FishbowlNY TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Mike Huckabee’

Morning Reading List, 10.24.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 09.29.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

DC’s “Funniest” “Celebrity”: Kotecki Wuz Robbed!

Last night was the 15th annual “D.C.’s Funniest Celebrity” competition and, after bombing for two years in a year, I decided to simply become a judge instead. (See my write up on last night’s event for the Washington Examiner here, including video and photos).

Suffice to say: Politico’s James Kotecki was the funniest, but some judges — *cough*Clements*cough*Jenkins*cough*Tumulty*cough*Carlson*cough* — were smitten by the star power of Mike Huckabee so the governor ended up winning (either that or someone did a really bad job tallying up the votes).

Some other funny media notes:

  • Want to know why David Shuster couldn’t perform and Chuck Todd couldn’t judge? Ask the bigwigs at NBC who forbade them from doing so at the last minute. (This Lame-O Factor could also explain why Shuster was recently told to can his regular light-hearted news segment).

  • What did Kotecki call Shuster during his routine? A dick? Tsk tsk…

  • Emcee Clarence Page paid tribute to two former Funniest Celebrity contestants — Tony Snow and Tim Russert — who passed away in the past year. “Despite the fact that they were journalists, they were good people.”

  • CNN’s Jamie McIntyre: “I have very low expectations for tonight. I just want to get through it and still have my job tomorrow.”

  • Bob Barr: “I like MSNBC. It’s like Fox, but without the ratings.”

    Check out Kotecki’s performance here.

  • Morning Reading List, 02.25.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you would prefer Barack Obama as an editor in the newsroom.

  • Regarding the poll, a reader writes in, “i just voted for obama in your poll as the person i’d rather have as an editor in the newsroom … but i feel that you should clarify somehow that ‘newsroom editor’ does not equal ‘president,’ in case that was the parallel you were trying to draw. i say this because the very reason that i would prefer obama as my editor is the very same reason i would NOT want him to be my president (and likewise, the reason i don’t want hillary to be my editor is the same reason i’d prefer her to be the prez) — i feel like under obama’s newsroom leadership, i could get away with a lot more shit b/c he wouldn’t have the experience to know when i wasn’t doing what i was supposed to and/or when i wasn’t doing it right … and i feel like he’d be the ‘nice guy’ and the easier guy to work for and with … hillary, on the other hand, would run a much tighter ship. so, what i am essentially revealing is that i’m lazy, but also that i hillary would make a better president b/c i will vote for the person who can bust balls and get the job done, not just walk around the newsroom (or the oval office) and smile but not really know what’s going on … which sounds a lot like my current bosses … hmmm …”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Josh Rogin is adding a new line to his resume. In addition to his full time job as a CQ reporter, he is the weekend editorial producer/booker for CNN International.

  • Tara Wall is The Washington Times’ has a new deputy editor for the editorial page.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader writes, “While the Washington Post congratulates itself on today’s McCain lobbying story, Bloomberg had it three weeks ago: Lobbyists Give Clinton Most Money, McCain Has Most on Staff Democrat Hillary Clinton has raised more money from lobbyists than any other presidential candidate while Republican John McCain has more of them assisting his campaign.”

  • “NYT stands behind McCain-lobbyist story,” reports Politico.

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “N.Y. Times Gets Flak From All Sides on Explosive Story.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle’s Debra Saunders writes, “New York Times sullies itself with McCain story”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “The New York Times reads like a gossip sheet”

  • From Slate: “New York Times 0, New Republic 0, McCain 1″

  • E&P reports, “‘New Republic’ Scribe Not Sure His Story Prompted ‘NY Times’ To Run McCain Piece”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “McCain story proves incendiary among journalists, conservatives”

  • McCain/New York Times story and anonymous sources”

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur writes,Bill Keller and Len Downie owe their readers the full details about the timing and circumstances that caused them to publish today’s innuendo-rich and fact-lite exposes on John McCain.”

  • John McCain: ‘pampered politician’ no more?”

  • Michael Gerson writes, “The Times Throws Mud at McCain”

    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, February 17, 2008, ABC News’ ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. This is the 12th time this season ‘This Week’ beat ‘Face’ in Total Viewers and the 11th time beating CBS among
    the key Adults 25-54 demo. ‘This Week’ posted 3.01 million Total Viewers, outperforming ‘Face’ by 120,000. Among Adults 25-54, the program posted 1.25 million, beating CBS by 290,000.”

  • An NBC release announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the #2
    Sunday morning public affairs show, behind only NBC News’ ‘Meet The
    Press,’ for the week ending February 17th, according to Nielsen Media Research data. ‘The Chris Matthews Show’ delivered a 2.3 HH rating, topping ABC’s ‘This Week,’ CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending February 17.”

  • A release announced, “MSNBC will telecast a debate between
    Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama Tuesday, Feb. 26, live from Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio, 9-10:30 p.m. ET. ‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams will moderate the debate, joined by ‘Meet the Press’ moderator and NBC News Washington Bureau Chief Tim Russert. This is the final debate between Sens. Obama and Clinton before the crucial March 4 primaries in Ohio, Texas, Rhode Island and Vermont.”

  • An NBC release announced, “Throughout the week of February
    24, ‘NBC News With Brian Williams’ will take a look at the issues Americans are discussing and Presidential candidates are debating in a new series ‘Where They Stand.’ The series will layout a different issue each day and explain how Presidential candidates Senator Hillary Clinton, Senator Barack Obama, former Governor Mike Huckabee and Senator John McCain stand on each topic.”

  • An ABC release announced, “With the New York Philharmonic set to perform a live concert from Pyongyang, ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff will report from inside North Korea on the Philharmonic’s historic visit beginning Friday, February 22nd. While there Woodruff will also report on the ongoing denuclearization process. Mr. Woodruff’s reporting will air on all ABC News broadcasts and platforms. He will also contribute behind the scenes reporting to PBS’s special coverage of the live concert that will air in New York on Tuesday, February 26th at 8:00 PM and nationally on PBS on Thursday, February 28th at 9:00 PM ET (check local listings).”

  • NewsBusted reports, “Chris Matthews says Obama makes a ‘thrill’ go up his leg when he speaks”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Best Life reports, “The 10 most important voices to listen to this election cycle — all of which are likely new to you.” Orbitcast has more.

