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Posts Tagged ‘Mike Bloomberg’

Morning Reading List, 12.29.08

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Morning Reading List, 03.10.08

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Good morning Washington. IT’S CHUCK NORRIS’ BIRTHDAY!

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

REVOLVING DOOR

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press has named two veteran editors to leadership positions in a new regional editing operation for the Southern United States. Brian Carovillano, news editor for the AP in Northern California, has been promoted to the new position of regional editor for the South. And Oscar Dixon, a longtime sports editor with USA Today, has been named to the new position of assistant sports editor for the South region.”

  • An Examiner release announced, “Michael J. Barnum has been promoted to regional vice president of circulation for the Washington-Baltimore Examiner Newspaper Group. Barnum was circulation vice president of The Baltimore Examiner since shortly after launch in 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Lots of Gridiron highlights!

  • Mortman on “What A [Expletive] Week It’s Been,” “A Glass-Enclosed Opinion Poll” and “[Expletive Deleted]?! Oh What The [Expletive Deleted]! My [Expletive Deleted] It Is!

  • The Examiner’s Bill Sammon interviewed at Gibraltar Associates’ Tarah Donoghue for his “3 Minute Interview.”

  • A reader writes in, “about the Natl Journalism Awards: the winner for Editorial Writing, Sonni Efron, is based in the LAT Washington bureau.”

  • Lone Post Calls Out Black Barack Attack

  • Bye, bye white hand.

  • From National Journal:

      So the Mike Huckabee press plane had a game: If you caught someone napping, you put a sheet of paper with a cute caption in front of him or her and took a picture. After much trying, participants finally snapped Huckabee last week, with the cutline: “If I close my eyes, it feels like Air Force One”

  • WWD.com reports, “Can glossy luxury supplements help save newspapers? The Wall Street Journal is about to find out. Days from now, the Journal will take prototypes for its upcoming quarterly glossy on the road, making a pitch to the coveted luxury advertiser resting on two major points: that the demographics of the paper are ripe for luxury marketers, and that new editor Tina Gaudoin possesses the experience and contacts to convincingly speak to the high-end audience.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Niche pages with a targeted audience may be attractive in weak economy”

  • “On Monday, March 17, the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s fifth annual State of The News Media report will address this question and introduce original research on topics as far ranging as the economics of advertising to the impact of citizen media sites.” Check out the results here.

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    TV

  • Brian Williams Nudges NBC to The Top With A Light Touch

  • Ratings Retention Favors FNC

  • TV Puts an Odd Lens on Politics

  • A CNN release announced, “CNN’s political team will report from the CNN Election Center in New York and from the state of Mississippi for the Tuesday, March 11, primary. This special night of political coverage follows CNN’s March 4 ratings win and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most watched in cable news history. On Tuesday, March 11, lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer joined by anchor Campbell Brown will guide the network’s coverage in a special edition of Election Center from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Chief national correspondent John King will provide in-depth data using the CNN ‘multi-touch’ wall, and anchor Soledad O’Brien will report the exit poll data.”

  • Journalism in the Hands of the Neighborhood

  • TV’s election lessons.

  • Michael Getler’s ombudsman column for PBS.

  • Reuters reports, “A senior Democratic senator on Wednesday introduced a resolution aimed at overturning a decision by regulators that loosened media ownership restrictions in the 20 biggest U.S. cities.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Tucker To Journalist That Got Powers Fired: ‘It’s A Little Much Being Lectured On Journalistic Ethics By Someone From The Scotsman’”

  • The New York Observer reports,Steve Friedman, the legendary news producer who’s been known over the years to walk the hallways of the various morning news outfits at which he’s worked wielding a baseball bat, is starting his own media venture. On the same day CBS News announced that it was firing embattled Early Show executive producer Shelley Ross, Mr. Friedman (who, oversaw the Early Show prior to Ms. Ross’ arrival), publicly announced the plans for his new venture, a consulting company called Vir2L media.”

