and in red trousers. Maybe we were duped by the British intern, thinking all their interns are from around the world. “Where are you from?” we ask.  Clearly expecting him to say Sweden or Munich, he says, “Cleveland.”

Our faces fell as we dipped into complete and utter disappointment. Who comes to a Reason party to encounter an intern from Cleveland? (Only kidding, Zenon.) “I love writing,” he says. “I’m dedicated to the libertarian cause. I feel like I’m actually accomplishing something.”

Reason‘s newsroom is unique in that there is a glass-encased fishbowl of a room plopped in the center. It apparently has poor acoustics and who wants to be on display like a fish with everyone pointing? Nonetheless, it’s a unique place to chat and tonight it’s where the cuisine — a low-key mix of wraps, vegetable platters and such — is situated.

It’s here in the fishbowl where we bump into Matthew Feeney, a British (we think) accented assistant editor. He was born in Scotland, but his parents are from England and New Zealand so his accent is all fucked up. Asked what his pet peeve as an editor is, he replies, “Not for the record.” (Seriously. A softball question to end all softball questions and he can’t say on the record what his editorial pet peeve is? We make fun of him to his face about it, but eventually let it go.) Here’s what he will tell us. Spoiler alert: It has nothing to do with sex or violence. “I’ve been working here since May. I enjoy my colleagues and the freedom to write about what I want, when I want.” Don’t mess with this guy! He’ll kick your ass.

By far the weirdest thing in the newsroom is the male pants-less mannequin located by the bar in the main newsroom. It’s showing off the black Reason T-shirt. (See it after the jump…)

In the back of the office is a library complete with a gargoyle and skeleton head. The library is the place where journalists go to “think great thoughts,” Gillespie explains. It’s just outside the library that we meet Preston Cornish. What kind of a name is this? We have no idea, but he seems to be a solid American. He manages the business advisory council for Reason. Like Feeney, he loves his colleagues, but he doesn’t own any Reason apparel. “It’s a great group of people who are committed to advancing freedom,” he says. “We punch above our weight.”

Somehow we get into the topic of cussing in the newsroom. “First time I heard ‘bloody f–ing c-word’ at 10 a.m. I was like, ‘alright mate,’” said Cornish. (By the way, “c–t” in England isn’t nearly as bad as it is here.) He glances at Feeney, who is apparently a pretty foul-mouthed bloke.

Spotted in the crowd… Read more

Morning Reading List 06.12.13.

Whoa. Benjamin Hart hates Twitter cliches — Twitter has become full of overused and cliched phrases, and Benjamin Hart is sick of it. The HuffPost front page editor wrote a must-read for The Awl in which he unloads his hate toward the “dulling sameness of phraseology” running rampant on Twitter, with the phrase “not the Onion” seemingly sparking the rant. Hart says exaggeration and dull, overused catch phrases are the two types of cliches “currently poisoning our Twitter discourse.” He uses examples like starting a tweet with “whoa” or ‘must-read,” or using phrases like “well-played, sir,” “that thing where,” “I see what you did there” or the new trend of using the phrase “in which” to lead off a tweet. Nothing, Hart argues, is a “must read,” the Anchorman movie that spawned “stay classy” is old and “I see what you did there” has been around for far too long. What this flood of repetitive phrasing is inevitably about, Hart says, is comedy. And twitter has become a massive stage for improv, where “everyone has to prove their joke bona fides, even if there’s nothing particularly funny to say.”

Obama surprises reporters in off-the-record meeting — When a select group of reporters were invited to a private meeting with White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough on Monday, they knew that the meeting would be off the record. What they didn’t know, as BuzzFeed’s Evan McMorris-Santoro reports, was that President Obama would be making a surprise appearance. About two dozen reporters were invited to the meeting, including those from the NY Times, WaPo, HuffPost, Time, Politico, McClatchy, Tribune, NPR, Bloomberg, USA Today, AFP and Yahoo! News, among others, where the president unexpectedly entered to address them, off the record of course. NYT’s Peter Baker, who attended, said he and his editors would have reconsidered if they had known the President would be present. Baker said the NY Times is concerned about off-the-record sessions with the President because they want to make sure “that they not become substitutes for opportunities to ask questions and get answers on the record, which after all is our job.” Though not expected, Baker did say the meeting was valuable.

See our third pick…

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Morning Chatter

Quotes of the Day

The Hill’s Editor-at-Large on the mend

“Docs told I have switch to shuffleboard and quit trying to be another Roger Federer. Sending me home today with strict instructions to quit chasing cat downstairs and wife upstairs.” — The Hill‘s Editor-at-Large Al Eisele who has been in the ICU this week with a blood clot after taking a spill on the tennis court. Eisele is still in the hospital, but is out of the ICU. He’s receiving emails on his new iPad at alesiele@thehill.com.

Whoa! Manners on Cable News? 

“You and I don’t see the world with the same set of eyes.” — California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsome quietly and politely to Brian Brown, President of the National Organization for Marriage, during an appearance on CNN’s “The Lead” Tuesday. The topic: gay marriage. Newsome was for it; loudmouthed porky Brown was opposed.

On HuffPost coming out of closet

“Once we learned that @HuffPostGay is gay, we began to look at the issue in a different light,” — HuffPost Washington Bureau Chief Ryan Grim in reaction to our post on HuffPost‘s rainbow avatar that debuted Tuesday.

 

Politico Playbook Publish Time: 8:49 a.m.

Reporter detects brain farts in columnist’s views

“Wow. Shithead ‘legendary’ newspaperman proposes taxing email to subsidize Post Office.” — Reason‘s Nick Gillespie on the magazine’s Matt Welch‘s story on George Skelton, a California political writer who has worked for LAT since 1974. He has done stints in both Sacramento and Washington. Skelton said he’d allow about 100 private emails a month tax free. Beyond that, taxable.

An excerpt from Welch’s story:

“How about you leave me alone, George Skelton, by not taking my money in the name of keeping open money-losing post offices?

Read the whole column for such columnar brain-fartery as “I’d allow everyone a certain number of untaxed, private emails a month — 100, maybe 200. After that, each message would cost one cent, up to a certain size.” Hat tip to Michael C. Moynihan.”

Rather Unusual Question to Ponder: “Is it wrong to secretly record an ex’s rant so you can remember what he gets like when he goes zero to sixty out of nowhere? #covertactivity.” — MetroWeekly Founder and Editor-in-Chief Randy Shulman.

Morning Reading List 10.08.12.

1. Tucker, bow-ties, page views and the NYT — On Sunday NYT media writer Brian Stelter had a story that’s likely to creep under the skin of some in Washington media. It’s an extremely favorable yarn about The Daily Caller‘s success with a news peg on last week’s 2007 video of President Obama, which some dismissed as over-hyped. The piece states that traffic-wise the outlet has surpassed The Hill and is gaining on The Washington Times. They regard WaPo as among their chief competitors. Memorable line: Editor-in-Chief Tucker Carlson — “It took me 20 years to realize that wearing a bow tie is like wearing a middle finger around your neck.”

2. Rich Man Poor Man — WaPo, for all its digital irritations, has a great infographic out this morning detailing members of Congress and their wealth. With the click of a mouse, we can see a lawmaker’s net worth and how, for better and worse, they handle their finances. We’re hardly nerds but we could play with this for at least an hour. See here.

3. Our Ezzy turns heads –  Columbia Journalism Review has an absolutely glowing profile out on WaPo‘s Ezra Klein. Via the Politico Playbook, we learn that author Matt Welch writes that Ez is “handsome enough to make the ladies turn their heads, and affable enough that their boyfriends compete for his attentions, too.” The headline on the story by Matt Welch is perfection: “The Boy in the Bubble.” We particularly love that Welch unleashes a Boybander explosion in the second graph and quotes one of Klein’s best buds: “He is just a good explanatory reporter and writer,” says David Weigel of Slate. But this is peculiar: There is one small graph on Klein’s JournoList, which Welch says Ez still defends though he doesn’t offer any quotes from him on it. “If anything, his professional rise has only accelerated in the wake of this kerfuffle,” writes Welch, unable to contain his unstoppable admiration for his story subject.

Morning Reading List, 03.26.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Nancy Pelosi’s birthday!

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • This election cycle has changed how you view Bill Clinton — in a bad way.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Crain’s Chicago Business reports, “Tribune Co. named Chandler Bigelow as chief financial officer, effectively immediately, to succeed Don Grenesko, who retired Monday.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Barack Obama’s 37-minute March 18 address on race relations was the major event in a week in which he easily dominated the battle for media exposure, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 17-23.”

  • Just How Did John McCain Obtain What He Has in the Bank with the Press?” And “The Maverick and the Media

  • Modern Art Notes reports, “Washington Post, Pollack revisit an old stereotype”

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    TV

  • Behind in the Ratings, CBS News Hopes for Help From a Debate

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Jeremy Hubbard has been named co-anchor of ABC News’ early morning news programs ‘World News Now’ and ‘America This Morning,’ News President David Westin announced today. In addition to this role, Mr. Hubbard will contribute reports to all other ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms.”

