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Posts Tagged ‘Michel du Cille’

Top 10 Works of Journalism of Decade Include D.C. Scribes and Judges

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As alerted to us by Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at NYU, the faculty at NYU have chosen the top 10 works of journalism in the United States for the past decade between 2000-2009.

Some D.C. journos made the cut.

Number 6
Jane Mayer
The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals, 2008
A thorough and damning investigation, based on her New Yorker articles, of the Bush administration’s more questionable tactics in the war on terror. Read the piece here.

Number 9
Anne Hull, Dana Priest (reporters) and Michel du Cille (photographer)
Soldiers Face Neglect, Frustration at Army’s Top Medical Facility, February 2007, The Washington Post
This two-part, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation of abuses at Walter Reed Army Medical Center exposed the substandard treatment soldiers received at this Washington, D.C., hospital and led to firings, resignations, government investigations and efforts to better care for those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Read the piece here.

Read the full list here.

Judges outside NYU including D.C.’s own Juan Williams of NPR: Madeleine Blais (University of Massachusetts), Gene Roberts (former editor Philadelphia Inquirer and New York Times), Dorothy Rabinowitz (Wall Street Journal), Morley Safer (60 Minutes), Ben Yagoda (University of Delaware), Eric Newton (Knight Foundation), Leon Dash (University of Illinois), Juan Williams (NPR), Sylvia Nasar (Columbia) and Greil Marcus (cultural critic).

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Morning Reading List, 04.09.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Joe Scarborough’s birthday! Also: Hugh Hefner and Jenna Jameson (why are we not surprised they share a day…thanks MicCheck). Also, on this day in 1865, Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you have broken a bone.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “My best friend was laid off, and she was the smartest person there. There was no good reason. It was ‘budgetary.’ I have no more faith in this industry.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The slow-drip continues…more WHCA news.

  • Pulitzer Day: Keller Brings Up ASME’s, Polks; WaPo Rager

  • Hillary Clinton (55%) finished narrowly behind Barack Obama (56%) in the race for press exposure last week. But a Clinton-centric narrative was the focus of the campaign coverage for March 31-April 6, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper readers agree with editors on the basics of what makes good journalism, but they are more apt to want looser rules for online conversations, a new study on news credibility has found.”

  • The Cornell Daily Sun reports, “Yesterday afternoon, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicholas D. Kristof delivered a lecture on the current human rights violations in Sudan and China’s controversial involvement in the continuation of the civil conflict. The New York Times columnist has visited the war-torn region of Darfur in Sudan on several occasions and urges the international community — especially Americans — to focus their attention on providing more aid, including political relief, in hope of ending the genocide.”

  • CJR’s Dean Starkman writes, “The big winner in yesterday’s Pulitzers? The investigation. Sure, The Washington Post won six. But newspapering’s highest—and most important—form won at least that many. Not only did our brothers and sisters upstairs on the Pulitzer Board award two investigative prizes, to Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker of The New York Times and to the Chicago Tribune staff for work on tainted medicine and consumer goods, an investigative thread ran through most of the major awards—including the Public Service award, given to The Washington Post staff for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull, and photographer Michel du Cille.”

  • Plain Dealer Columnist Ted Diadiun writes, “‘There is no patent on a good idea,’ an editor friend used to say. The pithy comment essentially summed up the source of most good newspaper stories: Other people.”

  • Dave Barry writes, “I’ve had many entertaining arguments with Gene on a wide range of issues, including which of us has a bigger oosik. (An oosik is the bone from the penis of a walrus. Gene and I each own one.) We’ve both won some arguments and lost some; neither of us, to my recollection, has ever been gracious about it. One of the running jokes that developed between us is that at some point in the argument, usually early, I will remind Gene that I have won a Pulitzer Prize, and he has not. I have used this particular argument — this is a conservative estimate — 119 million times. And Gene has never had a good answer for it. Until today. I am very pleased to report that Mr. Gene Weingarten has won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Gene, congratulations on an honor that is well-deserved and overdue. I’m thrilled for you, and genuinely happy that I can never use that particular argument against you again.”

  • Check out yesterday’s chat with Pulitzer Prize-winner Gene Weingarten.

