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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Getler’

Morning Reading List, 11.15.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you don’t count religious services as a regular activity.

  • An ABC release announces, “On Tuesday, November 20, ABC News’ Charles Gibson will conduct an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with President George Bush and First Lady Laura Bush at Camp David, the private presidential retreat. The interview, just days before the Thanksgiving holiday, will cover a variety of topics, including: the war in Iraq, turmoil in Pakistan, the state of the economy, and rising gas prices.”

  • A release announced, “Ten Washington DC area women who proudly stand at 5’4″ and under have made the first annual Washington DC Petite and Chic List. Petite specialty retailer Petite Sophisticate is releasing the list in conjunction with the opening of two new stores in the Washington DC area. The list includes local women, 5’4″ and under, who show that women of all heights are stylish and chic.” The ten women are Sen. Barbara Boxer, Lynne Cheney, Nicole Feld, Kathy Fowler, Kathleen Matthews, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Marisa Ramírez de Arellan, Raven, Helen Thomas and Eun Yang.

  • Kiplinger.com has named former AOL programming manager Cindy Schwalb as online content coordinator based in DC.

  • Patterico’s Pontifications reports, Anwyn has an excellent post today from the ‘Facts You Don’t Need to Know’ file of the Los Angeles Times. Anwyn chose to focus on a story the paper recently ran on the prosecutorial record of Fred Thompson. I read that article and meant to comment on its flippant dismissiveness of Thompson’s stint as an AUSA. Some of the lines in the article are blatantly designed to elicit cheap snickers from leftists”

  • Ann Althouse reports,Matt Yglesias is outraged — just outraged — at Tim Russert. How dare that man drive politicians into a corner with tough questions instead of giving them space to inform us. According to Yglesias, questions with the goal of providing information about the candidates’ policies would — take global warming for example — show how fine the Democrats are and trap only Republicans.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “After an exhaustive search, The New York Times has found its new corporate media reporter: Fortune’s Tim Arango will begin work next month.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Silver Spring-based cable network Discovery Health has pulled the series ‘Plastic Surgery: Before and After’ from its lineup this week after reports that the show’s host, physician Jan Adams, operated on the mother of hip-hop artist Kanye West before she died Saturday.”

  • Tuesday was the first anniversary of the launch of DarynKagan.com and Kagan celebrated the occasion on Oprah & Friends. Check out the show here.

  • In addition to his interview with Fox Business News yesterday, President Bush also recorded an interview with Fox News.

  • This is Jade Floyd’s (resident hottie) last week as Communications Manager for American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. She has taken a position as senior associate at the public affairs firm Chlopak, Leonard, Schechter and Associates, based here in D.C.

  • War on Photography reports, “I have to give credit where credit is due. The City of New York has reconsidered its proposal to require permits and insurance from most photographers.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch all but declared on Tuesday that the sky’s-the-limit profits from traditional broadcast TV are over.”

  • DCRTV reports, Jon Sullivan, commercial producer director at Channel 7/WJLA, picks up a national Emmy for ‘Best Local Public Service Announcement’ for his ‘Choose To Save’ campaign entitled ‘Savingsman.’”

  • Seems The Hill has decided they need some flair instead of flare.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “In the days before mounting a strike against Hollywood studios, film and TV writers did something that might be considered unusual in other labor disputes: They completed — and were paid for — a lot of work that was delivered to the companies they were about to picket. Now, the Writers Guild of America, which represents the striking writers, is scrambling to get copies of all the scripts turned in to studios over the past six months as part of an effort to police the use of nonunion labor to complete or polish union work. So far, however, by most estimates, the union’s efforts to collect all of those scripts has fallen far short of its goal.”

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press promoted Managing Editor Mike Silverman to the new position of senior managing editor Monday, and named news executives John Daniszewski, Lou Ferrara and Kristin Gazlay as managing editors. The moves come amid a reorganization of operations at the news cooperative.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. newspaper industry’s Audit Bureau of Circulations said it will change the way it counts paid circulation to provide marketers with more useful information.”

  • Market Watch reports, “Shareholders of Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio voted Tuesday to approve Sirius’ proposed $13.6 billion acquisition of XM.”

  • Variety reports, “In the months since Dane Cook first mounted his groundbreaking MySpace marketing campaign and ‘Saturday Night Live’s’ ‘Lazy Sunday’ skit helped vault YouTube to a billion-dollar Google buyout, online comedy sites have become as common as bad party jokes.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “Newspapers’ paying readership fell again in the industry’s latest circulation reports last week, but publishers took the opportunity to make their boldest pitch yet for counting everyone who sees their news stories — whether by buying a copy or borrowing one, picking up a print copy or finding the paper online.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp. probably won’t buy Clearwire Corp., the wireless Internet service provider whose shares surged today on speculation the largest U.S. cable- television company will offer to acquire it, according to Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.”

  • A release announced, “A prominent national Islamic civil rights and advocacy group today announced the launch of a major initiative to help enhance understanding of Islam and Muslims in the news media.
    At a news conference in the nation’s capital, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) said the centerpiece of its ‘Beyond Stereotypes’ campaign will be distribution of the newly-published ‘American Muslims: A Journalist’s Guide to Understanding Islam and Muslims’ to some 40,000 media professionals nationwide.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In what it calls the ‘biggest expansion of international newsgathering resources in its 27-year history,’ CNN is adding correspondents, opening a newsgathering hub in the UAE and investing in a digital-production unit in London.”

  • The AP reports, “Yahoo Inc., reeling from a growing backlash over human rights and its China operations, settled a lawsuit Tuesday that accused it of illegally helping the Chinese government jail and torture two journalists.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Court TV is firing 16 of the 31 people on its Web staff as the network, which is changing its name to truTV in January, shifts its online trial coverage to CNN.com.”

  • Stars and Stripes reports, “Midlevel editors at Stars and Stripes have called on the newspaper’s acting publisher to resign, saying he has refused to release information on the extent of the paper’s relationship with America Supports You.”

  • Media Life reports, “The news was of the sort that just several years ago would have shocked many, word that Condé Nast was folding House & Garden, the 100-plus-year-old shelter title. But in these far tougher times, last week’s news was not such a shock after all, as just the most recent in a line of closings that have beset the magazine industry.”

  • Helium.com, a social media site that shares its ad revenues with its most popular contributors, has announced a partnership with nonprofit organization OpenTheGovernment.”

  • The National Press Club announced, “NPF has selected Linda Topping Streitfeld as its new Director of Programs following a nationwide search. Streitfeld has been an editor and manager at The Miami Herald since 1992, working on coverage of the 2000 presidential election, education, growth and development, hurricanes and near-misses, government and politics. She managed a major Miami Herald community news initiative and contributed to the newspaper’s robust website and other multimedia efforts.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Filmmaker Sean Fine bristles at the suggestion that his strikingly handsome new documentary, “War/Dance,” is too pretty to tell a gritty story. … ‘War/Dance,’ which Fine shot and co-directed with his wife, Andrea Nix Fine, certainly looks great, even as it deals movingly with the lives of displaced kids in northern Uganda. A low-grade war has been simmering there for 20 years, with children often being conscripted by a rebel group known as the Lord’s Resistance Army.” The movie opens on Friday.

  • Min Online reports, “‘Magazines have an illustrious past, but they have a wonderful future,’ proudly proclaimed Time editor-in-chief Richard Stengel upon accepting min magazine’s award for Top Reinvention of the Year”

  • Public Eye reports, “Criticisms of the White House press corps come fast and furious in MediaLand and Blogistan. (From accusations like they’re ‘an extension of the Clinton spin machine’ to its ‘meekness’ in covering the Bush presidency.) But very rarely do they come from the White House press corps itself. Until this week.”

  • Check out this week’s Ombudsman’s Mailbag from PBS’s Michael Getler.

  • The New York Post reports, “A bidding war has erupted for the rights to Sen. Ted Kennedy’s (D-Mass.) autobiography, which could end up well into the mid-seven figure range.”

  • A release announced, “ICFJ’s Knight International Journalism Fellowships Program receives grants from Knight and Gates foundations to advance journalism excellence and free expression worldwide”

  • Digg the Blog reports, “The Wall Street Journal Online is adding Digg buttons across the entire site, and you’ll now have full (free) access to the articles submitted to Digg.”

  • New York Times reports,Don Imus, whose cowboy hat and western wear looked out of place on MSNBC, may have found a more comfortable saddle. On Dec. 3, when he returns not only to radio but also to television, it will be on RFD-TV, a cable and satellite channel that caters to farmers, ranchers and equestrians, as well as others who merely aspire to live a small-town life.”

  • DCRTV reports, “FTVLive tells us that former Channel 5/WTTG morning news anchor Michael Gargiulo has been promoted to the 5:30 PM anchor gig at NYC’s WNBC-TV, where he had been weekend morning anchor and reporter”

  • The Smoking Gun reported yesterday, “Judith Regan, the volcanic publishing industry figure who sought to publish O.J. Simpson’s ‘I Did It’ (and trysted with Bernard Kerik in an apartment overlooking Ground Zero) today sued Rupert Murdoch’s media conglomerate for defamation, claiming that she was unjustly tarred as an anti-Semite when fired last year. In a blistering $100 million lawsuit filed today in New York State Supreme Court, Regan, 54, accuses several defendants, including Murdoch’s News Corporation and HarperCollins Publishers, of orchestrating a smear campaign that was intended to advance the Murdoch political agenda and protect ‘Rudy Giuliani’s presidential ambitions.’”

  • TVWeek reports, “Although the Writers Guild of America’s pre-strike media campaign was criticized as sluggish, the guild’s headline-grabbing series of protests last week have managed to attract the sympathy of some viewers.”

  • Also of note on E&P’s 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites for October, The Washington Times shows a bump from last month.

  • DCist reports, “Fox5 reported on Sunday that a member of their staff, Gwen Tolbart, was injured in a collision between her car and a Metrobus on Saturday night on her way home. Tolbart was thankfully not seriously hurt, but the bus driver, Harvey Carey of Lanham, has now been charged with failing to stay in the proper lane, which resulted in the accident.”

  • E&P reports, “The board of the Audit Bureau of Circulations voted on a set of wide-sweeping changes that will put more prominence on the metric of total audience and affect the way newspaper circulation is counted.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is taking a swipe at FNC over the $100M lawsuit filed by Judith Regan. Regan worked for News Corp.-owned publisher HarperCollins.”

  • The Daily Northwestern reports, “The process of transforming the curriculum at the Medill School of Journalism to keep up with the times is a work in progress, Dean John Lavine told about 70 students, faculty and others at a forum Monday night.”

  • The New York Sun reports, “There were red faces at the Manhattan Institute, after the Union Club ejected reporters from an awards lunch in its Upper East Side clubhouse where they had been invited to hear Mayor Bloomberg and the former governor of Florida, Jeb Bush, speak” on Tuesday.

  • Washington Post reports, “The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission yesterday proposed relaxing an agency rule to allow big-city newspapers to buy the smaller television stations in their markets, a move designed as a compromise in the ongoing issue of corporate control of the airwaves.”

  • The New York Observer reports,Imus Is Back! But Not Quite Live! Bloodied Radio Cowboy Returns Dec. 3 With 21-Second Delay”

  • Paul Sullivan is a veteran newspaper editor and editor in chief of citizen journalism site Orato.com. Check out the site here.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “For James Goldston, executive producer of ‘Nightline,’ the prospect of a prolonged writers strike that paralyzes much of the television industry offers an awkward upside.”

  • Poynter has the memo from Stars and Stripes Europe bureau chief Sam Amrhein announcing, “I want to inform you that the overseas bureau chiefs Joe, Marni, Tom Skeen, Tim Flack, Chris Carlson and I ­ have called for Max Lederer to step down as acting publisher.”

  • The CJR asks, “A plea to campaign reporters: please resist the temptation to use Sin City-centric clichés in your coverage of Thursday’s Democratic debate in Las Vegas.”

  • BusinessJournalism.org reports, “The number of ‘green’ business stories published in the nation’s 10 largest newspapers this year has already doubled last year’s total, according to a study released Tuesday by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.”

  • Dave and Thomas reports, “NBC Direct is the Peacock’s answer to Internet video and if you are a fan of NBC shows like The Office and Heroes, be prepared to get a little angry. The good news is you can now download various NBC shows to your computer. And it’s free. Kinda. Free like giving an army recruiter you home phone number. First and foremost, you cannot get these shows onto you iPod. Second, it’s only available to PC users with IE only. Third, and this is the most annoying, you must download a crap-load of software to play the videos.”

  • E&P reports, “A top business-side executive at Dow Jones & Co. said it is premature to assume that The Wall Street Journal Web site will definitely drop its paid subscription model, despite comments by Rupert Murdoch that the change is expected.”

  • A Newsweek release via Romenesko announced, “Markos Moulitsas, the founder and publisher of dailykos.com, will become a Newsweek contributor for the 2008 presidential campaign, offering occasional opinion pieces to the pages of the magazine and to Newsweek.com.”

  • Mickey Kaus gives another scathing review of The Atlantic’s anniversary party.

  • CJR reports how “The New York Times went and put the ‘science’ back in the ‘political science’ of the campaign trail.”

    Jobs

  • PBS is looking for a Web Technologist and a Director for PBS Engage.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for an Associate Director, Content & Video.

  • The Star Democrat is seeking a layout editor and reporter.

  • EEI Communications is looking for an Editorial Production Director.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Science Writer.

  • The New Republic is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military Publications is looking to fill a position in Advertising/Sales.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Comments and Group Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.22.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • The White House bids farewell to Josh Deckard.

  • A NBC release announced, “‘Meet the Press,’ the longest running television show in the world, reached a programming milestone, airing its 3,000th broadcast last Sunday, October 14. In addition, according to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press’ topped the competition on Sunday, winning in all categories across the
    country and in Washington D.C.”

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column. Clark Hoyt’s too.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 14, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fifth straight week. This marks the sixth time in seven weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers. ‘This Week’ is also the only Sunday discussion program up year-to-date (4%) among Total Viewers.”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for Oct. 7-12 shows, “The debut of Fred Thompson as a GOP debater helped make last week the second-biggest week of the year in the talk show universe for the 2008 presidential campaign. But so did a talk brouhaha over a more tangential topic involving the debate.”

  • Herald Sun reports, “Speaking at News Corp’s annual meeting of stockholders in New York, Mr. Murdoch, said the global media giant’s proven track record spoke for itself. ‘Revenues have grown an average of 14 percent a year over the past five years and operating income is up 14 percent a year on average over the past four years,’ he said.”

  • Food Service Monthly has started a blog! Check it out.

  • PBC announced that “White House Chronicle” now airs on the Washington-Baltimore area’s three major PBS affiliates: WHUT-TV, Channel 32, WETA-TV, Channel 26, and WMPT-TV, Channel 22. Also, XM Satellite Radio will air “White House Chronicle” on P.O.T.U.S. ’08 (Channel 130) every Saturday, beginning Oct. 12.

  • New York Times reports, “Media companies are often criticized for not taking enough risks in choosing television shows, authors, movies and musicians. But when it comes to technology start-ups, their appetite for risk appears to be on the rise.”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Leading Internet and media companies teamed up … to set ground rules for dealing with copyright infringement in videos uploaded to user-generated content Web sites — and demanding stronger efforts on the part of content hosts.”

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. communications regulators cited conservative commentator Armstrong Williams on Thursday for violating a ban on ‘payola’ in promoting the Bush administration’s education plan.”

  • USA Today reports, “Google’s third-quarter revenue jumped 57%, but a hiring binge and product speculation left Wall Street wondering what the search giant wasn’t revealing.”

  • A reader tells us that NBC4 anchor Wendy Rieger. said her weekly Going Green reports on NBC4 (Tuesdays at 5:00pm) and has been picked up on by New York folks and “mandated that all NBC affiliates show her reports or take up the cause on their own. Even Brian Williams started his own Going Green segment on Nightly News, mainly from what Wendy started here. Way to go!”

  • Rieger is also hosting a gay-youth assistance fundraiser, SMYAL, on November 4. Click here for more details.

  • AP reports, “To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible. An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through Comcast cable modems. We picked the Bible for the test because it’s not protected by copyright and the file is a convenient size. In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked.” Also, the AP reports, “Comcast Corp. actively interferes with attempts by some of its high- speed Internet subscribers to share files online, a move that runs counter to the tradition of treating all types of Net traffic equally.”

  • From Wonkette: “Flipping though an advanced copy of Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, one item popped off the page. Apparently, Thompson used to date Sally Quinn of The Washington Post: ‘He was always pumping me,’ she says of the late journalist’s thirst for Washington gossip.”

  • Find out why his Extreme-ness calls Campaigns & Elections Magazine’s Walter Alarkon “The Best Political Reporter Today.”

  • Roll Call is holding an Adjournment Contest! “Guess, to the minute, the exact date and time that the second chamber of Congress will adjourn sine die for the first session of the 110th Congress. The person who comes closest to the actual time wins. If there is a tie, Roll Call will hold a drawing to determine the winner.” The winner gets a $500 gift certificate to Fogo de Chão. Email your entry to contest@rollcall.com by 5 p.m. Oct. 26.

  • CQ wants to know what you think about CQPolitics.

  • A reader writes in, “perhaps Facebook is more trouble than it’s worth — it’s just another vehicle for self-important journos who are more about capped teeth than reporting…”

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Colbert ‘run’ risks breaking law”

  • Lloyd Grove interviews Donnie Deutsch for Portfolio.com, “and gets the adman and CNBC host to address the Ann Coulter interview, his show as a vehicle to pick up women, future marriage and the Fox Business Network.”

  • A reader writes in: “It would be great if Stu Rothenberg started speaking in the third person. George is getting upset!”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comedy Central is getting more of Jon Stewart. The network said late Thursday that it has signed an extension with the ‘Daily Show’ host that will keep him around until at least 2010. Stewart’s contract would have expired at the end of 2008.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Tony Snow, the Fox News host-turned White House spokesman-turned unemployed guy, has signed on to be the keynote speaker at this year’s American Magazine Conference. Larry Hackett, managing editor of People, will conduct a Q&A with him. The conversation will be on the record — a good thing, since an attempt three years ago to keep Bill Clinton’s AMC remarks from leaving the room was contemptuously ignored by journalists in attendance. A spokeswoman for the Magazine Publishers of America declined to say if Snow — who left his job as White House spokesman saying he needed to make more money would be paid for the appearance.”

  • Bloomberg reports,Dean Singleton’s MediaNews Group Inc., the largest closely held U.S. newspaper publisher, plans to triple sales from its Internet sites by 2012.”

  • B&C reports, “The Federal Communications Commission issued its first fines for a station airing Armstrong Williams’ Department of Education-paid-for plugs for its ‘No Child Left Behind’ initiative. Station-owner Sinclair Broadcast Group doesn’t plan to pay the fine and said it will take the commission to court.”

  • To clarify, Major Garrett is currently the Chief Congressional Correspondent for FNC, but he was on the trail for the 2004 Presidential race and the 2006 mid-term elections.. he is not new to the campaign trail and has experience on the road covering the beat in previous elections.

  • Check out Mixed Media’s critique of Newsweek’s new design.

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger November Meetup is Wednesday, November 14, 2007 at 7:00 PM at RFD. Click here for full details.

  • Michael Getler, the PBS Ombudsman, writes, “Frontline, the outstanding (my opinion as well as that of many others) documentary series marked the beginning of its 25th season this week with another look into the often-closed world in which Vice-President Dick Cheney operates. The hour-long debut on Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, was titled ‘Cheney’s Law.’ It was produced by Michael Kirk, who could reasonably be labeled Minister of the Interior for his efforts, over the past six years, in turning out ten Frontline programs that, in one way or another, probed those activities of the Bush administration—whether one agrees with them or not—that have largely developed and been carried on out of public view.”

  • E&P reports, “Although Washington Post Radio was dropped last month after an unsuccessful 18-month run, the paper is still dealing with the fallout. A Newspaper Guild complaint that newsroom staffers had to perform extra work on the broadcast outlet has sparked a National Labor Relations Board hearing set for next week.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some good news about the media has actually been making headlines. When was the last time that happened? 1974? The bombshell is ProPublica, a brand-new investigative journalism outfit to be launched in January by one of the most respected figures in the newspaper business, longtime Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Paul Steiger.”

  • This week’s TV Q&A from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Rob Owen responds to questions about ads on WPXI, Jerry Seinfeld’s ‘Bee Movie’ minisodes on NBC and HBO’s ‘Five Days.’”

  • A release announced, “Inspired by Lions For Lambs (starring Robert Redford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise), MGM and YOUTUBE have extended the opportunity to submit videos to Youtube in order to win $25,000 for a charity of the winner’s choice. Participants have until October 24th to submit a 90 second video explaining thoughts on key issues and causes in today’s world.” For more info, click here.

    Jobs

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Editor/Writer.

  • The Cecil Whig is looking for a Web-savvy copy editor.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • Jamestown Foundation is looking for a Publications Coordinator.

  • The Frederick News Post is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDCH is looking for an In-House News Transcriber.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Satellite Coordinator.

  • Migration Policy Institute is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is looking for a Technical Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for an entry level writer.

  • Exchange Monitor Publications, Inc. is looking for Reporters.

  • The Current Newspapers is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Systems Engineer

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend Edition, Sunday and an Assistant Editor, Digital Media News.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Potbelly — Oh so good. All melty and toasty (and cheap), it is your favorite lunch spot.

  • Shales: “NBC Broadcasts An Eerie Epilogue

  • ASIS International is looking for an Editor/Reporter for Security Management Magazine.

  • The Media Research Center, a conservative business and media watchdog, is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • The Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • Southern Virginia a.m. is looking for a Sports Editor.

  • The Baltimore Sun is looking for a sports web producer.

  • The Project on Government Oversight is looking for an Investigator.

  • WAMU is seeking an “Ace Reporter.”

  • A Chicago-based Internet financial news service is looking for a Capital Markets Reporter in D.C.

  • Telesur is looking for a General Assignment Reporter/Producer (Spanish-English).

  • In one tipsters opinion, “russert looks like kidnapper Micheal Devlin much more than your choices!!!!”

  • Media Life reports, “While young people, the 13-to-24 set, do in fact spend more time than older people on the internet and with even newer media such as text messaging, it’s not at the expense of traditional media. Rather it comes on top of it, according to a new study by Deloitte & Touche, the management consulting firm.”

  • One reader weighs in on the Post-condom debate: “I think the Post Points look more like little blue diaphragms (which gives an indication of how old I am!!)”

  • Readers are up in arms over yesterday’s cartoon in Roll Call. Some of the comments we received:

    • “I found today’s editorial cartoon in Roll Call to be insensitive, appalling, and downright disrespectful to those grieving over Monday’s horrific events. Perhaps because I am a May ’06 graduate of VT, or perhaps just because I’m an emphatic human being (as I know that most people are in the wake of this tragedy), I think the decision to run this cartoon was utterly tasteless. Shame on you, Roll Call.”

    • “I guess the cartoonist at Roll Call didn’t know anyone at VT. Glad to see they are able to make light of a harrowing, tragic situation.”

    • “In an already overly-desensitized world, Roll Call’s cartoon today pushed things over the top. Have some tact.”

    • “The RJ Matson cartoon in Roll Call today is disgraceful. RJ should be ashamed and what the hell was Roll Call thinking putting that in their paper? Truly just pathetic!”

  • USA Today reports, “AOL boss predicts it will be No. 1 site on the Internet again.”

  • His Extremeness calls Rich Little, “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”

  • Pew’s weekly News Interest Index shows, “Americans, both black and white, generally agree with the punishment radio host Don Imus received for the racist and sexist remarks he made about the Rutgers University’s women basketball team. Nonetheless, there are substantial racial differences in views of Imus’s punishment, and an even bigger gap in opinions about news media’s coverage of the story.”

  • Chronicle of Higher Education’s Robin Wilson had a near Wolf experience in her hotel’s fitness center in Blacksburg, Va.

  • Michael Getler explains PBS’s role in the ousting of Imus.

  • Reuters reports, “Tribune Co. will have to mount some persuasive arguments why regulators should allow real estate mogul Sam Zell to take the media company private, Federal Communications Commissioner Michael Copps said on Tuesday.”

  • A reader of The Volokh Conspiracy offers a case for press restrictions.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext
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  • Morning Reading List, 03.30.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You laughed at Karl Rove. Not with him.

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet The Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending March 25 in all categories, both nationally and in Washington, D.C. “Meet” attracted 44% more viewers than CBS “Face the Nation,” 66% over ABC “This Week” and 248% more than FOX “News Sunday.”

  • Michael Getler didn’t love the “News War” finale.

  • Rachel Sklar has a “Dispatch From The ASNEs.”

  • From a reader: “Don’t ask why I remember this, but I recognize that NYT photo from the Kyle Sampson story: it’s from a Kit Seelye article from winter 2003ish about snowmobilers in Yellowstone.”

  • Another NBC release announced that “The Chris Matthews Show” was “the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show for the week ending March 25, 2007.”

  • The Pew weekly News Interest Index shows that while public interest in the Iraq war remained high last week, the fallout from the firing of eight U.S. attorneys by the Justice Department “failed to gain much traction with the public.”

  • Cousin TVNewser reports that David Gregory, and Don Imus had a friendly debate over which really is the number one nightly news show.

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media are seen to be fighting an uphill battle against Internet news and citizen journalists, despite questions over the credibility of the Web.”

  • Media Matter reports that Drudge has linked “to Politico 45 times during its two-month existence.”

  • Jay Rosen reports that Tim Porter and Michele McLellan have “change or die” findings from their tour of American newsrooms.

  • Paul Bedard reports that Bernadine Healy was giving her future son-in-law a hard time at her book party on Tuesday for his dangerous habit — rugby.

  • The Washingtonian’s write-up of last night’s Media Research Center awards gala.

  • BBC reports, “Among those calling for a bloggers’ code of conduct is Tim O’Reilly — one of the web’s most influential thinkers.”
  • Huffington Post’s Ankush Khardori asks, “Do Newspapers Need Ombudsmen?”

  • Poynter released the results of the EyeTrack07 study this week to the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Check out the results here. E&P has more on the study.

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC’s Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz reported from the North Arabian Gulf on Wednesday, where she was the only Western journalist aboard the USS Eisenhower.”

  • Jonathan Chait, the new author of TRB, “talked with TNR Editor Franklin Foer about the role of a column and the challenges of writing one.”

  • From Cynopsis:

      Discovery Communications yesterday announced it would buy the 25% ownership stake in Discovery held by Cox Communications in exchange for $1.275 billion in cash, and the Travel Channel and its related business pieces. It is likely Cox will spin the network and put it up for sale. The end result for Discovery is it will now be owned by Liberty Media with a now 66% stake, and Advance/Newhouse with 33% ownership. The deal is expected to close in early third qtr 2007.

  • Theodora Blanchfield has been promoted from staff writer to Associate Editor at Campaigns & Elections magazine

  • IANS reports, “The murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan will be the subject of an investigative journalism seminar being planned by Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies.”

  • “The Loudoun Times-Mirror was honored March 24 as the best weekly newspaper in Virginia for its circulation size.”

  • Salon’s Rebecca Traister takes a look at Fox’s “Conserva-babe and star-in-the-making Rachel Marsden.”

  • Check out the 2007 RTNDA Regional Murrow Award recipients, including two awards for WTOP.

  • The Washington Times reports, that House lawmakers “said they are committed to a Feb. 17, 2009, deadline for transitioning to digital TV.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc. will offer international news from reporters working with U.S. newspaper publisher McClatchy Co., including a blog written by Iraqi staffers, the companies said on Wednesday.”

  • The AP is looking for a photographer in the Baltimore bureau.

  • E&E Publishing is seeking a Production Assistant for E&ETV.

  • No-Va Living Magazine is seeking a freelance Statistician/Researcher.

  • And we have some photos from the Week Opinion Awards:
      Bill_Falk_Chip_Bok_Michael_Kinsley_and_Josh_Fruhlinger.jpg
      Bill Falk, Chip Bok, Michael Kinsley and Josh Fruhlinger

      Bill_Falk_Justin_Smith_Terry_McAuliffe.jpg
      Bill Falk, Justin Smith and Terry McAuliffe

  • And more:

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    (L to R) Rhoda Glickman, former Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Beth E. Dozoretz, Senior Vice President, Value Options Healthcare join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine, Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications and Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

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    (L to R) Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications, Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research, Patricia de Stacy Harrison, President and CEO, Corporation for Public Broadcasting join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

  • Morning Reading List, 01.08.07

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  • Are Democrats more fun?

  • An ABC release announces that according to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 25, 2006, “Nightline” “continued its growth trend in both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.” Compared to the same time last year, the show is up 18%. “Nightline” was the only late night program to post growth compared to last week.

  • XM announced that the company added more than 1.695 million new subscribers in 2006, ending the year with more than 7.625 million subscribers. According to the release, “XM achieved positive cash flow from operations during the fourth quarter of 2006.” Or you could follow this take: “XM Subscribers Fall Short

  • DCRTV reports that “Bonneville-operated news talker Washington Post Radio, WTWP, will be teaming weekend morning man David Burd with Mike Moss in the weekday morning drive slot. Late night talk radio veteran Jim Bohannon will add the 10 AM to noon slot. With Hillary Howard jumping from that slot to co-host afternoon drive with Bob Kur. Sam Litzinger will remain all by himself in the noon to 3 PM slot.”

  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler urges the network to “be more aggressive. Be more aggressive. I don’t mean aggressive as in hostile or combative, but rather as in energetic and enterprising.”

  • Politics and Prose is hosting P.J. O’Rourke on Monday at 7 p.m.. O’Rourke will discuss his new book, On The Wealth Of Nations.

  • For the tipsters wondering: The Hill newspaper will go to four issues a week sometime soon, likely end of this month.

  • Fitzgerald’s Wild Source Chase

  • Happy Birthday, Swamp and World Newser blogs.

  • Editor’s E-Mail May Be Used in Suit Against The Times“:

      A lawyer for a former government scientist who is suing The New York Times for defamation over a series of columns about the deadly anthrax mailings of 2001 said Friday in court that he was prepared to introduce an internal e-mail message from a senior Times editor that raised questions about one of the columns.

      The lawyer, Mark A. Grannis, said the columns written by Nicholas D. Kristof about the federal investigation of the mailings unfairly damaged the reputation of his client, Dr. Stephen A. Hatfill, a former germ warfare scientist.

  • Marc Fisher on WHUR.

  • Hardball Loves Rocky’s Softball

  • A CIA panel has told former officer Valerie Plame she can’t write about her undercover work for the agency, a position that may threaten a lucrative book project with her publisher.”

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