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Posts Tagged ‘Matthew Felling’

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI), Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), BP Capital Management founder/chair T. Boone Pickens and a roundtable with New York Times’ Tom Friedman, BBC’s Katty Kay, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell and PBS’ Tavis Smiley.

  • Face the Nation: Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA), Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), Newt Gingrich and Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA).

  • This Week: California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) and a roundtable with New York Times’ Paul Krugman, Sam Donaldson, Cokie Roberts and George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Sen. Jon Kyl, (R-AZ), Sen. Byron Dorgan, (D-ND), Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R-MN), Fmr. Lt. Gov. Michael Steele, Candidate for RNC Chairman/ (R) Fmr. Lt. Gov. of Maryland, and a roundtable with Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard & Fox News, Mara Liasson, National Public Radio & Fox News, Charles Krauthammer, Syndicated Columnist & Fox News and Juan Williams, National Public Radio & Fox News.

  • Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer: Rep. Charles Rangel, (D) New York, Ted Turner, Author, “Call Me Ted”, Leslie Sanchez, Republican strategist; CNN political contributor, James Carville, Democratic Strategist; CNN Political Contributor, and CNN’s Ed Henry and Suzanne Malveaux.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Newsweek’s Howard Fineman, CNBC’s Erin Burnett, Time’s Michael Duffy and NPR’s Michele Norris.
  • Reliable Sources: Baltimore Sun’s David Zurawik, Washington Examiner’s Julie Mason, AP’s Beth Fouhy, KTVA Anchorage News’ Matthew Felling, Washington Times’ Tara Wall, CNN’s Lola Ogunnaike, St. Petersburg Times’ Eric Deggans, Washington Post’s Steve Pearlstein and New York Times’ Joe Nocera.

  • GPS: Former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns, author Stephen Cohen, counterterrorism expert David Kilcullen, author Barnett Rubin and author Shirin Ebadi.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Rep. John Larson (D-CT) will be interviewed by Hartford Courant’s Jesse Hamilton and Politico’s Martin Kady.

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Republican governors Charlie Crist of Florida and Mark Sanford of South Carolina.
  • Mediabistro Course

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    Morning Reading List, 11.04.08

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    Good morning Washington. Enjoy the day, win or lose. You deserve it.

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

    Read more

    Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet The Press: Sen. Joe Biden and New York Times’ Tom Friedman.

  • Face The Nation: Sen. John McCain.

  • This Week: Sen. Barack Obama and a roundtable with The New York Times’ David Brooks, The Washington Post’s Jonathan Capehart, and ABC News’ Martha Raddatz and George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Obama strategist David Axelrod and McCain campaign manager Rick Davis.

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: John McCain’s campaign manager, Rick Davis. Also, Margaret Carlson and Kate O’Beirne and Bloomberg’s Hans Nichols.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Joe Klein of Time magazine; Andrea Mitchell of NBC News; John Heilemann of New York magazine; and Michele Norris of National Public Radio.

  • Reliable Sources: Sally Quinn, Washington Post, Emily Rooney, host, “Beat the Press” on WGBH, Roger Simon, Politico.com, Amanda Carpenter, Townhall.com, Joan Walsh, Salon.com, Ed Henry, CNN White House Correspondent, Lola Ogunnaike, CNN American Morning Entertainment Correspondent and Matthew Felling, media commentator.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Austan Goolsbee, Barack Obama for President, Economic Adviser will be interviewed by Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press, Chief Economics Writer & Michael Crittenden, Dow Jones Newswires, Banking & Finance Reporter.

  • Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer: Sen. Jon Kyl (R) Arizona, Gov. Tim Kaine (D) Virginia, Sen. Barbara Boxer (D) California, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R) Texas, Robert Gibbs, Obama Campaign Adviser, Nancy Pfotenhauer, McCain Economic Adviser, Alex Castellanos, Republican Strategist, James Carville, Democratic Strategist, Ed Henry, CNN White House Correspondent, Tara Wall, Republican Strategist, Washington Times, Donna Brazile, Democratic Strategist, Suzanna Malveaux, CNN White House Correspondent and William Schneider, CNN Senior Political Analyst.

  • Fareed Zakaria GPS: Rory Stewart, Author, The Places in Between, Yoshihisa Komori, Editor-at-Large, Sankei Shimbun, Josef Joffe, Editor, Die Zeit, Charles Onyango-Obbo, Columnist, The Nation and Nic Robertson, CNN Senior Int’l Correspondent.

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Karen Finney, DNC Communications Director, Rich Galen, Republican Strategist, David Drucker, Roll Call and Emily Heil, Roll Call.

  • Felling Goes Into The Wild

    It’s farewell to Washington’s most quoted unemployed person: Matthew Felling. The former CBS “Public Eye” writer has become an oft-quoted media analyst (Howie Kurtz is a big fan) ever since “Public Eye” went dark and let go of some of its writers. Felling is packing up his bags and heading to Alaska, Rachel Sklar reports, where he’ll be the anchoring the 6 p.m. local newscast on local CBS affiliate KTVA in Anchorage, Alaska.

    Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Sens. John Kerry (D-MA) and Joe Lieberman (I-CT), and a roundtable with NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, NBC’s Chuck Todd and PBS’ Judy Woodruff.

  • Face the Nation: McCain Victory Chair Carly Fiorina and former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin.

  • This Week: Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former PA Gov. Tom Ridge (R), and a roundtable with George Will, Donna Brazile, Jake Tapper and former White House adviser David Gergen.

  • Fox News Sunday: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and former Sen. Tom Daschle (D-SD). The “Power Player” is Ashley Judd.

  • Late Edition: Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy Jim Glassman, Obama economic adviser Laura Tyson, McCain economic adviser Nancy Pfotenhauer, Major General Mark Hertling, and a roundtable with CNN’s Bill Schneider, Joe Johns and Gloria Borger.

  • Chris Matthews Show: Time’s Joe Klein, Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson, New York Times’ Elisabeth Bumiller and CNN’s Gloria Borger.

  • GPS: Author Ayaan Hirsi Ali, author Jessica Stern, Wall Street Journal’s Bret Stephens, former Mexican Foreign Minister Jorge Castañeda and former U.S. Ambassador to the UN Richard Holbrooke.