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp reports, “Inside Word at Pulitzer Announcement: Entries Down, But Online Up.” Also, E&P has a round-up of winners and their stories, including Steven Pearlstein, Gene Weingarten, Amy Harmon, David Umhoefer, The Chicago Tribune editors and Michael Ramirez.

  • AJR’s John Morton writes, “Shortsighted cutbacks pose a serious threat to the future of newspapers.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer says, “Strategy Room Becomes Part of FNC Weekend.”

  • An ABC release announced, “‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ placed 1st among key demo viewers last week, tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ in the demo rating and share; both broadcasts averaged a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 7.98 million, placing second. Compared to a year ago, ‘World News’ posted gains among key demo viewers, increasing 6%. Additionally, for the twelfth time in thirteen weeks, the ABC News broadcast won among Women 25-54, averaging a 2.4/9.’”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 31, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.267 million total viewers”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Disney’s Bob Iger Explains Why ABC Passed On CNN Outsourcing, Why Media Concentration Is ‘A Joke’”

  • Silver Spring-based Discovery unveiled to advertisers yesterday its celebrity-encrusted plans for the new cable network Planet Green — the Prius of programming. Planet Green rises like the phoenix from the ashes of Discovery Home at 6 p.m. on June 4.

  • Small cable firms protest

  • CBS layoffs signal a financial squeeze on TV stations

  • DCTRV reports, “NBC Washington started handing out Sony HD cameras to all network field crews on Thursday, 4/3. NBC currently has four HD edit suits available and plans on upgrading the microwave system to full HD by the end of the summer.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reuters reports, “Viral sensation Obama Girl and satirical political corruption fighters Swift Kids for Truth along with Web sites for the New York Times and National Public Radio (NPR) have been nominated for Webby awards.”

  • Britannica Blog reports, “We’ll launch our blog forum on ‘Newspapers & the Net’ with an excerpt from Nick’s book. Throughout this forum assorted writers, journalists, bloggers, and media scholars will discuss and debate the state of newspapers in the digital age. Some of the participants will address Nick’s ideas directly, and others will talk generally about the impact of new media on traditional avenues of publishing. Lively debate will occur along the way, and we welcome your input, your comments and perspectives, and encourage your participation in these discussions.”

  • PostGlobal launched a blog called “Pomfret’s China“. “It will be
    written by Outlook Editor of The Washington Post John Pomfret and will cover the political, economic, and cultural elements playing into China’s rise as a world power.” Also coming to washingtonpost.com is “Intel Dump” by Phillip Carter. His blog will explore issues of national security and intelligence relating to American diplomatic, military and economic power.”

  • “C-SPAN wants to know, ‘What issue in this election is most important to you, and why?’ Shoot a short video response to this question and post it on our YouTube page! Now through the eve of the Pennsylvania primaries, YouTube users and C-SPAN viewers can upload their video to the YouTube/C-SPAN webpage.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Atlantic Media, owner of The Atlantic and National Journal, is close to selling its controlling stake in 02138 magazine to Sandow Media, WWD has learned. A spokesman for Sandow confirmed that the deal was in its final stages, but said it had not closed.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Former MSNBC VP Tammy Haddad, now president of Haddad Media, has been named to the Folio: 40. An annual list of magazine industry ‘influencers and innovators.’ Haddad is honored for showing ‘the magazine world that producing compelling video content doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition.’ Hadded is working with Newsweek on their video ventures.”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will broadcast from the Newseum during the grand opening festivities on Friday, 4/11. XM’s presidential election channel (XM-130) will be live from the new newsgathering museum on Capitol Hill from 11 AM to 4 PM. Also, DCRTV hears that former WMALer Chris Core, who now works for the POTUS channel, will emcee the opening from 7 AM to 9 AM Friday.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam writes, “Samantha Power didn’t get the memo! Nor, apparently, did retired John F. Kennedy School of Government — sorry, Harvard Kennedy School — professor Francis Bator. Both have been using the K-School’s ‘old’ name in communications of late. The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, whose ‘discussion papers’ stare up at me from the bottom of my wastebasket, is still using the no-longer operative moniker, ‘John F. Kennedy School . . . etc., etc.’”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • The Washington Social Diary reports, “True to its nature, in this town the power lunch spots get ranked in hierarchical order. The top is the top, meaning the leading power dining room would be the White House ‘Mess.’ The name belies its quiet authority, sitting as it does in the West Wing basement, under the Oval Office, and across the hall from the ‘Sit Room.’”