  • A reader writes in, “msnbc, at least on my tv at home, has been frozen for at least 20 minutes. no sound, just …a full screen of a graphic about the gop buying anti-obama web domain names.”

  • Tucker To Journalist That Got Powers Fired: ‘It’s A Little Much Being Lectured On Journalistic Ethics By Someone From The Scotsman’

  • A release announced, “AARP, the largest membership organization for people 50+, today announced the launch of AARP TV, a franchise that will create original lifestyle and news content catering to the boomer and 50+ demographic. AARP TV’s first two syndicated television shows—Inside E Street and My Generation—will debut on March 10 and 11, 2008, respectively and be distributed through and air on Retirement Living Television (RLTV) which reaches more than 29 million households nationwide. These two weekly half-hour shows extend from AARP’s lifestyle and news platforms as well as select single-topic specials.”

  • “Kimberly Dozier: I’ve Got to Make The Decisions For the Risks I Take

  • Check out B&C’s John Eggerton’s account of the Radio & Television News Directors Foundation dinner, where former CNN’s John Roberts cracked wise about Shelley Ross’ departure from CBS’ Early Show.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABCNews.com release announced, “ABCNEWS.com achieved another record-breaking traffic month in February 2008. Last month, ABCNEWS.com again broke all previous site traffic records, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 82% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 202.3 million page views, up 45% from the previous year. In February, the site increased video views by 117% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The Financial Times has launched a Facebook application that will give students free access to FT.com. The free subscription offer will be available through an application available in college groups within the social networking website.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “High-tech signs to feature breaking news”

  • Fortune reports, “Increasingly, Web content sites are finding ways to organize and syndicate writers’ content — one even sends them a check up front.”

  • Reuters reports, “For CBS, raiding Silicon Valley for talent is the fastest way to lose its rep as your grandpa’s choice media company. CBS Interactive President Quincy Smith, himself a veteran dealmaker for tech and media companies with close ties to the west coast, has been poaching top tech companies for talent, particularly engineers, to build up its online offerings.”

  • WebProNews.com reports, “When it comes to trusting the press in general 54 percent of Americans say they do not trust them and 46 percent say they do not trust television while 41 percent say the do trust Internet news according to a new poll from HarrisInteractive.”

  • Adotas reports, “Developers just got a brand new toy, courtesy of AOL. The company today announced the launch of Open AIM 2.0, a product that allows developers to access the AIM instant messaging network faster and integrate AIM into their sites and applications in customizable ways.”

  • InformationWeek reports, “If you’ve had a creeping sense that wireless has become more integral to your working and personal lives, then Wednesday’s numbers from the Pew Internet Project will confirm it with hard numbers.”

  • Online Media Daily reports, “Google is not out to disintermediate advertising agencies, but it looks as if it has it’s heart set on disintermediating some other organizations that help agencies manage how they buy media. That was one of the takeaways from Google President-Advertising and Commerce, North America, Tim Armstrong during a keynote address Thursday at the American Association of Advertising Agencies Media Conference here.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The sprawling media-information company that Mayor Mike Bloomberg left behind is bracing for the worst in terms of a fiscal downturn. ‘The new top brass here are betting on a recession,’ said one insider, in a thinly veiled pot shot at Dan Doctoroff, the one-time economy czar in Bloomberg’s administration who last month was named president of Bloomberg LP.”

  • A reader points out, “minor note: your post.com hand post cites ‘campaign within washingtonpost.com’ … but the elevators travel 12 floors and there are a bunch of non-WPNI companies in the building.”

  • “Digg CEO Jay Adelson is calling this post ‘completely inaccurate’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MinOnline reports, “Now that media conferences are in full swing, the question that keeps coming up is whether magazines are going the way of VHS and the horse and buggy. For John Squires, executive vice president of Time Inc, the answer was a resounding no.”