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the number one evening newscast among Adults 25-54 for the week of March 17-21. The ABC News broadcast averaged a 2.2/9 and 2.65 million among Adults 25-54, outperforming NBC’s “Nightly News” by 80,000. Week-to-week, ‘World News” advantage over NBC increased 33% in the key demo. Additionally, this marks the thirteenth time this season the ABC broadcast has finished first among Adults 25-54.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 17, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.920 million total viewers, +456,000 more than ABC ‘World News” 8.464 million, and +2.302 million more than CBS ‘Evening News” 6.618 million. Season-to-date ‘Nightly’ leads ABC by +227K viewers. CBS ‘Evening News’ numbers are based on a three-day average for the week due to the NCAA tournament.”

  • WWD.com reports, “As shareholders prepare to gather for Time Warner Inc.’s annual meeting on May 16, 12 stockholding organizations have a proposal up for a vote that the post of chairman and chief executive officer be split. The proposal states that it is often in shareholders’ best interests to separate the positions, as conflicts of interest arise when one person holds both posts.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Economic slowdown hits Hollywood”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Rob Goodspeed asks, “Is PostPoints Worth It?” and discovered, “A quick look at the rewards dampened my enthusiasm. A $10 CVS gift card looked like a useful prize. However, at 3,385 points it would take me 677 days of Express reading or almost one year of reading both a print publication and the website to earn enough points to earn it.”

  • Reuters reports, “Virtual beer and vampires may no longer be enough to keep members of social networks like Facebook and News Corp’s MySpace riveted to their computers. Instead, the key to the future of these Web sites may lie in more practical functions, such as making plans, booking tickets or checking stock quotes.”

  • Dallas Business Journal reports, “American Airlines Inc. is hoping to win customers by becoming the first major airline to launch an application for users of the social networking Web site Facebook. American, owned by Fort Worth-based AMR Corp. (NYSE: AMR), said its application, called Travel Bag, lets Facebook users share travel experiences with friends, offer and read reviews on restaurants and shops, and create countdowns for upcoming events or trips.”

  • FastCompany.com reports, “On the verge of a revival last year, AOL suddenly imploded. The inside story of a journey to nowhere.”

  • The Independent reports, “Apax has cooled its interest in the £1.25bn auction for Reed Business Information (RBI), the publisher. Rivals United Business Media and Informa have already indicated that they are not interested in the auction.”

  • Jupiter Research reports, “Big Trend for 2008 Online Media: Re-Inventing the Network”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Tonight, join Reason for a happy hour at The Fab Lounge (1805 Connecticut Ave., NW 2nd floor), at 6.30PM. Reason’s Radley Balko, Nick Gillespie, Dan Hayes, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Michael C. Moynihan, Jesse Walker, David Weigel and Matt Welch will all be there to celebrate the publication of the magazine’s April issue, as well as the “advent of spring, with its attendant flowers and sunshiney days.”

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    RADIO

  • “DCRTV hears that recently-yanked MSNBC show host Tucker Carlson will be filling-in for David Burd on 3WT from 5:30 AM to 8 AM on Wednesday. He’ll be joining Jessica Doyle and Victoria Jones.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Producer, Web Franchise Programming.

  • Center For Independent Media is looking for a Deputy National Editorial Director.

  • Al Jazeera is looking for an Output Producer and a Planning Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Changes At Reason

    FishbowlDC has learned that Nick Gillespie is taking over Reason.tv and Matt Welch is the new editor of Reason magazine. Gillespie has spent seven years as editor-in-chief of Reason. Reason.tv debuted in October. Welch is a former Reason editor and currently serves as assistant editorial page editor at the Los Angeles Times. He is the author of “McCain: The Myth of a Maverick.”

    Morning Reading List, 11.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • National Journal reports, “Average time spent consuming news on a typical workday,” broken down by type of Washingtonian.

  • The Pew Talk Show Index for November 4-9 shows, Dennis Kucinich’s call to impeach Vice President Cheney made nary a blip with the general media last week but it was a big story on in the talk media, especially on the left side of the talk radio dial. Meanwhile the many angles of the 2008 campaign gave everyone grist to talk about.”

  • Deb Howell weighs in on Tim Page.

  • Media General D.C. Bureau Shuffle Cuts Staff, Expands Web

  • NYT on Shep Smith: “Fox Cable Guy Edges Into the Big Pay Leagues

  • When it comes to Newsweek’s hiring of Rove and DailyKos, CJR says they “couldn’t be more predictable.”

  • From DCRTV:

      Adrienne Mitchell will host a new show on DC-based XM Satellite Radio’s presidential election channel “POTUS ’08″ (XM-130) starting Monday, 11/19. The former WTOP anchor and editor will host “The Race” weekdays from 7 PM to 9 PM. The show will focus on the campaign news of the day, plus interviews with journalists and newsmakers…..

  • Inside Cable News & Brian Stelter: Together.

  • Jack Shafer on “Big Media Octopuses, Cutting Off Tentacles” and “Why Newspapers Love the Striking Screenwriters

  • Inside Cable News’ What’s Hot/What’s Not.

  • Local Oscar hopes for Sean and Andrea Nix Fine and Ted Leonsis.

  • Can you answer CQ’s political Trivia for November 16?

  • An RCN release announced, “RCN Corporation … will be a Corporate Partner of MLS Cup 2007, Major League Soccer’s Championship game between the New England Revolution and the Houston Dynamo, which will be held Sunday, November 18, at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.”

  • “SAIS International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellows Libby Casey, a reporter with KUAC-FM in Fairbanks, Alaska; Eliza Barclay, a freelance print reporter in Mexico City; and Krista Kapralos, a reporter with the The Herald in Everett, Washington, will discuss their overseas reporting experiences. Members of the public should RSVP to IRP at irp@jhu.edu or 202.663.7726.”

  • Check out FNC’s Carl Cameron new blog from the campaign trail.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press writes, “Nice Try, CBS, But Rather’s Lawsuit Has Merit”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. said Friday its ad sales from continuing operations dipped 0.7 percent in October on softness in its publishing division. Total revenue from continuing operations edged up 1 percent.”

  • Matt Welch writes, “The funniest thing about anti-media activists — whoops, I mean “public interest groups” — is that their sky-is-falling brief against big media consolidation always (and I mean always) disintegrates on contact with what I like to call “personal experience.” As in, theirs. And mine.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “The leading candidate is a woman, and trailing her are a mixed-race man and a white man. Thus, the contest must be all about gender and race, right? Well, no. But that’s how the media coverage of the Democratic presidential race often reads.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook, “The next time you stop by the White House press room, be sure to admire Julie Mason’s rocking ‘rocket-red’ ‘do. Ed Henry has a new 20-YEAR calendar. Playbook booked him for his birthday in 2009 – we were both open!”

  • Public Eye reports, “Game, set, match, asterisk. The contest/discussion about who or what will be Time’s ‘Person of the Year’ is over. It’s Steroids. Yesterday’s federal indictment of Barry Bonds only sealed the deal.”

  • Susan Katz Keating reports, “This just in… The New Republic is scrambling to fill ‘an immediate opening’ for an editor to run its fact-checking shop. What happened to the old fact-otum? Has the prior chief been banished in the wake of L’Affair Beauchamp? As you will recall, Scott Thomas Beauchamp, an Army private, created quite a stir with his wild stories of American soldiers misbehaving in Iraq. The stir became a scandal when it turned out the stories were fabricated. Now it looks as if TNR wants to make sure this type of thing doesn’t repeat itself.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes,Mimi Valdes Ryan has a tough job. On Nov. 5, she became the top editor of Latina, a magazine and Internet operation, which is run by Latina Media Ventures and caters to Hispanic women.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABCNews.com Changes, Again”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Why Does Fox News Favor Giuliani? Well, Lots Of Reasons”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim looks into “The art of the leak”

  • Murdoch’s free WSJ.com could hurt parts of Dow

  • E&P reports, “It’s not often you see The New York Times’ editorial board joining forces with outsiders to promote political discussions. But that is just what the newspaper’s opinion-makers are doing through the ’10 Questions’ project, an online effort aimed at getting presidential candidates to answer YouTube-style questions chosen by online users.”

  • Guardian reports, “Gannett, the US newspaper chain, is to cut 45 jobs in the newsroom at its flagship title, USA Today. The paper will start with voluntary redundancies and then, if that doesn’t provide the full quota, it will demand mandatory redundancies.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Google Inc. made a big splash last week with its new software for cellphones. But that’s far from the limit of the Internet giant’s wireless ambitions — which could include running its own mobile network.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A key U.S. lawmaker urged Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin to delay his plans for a Dec. 18 vote on a media-ownership rule change that would benefit Tribune Co. and News Corp.”

  • FT.com reports,Rupert Murdoch’s six children are getting an early Christmas present after the family trust Mr Murdoch controls sold more than $360m worth of News Corp shares. The cash pay-out follows a $600m bonanza received by the siblings in February — at the time the biggest distribution of Mr Murdoch’s fortune.”

  • B&C reports, “Former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) will be the first presidential candidate to picket personally with Hollywood’s striking writers”

  • Lisa de Moraes writes, “David Letterman’s overall audience with reruns was on par with the previous week with original episodes — 4 million viewers. And he gained eyeballs in TV’s key demographic groups, including the Holy Grail — the 18-to-49-year-olds.”

  • CNBC reports, “A video made by the Writers Guild is circulating the web. As of now, it’s been seen 111,000 times on Youtube. It dramatically argues that the studios are cashing in on digital distribution and the writers aren’t getting a penny.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Nielsen numbers for online traffic at newspapers, which came out yesterday, show a significant jump in unique visitors to the NYTimes.com for October.”

  • New York Post reports, “The lucrative business of selling Web ads has become so fragmented — and easy to do — that even Martha Stewart has thrown her hat in the ring by setting up an online advertising network.”

  • Reuters reports, “Leading European publishers are coming to terms with what teenage boys and men have known for years — the Web beats magazines in grabbing their eyeballs.”

  • Business Week reports, “IAG delivers precise data on which TV ads are resonating. Now it’s headed online”

  • Folio reports, “Time Warner’s third quarter numbers were released recently, and while overall revenues rose nine percent over same period 2006—despite revenue declines from AOL—Time Inc.’s revenues were flat.”

  • Bed Bugs Found in Fox News Channel Newsroom

  • Poynter Online Steve Outing reports, “This week I gave a presentation to one of Sandra Fish’s journalism classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. (It was an overview of social media and citizen journalism initiatives). I hadn’t been in front of a bunch of college students in a while, so I took the opportunity for a quick news-consumption quiz. I did a pretty good job of guessing in my head beforehand what the responses would be, but my prediction proved a little off when it came to print editions of newspapers.” Check out the results here.

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “The New York Times Op-Ed page hasn’t been this hot in a long time. Now we are experiencing Columnist Wars, with Bob Herbert this week joining in a rapidly escalating battle between Paul Krugman and David Brooks – largely over an incident involving Ronald Reagan at a local fair over 27 years ago.”

  • Mother Jones reports, “With all the articles that have been written about the TV writers’ strike (how crappy the signs are, Eva Longoria’s strike breaking, neonatal guild members birthed onto the picket line, career-change opportunities for Hollywood hacks, and Dowd’s space filling), no attention has so far been paid to the real victims here.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s announcement this week that he expects to stop charging for access to the Wall Street Journal’s Web site is the latest example of a publisher giving up on the subscription-based business model — a significant shift in the evolution of online content.”

  • Fool.com reports, “Murdoch announced at a meeting of News Corp. shareholders Tuesday: ‘We … expect to make [WSJ.com] free, and instead of having 1 million [subscribers], having at least 10 [million to] 15 million in every corner of the earth.’”

  • Washington Post reports, “The District will have to renegotiate a proposed deal to bring broadcasting company Radio One to the city after D.C. Council members rejected a plan to give the developers city-owned land worth $6 million on which to build the project.”

  • B&C reports, “Veteran Fox News Channel critic Robert Greenwald (Outfoxed) opened a second front in his campaign against the top-rated cable news channel, this time aiming to get advertisers to drop their sponsorships.”

  • Wall Street Journal’s John Fund writes, “Lou Dobbs for President? Don’t laugh. After months of telling reporters that he “absolutely” would not consider leaving his highly-rated CNN show in which he crusades against free trade and illegal immigration, Mr. Dobbs posted a commentary on his Web site last week predicting a surprise new presidential candidate in 2008.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., its chief executive and Chairman Sumner Redstone, said a lawsuit filed by former news anchor Dan Rather is an attempt to ‘settle old scores’ and should be dismissed because of its ‘far-fetched allegations.’”

  • AFP reports, “The emergence of ‘smartphones’ has put the Internet, music and videos in the palm of the consumer’s hand, but the technology will need a flow of advertising cash to reach its full potential.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., owner of the most-watched television network, probably would take the biggest hit in a prolonged strike by TV and movie writers.”

    Jobs

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an International Book Licensing Representative.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Special Sections Editor.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking a Training Editor — Persian.

  • Army Times Publishing Company is looking for a Reporter to cover Federal Government.

  • Maryland Beachcomber/Worcester County Times/Ocean Pines
    Independent is looking for a Paginator.

  • Worcester County Times is looking for a staff reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Director, NPR Digital Media.

  • Howard University is looking for a Director of Communications and a Publications Manager.

  • The Hill is looking for a Political Editor.

  • Edleman is looking for a New Media Account Supervisor.

  • BusinessWeek Magazine is looking for a Correspondent for business, money, policy and politics and a legal Correspondent.

  • Center for Independent Media is offering an Online News Fellowship

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext