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Posts Tagged ‘Mitt Romney’

Morning Reading List, 02.06.08

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Good morning Washington. Ten years ago, Washington National Airport was renamed Ronald Reagan Airport.

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REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Ways and Means Republican Staff announced the new press team of Jim Billimoria as Communications Director and Cassie Smedile as Deputy Communications Director.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Jack Shafer on “Wall to Wall to Wal-Mart Political Coverage

  • Reuters reports, “At least 65 journalists were killed around the world because of their work last year, the highest figure for 13 years, and nearly half of them died in Iraq, a leading media watchdog reported on Monday. The figure compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists, or CPJ, in its annual report, ‘Attacks on the Press,’ was one more than that cited by the New York-based group in a Dec. 18 statement and compares with 56 in 2006.”

  • Objectivity is a serious subject for newspeople

  • Cartoonists to Protest Lack of Color in the Comics

  • WashPo texts: A Hillary sweep

  • The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s Campaign Coverage Index shows, “Fresh off his Florida primary win, John McCain attracted more media coverage than any other Presidential candidate last week. He appeared as a significant or dominant newsmaker in 37% of all campaign stories, and generated about 75% more coverage than his nearest GOP competitor Mitt Romney

  • ConWeblog reports, “A Feb. 5 WorldNetDaily column takes a certain amount of glee in the fact that the ‘strongly liberal’ Washington Post is losing circulation”

  • The New York Observer reports,Rupert Murdoch was on Fox News’ Your World with Neil Cavuto … and discussed how he had ‘no ill-will’ against Hillary Clinton and how he planned to change the culture of the Wall Street Journal (in part, by moving their offices to Midtown).”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of January 28, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 9.699 million total viewers”

  • Reporters should feel free to vote for the president

  • TVNewser reports,Johnny Dollar has the video of FNC anchor Shepard Smith absolutely unloading on a viewer who has a tendency to email Smith incessantly. Her email rant against Smith today regarding his supposed anti-Romney-bias gets him so riled up he reads it on air (something he says he’s wanted to do ‘for years!’).”

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 9.37 million Total Viewers and a 2.4/8 among Adults 25-54 for the week of January 28th. For the week, ‘World News’ placed first in the Adult 25-54 rating (2.4) and Households (6.5/12), tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News.’ Season-to-date, ‘World News’ is the only evening newscast to grow its Total Viewing audience, increasing 1%; NBC is down 3% and CBS is down 12%.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “News Corp.’s (NWS, NWSA) fiscal second-quarter net income rose 1.2% on improved results in its television, cable-TV and Internet businesses that were partially offset by lower results in film and TV production and losses at affiliates.”

  • TVNewser reports, “It’s not just any Tuesday: Hannity & Colmes in the early afternoon, Brian Williams at lunchtime and Cooper, Blitzer and Dobbs at high Noon. The networks have moved up their prime time talent, using them throughout this Super Tuesday. TVNewser attended today’s ‘CNN-Time America Votes 2008′ special at the Time Warner Center, which featured CNN’s biggest names.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Public broadcasting officials vowed Monday to fight drastic cuts President Bush is seeking to make to federal financing for public television and radio, warning that the reductions would seriously impair station operations.”

  • TVNewser reports, “If you live in Albuquerque, Chicago, Las Vegas, L.A., or Memphis, and you’re looking for real-time Super Tuesday election updates, you’ve got another way to get your information. The Memphis Business Journal reports that ‘Clear Channel Outdoor is joining with NBC News and MSNBC.com to provide digital reporting of primary election results” using a network of LED billboards.’

  • Variety reports, “Six national cable television programming companies have jointly sued the Federal Communications Commission, claiming that the agency’s so-called dual carriage requirement is a dual foul. C-Span, Discovery Communications, the Weather Channel, TV One, A&E Television Networks and Scripps Networks allege that the requirement constitutes both a First Amendment violation and an unfair advantage for broadcasters. The cablers are asking the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to toss the requirement, which forces cable operators to offer an analog version of a broadcaster’s channel as well as a digital one for at least three years following the transition to all-digital in early 2009.”

  • Washington Post reports on CNN’s debut of its “Magic Wall.”

  • “HuffPo’s Sam Stein reports Sen. Hillary Clinton has accepted the offer to participate in a debate expected to air on Fox News on Monday,” reports TVNewser.

  • Jon Klein said: “I Think I’m Going To Have a Heart Attack” Find out why here.

  • TVNewser reports, “After receiving some criticism over the weekend for his financial support of Sen. John McCain and Mitt Romney, CNN political analyst and conservative author Bill Bennett’s support was disclosed during CNN’s America Votes 2008 special.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “If New York ever needed to make its case for being the center of the media universe, Tuesday is one of those days. For the first time in recent history, each state in the tristate area — Connecticut, New York and New Jersey — is holding a primary that will matter, thanks to the wide-open nature of both parties’ races and an expanded Super Tuesday. The media industry is gearing up to cover the races from the New York-based news divisions. If that wasn’t enough, Sunday night’s heroes the New York Giants will be feted with a ticker-tape parade in downtown Manhattan and a giant celebration across the Hudson River at their Meadowlands home. Add in Fashion Week and a big convention at the Javits Center, and it’s all shaping up to be a huge news day.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “E-mail newsletters seek riches in niches”

  • Poynter Online reports, “On Jan. 25, Simon Owens blogged about new research about why more and more journalists are fleeing the newspaper business. Owens didn’t just quote from the paper by Dr. Scott Reinardy of Ball State University — he also interviewed the author and presented information from that original reporting in his post. Owens’ post got noticed not only by Poynter’s Jim Romenesko, but also by Editor & Publisher, in this Jan. 25 article by Emily Vaughan. According to Owens, when he saw Vaughan’s article as originally posted to the E&P site, he was taken aback: ‘Though some of the facts [in her story] came directly from the study itself, many of the facts reported were lifted directly from my article — facts that came from my interview with the professor in question. Was I given any credit for my reporting? None at all. It’s presented in such a way as if the reporter had gathered those facts herself.’”

  • This week on WETA’s videoblog Author, Author! is Garrett Graff, the author of The First Campaign: Globalization, the Web, and the Race for the White House.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Observer reports, “Newsweek, which for decades has called midtown its home, is nearing a deal that would move its offices downtown to 100 Church Street. According to a source, the magazine giant has a lease out with the building’s owner, Alex Sapir president of the Sapir Organization, though the papers have yet to be signed”

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    RADIO

  • A SIRIUS release announced, “Indie Talk, an exclusive, groundbreaking talk radio channel that will serve as an uncensored, unfiltered forum for independent thought and opinion will launch tomorrow, Wednesday, February 6 at 9:00 am ET on SIRIUS channel 110. The channel will feature veteran actor and political maverick Ron Silver, among others. Indie Talk will give an equal voice to individuals from any affiliation or background, target the blogger generation, and be a platform for listeners across the country to react to breaking news, issues and buzz.”

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    JOBS

  • Freedom House is looking for a Press Officer (Advocacy Department).

  • The New Republic is looking for reporter-researchers.

  • The Warren Communications News is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • The Free Lance-Star Publishing Companies is looking for a Senior Designer.

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR & Marketing Specialist.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for Business Reporters.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.13.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think The Washington Post’s reaction to Tim Page was too harsh.

  • Mitt Romney Loses Coveted Endless Simmer Endorsement”

  • Is that CBS’s Matthew Felling hosting the Kojo Nnamdi Show today?

  • Get ready for tomorrow’s Meet the Press party…and Rush Limbaugh?!?

  • New York Times presents, “Stray Questions for: P.J. O’Rourke

  • New York Post reports,Jack Ford, the son of the late President Gerald Ford, is teaming up with magazine entrepreneur Don Welsh to launch a new publishing company, Mountain Time Publishing.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Presidents and candidates have graced the covers of men’s style mags going back to John F. Kennedy, who posed in the Oval Office for the March 1962 issue of GQ. … For men, these magazines offer an opportunity to shape their images. … So why is a women’s fashion magazine a minefield for Hillary Clinton? It’s a double standard to be sure. A male candidate appearing in a men’s magazine is getting his message out. A female candidate appearing in a women’s magazine is falling into a stereotype and opening herself up to criticism for caring more about her looks than the issues.”