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    RADIO

  • NewsBusters: “NPR Favors Special Tax Breaks — For Its Own Headquarters

  • DCRTV spots a funny goof in the WaPo…

  • The AP reports, “CBS Radio is teaming up with AOL to provide online streams from all 140 of its stations to AOL’s online radio service. The deal announced Friday will bring news, sports and music programming from big CBS stations to AOL, including WFAN-AM and 1010 WINS in New York.”

  • AOL, CBS Team Up For Radio, Advertising

  • Mark Kaye spoke with Chris Core about leaving WMAL-AM, and “his past, present and future.”

  • From DCRTV:

      DCRTV hears from a reliable local sports source that Washington Post superstar sports columnist Tony Kornheiser (left) “will make it official” this month that he’ll be returning to his broadcast booth gig at ESPN’s “Monday Night Football.”

  • Invite more conservatives to NPR?

  • Barron’s reports, “Government approval for the pending merger of XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) and Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) ‘now appear less likely,’ Pacific Crest Washington analyst Erik Olbeter said in a research note this morning. Now 13 months since the original announcement of their plans to merge, Olbeter says that ‘prospects for the merger have become increasingly cloudy.’”

  • Journalist Perspectives on Five Years in Iraq

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press seeks an APTN Newsperson for its Washington, D.C. operation.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Web Content Assistant: Writer.

  • The American Prospect is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • W*USA 9 News Now is looking for a Freelance Writer — Metromix.

  • Hanley Wood LLC is looking for a Senior Marketing Manager and a Senior Editor Online — Builder.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Editor, National Desk.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Editor, National Desk and a Digital Trainer, Digital News Desk.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning More Like Noon Reading List, 01.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

    We blame Iowa for the delay.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “Discovery Communications will announce today that company veteran Mark Hollinger will be promoted to the newly created job of chief operating officer, wrapping up a frenetic year of reorganization, acquisitions and layoffs at the Silver Spring cable television network.”

  • A release announced, “Macon Morehouse has joined the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) Department of Federal Affairs as an assistant director. She will be responsible for media relations and lobbying on issues such as Internet safety and the impact of advertising on children.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • LA Observed reports, “Times publisher David Hiller has let staffers know that he was back home for the holidays but has returned here refreshed and ready to carry out the Sam Zell agenda. Turns out Zell gets credit (or blame) for the banners hung inside the Times building that staffers have been rolling their eyes over.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the first time in polls since 1996, this ABC News/Facebook survey finds the Internet rivaling newspapers as one of Americans’ top two sources of news about the presidential election. It’s also the only election news source to show growth, doubling since 2000. One reason is the Internet’s advance overall: Seventy-three percent of adults now go online, the most in polls since the dawn of the Internet age. Forty percent use the Internet specifically for news and information about politics and the election, surpassing the previous high, 35 percent in a 2004 survey.” Check out the full analysis and results.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, has boosted the newspaper’s US-based news operation by purchasing an American site offering news and commentary on the money management industry. Money-Media, bought from its sole shareholder and CEO Michael Griffin, offers live news services on the American world of ‘high-net worth’ asset management and mutual fund trustees. Its Agenda section claims to be ‘the most influential source of intelligence for today’s corporate directors’.”

  • The National Legal and Policy Center reports, “The long-term decline in newspaper circulation presents the conservative movement with an excellent opportunity to increase its influence with the media. Falling readership and tighter budgets are forcing newspapers to dedicate fewer staff to investigative reporting. As a result, they are increasingly relying upon nonprofit organizations to fill the gap. A 2005 Arizona State University study found that 37 percent of the 100 leading daily newspapers had no full-time investigative reporters.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Paul Steiger thinks there’s a possibility Bloomberg LP and The New York Times Co. could merge sometime after the election, assuming Mike Bloomberg doesn’t win the presidency. Jim Cramer agrees.”

  • Secrecy News reports, “On December 31 President Bush signed into law the “Openness Promotes Effectiveness in our National (OPEN) Government Act of 2007,” which amends the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The new law makes several constructive procedural changes in the FOIA to encourage faster agency response times, to enable requesters to track the status of their requests, to expand the basis for fee waivers, and more.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage Sleepless in Seattle, Billich gets his TV job when he wants it, Playoff Preview”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It’s a very big win for Barack Obama, in part because he knocked off the former first lady and in part because the media have been hankering to write the upset story. But remember all the pundits taking Hillary Clinton’s inevitability for granted most of the year, and despairing during the summer and fall that Obama could never catch up because he wasn’t pummeling her? He never hammered Hillary all that hard, and he still caught up.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “CNBC, First in Business Worldwide,
    had robust ratings growth in 2007 and had its best year in Business Day programming (5 AM-7 PM ET) since 2003 in the key demographic of adults 25-54. In total viewers, CNBC had its best year since 2002.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser has learned the CBS News blog PublicEye, once described as a “de facto ombudsman” of CBS News, has ceased operations. CBS Interactive cut several staff members last month, including Matthew Felling who was editor of the site. A spokesperson for CBS Interactive tells TVNewser, ‘We weren’t able to find a sustainable business model for Public Eye. We are exploring ways to maintain a similar spirit of public discourse by engaging the CBSNews.com audience and building a community around multiple voices.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Writers Guild of America said it will picket the Golden Globe Awards, rejecting a call by the show’s owners to let a scripted show air on Jan. 13 without protests.”

  • Silicon Valley Insider reports, “We know several people who watch the Fox Business Network, but that’s because all of them appear on the newly launched cable channel from time to time. The rest of America, it seems, is soundly ignoring News Corp.’s newest offering: Nielsen says an average of 6,300 people a day watched FBN in the first two months of its launch last fall — a little more than 2% of CNBC’s audience of 283,000.”

  • DCRTV reports, “The still relatively new French ambassador to the US, Pierre Vimont, will be the guest on “The Q&A Cafe With Carol Joynt” on 2/7. It will air on NewsChannel 8 that weekend and DC Cable the following Friday. The cafe begins its new season next week with syndicated columnist Robert Novak”

  • The AP reports, “ABC News is eliminating Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter and Democrats Dennis Kucinich and Mike Gravel from its prime- time presidential debates Saturday night because they did not meet benchmarks for their support.”

  • Brian Stelter takes New York Times readers “Inside CNN’s Control Room, Balancing Projections With Patience”

  • TVNewser reports,Shepard Smith, talking with Greta Van Susteren and Susan Estrich went there during the late-night coverage of the Iowa caucuses. Smith was talking about Rep. Ron Paul’s 10% support from caucus-goers. ‘More than double’ what Rudy Giuliani got, Smith said. Then he asked the question: ‘Should Fox News reconsider’ and allow Paul in the GOP forum set for Sunday night?”

  • Also from DCRTV: “Landmark Communications, the parent company of the Annapolis Capital and the Bowie Blade-News newspapers, is exploring a possible sale of its businesses. That’s according to the Virginian-Pilot, the flagship newspaper of Norfolk-based Landmark, which owns a batch of media properties, including The Weather Channel”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When Jim Stewart stepped down from CBS News in November 2006 after some 16 years of reporting on a range of topics for the Tiffany Network, the longtime Washington-based correspondent retired to the warmth of Florida. Now, depending on a judge’s ruling in an ongoing case, Mr. Stewart could be spending a part of his golden years in a much less sunny position—namely in contempt of a federal court.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Television’s late-night impresarios burst back on the air Wednesday after a forced two-month hiatus, expressing support for the striking writers even though several of the hosts crossed the picket line to resume their shows.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Wednesday was not just the first trading day of the year. It was also the first working day for Jeffrey Bewkes in his role as the new chief executive of media octopus Time Warner. Mr. Bewkes’s move to the C.E.O. chair, recently occupied by Richard Parsons, comes amid rampant chatter about whether he might decide to sell some of Time Warner’s parts, such as AOL or its publishing arm. Much of this speculation is old. And so far, Mr. Bewkes hasn’t tipped his hand. But in a report Wednesday, an analyst from UBS sounded skeptical that a sale would come soon and argued that such a move might not add much value anyway.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “On Saturday, January 5, 2008 — only two days after the critical Iowa caucuses and three days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary — ABC News, Facebook, and ABC affiliate WMUR will team up for a historic debate night.” For more details, click here.

  • Eat The Press reports, “TVNewser has the confirm: CBS’ Public Eye Blog is no more (seriously, look for it — it’s gone from the list of blogs). After last month’s round of layoffs at CBS (joyeux noel!), we wondered if that meant ‘Bye to the Eye.’ We’d asked CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock who specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated and claimed that political reporter (and former PubEye co-editor) Brian Montopoli would be taking Felling’s spot.”

  • The Boston Herald reports, “Back in 2004, YouTube, the Internet-based video-sharing site, hadn’t been created. Now, the site, and the millions of the videos posted on it, has a coveted, influential spot in the current presidential campaign. On Monday night, the site and its owner, Google, plan on celebrating that role, by hosting an epic bash for all the reporters and photographers who are working the campaign trail. The party will be held at a Manchester, N.H., science center, the night before the state’s voters winnow down the list of presidential candidates.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “A new study found that many uses of copyrighted material in online video, including mash-ups and satire, are legal and could be endangered by new censorship practices.”

  • Based on the number of anonymous tips we’ve received, you’ve picked up on a change on Wonkette’s masthead. Ken Layne is no managing editor and John Clarke, Jr. has left the website.

  • Kara Swisher shares, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Learned to Love the Blog: Goodbye Dead Trees!”

  • CyberJournalist.net reports, “Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007″

  • Jon Friedman tell us, “How the media let us down at the Iowa caucus”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Less than three months after its much-ballyhooed launch, Fox Business Network is drawing an average of 6,000 daytime viewers. The Nielsen number, for the period Oct. 15 through Dec. 16, rises to 15,000 during prime time. Taken in isolation, the debut might be judged an abysmal failure. But no one — including Fox executives — expected the fledgling channel to make a serious run at the top business network, CNBC, until it had been on the air for at least a year.”

  • Eat The Press represents, “More Media Winners, Iowa Edition”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Age reports, “Time Inc to challenge Soeharto’s $125 million libel win”

  • A tipster tells us, “Sonny Bunch from Weekly Standard also sporting a ‘strike beard’”

  • Business Week reports, “As if media companies didn’t already have enough going on, now they have something else to look forward to in 2008: scarcity. I don’t mean the ‘scarcity’ media knew in easier times, back when owning printing presses or broadcast towers gave you a stranglehold on distribution, back when there was no newfangled noisy megaphone—the Internet—through which those whom traditionalists call ‘nonprofessionals’ could broadcast their own media.”

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    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

  • Matthew Felling to the The Kojo Nnamdi Show on NPR next Monday and Tuesday.

  • UPI reports, “For the first time, a national radio station will be devoted to the U.S. presidential race 24 hours a day, seven days a week, XM Satellite Radio said.”

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    JOBS

  • US News & World Report is looking for a Manager, Audience and Business Development: Health and a Manager, Audience & Business Development: Money

  • The Development Executive Group is looking for an Editor for Leading International Dev’t Website.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a
    Public Relations Coordinator.

  • Allison & Partners is looking for a Senior Account Executive and Account Manager.

  • Virilion is looking for a Copywriter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.03.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Lots and lots and lots of coverage of the recent Tribune deal. (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Almost no one got busted by an April Fools joke. Are you too smart or no fun?

  • Jack Hurley, “deputy director/senior VP, broadcasting, for the Newseum and its backer, the Freedom Forum” talks to B&C’s John Eggerton.

  • At AFI Silver, an Arch Look at ‘Broadcast News’

  • We’re At War; That’s Front-Page News Every Day

  • E&P reports, “While newspaper circulation continues to slide, readership is growing, especially with younger readers — when taking online newspaper sites into consideration. According to the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America, newspaper Web sites contributed a 13.7% increase in total newspaper audience for adults 25-to-34.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “MSNBC.com, the No. 2-ranked news Web site behind Yahoo News, is starting its first branding ad campaign this week.”

  • Are journalists predisposed to substance abuse? Tell us what you think.

  • Slate gives us this: “The WP takes a moment to explain why President Bush opting not to throw out the first pitch at a ballgame isn’t news. TP is just as confused as you are.”

  • Washington Whispers reports that Daryn Kagan “has found a new outlet for her special style of reporting: PBS. Come June, she airs Breaking the Curse, a documentary about a mom who dealt with her daughter’s death by helping Indians with leprosy.” More here.

  • CQ reports, “Baseball’s New TV Deal Draws Hill Scrutiny.” It is also drawing scrutiny from Virginians.

  • Chris Wallace torches Keith Olbermann.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “American Capital Strategies and an affiliate have invested $160 million in Geosign Group Holdings and Geosign Corp., collectively known as Geosign, an online publishing company
  • Business Week explores the question, “Is Google Too Powerful?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy is in talks to form advertising partnerships with Google, Yahoo and Microsoft to grab a greater share of Internet spending, says CEO Gary Pruitt.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner’s AOL says its Advertising.com unit will manage advertising sold on a new online video venture being built by News Corp. and NBC Universal. Advertising.com will also manage ads inserted into an embedded media player to be used by the venture’s distribution partners.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Should New York mayor Mike Bloomberg run for president of the United States, he will have a major ally in Rupert Murdoch.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “Comcast chief Brian Roberts received about $27.8 million in compensation last year, according to a statement the company filed with federal regulators.

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times’s new Classic Crossword Widget gives users the ability to personalize their Google home page with the newspaper’s crossword puzzle.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Washington Post is revamping its home page to make video more prominent. A new, sleek, black media player, spanning nearly the entire width of the page, displays three windows with featured videos. The player can be ‘pushed’ to the right to present more multimedia offerings.”

  • M V Kamath, chairman of Prasar Bharati, India’s national public broadcaster, predicts a gloomy future for newspapers.”

  • Radar reports, “The Huffington Post, the left-leaning opinion collective and news aggregator that bears her name, is adding hundreds of new diarists in time for its two-year anniversary on May 9.”

  • Drudge reports, “During a live press conference in Baghdad, Senators McCain and Graham were heckled by CNN reporter Michael Ware.”

  • TVNewser tells us, “Greenfield May Be On CBS Within Month.” CBS News President Sean McManus said, “Jeff’s writing, reporting and analytical skills are second to none.” Greenfield’s start date is May 1.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “Discovery Communications says it has agreed to buy Cox Communications’ 25 percent stake in the company for $1.28 billion.”

  • Gawker took “a little gander” at some of Salon’s recent filings with the SEC.

  • TVNewser has highlights from Newsday’s profile on Sean Hannity.

  • FOX News Channel tells us they were the first cable news network to break today’s tragic news of the shooting in Seattle at the University of Washington.

  • Yesterday from Reporters Without Borders: “Reporters Without Borders today voiced its serious concern about the continued detention in the Gaza Strip of British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) reporter Alan Johnston and appealed to the Palestinian Authority president and prime minister to take a tougher line with his kidnappers to obtain his release.”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim takes “A Jab at JibJab.”

  • Mark Lasswell thinks George Stephanopoulos “knows more than he lets on about firing U.S. attorneys.”

  • Slate is fixing up The Fray “with the help of our users.”

  • Last night was the first night of “World News’” special series — “Key to the World” — that is taking ABC’s Bill Weir to remote places that are examples of the major challenges of our time. Last night was from Kiribati in the Pacific Ocean. Check out the report.

  • A reader writes in, “It’s been my experience that people who comment online tend to be obsessive trolls whose opinions should be taken with a grain of salt (and yes, I realize that I am currently commenting on a blog). Post.com is still the best news website around. And it looks clean and articulate. Just like Barry O. And no, I don’t work for WaPo.”