  • The Post Politics Program with Ed O’Keefe and Emily Freifeld on POTUS ’08: Highlights of The Post’s Libby Copeland‘s interview with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and The Post’s David Broder.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Minority Whip Rep. Roy Blunt (R-MO) will be interviewed by Mary Ann Akers, Washington Post, Correspondent & Sean Lengell, Washington Times, Congressional Correspondent

  • This Is America with Dennis Wholey: Sen. Arlen Specter (R-PA)

  • Reliable Sources: A.B. Stoddard, associate editor, The Hill, Roger Simon, chief political columnist, The Politico, Matthew Felling, media commentator, Deroy Murdock, syndicated columnist, Scripps Howard News Service, Ana Marie Cox, Washington editor, TIME.com, Melinda Liu, Beijing bureau chief, Newsweek, Jill Dougherty, U.S. affairs editor, CNN International

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Senator Jack Reed (D-RI).

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Abe Amoros, Political and Communications Director, Pennsylvania Democratic Party; Renee Amoore, Republican Strategist and President, the Amoore Group; and David Drucker and Emily Heil of Roll Call.

  • Morning Reading List, 04.16.08

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    Good morning Washington. Doug Heye celebrates a birthday today. Yesterday, the new Yahoo! election page went live in conjunction with Politico. And the first lady will soon co-host the “Today” show.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • A third of you recycle, but you are not that into avoiding plastic water bottles.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “How many times will upper management come up with quick money-maker schemes, spend money to put them in place and then refuse to give them the monetary and staff support they need to really be successful? And why does same upper management seem so mystified when said schemes completely tank? It’s all about making a quick buck, to hell with the product. I feel like I work at Wal-Mart.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washingtonian’s Ben Clark has joined Fleishman-Hillard’s DC digital team.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Poynter’s Ethics and Diversity Fellow Tom Huang writes, “Let me be a realist, if not a pessimist: The diversity numbers released by the American Society of Newspaper Editors on Sunday worry me. A lot. At first glance, the overall numbers don’t seem too gloomy: In the past year, the percent of minorities working at daily newspapers grew a smidgeon — from 13.43 percent to 13.52 percent. But it’s the absolute number we should be worried about. The only reason why the percentage of minorities in newsrooms has essentially remained flat is because both white and minority journalists left our newsrooms at about the same rate”

  • “Republican John McCain was a significant or dominant factor in only 35% of the campaign stories last week. But though he trailed both Hillary Clinton (56%) and Barack Obama (46%) in exposure, he was the winner when it came to the media narrative for the week of April 7-13, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “The Washington Post Metro section has been hot on the trail lately, pursuing the story of full-length phone books getting decommissioned. From the sound of their breathless coverage, you would think there was only one left in the DC area — and that one was removed.”

  • On The Media reports, “Gene Weingarten, writer for the Washington Post Magazine, got an idea: he would lock himself in a room for 24 hours straight with 5 TV’s, 2 radios and a laptop all tuned to loud, opinionated pundits. After basically losing his mind, he tells us what he learned.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The number of newspaper journalists in the US fell last year by almost 5 per cent to a low of 52,600, the lowest it has been for almost 25 years and the biggest drop in 30 years. The new figures, released by the American Society of Newspaper Editors, reflects the attrition going on in the America media.”

  • The AP reports, “About half of the 1,326 employees at Media General Inc.’s Florida properties — including The Tampa Tribune and WFLA-TV — were offered buyout packages Monday as the struggling company tries to cut costs and consolidate platforms.”

  • Check out the winners of the “Best headlines of the year”

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    TV

  • Dan Rather On Les Moonves, The ‘Evening News,’ And Who Should Replace Katie When (Not If) She Goes

  • MSNBC won’t air ‘controversial’ gun ad

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was honored with a 2007 Sigma Delta Chi Award for excellence in journalism in the category of ‘Breaking News Coverage (Network/Top 25 Markets)’ for ‘The Massacre at Virginia Tech.’ The NBC News program was the only network evening news broadcast to win the prestigious award. This is the third consecutive year ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ has won for breaking news coverage.” Check out all of the winners here.

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of April 7-13. The ABC News broadcast averaged 8.03 million Total Viewers, and a 2.0/8 among Adults 25-54, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 110,000 Total Viewers and 160,000 key demo viewers. This marks the 15th time this season ‘World News’ has ranked first among Adults 25-54 and the 9th time this season the broadcast has ranked first among total viewers.”

  • Newsweek reports, “Craig Ferguson can’t beat Dave’s or Jay’s ratings, but he’s got something bigger: a date with the president.”

  • Check out “Bill Moyers Acceptance Speech for the Ridenhour Courage Prize” where he says journalists’ “deeper mission is to uncover the news that powerful people would prefer to keep hidden.”

  • The New York Times reports, “While the fate of Ms. Couric and the ‘CBS Evening News’ is in the headlines, the entire CBS News division represents only a fraction of the CBS broadcast network’s revenue. More perplexing is the prime-time schedule, where no new hit has emerged this year, and as a result, CBS is likely to lose the crown of most-watched network to the Fox network.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • In conjunction with Pope Benedict’s visit to the U.S., washingtonpost.com and Newsweek’s interactive feature on religion “On Faith” is hosting a live webcast. Anchored by On Faith founder and Washington D.C. insider Sally Quinn and Washington Post journalist Eugene Robinson, the video will stream live the mornings of April 16 and April 17 here. The first show begins at around 10 a.m. today.

  • Tech Crunch reports, “AOL will announce the acquisition of San Francisco-based Sphere, a blog content engine that launched in 2006. The price is not being disclosed, but sources are suggesting it’s in the $25 million range, or possibly a little more.”

  • The Los Angeles Times has a, “Interview with Ken Layne, new owner of Wonkette”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “That’s the idea behind a new hyperlink technology rolling out on parts of WashingtonPost.com Tuesday morning. Two of the paper’s blogs, The Fix and Celebritology, will introduce links powered by a tech start-up called Apture. By rolling the cursor over a link, readers can see what’s at the destination — be it an article, photo or video — without clicking through.”
  • Portfolio reports, “No wonder Rupert Murdoch’s in no hurry to do away with The Wall Street Journal’s online pay wall. Even with it still in place around large sections of the site, traffic is still growing at a most impressive rate. According to internal numbers, WSJ.com hosted 15 million unique visitors in March, a 175 percent increase over March 2007, says Alan Murray, executive editor of the Wall Street Journal Online. Page views came in at around 165 million, up 75 percent year-over-year”

  • The Washington Blogger April Meeting is tonight at 7:00PM at Regional Food and Drink. For more info, click here.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Post reports, “Magazines that cover news, business and luxury goods were sent reeling in the first quarter of the year, while food magazines offered a few rays of light for the publishing industry, according to just released figures.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will be hosting NPR’s “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today.

  • A release announced, “The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) congratulates the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) for receiving a MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions. Established by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions recognizes and invests in small, emerging nonprofit organizations around the world that demonstrate exceptional creativity and effectiveness.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • The AP reports, “Rupert Murdoch and Sam Zell, two media figures who led major newspaper acquisitions in recent months, are among four new members joining the board of directors of The Associated Press, it was announced Monday at the news cooperative’s annual meeting.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Shares of media company News Corp., controlled by Rupert Murdoch, fell the most in five years after Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. and UBS analysts cut their outlook for the stock, citing concerns that growth will slow.”

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press announced Monday it will further cut fees paid by struggling newspaper members and will develop an advertising-supported service that will deliver stories and photos to advanced cell phones, including the iPhone.”

  • MediaChannel.org reports, “Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications today announced 22 finalists in five categories in the second annual Mirror Awards competition honoring excellence in media industry reporting. The competition drew more than 100 entries. The media’s top writers, readers and leaders will gather June 23 at 11:45 a.m. at the Rainbow Room, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City, to fete the winners.” For the list of winners, click here.

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    JOBS

  • Forbes Interactive Media is looking for a Regional Sales Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for a Marketing Manager.

  • Society of American Florists is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • “An international news wire service is looking for an entertainment anchor and general reporter with a journalism education and background to anchor a daily entertainment webcast for their website.”

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.07.08

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    Good morning Washington. Playbook tells us that Bloomberg’s Billy McQuillen, “who provides ‘adult’ supervision to Catholic University’s newspaper, is a birthday boy today.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | EVENTS | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Monica Lewinsky will vote for Obama in ’08.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “Went to yet another ‘retirement’ party for a couple of newspaper writer friends of mine taking the buy out and getting the hell out of Dodge. All while the losers ‘running’ the paper (In to the ground..) are staying.”

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include How to Write About Anything, Interviewing Techniques and Fact-Checking.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • DCRTV reports,Richard Willing has joined the Office Of The Director of National Intelligence as its director of public affairs. Willing covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to announce that David E. Kaplan has been named the new Director of its International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).”

  • News-Press.com reports,Kate Marymont, vice president and executive editor/Information Center at The News-Press and news-press.com, was named today as vice president/Information Center Content for McLean, Va.-based Gannett Inc., the paper’s owner.”

  • Business Wire reports,Jennifer Carroll, vice president of New Media Content and an architect of the company’s Information Center initiative, will become vice president of Digital Content for Gannett Digital.”

  • The Washington Post announced, “The Maryland desk is delighted to announce that we’ve hired Aaron Davis, an enterprise reporter for the Associated Press in Sacramento, Calif., to cover law enforcement in Prince George’s County. He succeeds Candace Rondeaux, who went to Foreign to cover Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of Society for Science & the Public, has named Tosh Arimura circulation manager.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Throughout the campaign, the media have treated Paul as a footnote. Snickering pundits all but dismissed him as a cranky kook, in the tradition of another Lone Star State insurgent, Ross Perot. Even when the mainstream publications covered him, you could imagine the assignment editors rolling their eyes in amusement, like parents patronizing a child. Yet anyone who looked hard enough knew that there was more to Paul than an inability to amass delegates. Most of the media, turned off by his shrill libertarian leanings, missed the real news value of Paul’s story — namely, the Texas congressman’s ability to connect intensely with voters.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows,Hillary Clinton’s retraction of her claim that she came under sniper fire while visiting Bosnia in 1996 was one of the main campaign storylines last week. But the controversy over her statements did not resonate as widely as the furor over statements made by Barack Obama’s pastor earlier in March. Four-in-ten Americans heard a lot about Clinton’s claim that she came under sniper fire, compared with 51% who had heard a lot about Rev. Wright’s sermons the week before.”
  • “Results from the Dow Jones Insight — 2008 Presidential Election Media Pulse show that Barack Obama’s pivotal race speech on March 18 may have helped mitigate that week’s controversy surrounding the remarks of Reverend Jeremiah Wright, shifting attention back to the issues of the economy and the upcoming Pennsylvania primary.”

  • CJR reports, “Business news is booming these days. Business-news sections not so much. They are disappearing and have been doing so regularly for months. The trend seems set to continue.”

  • Washington Blade editor’s Kevin Naff asks, “Why did editor Len Downie go to such lengths to hide the simple fact that a soldier was gay?”

  • Huffington Post has a “Eulogy for Dead Trees”

  • “As Katharine Weymouth, granddaughter of the legendary Katharine Graham, takes over as publisher of the Washington Post,” The Washingtonian has some “suggestions for her agenda, based on interviews with subscribers and Post staffers.”

  • Romenesko reports, “WSJ changes news desk structure”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Veteran newsman Roger Mudd” reports the “five best” “essential works about journalism.”

  • Joel Achenbach writes, “Let’s have a blog item today that’s not about me and my personal obsessions and neuroses. Instead, let’s talk about the general plight of all those middle-aged newspaper reporters out there who, at the age of 47, are just barely too young to get the buyout offer. Clearly it is time for these people to think about the next big career move.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “I’ve said many times that Barack Obama has gotten easy treatment from the news media, although that has changed a bit in recent weeks, particularly since the Rev. Jeremiah Wright became a household name, at least in households that watch plenty of cable. In fact, there’s a bit of a narrative about Obama as an elitist starting to take hold in the media, and that could prove troublesome for him.”

  • New York Time’s Public Editor writes, “Change Can Be Painful, but This One Shouldn’t Hurt”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Most regular local readers of The Post read it on newsprint. And when they want something in the paper and it’s not there, they usually don’t like me telling them to find it on washingtonpost.com.”

  • Washington City Paper’s Mike DeBonis asks, “Has Adrian Fenty reneged on his campaign tax pledge?”

  • Check out The Best of Cox 2008 winners.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 30, 2008 in all categories.”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for First quarter 2008, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Major television networks are privately saying that if they have to worry about a fine every time someone utters a profanity on air, they may have to stop real-time broadcasting of live events such as the Academy Awards and Grammys. At the same time, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and parents groups are saying that if the Supreme Court removes the threat, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox will seize the opportunity to make the airwaves more coarse and profane.”

  • 23/6 has the “Inappropriate Hottie Rundown: Racially Diverse Pundit Edition”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Forty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Tom Brokaw is making sure his legacy isn’t forgotten. In King, a two-hour television documentary premiering on the History Channel April 6, the award-winning newsman talks to everyone from Bill Clinton to Forest Whitaker to Dr. King’s son Martin Luther King III about the legendary civil rights figure.”

  • TVNewser reported on Friday, “Megan Henderson, morning anchor at Fox O&O KDFW, will be co-hosting Fox & Friends this weekend.”

  • The AP reports, “Early Mike Wallace interviews now online”

  • “TVNewser received several tips wondering what happened during the 6:30 feed of Friday’s NBC Nightly News. Brian Williams was anchoring from Memphis to mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Williams began the broadcast with a live interview with Sen. John McCain. What they didn’t expect was a crowd behind them with speeches blaring through loudspeakers.”

  • A tipster tells us from Friday, “Bill Press speaking to an irate caller on today’s ‘Washington Journal’: ‘Chris Matthews is in the tank for Barack Obama, but don’t blame it on me.’

  • “CNN Crosses Paths With Clinton, Grabs Impromptu Interview,” TVNewser reports.

  • From a TVNewser tipster: ‘I understand that there is a move afoot to develop a legal television network in place of CourtTV.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart featured a glance at Sen. Barack Obama’s recent media tour. Some got snubbed, some got cozy and some were ‘thrilled’ to spend an hour with the candidate…until hearts were broken.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com continues to achieve record-breaking traffic in March 2008. In March, ABCNEWS.com scored another high traffic month, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 69% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 207.4 million page views, up 44% from the previous year and marked four consecutive months of record page view growth. In March, the site increased video views by 123% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • This Wednesday is the Blogger’s Happy Hour Bash at Velocity Five Restaurant. For more info, click here.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “Is the Huffington Post really a $200 million company? Monday’s New York Times story about the fast-growing group blog/news aggregator left a lot of people wondering about that eye-catching number, reportedly the price the company uses in its internal discussions about the possibility of a sale. The consensus, among those who know about some matters: No, the Huffington Post is not remotely worth $200 million.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Google Inc. confirmed Thursday it bid in the recent government spectrum auction in an effort to wring higher competing bids out of Verizon Wireless and open up a large chunk of the airwaves to outside Internet devices.”

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp’s Fox Interactive Media Internet division could fall short of its fiscal 2008 revenue target of $1 billion, as it reorganizes its divisions to better exploit the online advertising market.”

  • ABC.com asks, “Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?”

  • The Swamp reports, “It’s an introspective week for The Swamp. First we rolled out a new look and invited critiques. Now, some university researchers are asking whether we — and newspaper political blogs across the Web — should exist at all.”

  • Guardian’s greenslade reports, “I have argued for some time that the internet will free us from media mogul domination. Oddly, Rupert Murdoch has said much the same thing, a clue that I was being more than a shade optimistic. Now comes evidence that the democratising force of the net is anything but a given.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “The non-profit Freedom Forum’s most recent tax return shows that it paid Founder Al Neuharth $225,000 in 2006, plus gave him a $200,545 expense account — the biggest such account of any officer, director or trustee. Neuharth, 84, who recently groused about his diminished mental capacity, worked 40 hours a week for Freedom Forum, the return shows.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The weekly newsmagazines have been declared dinosaurs as far back as the late 1980s. But now that 111 employees at Washington Post Co.’s Newsweek have taken buyouts, including many longtime editors, it’s clear that their cultures are finally being blown up and reinvented. And some say that’s not such a bad thing.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will host “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today. The show can be heard on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm.

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a letter to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) notes that, although the Department of Justice has unconditionally approved the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, ‘serious concerns remain as to how this merger will impact consumers if it is permiited to go forward.’”

  • FBLA Exclusive: Interview with Randi Rhodes’ Ex-Writer Barry Crimmins

  • NPR announced, “A special edition of NPR’s news-talk program Talk of the Nation will broadcast live from the Newseum on Tuesday, April 8, 2:00-4:00PM (ET). This broadcast — the first live national program from the new Washington, D.C.-based interactive museum of news – is part of the Newseum’s press preview day, in advance of its public opening on Friday, April 11, and will have a studio audience.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Just as the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal became the ultimate water-cooler conversation topic — if only for a few days — Sirius Satellite Radio launched Client 9 Radio, a 24/7 all-Spitzer channel, but just for a few days.”

  • New York Times reports, “In what would be the latest twist in the increasingly contentious battle over the $20 billion buyout of Clear Channel Communications, hedge fund clients of the banks balking at financing the deal are reportedly threatening to pull their business if the banks don’t move ahead with the deal for the radio broadcaster.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • E&P reports, ” In a harsh press release, The White House slammed The New York Times for a Thursday column that criticized President Bush’s reaction to the economic crisis.”

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    EVENTS

  • Julie Ocean played at the Rock n Roll Hotel saturday night. Teh band’s CD comes out May 13. Check out their website here.

  • A release announced, “Andrea Rodgers, President and CEO of The Courage Cup, an IRS designated 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation established to help at-risk urban youth, is pleased to announce that Legal Times is inviting Washington law firms to attend Meadow Matches and participate in a Charity Segway Polo Challenge. This exciting day of polo matches will bring Washington’s legal community together for a day of charity in the picturesque Virginia Piedmont.”

  • PDN Pulse offers, “A Sneak Peek At The Newseum”

  • USAToday reports, “Massive Newseum opens window on journalism”

  • Kurtz reports, “At Sparkly Newseum, The Glory Of the Story Goes Above the Fold”

  • Lorraine Ahearn writes, “Determined to make the news ‘fun’ and ‘fresh,’ the Newseum has something for everyone. A 100-foot-wide screen lets visitors experience for themselves what it’s like to be interviewed by, say, Charlie Rose — with the help of 3-D glasses and complimentary Breathe-Right strips.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Unlike that bombastic structure, the journalism museum makes no attempt to bow and scrape to classical traditions. It is sheathed in glass, not masonry, to reveal some of its activity inside and counter the sealed-up monumentality so prevalent in Washington.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Washington City Paper writes, “For decades, D.C. has been hurting for a classic novel all its own. Some suggestions on how to make it.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Latin America Deputy Regional Editor and a Global Media Services (GMS) Unit Manager.

  • YMCA of Metropolitan Washington is looking for a Communications Specialist.

  • Greenpeace Inc. is looking for a Media Relations Director and a Graphic Designer.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist ,Group Retention & Billing.

  • Forbes.com is looking for an Unpaid Intern.

  • Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. Perez Hilton is a WHCA guest! And Donatella Versace, too! And it’s the birthday of Politico’s Jonathan Martin and Mike Allen’s Mom. Speaking of Jonathan Martin’s b-day, Mike Allen has this to say: “Without J-Mart, Politico readers would know a lot less and the campaign trail would have a lot fewer exclamations of ‘SOLID!’ and ‘SO GOOD!’ (Martin’s the last person we know who carries a checkbook in his back pocket.) No truth to the rumor that TAGG ROMNEY will jump out of the cake. But KEVIN MADDEN has a touching tribute: ‘Happy Birthday to Jonathan Martin — a guy who has Patrick O’Connor’s style, John Bresnahan’s charm, a face for radio and a brain that should be left for science.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you cannot run three miles non-stop.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “With the exception of the Wall Street Journal, most of today’s print mass media is biased crap, agenda-based sensationalism, mere entertainment. I do believe there is a market for solid journalism (objective and fact-based), but readers like myself have to look pretty hard to find it.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Leon Walczak, 61, a retired Washington bureau chief for Business Week and a writer and editor who specialized in national politics, died March 28 of pancreatic cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda.”

  • Also from The Washington Post, “Betty Miles James, 84, one of the first female reporters at the Washington Star, died March 18 of congestive heart failure at Ingleside at Rock Creek, a Northwest retirement community.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Martha Wright, director of design for the Washington Post’s Style section, recently quit to move to Chicago.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • “Democrats dominated election coverage by about a six-to-one margin over Republicans in a week when making headlines was not necessarily a good thing, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 24-30.”

  • Vanity Fair’s Michael Wolffe reports, “The Sulzberger family would never let go of The New York Times. Or would it? With the latest shareholder assault on the ‘invulnerable’ paper’s management — this one from a couple of upstart hedge funds—the author plays out the most likely (and unlikely) scenarios.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Mystical Pennsylvania Foodstuffs Confuse NYT Reporter”

  • Mad.co.uk reports, “The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp since December, is set to sell its US print edition in London, the first time the newspaper has been printed in Europe.” Romenesko has more.

  • Eric Boehlert says “Fact: The press tuned out Iraq.”

  • Joe O’Connell, a Special Contributor to The Dallas Morning News
    reports, “What happens if the newspaper presses stop rolling? That’s the big question behind the documentary Stop the Presses: The American Newspaper in Peril, which has its world premiere today at the AFI Dallas International Film Festival.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes about the New York Times, “The paper’s design director defends its expanded summary pages.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A U.S. Senate committee plans to vote April 24 on a measure to reverse federal rules that let companies such as Tribune Co. own a broadcast station and daily newspaper in the 20 largest markets.”

  • E&P’s Steve Outing writes, “I stopped getting the print edition of my local newspaper this month. Among my new-media expert colleagues, I’m behind the curve with that move; many gave up the print habit long ago. But compared to the general population, I’m still ahead of most folks. I admit, I feel a bit guilty about this. After all, I write for and offer advice to newspapers on an industry website.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “MSNBC ends March 2008 tied for #2 in primetime in the advertiser-friendly 25-54 demographic, the best monthly finish for MSNBC compared to CNN since May 2001. In primetime, there is a true three-way race in cable news, with only 66,000 viewers A25-54 separating first and second place. MSNBC also delivered its best-ever quarterly weekday primetime ratings in 1Q08 in total viewers, and best in the 25-54 demographic since 4Q01.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of March 24-28, ‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54 and tied for first place among Total Viewers. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/8 and 2.55 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 90,000. Among Total Viewers, ABC and NBC both averaged 8.41 million.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The historic and long-running presidential campaigns of Senator Barack Obama and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton have injected issues of race and gender into politics as never before. With campaign coverage center stage on the cable channels, producers and critics are again assessing the diversity among pundits, who talk (and talk) about things like Mr. Obama’s pastor, the Hispanic vote, Iraq and the economy.”

  • Politico looks at the upcoming Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association dinner.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC was the fourth ranked cable network during the first quarter of 2008 (during prime time), despite not hosting a debate during the time period. CNN, who hosted four highly rated debates, finished #14 while MSNBC came in at #27.” And, “Fox News had the top five program in Total Viewers, and 15 out of the top 20, during the first quarter of 2008. The top CNN program was CNN Election Center at #6, while the top MSNBC program was Countdown with Keith Olbermann at #20. The O’Reilly Factor was the top program during the time period.”

  • “While CNBC continues to grow in Total Viewers, the A25-54 demo numbers continue to slide. For Q1 2008, CNBC was down in many “business day” hours (5amET-7pmET) year-to-year,” reports TVNewser.

  • “Headline News had one of its best quarters in five years in Total Viewers (today day). Also, Glenn Beck Tonight at 7pmET posted its best quarter ever in Total Viewers, while Nancy Grace’s 8pmET hour scored its best quarter ever in the A25-54 demo,” TVNewser also reports.

  • CBSNews.com reports, “CBS, reeling from disappointing earning in the last quarter has done some layoffs, at the corporate level, and separate from that, at some local O&O stations. On corporate level, TVNewser reports that CBS News has made cuts in to editorial, technical operations and the bureaus. The total cuts amount to 1 percent of the staff, the post says.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In the first quarter, Fox News Channel was the most-watched channel in all of cable news, winning both the today day and prime time categories in Total Viewers. This marks the 25th consecutive quarter in which FNC has won these categories.”

  • Also, “In addition to MSNBC tying for second in the A25-54 demo in prime time for the month of March, the network experienced a 63% year-to-year increase in weekday prime time, averaging 885,000 Total Viewers.”

  • And, “As TVNewser first reported Friday, CNN did in fact win the ad-friendly A25-54 demo in prime time for the first quarter.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Consumers appear to be turning down the volume on television purchases. As the largest specialty-electronics retailers get set to report year-end results, recent consumer surveys and comments from a TV supplier and from club stores point to slowing TV demand. The category has been among the few bright spots in big-ticket spending for the home as the economy has weakened.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister asks, “Will Thrills Abound When Obama Plays Hardball?”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Hugh Downs

  • A release announced, “From his riveting radio reports of World War II to his dramatic television showdown with Sen. Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow established the gold standard for American broadcast journalism. Celebrating the centennial of the legendary broadcaster’s birth, Murrow’s son Casey Murrow and former colleagues Richard C. Hottelet and Marvin Kalb will explore Murrow’s life and legacy at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 24, 2008, in GW’s Jack Morton Auditorium, located at 805 21st St., NW. The seminar will be moderated by Michael Freedman, GW vice president and professorial lecturer in journalism and former general manager of CBS Radio Network News.”

  • The Village Voice reports, “Supposedly Democrat-Friendly MSNBC Has Let a Clinton-Hating Joe Maul New York’s Senator”

  • TVNewser asks, “Do Cable’s Pundits Reflect Diversity of Presidential Race?”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Radar reports, “Former Vanity Fair and New Yorker editor Tina Brown has more than her much-ballyhooed bio of Bill and Hillary Clinton coming down the pipeline: Radar has learned that the erstwhile ‘Queen of Buzz’ is partnering with InterActiveCorp honcho Barry Diller to launch her own news aggregator website. The site, Brown tells Radar, will have ‘no ideological stance’ and will be edited by Edward Felsenthal, the former deputy managing editor of the Wall Street Journal who is currently a consultant at Portfolio.”

  • A reader asks, “Have there been any talks of a website called Politics 2 or Politics II?”

  • The AFP reports, “They’re angry at their demanding editors. They’re angry about the mushrooming workload in shrinking newsrooms. They’re even angry about other angry journalists. But these angry journalists are happy they can now vent their frustrations to the rest of the world, courtesy of angryjournalist.com, a sort of online complaint board allowing ink-stained wretches to gripe anonymously. Ironically, their anger is partly fueled by the Internet, which has forced newspapers and television networks to reinvent themselves with painful consequences for their staffs.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Observer’s Doree Shafrir writes, “‘There’s not one path anymore,’ David Hirshey, executive editor of HarperCollins and former longtime deputy editor of Esquire magazine, said the other day. ‘Thirty years ago, you worked at a newspaper, you moved to a magazine, and then you wrote books or screenplays. Today you can be a blogger who writes books or you can be a stripper who wins an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.’”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Interviews with editors of magazines like Wired, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, Us Weekly and several others elicited more of the same:Magazines are not, for the most part, worried about the Internet.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “WAMU 88.5, America Abroad Media, and The American Interest magazine will present a special town hall entitled ‘Foreign Policy and the Presidential Election: America’s Image Problem’ at 7 p.m., Monday, April 7, at the Kay Spiritual Center on the campus of American University in northwest Washington, D.C. This event is free and open to the public.” For more, click here.

  • Matthew Felling is hosting the “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm EDT.

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Rupert Murdoch addressed the students and faculty of Georgetown University this afternoon, explaining the ‘creative destruction’ wrought upon the news and entertainment industries by changing technology. Murdoch cast himself as a relentless competitor, which he is, who has taken on entrenched monopolies and oligopolies around the world, which is also true.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • BtoB reports, “Despite the slowing economy, mergers and acquisitions in the media and information industries kept up a fairly strong pace in the first quarter, according to a report released Tuesday by media investment bank Jordan, Edmiston Group.”

  • NPR’s On The Media reports, “The Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual State of the News Media report and the state of the news is strong.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman is “Pondering the strange appeal of the Newseum”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Washington Post’s On The Plane reports, “The White House press charter that ferries journalists, presidential staff and Secret Service agents whenever the president travels has been grounded. The chartered jumbo jet is one of the 52 Boeing-777 aircraft that United Airlines ordered out of service today until it can inspect them for possible problems with the fire suppression systems in the cargo holds. The jet is currently here in Bucharest, where President Bush is attending a NATO summit that opens tonight.”

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    JOBS

  • National Television Network is looking for a Director of Field Operations.

  • American Psychological Association is looking for a Marketing Manager, Journals Circulation.

  • AARP is looking for a Quality Associate.

  • The Hotline of National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a Design editor.

  • Daily News-Record is looking for an Editorial Page Editor.

  • AOPA is looking for a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • The Story With “Morning Joe”

    Matthew Felling has a piece in the American Journalism Review about MSNBC’s “Morning Joe”:

      Former “Scarborough Country” host Joe Scarborough’s “Morning Joe” takes a less scripted approach to morning television than its competitors. The MSNBC program’s freewheeling format features interviews with political figures and pundits that are longer than the ones offered elsewhere; they seem more breakfast table than news desk. …

      By giving the candidates and political players a little breathing room and letting them relax, the show stands out, said C-SPAN’s Steve Scully, who hosts “Washington Journal,” a morning show competitor. In an e-mail interview, Scully said: “For those of us who love and follow politics, we want more than just a 5-7 minute segment on ‘Today,’ we want the stories behind the headlines. Next to C-SPAN, of course, ‘Morning Joe’ really does go behind the scenes, to understand the players, the political maneuvers, the backroom deals that may result in what the candidates are doing.” …

      How fun? Horseplay fun. When the on-air behavior ends up with Tim Russert on the receiving end of an unexpected Mike Barnicle headlock, it’s clear you’re watching something quite different.

    Read the rest here.

    Morning Reading List, 02.26.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You do not fake tan.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS announced today that Joe Trippi is officially joining CBS News as a political consultant. Trippi had served as a senior advisor to the John Edwards presidential campaign.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “Radio One Inc. has been dealt another blow. A day after the Lanham-based broadcaster announced fourth quarter losses, Radio One disclosed its vice president of operations has resigned. Zemira Jones has stepped down, and no replacement has been made, the company said Friday. Radio One did not release where Jones is going and could not be immediately reached for comment.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Anne Kornblut and Jess Yellin both celebrated birthdays yesterday.

  • The NAA Announces Digital Edge Award Winners. Check out the winners here.

  • NAJP reports, “Nobody’s reading newspapers anymore. And yet they are. And in record numbers. … The online audience is soaring”

  • The Nation reports, “Since the New York Times endorsed John McCain, the newspaper was obviously not biased in reporting on his conflicts of interest. That’s one view you won’t hear much in the raging debate over the Times article about McCain. Media insiders don’t say it, since they believe in a ‘wall’ separating news and editorial staff. Most readers overlook it, instead focusing on the substance of the actual article. And in the bizzaro world of the paper’s insatiable conservative critics, the endorsement is cited to demonstrate a media conspiracy against McCain. ‘The liberal Times had endorsed McCain as the best Republican in the presidential race. Were they just setting him up for the kill?’ asks Cliff Kincaid, an operative at the right-wing pressure group Accuracy in Media.”

  • Content Bridges asks, “Is it Time for the Times to Get Out of Local Paper Business?”

  • Michael Signer writes in the Washington Post, “challenges at the United States. We deployed an additional 30,000 troops to Iraq. Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad blustered their way across the world stage. Russian President Vladimir Putin flirted with a new cold war with Washington. Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in Pakistan. And, of course, we all continue to live in the chilly shadow of 9/11. You might imagine that such red-hot foreign policy issues, combined with a wide-open presidential election, would spark a journalistic fire so intense it would force candidates up into trees and out on limbs to defend their foreign policy positions. But you’d be dreaming.”

  • The Philadelphia City Paper’s Tom Namako says “Why Time Mag and Attytood are just plain wrong”

  • The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s Campaign Coverage Index shows, “Barack Obama (57%) won the race for media exposure and cemented his status as frontrunner in the Democratic primary fight, according to the campaign media narrative last week. Hillary Clinton was a close second, registering as a significant or dominant factor in 50% of the coverage. But much of that coverage suggested a campaign in trouble, one that might not be capable of stopping Obama’s momentum.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. fell for a second day on the New York Stock Exchange after a Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analyst said that asset sales advocated by hedge funds may not be financially practical.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “An investor group that has nominated four candidates to the New York Times Co.’s board plans to report it has raised its stake in the publisher, according people familiar with the matter.”

  • E&P reports, “They may not have the national attention of the Barack Obama/Hillary Clinton nomination fight, but to members of The Newspaper Guild, presidential candidates Linda Foley and Bernie Lunzer are waging a war of words, grassroots campaigning, and even music videos that rivals anything in the union’s recent history.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Who is this muscleman with the sword who wants to fight his way onto the board of the New York Times Co.? His name is Scott Galloway, he’s 43, and he was unknown to the Times Co. two weeks before Christmas. Since then, he has purchased more than 15 percent of the company’s stock and proposed a slate of four directors — including himself — that was effectively shot down by the company yesterday”

  • NMA reports, “The Financial Times this morning launched a social network aimed at senior business people from the media and technology sectors.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “As part of a special edition of ‘It’s Your Call With Lynn Doyle,’ CN8, The Comcast Network will get inside the minds of young voters at a Rock the Vote party held at Todd English’s Olives Restaurant and Lounge in Washington, D.C. The program will air on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 9 p.m. as CN8 Host and Political Director Lynn Doyle explores all aspects surrounding race and the 2008 election, addressing some of the tough questions and issues facing youth and minority voters today. Doyle will be joined in studio by a panel of experts who will discuss the influence of the youth vote in the 2008 election, as well as voter reaction to female and black candidates running for office.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC’s Bob Woodruff, in North Korea along with other U.S. reporters covering the New York Philharmonic’s concert in Pyongyang, became the first Western journalist to go inside the country’s Yongbyon Nuclear Facility, according to ABC News.”

  • Huffington Post’s Sam Stein reports, “MSNBC-Clinton Feud Continues: Tucker Goes Off”

  • Dow Jones reports, “The three Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission have voted to approve the transaction swapping effective control of DirecTV Group Inc. (DTV) from News Corp. (NWS) to Liberty Media Corp. (LCAPA), several agency officials said Thursday.”

  • 23/6 has The Situation reduced to one minute.

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN/U.S. president Jon Klein announced today that Ed Litvak is leaving American Morning as the executive producer. He’s also parting company with CNN. Insiders tell us Litvak was interested in moving on from the 2 a.m. wake-up calls. But American Morning has struggled to find an audience.”

  • Former CNN-er Chez Pazienza looks into Litvak’s departure from the network.

  • New York Times reports, “Looking to strike a blow against the proliferation of digital video recorders, the ABC network, its affiliated broadcast stations, and Cox Communications’ cable systems are establishing an on-demand video service that would allow viewers to watch ABC shows like ‘Lost’ and ‘Desperate Housewives’ any time they choose.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Only one of the regular Fox & Friends Weekend team was back on set this weekend, as it appears some of the moves may be more permanent than first thought. Last weekend, an entirely new crew graced the Saturday morning screen on FNC. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris occupied the morning show seats. This morning, Earhardt and Morris were back, as was Greg Kelly, who returned after a two week absence to his usual position.”

  • “Discovery Turns Its Spotlight Inward,” Washington Post reports.

  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler asks, “Is The New York Times Still Necessary?”

  • TVNewser’s Debate Ranker shows, “CNN Has Top Six Cable Debates”

  • New York Observer reports,Jim Lehrer Won’t Have to ‘Do Fisticuffs’ on Chip McGrath After All”

  • TVNewser looks into “Raised “Volume” in 2008 Election Coverage”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rove on CBS: ‘The National Enquirer of Network News’”

  • Dow Jones reports, “The Federal Communications Commission on Friday took the next step in an indecency enforcement action against News Corp. (NWS) over a 2003 episode of a short-lived reality TV show. The Commission said it would fine each Fox television station that aired an episode of ‘Married By America’ in April 2003 that resulted in a complaint against it.”

  • TVNewser reported after last week’s debate, “Last night’s Democratic duel in Austin was a ratings winner for CNN. 7,576,00 total viewers watched the debate, making it the second most watched debate in cable history (behind the last CNN debate, from Los Angeles). In the A25-54 demo, the debate drew 2,986,000 viewers, also enough for second place on cable. This means that CNN now has the top six debates on cable this season in total viewers, and the top seven in the demo.”

  • Politico’s Ben Smith calls into question CNN’s, umm, questionable question of the day. Huffington Post reports, “CNN Re-Legitimizes ‘Scurrilous’ Obama Email”

  • The New York Post reports, “Cablevision has been quietly working with Bear Stearns on ways to enhance shareholder value, including putting a value on its Rainbow Media unit ahead of a possible sale and drawing up a list of targets for potential acquisitions, The Post has learned.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “MSNBC serves political news with a side of opinion”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The AP reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL said Thursday that it launched a Web site for users in Mexico that combines its free e-mail and instant messaging features with local content in Spanish. AOL partnered with fixed-line company Alestra for distribution and Mexican magazine company Grupo Editorial Expansion for content. Grupo Editorial Expansion is owned by Time Warner’s magazine publishing unit, Time Inc.”

  • New York Times reports, “Of the many landmarks along a journalist’s career, two are among those that stand out: winning an award and making the government back down. Last week, Joshua Micah Marshall achieved both.”