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    JOBS

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Staff Reporter.

  • Bristol Herald Courier is looking for a Sports Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is seeking a Copy Editor, Health Line Group.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for a Desk Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Pulitzers Announced…WaPo Cleans Up

    Where the WaPo took home the gold:

    Public Service:

      Awarded to The Washington Post for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull and photographer Michel du Cille in exposing mistreatment of wounded veterans at Walter Reed Hospital, evoking a national outcry and producing reforms by federal officials.

    Breaking News Reporting:

      Awarded to The Washington Post Staff for its exceptional, multi-faceted coverage of the deadly shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, telling the developing story in print and online.

    National Reporting:

      Awarded to Jo Becker and Barton Gellman of The Washington Post for their lucid exploration of Vice President Dick Cheney and his powerful yet sometimes disguised influence on national policy.

    International reporting:

      Awarded to Steve Fainaru of The Washington Post for his heavily reported series on private security contractors in Iraq that operate outside most of the laws governing American forces.

    Feature Writing:

      Awarded to Gene Weingarten of The Washington Post for his chronicling of a world-class violinist who, as an experiment, played beautiful music in a subway station filled with unheeding commuters.

    Commentary:

      Awarded to Steven Pearlstein of The Washington Post for his insightful columns that explore the nation’s complex economic ills with masterful clarity.

    (Oh, and Bob Dylan won a Pulitzer, too)

    As E&P notes, this is the second biggest sweep by a single paper ever (the NYT took home seven in 2002, thanks to its Sept. 11 coverage).

    And: Does this silence some of the anti-Len Downie chatter (accurate or not) we’ve been hearing recently?

    Congrats to all.

    Morning Reading List, 09.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Vitamin Water wins out over Gatorade.

  • We looked into this, “missing? washington post’s technorati supplied ‘who’s blogging’” and discovered the Washington Post did not get rid of the feature. It just wasn’t ready for the new home page launch. The paper tells us the “what blogs are saying” feature will be back in a few weeks.

  • Fox News announced, “FOX News Channel’s Greta Van Susteren will conduct an interview Thursday with former President Bill Clinton. The interview will air on FOX News Channel’s On the Record with Greta Van Susteren from 10-11PM/ET.”

  • Glynnis MacNicol and Rachel Sklar live blog the Dem debate (and “Dems debate Tim Russert’s giant noggin.”)

  • “During a panel discussion at the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Washington, D.C., former White House Press Secretaries Ron Nessen, Larry Speakes and Mike McCurry will join Dr. Martha Joynt Kumar, a professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University, to discuss what their jobs were like and whether they would be harder in today’s climate. Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR, will moderate the discussion. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Columbia B room.” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports that the witness list for today’s Senate hearing on Google’s proposed $3.1 billion purchase of ad firm DoubleClick “is more notable for who is not testifying than for who is. The five witnesses slated to appear before the panel, including company officials, analysts and consumer privacy experts, are divided between those for and against the deal. Google’s chief legal officer, David Drummond, will appear before the panel, along with his counterpart at rival Microsoft, General Counsel Brad Smith.”

  • Rumormonger reports, “There’s not much surprise left, given the drumbeat of rumors that AOL would be pursuing mass layoffs later this year. But we now hear that layoffs have started at the Internet giant, even earlier than expected, with a number of middle managers getting the chop Tuesday afternoon.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Justice Department is moving ‘as quickly as possible’ in its antitrust review of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s acquisition of XM Satellite Radio Inc, a senior department official said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “In a major reorganization that affects all of its top executives, ABC News president David Westin Tuesday appointed a single executive to oversee all programs. Dave Davis, formerly general manager of WABC in New York, was named executive vice president responsible for ABC News programs including Good Morning America, World News, 20/20, Primetime, Nightline, This Week with George Stephanopoulos and the overnight broadcasts. Davis will report to Westin.”

  • USA Today reports, “Arianna Huffington’s business plan: start an online news site, fueled by blog reports from her celebrity and influential friends. And have them all work for free, in exchange for using her bully pulpit. Nearly 2 1/2 years and $10 million later, the experiment has nearly paid off. The Huffington Post is the fifth-most-linked-to blog on the Internet, according to
    measurement firm Technorati.”

  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, “Consumers are in control, and advertisers should get used to it. That was a common theme as marketing industry leaders gathered in Manhattan on Monday to ponder how the Internet has turned their world upside down.”

  • Julie Mason, Houston Chronicle’s White House Correspondent, has been added to the regular rotation for Hardball.

  • B&C reports, “The Justice Department agreed to seek Supreme Court review of the Second Circuit court’s smackdown of the Federal Communications Commission’s crackdown on fleeting profanities.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Poynter’s ongoing Eyetrack research project has taught us some important basics, such as: Online audiences focus heavily on headlines, and in some cases almost ignore pictures. But other research tools make me want to challenge — or at least supplement — this finding.”

  • A release announced, “National Journal Group, Washington’s leading publisher of political and policy news and analysis, today announced the lineup for the inaugural edition of National Journal On Air, its new weekly show on XM Satellite Radio’s P.O.T.U.S.’08 channel. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will headline National Journal’s first show in the featured newsmaker interview with host Linda Douglass. Also scheduled to appear on the show are National Journal political writer Jim Barnes, National Journal White House correspondent Carl Cannon, and Senior Editor of The Hotline, John Mercurio.”

  • The Hill reports, “It’s always preferable to conduct interviews face to face, but hey, if Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) wants to visit via satellite from a barn in New York, who was Fox News to complain? That’s ‘Fox News Sunday’ host Chris Wallace’s take on Clinton’s appearance last weekend on his show.”

  • We have to ask, in light of the Washington Times hiring two new hires on the copy desk, does that mean the paper’s hiring freeze is off?

  • A reader tells us, “You should know that there is an error in the Michel du Cille internal memo from the Washington Post. Contrary to their statement, there is no ‘University of Indiana’. Rather, the appropriate institution to which they refer is ‘Indiana University’… a very important difference.”

  • Featured on Kudlow & Company, Brent Bozell revealed the results of the Business & Media Institute’s yearlong study analyzing how businessmen and women were characterized by ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN and Fox News’ evening newscasts. The results reveal how network news portrays our nation’s corporate leaders — as criminals, crooks, villains and filthy rich big-wigs. The full 18-page study — with audio and video — is available at www.businessandmedia.org.

  • Ad Week’s Mike Shields writes, “Political candidates from both parties are demonstrating a stubborn devotion to traditional media, along with a cautious streak that is holding them back from embracing the Web as an outlet for political ad dollars, according to a group of panelists speaking during a Mixx Conference session” held Tuesday.

  • B to B reports, “DoubleClick announced the launch of DoubleClick Mobile, a new service for mobile advertising. DoubleClick Mobile integrates operational processes for scheduling, targeting, selecting and delivering ads on mobile Web pages with publishers’ existing digital channels.”

  • Multichannel reports, “TV Guide Broadband, the digital video entertainment programming service launched one year ago by TV Guide Network, has signed a new distribution deal with Comcast’s portal site, officials said Tuesday.”

  • Reuters reports, “Steve Case, the founder of the AOL Internet service, is backing a new online payment company that promises to let users transfer funds for free and offer a credit card with sharply lower fees for merchants.”

  • Ad Week reports, “WPP Group joined in a $12 million round of funding for blog and social network tracking service Visible Technologies.”

  • New York Observer reports, “It’s still nearly two months until News Corp. officially closes on Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal’s parent. But there’s growing evidence that at The Journal, the Rupert Murdoch era has already begun. On September 17, the paper announced that it would launch Pursuits, a glossy magazine supplement covering the exploits of the superrich. The press release sent out by The Journal quoted publisher Gordon Crovitz and managing editor Marcus Brauchli — but according to one staffer, the prototype for the new venture had already passed through the hands of Mr. Murdoch, who gave it the green light.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s Fortune and Money business magazines plan to contribute several hours of video news to the company’s CNN Money Web site each day to lure users and advertisers.”

    Jobs

  • E&E Publishing/E&ETV is looking for a Video Producer.

  • Media General is looking for a Senior Multimedia Reporter.

  • The Center for Democracy & Technology is seeking Dynamic Communications Director.

  • The Society For Neuroscience is looking for a Staff Writer/Editor (Print).

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext