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Posts Tagged ‘Mike McCurry’

Ed Henry Recalls Being Told to ‘Zip it’

Four former White House Press Secretaries joined former CNN White House correspondent and Washington bureau chief Frank Sesno at George Washington University last night for candid conversation.

Press secretaries from the Clinton administration – Dee Dee Myers (now a contributing editor for Vanity Fair) and Mike McCurry – joined Bush 43 press secretaries Dana Perino (now a FNC contributor) and Ari Fleischer at the university’s Lisner Auditorium. Another Clinton flack, Joe Lockhart, planned to attend, but couldn’t due to complications following surgery.

The event, broadcast on C-SPAN and P.O.T.U.S. radio, opened with remarks from CNN’s current White House correspondent, Ed Henry (he and Lockhart are fellows at GW’s School of Media and Public Affairs this year). Henry spoke about “sparring” with several press secretaries during his five years at the White House, and recounted a story about the late Tony Snow, who once lost his temper in a briefing and told Henry to “zip it.” The next day, they put it behind them. It’s important, he said, for the press secretary and the press corps to have a “healthy dose of respect” for one another.

With that, the press secretaries were introduced, and Sesno posed the first question: Was President Obama’s sit-down with Bill O’Reilly before the Superbowl a good idea or a bad one? All agreed it was a “great” idea. “Everyone in America’s in a good mood,” Perino said. Fleischer thought Obama “scored some points for going over to the lion’s den.”

McCurry, along with the rest of the panel, lamented allowing TV cameras in the briefing room, which he said had turned briefings into political theater and weren’t good for public discourse. “It was an idiot who allowed TV cameras” into the briefing room, he joked. (He was the one who first introduced the cameras.)

Each panelist spoke about the relationship the press secretary has with the press. You always see the press secretary defending the president, Perino said, but “you never see” him or her “defending the press to the president,” which is a big part of the job. Others agreed.

But the relationship isn’t always friendly. “Reporters play the aggressive role,” Fleischer said. He charged they also demand an unrealistic amount of access. “They won’t be satisfied till there’s Oval Office cam.” McCurry agreed: “They’re always bitching and moaning about something.”

A few specific reporters were mentioned…

Also: Find out what Perino thinks of AOL/HuffPost

Read more

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Kurtz Hammers FNC’s Hemmer on ‘Fair & Balanced’

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In a WaPo media story today by Howard Kurtz, the headline reads: Fox News’s Bill Hemmer melds middle-of-the-road persona with conservative guest list

Fair and balanced? Kurtz has doubts.

An excerpt
Bill Hemmer, a middle-of-the-road guy from the middle of the country, sees himself as the straightest of straight arrows when it comes to news.

“The opinion-makers on our channel have enormous talent,” he says in his Fox News office in midtown. “I deal in facts. I deal in evidence. And opinion, frankly, is not my comfort zone. Opinion news is something I’m not good at. It is in the DNA of certain individuals. I’m not one of them.”

Kurtz reports that while Hemmer’s show is billed to be the “straight stretch” of news, the guest list and story choices “tilt markedly to the right.” Kurtz names a long list of conservatives Hemmer has had on the show including Karl Rove, Steve Forbes, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) and more. But here’s a twist: at the close of the story Kurtz softballs the whole premise and writes, “Despite the guest lineup, Hemmer, 45, takes a generally balanced approach, a style he honed in his native Cincinnati and during 10 years at CNN.”

And besides, reasons Hemmer in the story, “If Mike McCurry were available to us, I would put him on TV tomorrow.” (McCurry was former President Clinton’s White House press secretary.)

It appears Kurtz still stands by his original premise, tweeting just a few hours ago, “Bill Hemmer is focused on fairness, but his Fox News show is heavily stacked with Republican and conservative guests.”

> Update: More hammering. In an even more recent tweet today, Kurtz says, “As if to underscore my story about the right-leaning bookings on Fox’s “America’s Newsroom,” today’s leadoff guest was [GOP Whip from Virginia] Eric Cantor.”

WHCA to Give Thousands in Awards on Prom Weekend

31722.jpg The White House Correspondents’s Association is scheduled to give $132,500 in award scholarship funding to 18 journalists from five “prestigious” universities.

The association will honor the students on Friday April 30 at the Atlantic Media Offices in Washington, D.C. with a lunch and panel discussion. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry will moderate a panel with Washington journalists called “Press & the Presidency: A Front Row Seat to History.”

Five White House correspondents who will join McCurry on the panel include:
Christina Bellantoni, Talking Points Memo
Ron Brownstein, NJ/ Atlantic Media
Major Garrett, FNC
Savannah Guthrie, MSNBC’s “Daily Rundown”
Jennifer Loven, AP

Morning Reading List, 03.17.08

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day Washington.

  • Sunday was Ellen McCarthy’s birthday. Today is Tim Burger’s and Mark Paustenbach’s and Saturday was Jenny 8 Lee’s.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Email is your favorite way to communicate.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Karen Hosler has left the Baltimore Sun.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • A release announced, “The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel is the winner of the 2007 Thomas L. Stokes Award for Energy Writing. Reporters Thomas Content, Lee Bergquist and Joel Dresang will share a $1,000 check and receive individual citations for the yearlong project.”

  • Justice and the Press

  • The AP reported that The Washington Examiner’s Nate Beeler won a Virginia Press Association award “for a portfolio of three editorial cartoons.”

  • Clark Hoyt says the Times was fooled again.

  • Deb Howell on “A Reporting Coup and Its Critics.”

  • Celebrated History of the CIA Comes Under Belated Fire

  • With Order to Name Sources, Judge Is Casting a Wide Net

  • Are job cuts death knell for America’s newspapers?

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “When some people first heard the news about New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a prostitution ring, they thought: How awful, how tragic, how corrupt. When I first heard it, I thought: Thank God for newspapers.”

  • E&P reports, “A dispute over a Pulitzer Prize finalist in investigative reporting has emerged between The Denver Post and the Charlotte (N.C) Observer. The conflict sparked a phone call Wednesday from Observer Editor Rick Thames to Post Editor Greg Moore, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. Moore says he is now ‘writing a letter about it.’”

  • Walter Pincus Rips into Newsroom Neutrality

  • The Washington Post reports, “In his youth, Ivory Wilson says, he drove a Bentley, drank Hennessy and rolled joints with $100 bills. Now he’s a middle-aged man, bent but not broken, homeless but not hopeless, writing fiction for Street Sense, the District’s twice-monthly newspaper written by and about the area’s homeless.”

  • The Q&A Cafe will feature The Washington Post’s Len Downie on April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “You know a presidential primary is really important when…a news program that rarely goes on the road decides to pull up stakes and do just that. With Pennsylvania the focus of attention on April 22, PBS anchor Jim Lehrer will broadcast The NewsHour from Pittsburgh during the week of April 21.”

  • Bob Schieffer: Who says there isn’t life after TV?

  • Iraq war disappears as TV story

  • Rove on Fox: It’s Fair to Say He’s Mellowed

  • Business Week reports, “Ever since Brian L. Roberts abandoned a hostile bid for Walt Disney (DIS) four years ago, Wall Street has wondered when the Comcast (CMCSA) chief executive and serial acquirer might make a play for another big media prize. The chatter picked up last fall, just before America’s largest cable company confessed that it would add fewer subscribers than expected in the fourth quarter. Some investors worried that, with growth slowing, Roberts might try to pick off Yahoo! (YHOO) or NBC Universal (GE) — diversifying away from cable by wading into the murky waters of ‘content.’”

  • Information Week reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is defending the way it tracks complaints, investigations, and enforcement, and it claims a critical government report is based on several inaccuracies. The U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a 53-page report this week saying the FCC doesn’t properly collect and analyze data, making it impossible to analyze the effectiveness of its enforcement.”

  • Michael Calderone reports, “Fox launches ‘Obama Watch’”

  • TVNewser reports, “A tornado that tore through downtown Atlanta did not spare the CNN Center. This morning the network has been covering the aftermath of the severe weather, and the potential for more today. Anchor Betty Nguyen took viewers on a tour of part of the newsroom ‘where our writers and our producers sit.’ It is now covered with blue tarp. The tornado shattered windows in the newsroom and damaged the roof in the atrium which, until 2003, was the studio for the CNN daytime program, Talk Back Live.” And, “After last night’s tornado, CNN was taking no chances today. The blog Newscast Studio added, ‘Today CNN was thrown another curve ball…CNN’s Frederica Whitfield uses the CNN International set to bring the news to the viewers.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Project for Excellence will release the State of the News Media 2008 report today at www.stateofthenewsmedia.org.

  • Richard Prince writes, “A front-page photo of Sen. Barack Obama in the New York Times last week showed the Democratic front-runner on his campaign plane as a number of hands holding tape recorders reached up to him. None of the hands appeared to be black or brown. It seemed ironic in that Obama is the first African American with a serious chance to be president, running in a campaign in which the nuances of race have been discussed as never before.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Newspapers and online publishers appear to be heading back into battle against search engine behemoth Google.”

  • Politico.com has been redesigned.

  • Web Has Unexpected Effect on Journalism

  • Find out here what His Extreme-ness calls “Just Whore-ible”

  • strong>Laurel Touby Holds Fake Presser

  • The AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said Thursday he expects the next decade to bring even greater technological leaps than the past 10 years.”

  • Is KickApps Next to Board AOL’s Gravy Train?”

  • A release announced, “OhMyGov!, the only website devoted to improving bureaucracy through the spread of information, ideas, innovative online tools, and strategic satire, today announced the launch of its pilot site, www.ohmygov.com, for beta testing.”

  • Conde Nast’s Portfolio asks, “Google’s business model of internet-search-driven advertising has become so dominant that competitors Microsoft and Yahoo can hardly compete. But will C.E.O. Eric Schmidt be able to keep Google true to its roots?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • It’s that time of year again. “Nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2008 Campaigns & Elections’ Politics magazine Rising Stars.” Entries should be submitted by April 18, 2008 and emailed to risingstars@campaignsandelections.com.

  • The New York Observer reports, “At Columbia, The Inadvertently Boldface Joanne Lipman Sticks to the Script”

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jon Meacham and his wife, Keith, are celebrating the arrival of No. 3 — Margaret Randolph Meacham, to be called Maggie. You’d never know her folks are from Tennessee and Mississippi. They’ll see you in 18 years.”

  • Also from Mike Allen, “Jay Carney and Claire Shipman opened their home to a celebration for TIME Nation Editor Amy Sullivan’s new book, ‘The Party Faithful: How and Why Democrats Are Closing the God Gap.’ TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel was also a host. Guests included Mike McCurry, Walter and Cathy Isaacson, Sally Quinn, Dana Bash, Howard Kurtz, Sam Feist, Chris Matthews and David Bohrman. Among many others, Sullivan thanked her fiance, The New Republic’s Noam Scheiber.”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman tells us about, “Three magazines that deserve better fates”

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    RADIO

  • Innovator rethinking Tribune ways

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “The future of Time Warner, MGM, Lionsgate, Liberty Media, satellite radio and the general outlook for mergers and acquisitions in the media and entertainment field were in the spotlight Thursday at McGraw-Hill’s 2008 Media Summit New York. ‘There is going to be a lot of M&A activity’ despite the recent credit crunch, said Santo Politi, co-founder and general partner of Spark Capital, during a panel on the industry’s deal outlook. His rationale: Media giants have become more active in pursuing digital companies as they embrace the digital future and private-equity firms’ ability to bid in deals is hurt by the crunch.”

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    BOOKS

  • Jennifer 8. Lee will be at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue at 600 I Street, NW tonight for a Politics & Prose event.

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Writer/ Producer.

  • Child Welfare League of America is looking for an Associate Editor/Writer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Web Reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Need To Know News is looking for a Financial Reporter.

  • NSSEA is seeking an Entry-Level Editorial Assistant.

  • World Resources Institute is looking for a Communications Coordinator — GHG Protocol, World Resources Institute.

  • National Journal Group is looking for an Account Executive.

  • Dickstein Shapiro LLP is looking for a Website Administrator.

  • Food & Water Watch is looking for an Advocacy Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for a Destination Account Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Defense Reporter and an Energy Policy Reporter.

  • A New Web Channel is looking for a Capitol Hill Correspondent/Fill-in Anchor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Interactive Designer.

  • National Consumer Magazine is looking for an Associate Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Vitamin Water wins out over Gatorade.

  • We looked into this, “missing? washington post’s technorati supplied ‘who’s blogging’” and discovered the Washington Post did not get rid of the feature. It just wasn’t ready for the new home page launch. The paper tells us the “what blogs are saying” feature will be back in a few weeks.

  • Fox News announced, “FOX News Channel’s Greta Van Susteren will conduct an interview Thursday with former President Bill Clinton. The interview will air on FOX News Channel’s On the Record with Greta Van Susteren from 10-11PM/ET.”

  • Glynnis MacNicol and Rachel Sklar live blog the Dem debate (and “Dems debate Tim Russert’s giant noggin.”)

  • “During a panel discussion at the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Washington, D.C., former White House Press Secretaries Ron Nessen, Larry Speakes and Mike McCurry will join Dr. Martha Joynt Kumar, a professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University, to discuss what their jobs were like and whether they would be harder in today’s climate. Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR, will moderate the discussion. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Columbia B room.” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports that the witness list for today’s Senate hearing on Google’s proposed $3.1 billion purchase of ad firm DoubleClick “is more notable for who is not testifying than for who is. The five witnesses slated to appear before the panel, including company officials, analysts and consumer privacy experts, are divided between those for and against the deal. Google’s chief legal officer, David Drummond, will appear before the panel, along with his counterpart at rival Microsoft, General Counsel Brad Smith.”

  • Rumormonger reports, “There’s not much surprise left, given the drumbeat of rumors that AOL would be pursuing mass layoffs later this year. But we now hear that layoffs have started at the Internet giant, even earlier than expected, with a number of middle managers getting the chop Tuesday afternoon.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Justice Department is moving ‘as quickly as possible’ in its antitrust review of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s acquisition of XM Satellite Radio Inc, a senior department official said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “In a major reorganization that affects all of its top executives, ABC News president David Westin Tuesday appointed a single executive to oversee all programs. Dave Davis, formerly general manager of WABC in New York, was named executive vice president responsible for ABC News programs including Good Morning America, World News, 20/20, Primetime, Nightline, This Week with George Stephanopoulos and the overnight broadcasts. Davis will report to Westin.”

  • USA Today reports, “Arianna Huffington’s business plan: start an online news site, fueled by blog reports from her celebrity and influential friends. And have them all work for free, in exchange for using her bully pulpit. Nearly 2 1/2 years and $10 million later, the experiment has nearly paid off. The Huffington Post is the fifth-most-linked-to blog on the Internet, according to
    measurement firm Technorati.”

  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, “Consumers are in control, and advertisers should get used to it. That was a common theme as marketing industry leaders gathered in Manhattan on Monday to ponder how the Internet has turned their world upside down.”

  • Julie Mason, Houston Chronicle’s White House Correspondent, has been added to the regular rotation for Hardball.

  • B&C reports, “The Justice Department agreed to seek Supreme Court review of the Second Circuit court’s smackdown of the Federal Communications Commission’s crackdown on fleeting profanities.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Poynter’s ongoing Eyetrack research project has taught us some important basics, such as: Online audiences focus heavily on headlines, and in some cases almost ignore pictures. But other research tools make me want to challenge — or at least supplement — this finding.”

  • A release announced, “National Journal Group, Washington’s leading publisher of political and policy news and analysis, today announced the lineup for the inaugural edition of National Journal On Air, its new weekly show on XM Satellite Radio’s P.O.T.U.S.’08 channel. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will headline National Journal’s first show in the featured newsmaker interview with host Linda Douglass. Also scheduled to appear on the show are National Journal political writer Jim Barnes, National Journal White House correspondent Carl Cannon, and Senior Editor of The Hotline, John Mercurio.”

  • The Hill reports, “It’s always preferable to conduct interviews face to face, but hey, if Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) wants to visit via satellite from a barn in New York, who was Fox News to complain? That’s ‘Fox News Sunday’ host Chris Wallace’s take on Clinton’s appearance last weekend on his show.”

  • We have to ask, in light of the Washington Times hiring two new hires on the copy desk, does that mean the paper’s hiring freeze is off?

  • A reader tells us, “You should know that there is an error in the Michel du Cille internal memo from the Washington Post. Contrary to their statement, there is no ‘University of Indiana’. Rather, the appropriate institution to which they refer is ‘Indiana University’… a very important difference.”

  • Featured on Kudlow & Company, Brent Bozell revealed the results of the Business & Media Institute’s yearlong study analyzing how businessmen and women were characterized by ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN and Fox News’ evening newscasts. The results reveal how network news portrays our nation’s corporate leaders — as criminals, crooks, villains and filthy rich big-wigs. The full 18-page study — with audio and video — is available at www.businessandmedia.org.

  • Ad Week’s Mike Shields writes, “Political candidates from both parties are demonstrating a stubborn devotion to traditional media, along with a cautious streak that is holding them back from embracing the Web as an outlet for political ad dollars, according to a group of panelists speaking during a Mixx Conference session” held Tuesday.

  • B to B reports, “DoubleClick announced the launch of DoubleClick Mobile, a new service for mobile advertising. DoubleClick Mobile integrates operational processes for scheduling, targeting, selecting and delivering ads on mobile Web pages with publishers’ existing digital channels.”

  • Multichannel reports, “TV Guide Broadband, the digital video entertainment programming service launched one year ago by TV Guide Network, has signed a new distribution deal with Comcast’s portal site, officials said Tuesday.”

  • Reuters reports, “Steve Case, the founder of the AOL Internet service, is backing a new online payment company that promises to let users transfer funds for free and offer a credit card with sharply lower fees for merchants.”

  • Ad Week reports, “WPP Group joined in a $12 million round of funding for blog and social network tracking service Visible Technologies.”

  • New York Observer reports, “It’s still nearly two months until News Corp. officially closes on Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal’s parent. But there’s growing evidence that at The Journal, the Rupert Murdoch era has already begun. On September 17, the paper announced that it would launch Pursuits, a glossy magazine supplement covering the exploits of the superrich. The press release sent out by The Journal quoted publisher Gordon Crovitz and managing editor Marcus Brauchli — but according to one staffer, the prototype for the new venture had already passed through the hands of Mr. Murdoch, who gave it the green light.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s Fortune and Money business magazines plan to contribute several hours of video news to the company’s CNN Money Web site each day to lure users and advertisers.”

    Jobs

  • E&E Publishing/E&ETV is looking for a Video Producer.

  • Media General is looking for a Senior Multimedia Reporter.

  • The Center for Democracy & Technology is seeking Dynamic Communications Director.

  • The Society For Neuroscience is looking for a Staff Writer/Editor (Print).

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • More Keller Separated

    And yet another installment on the gift that keeps on giving.

    A reader writes in saying that Bill Keller
    kellersepat.jpg

    …looks like, Bob McDonnell
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    (Photo Credit)

    Another reader thinks he looks like Mike McCurry
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    (Photo Credit)

    And, another thinks he looks like James Morrison
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    (Photo Credit)