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Mark your calendars! Ed2010 is celebrating St. Patrick’s Day a week early. Come joine Ed at Fado on March 10 at 6:00 p.m. Please RSVP to theodora.blanchfield@gmail.com

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Trust for America’s Health is looking for a Media Relations Manager.

  • Spectrum Science Communications is looking for a Creative Director/Web & Graphic Design.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today, an Editor, Transcripts and a Reporter, Homeland Security.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Reporter/Correspondent Business, National Desk

  • MarketWatch is looking for a News Reporter/Producer, Radio.

  • US Holocaust Memorial Museum is looking for a Communications/Public Affairs Officer, a Marketing Specialist and a Web Communications Specialist.

  • Examiner.com is looking for a Baltimore City Editor.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking a Program Director.

  • Moment Magazine is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • Science News is looking for an Art Director.

  • The Century Council is looking for a Communications Manager.

  • The Century Council is looking for an Entry Level Interactive Media Coordinator.

  • Association for Conflict Resolution is looking for a Communications Director.

  • Center for Responsive Politics is looking for a Communications Internship Summer 2008.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning More Like Noon Reading List, 01.04.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

    We blame Iowa for the delay.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “Discovery Communications will announce today that company veteran Mark Hollinger will be promoted to the newly created job of chief operating officer, wrapping up a frenetic year of reorganization, acquisitions and layoffs at the Silver Spring cable television network.”

  • A release announced, “Macon Morehouse has joined the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) Department of Federal Affairs as an assistant director. She will be responsible for media relations and lobbying on issues such as Internet safety and the impact of advertising on children.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • LA Observed reports, “Times publisher David Hiller has let staffers know that he was back home for the holidays but has returned here refreshed and ready to carry out the Sam Zell agenda. Turns out Zell gets credit (or blame) for the banners hung inside the Times building that staffers have been rolling their eyes over.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the first time in polls since 1996, this ABC News/Facebook survey finds the Internet rivaling newspapers as one of Americans’ top two sources of news about the presidential election. It’s also the only election news source to show growth, doubling since 2000. One reason is the Internet’s advance overall: Seventy-three percent of adults now go online, the most in polls since the dawn of the Internet age. Forty percent use the Internet specifically for news and information about politics and the election, surpassing the previous high, 35 percent in a 2004 survey.” Check out the full analysis and results.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, has boosted the newspaper’s US-based news operation by purchasing an American site offering news and commentary on the money management industry. Money-Media, bought from its sole shareholder and CEO Michael Griffin, offers live news services on the American world of ‘high-net worth’ asset management and mutual fund trustees. Its Agenda section claims to be ‘the most influential source of intelligence for today’s corporate directors’.”

  • The National Legal and Policy Center reports, “The long-term decline in newspaper circulation presents the conservative movement with an excellent opportunity to increase its influence with the media. Falling readership and tighter budgets are forcing newspapers to dedicate fewer staff to investigative reporting. As a result, they are increasingly relying upon nonprofit organizations to fill the gap. A 2005 Arizona State University study found that 37 percent of the 100 leading daily newspapers had no full-time investigative reporters.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Paul Steiger thinks there’s a possibility Bloomberg LP and The New York Times Co. could merge sometime after the election, assuming Mike Bloomberg doesn’t win the presidency. Jim Cramer agrees.”

  • Secrecy News reports, “On December 31 President Bush signed into law the “Openness Promotes Effectiveness in our National (OPEN) Government Act of 2007,” which amends the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The new law makes several constructive procedural changes in the FOIA to encourage faster agency response times, to enable requesters to track the status of their requests, to expand the basis for fee waivers, and more.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage Sleepless in Seattle, Billich gets his TV job when he wants it, Playoff Preview”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It’s a very big win for Barack Obama, in part because he knocked off the former first lady and in part because the media have been hankering to write the upset story. But remember all the pundits taking Hillary Clinton’s inevitability for granted most of the year, and despairing during the summer and fall that Obama could never catch up because he wasn’t pummeling her? He never hammered Hillary all that hard, and he still caught up.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A release announced, “CNBC, First in Business Worldwide,
    had robust ratings growth in 2007 and had its best year in Business Day programming (5 AM-7 PM ET) since 2003 in the key demographic of adults 25-54. In total viewers, CNBC had its best year since 2002.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser has learned the CBS News blog PublicEye, once described as a “de facto ombudsman” of CBS News, has ceased operations. CBS Interactive cut several staff members last month, including Matthew Felling who was editor of the site. A spokesperson for CBS Interactive tells TVNewser, ‘We weren’t able to find a sustainable business model for Public Eye. We are exploring ways to maintain a similar spirit of public discourse by engaging the CBSNews.com audience and building a community around multiple voices.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Writers Guild of America said it will picket the Golden Globe Awards, rejecting a call by the show’s owners to let a scripted show air on Jan. 13 without protests.”

  • Silicon Valley Insider reports, “We know several people who watch the Fox Business Network, but that’s because all of them appear on the newly launched cable channel from time to time. The rest of America, it seems, is soundly ignoring News Corp.’s newest offering: Nielsen says an average of 6,300 people a day watched FBN in the first two months of its launch last fall — a little more than 2% of CNBC’s audience of 283,000.”

  • DCRTV reports, “The still relatively new French ambassador to the US, Pierre Vimont, will be the guest on “The Q&A Cafe With Carol Joynt” on 2/7. It will air on NewsChannel 8 that weekend and DC Cable the following Friday. The cafe begins its new season next week with syndicated columnist Robert Novak”

  • The AP reports, “ABC News is eliminating Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter and Democrats Dennis Kucinich and Mike Gravel from its prime- time presidential debates Saturday night because they did not meet benchmarks for their support.”

  • Brian Stelter takes New York Times readers “Inside CNN’s Control Room, Balancing Projections With Patience”

  • TVNewser reports,Shepard Smith, talking with Greta Van Susteren and Susan Estrich went there during the late-night coverage of the Iowa caucuses. Smith was talking about Rep. Ron Paul’s 10% support from caucus-goers. ‘More than double’ what Rudy Giuliani got, Smith said. Then he asked the question: ‘Should Fox News reconsider’ and allow Paul in the GOP forum set for Sunday night?”

  • Also from DCRTV: “Landmark Communications, the parent company of the Annapolis Capital and the Bowie Blade-News newspapers, is exploring a possible sale of its businesses. That’s according to the Virginian-Pilot, the flagship newspaper of Norfolk-based Landmark, which owns a batch of media properties, including The Weather Channel”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When Jim Stewart stepped down from CBS News in November 2006 after some 16 years of reporting on a range of topics for the Tiffany Network, the longtime Washington-based correspondent retired to the warmth of Florida. Now, depending on a judge’s ruling in an ongoing case, Mr. Stewart could be spending a part of his golden years in a much less sunny position—namely in contempt of a federal court.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Television’s late-night impresarios burst back on the air Wednesday after a forced two-month hiatus, expressing support for the striking writers even though several of the hosts crossed the picket line to resume their shows.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Wednesday was not just the first trading day of the year. It was also the first working day for Jeffrey Bewkes in his role as the new chief executive of media octopus Time Warner. Mr. Bewkes’s move to the C.E.O. chair, recently occupied by Richard Parsons, comes amid rampant chatter about whether he might decide to sell some of Time Warner’s parts, such as AOL or its publishing arm. Much of this speculation is old. And so far, Mr. Bewkes hasn’t tipped his hand. But in a report Wednesday, an analyst from UBS sounded skeptical that a sale would come soon and argued that such a move might not add much value anyway.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “On Saturday, January 5, 2008 — only two days after the critical Iowa caucuses and three days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary — ABC News, Facebook, and ABC affiliate WMUR will team up for a historic debate night.” For more details, click here.

  • Eat The Press reports, “TVNewser has the confirm: CBS’ Public Eye Blog is no more (seriously, look for it — it’s gone from the list of blogs). After last month’s round of layoffs at CBS (joyeux noel!), we wondered if that meant ‘Bye to the Eye.’ We’d asked CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock who specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated and claimed that political reporter (and former PubEye co-editor) Brian Montopoli would be taking Felling’s spot.”

  • The Boston Herald reports, “Back in 2004, YouTube, the Internet-based video-sharing site, hadn’t been created. Now, the site, and the millions of the videos posted on it, has a coveted, influential spot in the current presidential campaign. On Monday night, the site and its owner, Google, plan on celebrating that role, by hosting an epic bash for all the reporters and photographers who are working the campaign trail. The party will be held at a Manchester, N.H., science center, the night before the state’s voters winnow down the list of presidential candidates.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “A new study found that many uses of copyrighted material in online video, including mash-ups and satire, are legal and could be endangered by new censorship practices.”

  • Based on the number of anonymous tips we’ve received, you’ve picked up on a change on Wonkette’s masthead. Ken Layne is no managing editor and John Clarke, Jr. has left the website.

  • Kara Swisher shares, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Learned to Love the Blog: Goodbye Dead Trees!”

  • CyberJournalist.net reports, “Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007″

  • Jon Friedman tell us, “How the media let us down at the Iowa caucus”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Less than three months after its much-ballyhooed launch, Fox Business Network is drawing an average of 6,000 daytime viewers. The Nielsen number, for the period Oct. 15 through Dec. 16, rises to 15,000 during prime time. Taken in isolation, the debut might be judged an abysmal failure. But no one — including Fox executives — expected the fledgling channel to make a serious run at the top business network, CNBC, until it had been on the air for at least a year.”

  • Eat The Press represents, “More Media Winners, Iowa Edition”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Age reports, “Time Inc to challenge Soeharto’s $125 million libel win”

  • A tipster tells us, “Sonny Bunch from Weekly Standard also sporting a ‘strike beard’”

  • Business Week reports, “As if media companies didn’t already have enough going on, now they have something else to look forward to in 2008: scarcity. I don’t mean the ‘scarcity’ media knew in easier times, back when owning printing presses or broadcast towers gave you a stranglehold on distribution, back when there was no newfangled noisy megaphone—the Internet—through which those whom traditionalists call ‘nonprofessionals’ could broadcast their own media.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

  • Matthew Felling to the The Kojo Nnamdi Show on NPR next Monday and Tuesday.

  • UPI reports, “For the first time, a national radio station will be devoted to the U.S. presidential race 24 hours a day, seven days a week, XM Satellite Radio said.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • US News & World Report is looking for a Manager, Audience and Business Development: Health and a Manager, Audience & Business Development: Money

  • The Development Executive Group is looking for an Editor for Leading International Dev’t Website.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a
    Public Relations Coordinator.

  • Allison & Partners is looking for a Senior Account Executive and Account Manager.

  • Virilion is looking for a Copywriter.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.21.07

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. You don’t plan on watching any college football games on New Years Day. And, this morning, Kiefer Sutherland celebrates his 41st birthday sober, and in jail.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The Washington Post put together a quick audio slideshow that deconstructs Barack Obama’s fashion choices. Surfacely it seems that Obama is almost always wearing the same dark suit, and often without a tie. Robin Givhan and Nancy Donaldson look closer to see what these vestments signify. According to them, it shows that Obama is a modern leader, echoing the relaxed but still professional mindset of the American workforce.”

  • John Boehner is a fashion cop for reporters.

  • Bloomberg reports, “The chief executives of Gannett Co. and Media General Inc. personally lobbied top U.S. regulators before winning exceptions to rules that limit newspaper and broadcast ownership in the same markets.”

  • New York Times’ David Pogue explores, “The Generational Divide in Copyright Morality”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “A new era at Tribune Co. began taking shape Wednesday with the departure of Chairman and Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons and the expected arrival of new leadership under Chicago billionaire Sam Zell. The changing of the guard represents a make-or-break proposition for the 160-year-old media concern, struggling to transform itself for the Internet age by going private in a daring, debt-laden $8.2 billion deal.”

  • We hear the Washington Times tree is back up. The first one had its needles fall off.

  • Washington City Paper reports, “To this day, the Washington Post lives by the guiding principles of fabled publisher Eugene Meyer, who decreed, among other things, the following: ‘As a disseminator of news, the paper shall observe the decencies that are obligatory upon a private gentleman.’ And these days that means not publishing the word ‘dick’ in the Style section.”

  • DCist reports, “Metro fares aren’t the only thing going up in price in D.C. If you’re in the habit of purchasing a copy of the Washington Post from a vending machine or a sidewalk hawker on your way to work in the morning, take note: the cost of the daily paper is about to go up by 15 cents. The Post’s newsstand price will become 50 cents beginning on Dec. 31. The company cited a decline in the paper’s circulation and advertising revenue as the reason for the increase.”

  • The AP reports, “The National Press Foundation will honor half a dozen journalists at its 25th anniversary dinner in February.”

  • The New York Times reports,Claudia Payne, special sections editor, is answering reader questions Dec. 18-21. Questions may be e-mailed to askthetimes@nytimes.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Editors at the Associated Press have picked the year’s top 10 stories, and we expected the presidential campaign to be like, you know, top five or something, right? Well, it lands in at #8 — coincidentally one spot ahead of the immigration debate.”

  • Drudge reports, “McCain Pleads with NY Times to Spike Story”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Thursday revenue fell 9.2 percent in November, primarily from a sharp drop in classified ads as jobs and real estate listings continue to migrate online.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, December 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ posted 3.12 million total viewers, the program’s best total viewer delivery since the week of February 4, 2007. In addition, ‘This Week’ increased the most of the Sunday discussion programs among Total Viewers compared to last year, a significant 28%.”

  • Also from ABC: “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 10, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Adults 25-54 for the third week in a row. The last time ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ three weeks in a row in the demo was May 1995.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 16, 2007. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.205 million total viewers.”

  • “CNN and NBC/MSNBC have released their coverage plans for the Iowa Caucus, Thursday Jan. 3.” Check out the full details at TVNewser.

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN will air a Special **LIVE** ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE, Sunday, December 23rd at Noon (ET), and will re-air in the normal Road to the White House timeslots of 6:30 & 9:30 pm”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News Sunday Morning continues as the #1 Sunday morning news program, and it’s growing. Last Sunday the Charles Osgood program drew 5.34M Total Viewers, up 12% year-to-year.”

  • An ABC insider tells us, “Hilarity has ensued at our bureau after a widely attended ‘facebook seminar’ earlier this month. It’s now commonplace to see highly regarded producers and correspondents asking interns about ‘poking’.”

  • USAToday reports, “If you plan to dance at your New Year’s Eve party, you might want to pick up some moves from White House correspondent David Gregory, who boogied this morning to Mary J. Blige music.” Check out the video here.

  • One year after her departure, Kathleen Matthews’ picture has finally been removed from the banner welcoming visitors to WJLA in Rosslyn.

  • Forbes reports, “Despite a growing cadre of viewing alternatives like the Web and repeat-heavy schedules on the broadcast networks, people are still watching television, a new survey finds.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle is taking participatory democracy into the newsroom. The broadcaster is asking viewers and Web surfers to submit videos about the upcoming New Hampshire primary to the station Web sites of its WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H., and WCVB-TV Boston as well as the stations’ YouTube channels.”

  • Check out the latest installment from Green Room Girl.

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Beet TV reported yesterday, “Earlier today I interviewed Cynthia Farrar, the CEO and producer of PurpleStates.TV. Tomorrow, the first of nearly a dozen video segments produced by her new company and reported by non-professional citizen journalists, go up on the Op-Ed pages of the NYTimes.com The videos will be uploaded through February 5, ‘Super Tuesday.’”

  • PolitiFact is a finalist in the prestigious DigitalEdge awards by the Newspaper Association of America for best overall news site along with the Star-Tribune of Minneapolis and washingtonpost.com. You can find out more here.

  • WebProNews reports, “Bloggers from the left, center, and right sides of the political spectrum opened a group blog on Newsweek.com called The Ruckus.”

  • The LCV just launched a new website “calling the Sunday talk show hosts to task for ignoring the issue of global warming.” Check it out here.

  • Hotline’s On Call announced, “check in often between Christmas and New Year’s for On Call’s up-to-date coverage of the presidential contest.”

  • The AP reports, “Antitrust regulators approved Google Inc.’s $3.1 billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc., clearing the way for a formidable combination in the burgeoning online advertising sector. Microsoft Corp. and AT&T Inc. have lobbied heavily against the deal, but the Federal Trade Commission gave it the go-ahead Thursday.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • In the first edition of The Atlantic’s politics roundtable, Marc Ambinder, Ross Douthat, and Matthew Yglesias predict which candidates will win the primaries and debate whether Hillary’s slide is a media fabrication. Check it out here.

  • A reader points out “a notable first for DC: NYMag.com suggests that the DC food scene has something that New York doesn’t. ha.”

  • Starting this week, much of CQ content is now accessible and easy to read on your handheld device. “The new handheld-optimized pages include news stories from CQ Weekly and CQ Today, CQ Transcripts, CQ BillAnalysis and many other services.”

  • Popular Mechanics has published its first ever Geek the Vote — an online guide to all the candidates’ stances on issues related to science and technology including energy policy and climate change, gun control, science education and infrastructure investment. Check it out here.

  • The New Republic reports,Max Brantley, the editor of the alternative weekly Arkansas Times, has feuded with Mike Huckabee since the presidential candidate first appeared on the political stage during his failed 1992 Senate run. A liberal columnist married to a circuit judge appointed by Bill Clinton, Brantley penned weekly columns antagonizing Huckabee for his staunchly conservative social views, opaque campaign finance disclosures, and acceptance of gifts during his time in office. ‘Huckabee would believe I covered him obsessively, and he’d be right about that,’ Brantley says.”

  • The New Republic’s Sean Wilentz writes, “Opinion-slingers are mooning over Barack Obama’s instincts. Don’t they remember how badly that worked out last time?”

  • The Atlantic’s Megan McArdle writes, “the wild, drunken office Christmas party used to be a staple of television, books, and movies. Now I feel as if it’s dropped pretty thoroughly out of the popular imagination; the only example I can think of recently is a fleeting scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary. Were office holiday parties really that much wilder in the past? Or have we just stopped noticing, literarily?”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News and South Carolina ETV Radio (the state’s public radio network) will present an audio-only Republican Presidential Debate, to be broadcast on NPR Member stations and webcast live from 2:00-4:00PM (EST) on Wednesday, January 16. NPR News journalists and hosts Steve Inskeep, Michele Norris and Robert Siegel will act as moderators.”

  • So far, there has been over 3000 comments in response to Bryant Park Project blog post asking Ron Paul supporters to identify themselves.

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Preparing your boss for a MTP appearance isn’t an easy assignment (especially when it’s the full hour)! Many a guest has recruited high-priced talent to do their best Russert in hopes of better preparing for the grilling they will receive on Sunday. Word on the street was that former Bush Administration flack, Adam Levine did the best Russert impersonation in town. Looks as though he has some serious competition after Romney’s appearance last Sunday.”

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Steve Valentini, the circulation director for Politico, is jumping ship and going over to the Examiner.

  • On Jan. 2, Quin Hillyer is leaving Citizens United to begin work at the editorial page of the Washington Examiner as Associate Editor.

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director of Business Development, an Editor for Morning Rundown and an Editor for the
    Afternoon Rundown
    .

  • The Daily Progress is looking for an Assistant City Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.20.07

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. On this day in 2002, Sen. Trent Lott resigned as Senate Majority Leader.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think card games are “much fun.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader wonders, “Where did the Washington Times Christmas tree go? It was there but now it’s gone”

  • NPF president Bob Meyers writes, “Last year you supported us with many contributions so we could meet our Challenge Grant obligations. This year the challenge is equally important, but we’re doing this on our own, without any challenge grant to spur us on. … Could you help with a $25 contribution? A $50 contribution? We’re a 501-c-3, so you could deduct your gift. I’ve added a connection to our magical online giving icon (you can find it on our site as well).” For more info, click here.

  • FCC Eases Ownership Limits for Big Media

  • Politico has a caucus night bingo game for readers (no, it is not a drinking game, although we find that hard to believe).

  • New York Times Sees Boost from Web Sites

  • Tribune CEO Expected to Step Down in Buyout

  • From a Post insider: “what frustrates so many post reporters about today’s nytimes piece on the bacon fiasco is that, yet again, downie does not explain how editors edited the story and does not address the criticisms of the piece. instead, he takes the easy way out and defends the notion that young people can be big reporters too. he’s permitting daly to divert the discussion away from the real journalistic issue. he should have come out and explained what was wrong with the story, what was right with the story, and what the post will do to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

  • PEJ reports, “Americans received a grim picture of the war in Iraq in the first 10 months of 2007. Daily violence accounted for 47% of the stories studied. And of the stories that offered an assessment of the direction of the war, most were pessimistic, according to a new study of press coverage from Iraq from January to October.”

  • Newsday, Hoy to Pay $15 Million in Circ Case

  • Also from Pew, “Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007. Nearly half of Americans (45%) tracked news about the shootings at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “After weeks of bad news, Hillary Clinton and her strategists hoped that winning the endorsement of Iowa’s largest newspaper last weekend might produce a modest bump in their media coverage. But on Sunday morning, they awoke to upbeat headlines about their chief Democratic rival: ‘Obama Showing New Confidence With Iowa Sprint,’ said the New York Times. ‘Obama Is Hitting His Stride in Iowa,’ said the Los Angeles Times. And on Monday, Clinton aides were so upset about a contentious ‘Today’ show interview that one complained to the show’s producer. Clinton’s senior advisers have grown convinced that the media deck is stacked against them, that their candidate is drawing far harsher scrutiny than Barack Obama. And at least some journalists agree.”

  • Washington Post reports, Don Graham, “The chairman of The Washington Post Co., who separated from his wife last month, just closed on a 1896 semi-detached townhouse near Dupont Circle. The four-bedroom, four-bath Tudor underwent extensive work during the past year and is described as impeccable.” Ed Note: Wait, Post ombudsman Deb Howell says that Don Graham’s divorce isn’t appropriate for the Style section (it went in Business) but his house sales are?

  • CJR reports, “In an otherwise reasonable and spirited defense of a reporter, The Washington Post’s Leonard Downie Jr. trips by employing ad hominem attack and innuendo against a critic—the very tactics Downie seeks to criticize.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss was a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staffer when he broke through the chrysalis of Capitol Hill conventionality to become a musical satirist. Mr. Strauss, who died Dec. 18 of pancreatic cancer at his home in McLean, recalled the breakthrough in a phone interview shortly before his death at age 60.”

  • Politico reports, “New York Times columnist Frank Rich regularly chides political journalists for not thinking outside the Beltway in covering the presidential campaign. But what about venturing beyond the west side of Manhattan? Unlike his Times opinion-writing colleagues — Maureen Dowd, David Brooks and Gail Collins — Rich has yet to rack up an Iowa dateline this year, not to mention New Hampshire or South Carolina.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Inside the pressure-cooker that is live television, the name Barack Obama apparently becomes tricky.
    The Democratic presidential candidate’s name has been confused with the terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and even Omaha, Neb., in separate occasions on CNN recently.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • “2007 Ratings: MSNBC has ‘Fastest Growing Primetime Lineup of any Top-50 Cable Channel,’” reports TVNewser.

  • TVNewser reports, “Bob Schieffer: 2008 Campaign Probably ‘My Last In The Role I Have Now’”

  • TVNewser reports, “You may have noticed World News with Charles Gibson and World News Now have been broadcasting form a different location this week. We are hearing construction is underway for a new set which is expected to debut in the next couple of weeks. We’re told the new set will also be HD-ready and that the Gibson broadcast is expected to be in HD sometime in 2008.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “CNN’s Jonathan Klein on Campbell Brown, Couch Potatoes and Plans for 2008″

  • Wonkette reports, “Joe Scarbrough and Friend Ridicule Huckabee’s Jesusery”

  • TVNewser reports, “Gore Vidal Has Beef With Wolf Blitzer, Apparently”

  • TVNewser reports, “The cable nets continue breaking news coverage of a fire at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which is part of the White House complex. Of the three cable news nets, CNN was first with the news at 9:42:30. MSNBC was next at 9:43:10 and FNC reported the story at 9:44:40.” Meanwhile, on broadcast, “ABC News’ Chris Cuomo anchored a network special at 9:51amET on the fire at the EEOB. The NBC network continued with the third hour of the today show and aired a special report at 10amET (MSNBC was already in breaking news coverage of the fire). CBS reported the fire with an update to the west coast feed of The Early Show at 10amET”

  • TVNewser reports, “In an opinion column in USA Today, titled ‘Does Al-Jazeera belong in the USA?’, Souhelia Al-Jadda, an associate producer at Link TV’s Mosaic: World News from the Middle East and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors, laments the fact that more than one year after the launch of Al-Jazeera English, ‘no major U.S. cable or satellite company is willing to carry the station.’”

  • Inside Cable News reported yesterday, “Bloomberg TV announced this morning that Terry Holt and Stephanie Cutter will be providing analysis for the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary.”

  • A CNN release announced, “The next stops for the CNN Election Express include Iowa for the state’s upcoming caucuses, New Hampshire for the nation’s first primary elections and visits to Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Los Angeles for CNN’s remaining presidential primary debates. To date, the CNN Election Express has served as the studio for interviews with top presidential candidates including Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The studio configuration includes a lighting grid with full power to allow quick set-up for interviews. The video equipment on board can also be used outside for interviews and live shots.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The NewsHour Gets New Set, Goes HDTV”

  • TVNewser reports, “It was good news all around for CNN yesterday, with a re-up for CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein and a memo from CNN Worldwide president Jim Walton discussing all the “fun” the network is having.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Once again, Obama has been confused with Osama. This time, by HLN’s Glenn Beck on Good Morning America.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Comcast Says FCC Limit Rule Is ‘Perverse’

  • FCC Accepts Google’s Auction Application

  • Check out www.2008ElectionProCon.org, “created to be a comprehensive source of information on the 2008 presidential election.” The site has “compiled the pro and con positions of all the presidential candidates on major policy issues, along with other resources related to the election, like a printable one-page summary of all the candidates’ positions on the issues and a history of political parties. All of the information is designed to help people determine for themselves which candidate would make the best president.”

  • A reader writes in, “Have you seen www.Whitehouse.com lately? (not .gov, BTW). Yes it is the same URL that was once the famed porn site. Now it has been reborn as some kind of uber-hip political blog. And word on the street is they’ve been phoning up reporters and inviting them to come and start work…resume, clips and references sight unseen. The site boasts 10 years of tradition (doesn’t mention that 9.5 of them are as a porn site)…and check out the ‘benefits’ page! 25 cent soft drinks and occasional Pizza Fridays!”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes, “How can I say this nicely? Oh, what the heck. If Ted Leonsis is going to be candid and bash mainstream media, then why can’t I? It’s not like I need a job. At this point in my career, I’d only be bought out at best or downsized in a restructuring at worst.”

  • A release announced, “Alive in Baghdad, a web news program reported and filmed by local Iraqis and distributed by independent US news agency Small World News lost correspondent Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi after he was killed over the weekend in Sadr City. The correspondent was found dead by a family member after being shot 31 times. Details as to motive and circumstances about the killing are undetermined.”

  • Check out the “major design” of Bloggingheads.tv.

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • A Democracy release announced, “It’s not chestnuts roasting on an open fire or ringing sleigh bells, but Christmas came early (or Hannukah came late) to Democracy this December. Just after we had released our winter issue and thought things would be winding down for the year, we were notified that Democracy has been named the Best New Publication of 2007 by the Utne Independent Press Awards.” For more on the awards, click here.

  • Check out a new video feature on newyorker.com, The Naked Campaign, “a series of short videos featuring the illustrator Steve Brodner as he draws the Presidential candidates and discusses the race for the White House. The videos are directed by Gail Levin, with animation by Asterisk.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Carl Kasell — the National Public radio newscaster and the judge/scorekeeper/second banana on NPR’s weekly call-in quiz show ‘Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!’ — is running late for an interview. … Mr. Kasell, who’ll be moonlighting next week as the announcer for the 30th annual “Kennedy Center Honors” broadcast, was recording an answering machine message for a ‘Wait, Wait’ winner. Such is the highly coveted prize for callers who triumph in events like ‘Listener Limerick Challenge,’ ‘Bluff the Listener,’ and ‘Who’s Carl This Time?’ — wherein Mr. Kasell delivers highly flavored imitations of newsmakers from Paris to Britney to George W. and all points and poobahs in between.”

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Amos Snead is stepping down as Press Secretary to House Republican Whip Roy Blunt and is returning to FD Dittus.

  • Salon finally admits that Michael Scherer is leaving. Joan Walsh writes, “Some of you may have noticed the change to Michael Scherer’s bio at the bottom of his great Meghan McCain profile today, identifying him as our ‘former’ Washington correspondent. I’m sad to say that Michael has left us to cover the presidential campaign for Time magazine. He’s been a crucial part of our news resurgence over the last two years, breaking stories on Abu Ghraib, George Allen’s race problems and the 2008 presidential campaign. We miss him already. But we’re thrilled to welcome Mike Madden, who has covered politics, Congress and Washington for Gannett News Service since 2000. Mike has also written for Time.com, the New York Observer, USA Today and Wonkette, and he’ll join Walter Shapiro on the campaign trail shortly.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Feature Writer.

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is looking for a Washington Bureau Reporter.

  • PBS is looking for a Director, PBS Engage.

  • Heldref Publications is looking for a Marketing and Advertising Director.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.14.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You find NBC’s Green Week theme journalistically troubling.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of November 5-9, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ won among Households (6.3/12) and tied for first place among the Adult 25-54 rating (2.3/9). Among Total Viewers, the ABC broadcast averaged 9.18 million, with just 50,000 separating ABC and NBC for the week. This marks ‘World News” best delivery among Total and key demo viewers in more than eight months (week of February 26, 2007).”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the No. 1 network evening newscast, winning the week of November 5-9, 2007 in both total viewers and among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Gannett disclosed that revenue at its U.S. newspapers rose just 11% in the third quarter from the year-ago period, a Gannett Blog reader reminded me today. That’s down from 12% growth in the first and second quarters — a rate that was already below the industry average.”

  • WorldScreen.com reports, “According to a report by Global Media Intelligence in association with its partner Merrill Lynch, movies no longer make money in large part because of the ever-growing participation deals studios make with stars, directors and producers.”

  • AP reports, “About 500 unionized news writers could soon join their creative colleagues on the picket line. The writers, employees of CBS News television and radio, are expected to overwhelmingly approve a strike authorization. Represented by Writers Guild of America East, the writers were scheduled to vote Thursday.”

  • “With the exception of the war in Iraq, international affairs tend not to generate major media interest. But General Pervez Musharraf’s Nov. 3 declaration of emergency rule in Pakistan proved to be a dramatic exception to that rule — and there may be several disquieting reasons why,” according to the Pew News Coverage Index for November 4-9.

  • The Susan B. Anthony List Candidate Fund, “a national pro-life Political Action Committee, officially launched its online 2008 campaign efforts with the unveiling of a new website to highlight pro-life candidates.” According to the release, “The website, www.sba-listcf.org, allows Susan B. Anthony List members to bundle contributions for pro-life Congressional candidates, access political updates about key Congressional races, register to vote and engage in pro-life advocacy efforts.”

  • TVWeek reports, “An online powerhouse is getting ready to take on TV. Twentieth Television has entered a deal with Internet mega-site Yahoo! to develop a series featuring popular Web videos for syndication that could air next year.”

  • The Washington Social Diary reports on “the gala affair that was held to honor the Iraq and Afghanistan wounded who reside at Walter Reed Army Hospital.”

  • A release announced, “Navy TV, a new online TV network featuring the U.S. Navy 24 hours a day on demand, was launched today at www.navytv.org. Hosted by the United States Navy Memorial and created for all to use and enjoy, Navy TV plans to showcase a variety of cutting-edge short videos highlighting today’s Navy at sea around the world as well as classic clips from the service’s proud history.”

  • The University of Maryland announced, “Award-winning journalists will discuss the techniques, hazards and rewards of covering the most difficult stories of our time when they gather in Shoemaker 2102 beginning at 2 p.m. Nov. 19. D.C.-area anchor Mike Walter of WUSA-TV will join Australian journalist Gary Tippet of The Age and Natalie Pompilio, a writer based in Philadelphia who has provided on-the-ground coverage of the war in Iraq and Hurricane Katrina. All are members of The Dart Society, an organization that provides outreach to journalists who cover trauma.”

  • AP reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, spent $1.7 million to lobby the federal government in the first half of 2007, according to a disclosure form.”

  • CNET News.com reports, “no one should be surprised that newspapers are struggling and that newspaper alliances springing up to tackle online ads have that whiff of desperation.”

  • washingtonpost.com’s new music blog Post Rock recapped Bruce Springsteen’s concert at the Verizon Center. Check it out here.

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins reports, “Bob Schieffer’s big weekend get? GOP presidential contender Mike Huckabee! He’s surging! Dynamic! And how best to play up your guest’s surging dynamism? Well, it’d probably be wise to avoid asking questions that were posed to the candidate just days before on Hardball. Unfortunately, Schieffer spent a lot of his time covering the same well-worn ground on Sunday morning.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Earlier this year, Google quietly added a new feature to its maps program, a tool that allows users to customize driving directions by clicking and dragging on a map to create a detour. A few months later, the developers of Gmail, Google’s free e-mail program, unveiled an upgrade to allow messages to synchronize with other e-mail systems. The alterations to these popular programs are minuscule compared with two larger recent news events: Google’s announcement of a partnership, called Android, to make it easier to navigate the Web on cellphones, and its introduction of OpenSocial, a cooperative effort to make it easier for developers to create tools for social networking sites such as MySpace.”

  • New York Daily News reports,Dan Rather was in Cuba Monday, hoping for a gift from above in the form of an interview with Fidel Castro. He’d been told it wasn’t going to happen, but he’s not giving up. ‘I have no expectations,’ said Rather. ‘Do I have hope? I always have hope. You drive to the heart of the story and give yourself your best chance.’ It’s been that way for the past year, since news legend and former CBS anchor Rather joined Mark Cuban’s HDNet.”

  • AP reports, “News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Tuesday he intends to make access to The Wall Street Journal’s Web site free, dropping subscription fees in exchange for anticipated ad revenue.”

  • The Daily Record reports, “Sandy Hillman has resigned as vice chairman of Baltimore ad agency Trahan Burden Charles to start her own public relations agency.”

  • The Fayetteville Observer has a “Q&A with Bob Woodward”

  • Wired reports,Barry Diller Says He Might Like to Buy AOL”

  • Richard Benedetto writes in Politico, “In wartime, low death toll is news, too”

  • The San Francisco Chronicle reports, “The crowd of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs making big bets on a global revolution in green technology added one more big name Monday: Al Gore. The former Democratic vice president and recent Nobel Peace Prize winner announced he is joining the prestigious Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as a partner in the firm’s effort to finance global warming solutions.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin is expected to unveil his plans for reforming the agency’s media ownership rules as soon as Tuesday, which could pave the way for the proposed sale of Tribune Co. (TRB) to receive regulatory approval.”

  • Martin writes in the New York Times, “If we don’t act to improve the health of the newspaper industry, we will see newspapers wither and die.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Cable-television companies including Comcast Corp. are fighting a plan by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to claim new regulatory powers.”

  • B&C reports, “MSNBC Monday launched its redesigned msnbc.com Web site. Surfers will be able to customize the site to reorder the stories any way they like, says the news channel, including tabs that allow them to access up to 15 stories in each section. Those stories will also have more videos, photos, and slide shows.”

  • CNBC reports, “News Corp Chairman Rupert Murdoch said on Tuesday the company had made a strong start to the second quarter with the global credit market squeeze so far not having much affect on forward advertising.”

  • Huffington Post’s Alex Leo asks, “When Is a Scandal Like a Gate?”

    Jobs

  • Post-Newsweek Media, Inc. is looking for a Publisher.

  • DBC Public Relations Experts is looking for a New Media AE.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.19.07

  • Most of your brackets are already broken. Stupid Duke.

  • More on AssignmentZero.

  • For Bookstores, a Real Page-Turner: Digital or Paper? Take Your Pick.”

  • Look out Morning Edition

  • Deb Howell on “What Riled Readers Last Week.”

  • Radio Deal Could Face Technical Difficulties: XM, Sirius Systems Already Strained”

  • Roll Call and Gallery Watch’s CongressNow debuts today. From a tipster: “On March 19, Roll Call and GalleryWatch will launch an online publication, CongressNow, to cover legislation on Capitol Hill. We’re offering Congressional staff and other Roll Call subscribers a free preview of the kinds of articles that our reporting staff will be filing for this new publication. And for a free trial subscription to CongressNow, beginning with the first issue March 19, call us at 800-289-9331. Don’t miss a day of insider coverage!”

  • We’ll believe it when we see it: “McCain Pledges Bi-Weekly Press Conferences

  • Hotline reports, “MSNBC will mark the 4th anniv. of the beginning of the Iraq war on 3/19 with all day coverage. Anchors throughout the day will include Tim Russert, David Gregory, Andrea Mitchell, Chip Reid, Chris Matthews, Keith Olbermann, Joe Scarborough, Tucker Carlson and Norah O’Donnell. Scheduled interviews include ex-WH CoS Andy Card, Sen. Kit Bond (R-MO), ex-Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-AR), Sen. John Kerry (D-MA), Sen. Joe Lieberman (ID-CT), Rep. John Murtha (D-PA) and Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-PA) (release, 3/15).”

  • PEJ’s Talk Show Index shows that the Scooter Libby verdict dominated talk shows for the week of March 4-9, with 28% of the coverage.

  • “Washington Post Live” debuts today.

      This afternoon, “Washington Post Live” debuts (Comcast SportsNet at 5). The program features Comcast SportsNet personalities and Post sports staff writers taking on local and national sports topics. The program, seen simultaneously on http://www.washingtonpost.com, also incorporates fan interaction through e-mail questions for guests and a call-in segment. Today’s guests are Washington Capitals star Alexander Ovechkin, Washington Redskins quarterback Jason Campbell and Washington Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman.

  • A reader tells us that Hillary Clinton did an exclusive interview with Bloomberg TV’s “Money & Politics” last week, and asks, “Another sign of the growing clout of the small but incredibly hardworking Bloomberg Washington bureau?”

  • Regarding this comment: “I think some more liberal Post writers probably get upset because many of the comments tear apart and rip to shreds and bring back to reality some of the articles that are obviously more liberal-leaning.” A reader (and Postie?)responds: “Nice try. But no. we get upset because we — at least i — don’t care for the horribly racist stuff some people write. It’s the washington post not a KKK chat room.”

  • NPR is hiring a Director for NPR Music, a Quality Assurance/Developer, a Design Director and a Producer for NPR Digital Media.

  • The World Bank is hiring a Web and Photography Collection Consultant and Communications Broadcast-TV Reporters.

  • The Washington Examiner has started “The List.”

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education was nominated for a 2007 National Magazine Award. Phil Semas is the editor-in-chief.

  • Ron Brownstein looks at “How the Democrats are turning on Fox News.”

  • Regarding this, a reader tells us that “Pearlstein gets paid to do the chat; he should give a better effort than ‘thanks.’”

  • An Atlantic release announced that the publication was nominated for three more nominations for editorial excellence for the 2007 National Magazine Awards. The nominations are in General Excellence, Public Interest and in the “Reviews and Criticism” category.

  • Wolf Blitzer interviewed ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff and his wife, Lee, on the Friday, March 16, edition of The Situation Room.

  • Pew’s weekly News Interest Index shows that Iraq and the state of Walter Reed dominated the public’s attention last week.

  • A reader asks, “Are there ANY *hot* single journalists in this city?”

  • A reader notes, “politico’s search tool sucks.”

  • Regarding this, a reader says, “It wasn’t the ‘annual’ photo, it was the ’25th Anniv. Photo,’ and there were not ‘about 50′ photos taken, there were exactly 12 photos taken. There were, however, many lame jokes made during the process.”

  • Webcasters Slam into Royal(ty) Pain

  • On this, a reader comments, “See ya, Cathy. She sucked. I won’t miss her. She was always crying, spitting, sweating or all of the above. She was a spaz.”

  • Eat The Press has a bone to pick with Slate.

  • ABC News reports that “Friday afternoons are the favorite time to release embarrassing information.”

  • E&P reports, “The New York Times is opening up access permanently to TimesSelect to all students and faculty who have .edu e-mail addresses beginning on March 13.”

  • The Corporate Executive Board is hiring a sales associate.

  • TIG Global is hiring a Client Services Coordinator and a Web Marketing Analyst.

  • Al Jazeera English is hiring a News Editor and a Deputy News Editor.

  • A tipster tells us, “Politico has secured a seat in the white house press room, thanks to Mike Allen.”

  • A reader tell us that NBC4.com on Friday had “Review: Rock’s ‘Wife’ Is Fun, Witty Ride… Um… funny risque pun or accidental inappropriateness?”

  • Reuters reports, “Time magazine hits newsstands on Friday with layout and design changes to attract the Web generation. A new mix of writing styles range from quick-hit bullet points to more contemplative features. “A magazine is like a buffet,” muses managing editor Rick Stengel.”

  • DMNews reports, “Research conducted by the Magazine Publishers of America says that 262 magazines were launched last year — a 2% increase over the number launched in 2005. Among the new titles were 88 lifestyle magazines. Eight of these titles made the jump from online to print.”

  • From a tipster: “Fox New’s Greta will be profiled in the August 2007 issue of Runners World.” $10 in fake FishbowlDC money for the first person to send us images…

  • The International Center for Journalists named its first class of Knight International Journalism Fellows since expanding the program to include Fellows from outside the United States. Check out the new fellows.

  • From a tipster: “Lots of talk yesterday by comics fans — angry talk — that the Post is, for some odd reason, dropping three of its most veteran — and well-liked — comic strips: ‘Mary Worth,’ which has run in the Post for least 40 years; ‘Broom Hilda,’ which has run in the Post for at least 30 years; and ‘Cathy,’ which is one of the most popular national comic strips in the country. There are at least seven or eight other comic strips in the Post that are just crap–unfunny, juvenile, badly drawn, stupid–and the Post decides to drop three very popular, veteran strips. Yes, it’s only comic strips and not war or poverty or homelessness or crime coverage, but people read the comics as a counter to hard news and for entertainment, so they do serve a purpose. But, lately, the Post’s comics pages have been just awful. And the Post wonders why it’s losing readers? Here’s another reason.”

  • David Adler, C.E.O. and Founder of BiZBash Media, announced he will launch a Washington, D.C. edition of its Web site and weekly email service on Tuesday, March 27, 2007. “The BiZBash weekly email newsletter will allow more than 10,000 local industry professionals to go behind the scenes of important D.C. events to see how others are handling everything from decor, catering, entertainment, meeting content, and strategy to other event planning ideas and resources.”

  • << PREVIOUS PAGE