  • MassLive’s Red Sox Monster reports, “In what came as quite a shock to me, Bruce Allen of Boston Sports Media Watch, the preeminent sports media critic in the market, named its Top 5 mainstream media sports blogs today… and Red Sox Monster placed third, beating out a few huge heavy hitters.”

  • CNet News talks toBill Gates on the future of journalism and more.”

  • Open Forum’s John Battelle writes, “Today, I’ll assert, no matter what business you think you’re in — be it making widgets or providing a service, you’re now in the media business, plain and simple. Those that recognize this shift will succeed, those that ignore it will atrophy and eventually become irrelevant.”

  • AP reports, “Yahoo Inc. said Thursday it added four publishers to its network of newspaper partnerships. The Internet search engine’s newspaper consortium now includes 634 newspapers. The company recently added Shaw Newspapers, The Buffalo News, the Times Publishing Co. and the Columbia Publishing Co.”

  • Military Times Photographer Sheila Vemmer was asked to delete pictures in Kenya and she reports, “When journalists like Michelle and I embed with the military, we are given a long set of rules and instructions that we have to initial and abide by. Whether it is in Iraq or Kenya, a ‘kinetic’ environment or not, the rules are pretty much the same.”

  • The Times Online reports, “Web socialites succumb to ‘Facebook fatigue’”

  • Beltway Confidential reports, “White House spokeswoman Dana Perino warned early in the day today that President Bush was in “a really good mood” and might do an interview on the AF1 flight home from Liberia. Sure enough, POTUS and Mrs. had the press pool brought to the front of the plane where he discussed his trip to Africa, fondness for napping, and plans to vote in the Texas Republican primary. And he expressed concern for Ben Feller of the AP, who is apparently puking his way across the continent.”

  • “Fox Said To Be Exploring Termination Of Google Advertising Deal,” Tech Crunch reports.

  • RTTNews reports, “The New York Times Co. is launching ShifD, an application that enables users to seamlessly shift content between their computers and mobile devices.”

  • Boston Herald reports, “Comcast and its critics are gearing up for a showdown that some say may determine the future ability of people to navigate freely around the Internet without corporate restrictions. In an unusual move, the full board of the Federal Communications Commission will hold a special hearing next week at Harvard Law School in Cambridge to review charges that Comcast has deliberately interfered with attempts by high-speed Internet subscribers to share files online.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Getty Images Inc., one of the world’s premier photo agencies, agreed to a $2 billion buyout from private-equity firm Hellman & Friedman LLC. Hellman will pay $34 a share, a 55% premium to its closing price on Jan. 18, the day before it announced it was exploring a possible sale. The offer is 39% higher than Friday’s closing price of Getty’s shares. Including debt, the deal is valued at $2.4 billion.”

  • Reuters reports, “The head of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said on Monday he is ‘ready, willing and able’ to stop broadband providers that unreasonably interfere with subscribers’ access to Internet content.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Could television be the next industry to become Internet roadkill? Online video has been a hit. Americans watched more than 300 million videos on Google’s YouTube in December alone, and the amount of time spent watching video online grew 34% last year.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader writes, “Oscar night was good for Atlantic Media: The Atlantic’s James Fallows was featured in one of the documentary clips, and Alex Gibney, brother of Atlantic Editor James, took home the prize for best documentary for Taxi to the Dark Side. Maybe Oscar can come visit the magazine’s Ellies…”

  • E&P reports, “USA Today has launched a new lifestyle magazine, Open Air, covering topics from workout tips to athletic gear to travel destinations. The magazine will publish quarterly in the Friday editions of USA Today. Open Air ‘geared towards the busy, well-informed, affluent consumer,’ as described in a statement. Content is designed for readers with a healthy, active lifestyle and a taste for adventure, with many articles about travel and outdoor activities.”

  • “The Washingtonian has obtained this industry planning memo documenting some of the cruise ideas that didn’t happen this year.” Check them out here.

  • Folio reports, “An attempt by The Economist to gain rights to the domain name TheEconomist.com has been denied by the World Intellectual Property Organization. The Economist filed its claim with WIPO on November 9, 2007. The magazine’s Web site is registered as simply economist.com.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “Newsweek and Time should end a stodgy practice”

  • The AP reports, “Time Warner Inc. said in its annual regulatory filing Friday that it expects to cut more jobs in its magazine publishing division in the first quarter, resulting in $10 million to $20 million in expenses.”

  • The American Spectator looks at “The Sources of Our Discontent”

  • MoveOn.org has “partnered with Mother Jones magazine — if you sign up as a monthly donor to Operation Democracy, you’ll get a year’s subscription to their excellent investigative reporting on progressive issues and the right wing”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will be “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm EST.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. radio broadcaster, is in talks with Providence Equity Partners Inc. about revising an agreement to sell its television stations, said two people briefed on the discussions.”

  • A release announced, “Talk show host Robert ‘Rob’ Redding Jr.’s brand new two-hour weekly radio show, named after his Web site Redding News Review, will go national on March 1st. Redding’s company Redding Communications, Inc. (RCI) is teaming with the Genesis Communications Network to distribute Redding News Review, now heard exclusively on the show’s flagship station Talk 540-AM KNOE in Monroe.”

  • DCRTV reports,Jeff King leaves his producer gig at the DC-based ‘Bill Press Show’ to be an account exec with DC’s Strauss Radio Strategies. King used to work for ABC (now Citadel) talker WMAL (630 AM), where he produced Michael Graham’s show. Press’s Jones Radio Network show is heard mornings on Clear Channel talker WWRC (1260 AM)…”

  • DCRTV tells us that Kornheiser may have been referring to one of his recent rants.

  • Radio Ink reports, “FCC Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate says the FCC is looking into how its indecency regulations could extend to the increasing availability of audio and video content delivered to mobile devices.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Los Angeles Times reports,Paul Haggis and Michael Nozik with Hwy61 Films, based at Paramount, option Joseph Weisberg’s ‘An Ordinary Spy,’ a novel about the realities of day-to-day work in the CIA, and the emotional damage participants can wreak on each other”

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    JOBS

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for Staff Writers for an Online Daily Health Publication.

  • API is looking for a Web Content Administrator.

  • Goldman & Associates Public Relations is looking for a Public Relations Associate.

  • Buffalo Communications (A Division of Billy Casper Golf) is looking for someone to work in Public Relations and for a PR Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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