  • Reuters reports, “Investors punished shares of the Walt Disney Co and other large media companies on Friday after U.S. consumer sentiment hit a two-year low and sparked worries about cuts in advertising, analysts said.”

  • AP reports, “AOL, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. said Monday it purchased Yedda Inc., a social search question and answer service.”

  • Tech Check reports,Marc Andreessen Warns ‘Old Media’ Over Writers’ Strike”

  • Mel Karmazin, chief executive officer of Sirius Satellite Radio, met with the Tribune editorial board Wednesday to discuss the proposed merger of Sirius with XM Satellite Radio, shock jock Howard Stern and the intense competition in media markets.” Check it out here.

  • Andrew Sullivan speaks candidly” to Jennie Rothenberg Gritz “about why he supports Barack Obama, how he became a blogger, and why he’s not afraid to change his mind.”

  • Ad Age reports,Peggy Northrop is leaving her post as editor in chief at More magazine to become editor in chief of Reader’s Digest”

  • Washington Times reports, “Hollywood producer Joel Surnow dismissed as ‘nuts’ the notion that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton can be elected president and said he and other conservatives in the entertainment industry are leaning toward supporting Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

  • Redding News Review won its first “Black Web Award.” Congrats!

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of Oct. 28-Nov. 2, 2007 shows, “Thanks in part to the Democrats’ spirited debate in Philadelphia, last week was the biggest week of the year for the presidential campaign in the universe of radio and cable talk shows. The main course was the Democratic front runner who got carved up by hosts and pundits of various political stripes.”

  • The Independent reports, “The editor of ‘Time’ magazine, Richard Stengel, tells Ian Burrell why even his publication can’t afford to stand still if it wants to compete in an increasingly hi-tech industry.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “Ifra will launch a vertical search engine for the newspaper industry in January, its CEO claimed.”

  • AP reports, “The first lead story on MinnPost.com, a new daily news site, is a 1,400-word report on the Minnesota Democratic Party’s finances. It’s not the kind of flashy tidbit guaranteed to goose online traffic. But flash isn’t the idea at MinnPost, a venture staffed mostly by recent casualties of newspaper downsizing.”

  • Internet News reports, “A few years ago, it might have seemed far-fetched to imagine representatives from traditional media stalwarts like The New York Times and MTV Networks urging others to follow their lead in adapting to survive an evolving online environment. But the times, they are a-changing.”

  • Check out Nick Sweezey’s contestant interview from Jeopardy!

  • Reason’s Marty Beckerman interviews Matt Taibbi, “Rolling Stone’s controversial chief political reporter on Campaign 2008, following Hunter S. Thompson, and his new book.”

  • WTTG launched a new Web site. Check it out here.

  • CNN reports, “The man who revealed that Valerie Plame worked for the CIA said that he was ‘extraordinarily foolish’ to leak her name. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage was a source of the CIA leak to columnist Robert Novak. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer in an interview broadcast Sunday that he did not realize Plame was a covert agent when he discussed her with syndicated columnist Robert Novak.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “As the television writers’ strike slowly gnaws its way through the TV grid, the question arises: What else is there to watch? Doesn’t Al Gore have some kind of television channel, among his many worthy pursuits? Maybe nobody there’s on strike.”

  • The New Republic’s Michael Crowley writes about, “Clinton’s strategy for crushing the media.”

  • Randy Bennett, Vice President of Audience and New Business Development for the Newspaper Association of America writes about the new Imagining the Future of Newspapers Blog. “We asked 22 of some of the more insightful thinkers we know to provide their perspectives on how newspapers can shape their own future. Some are currently employed by newspapers, but most are outside observers (analysts, futurists, academics, customers, etc.) without a vested interest in the success or failure of new business or journalistic approaches. There were no restrictions. All were free to write on any aspect of the newspaper business and offer up positive or negative prognoses. The goal: stimulate ideas and discussions about the newspaper franchise 5-10 years from now. We will be posting several commentaries a day (to give you time to digest) over the next week.”

  • The New York Times’ Public Editor writes,Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers the White House for The Times, gets a steady stream of complaints from readers about a curious issue. These readers, like Susan Lonsinger of Bakersfield, Calif., object to the fact that The Times refers to President Bush as Mr. Bush on second and later references in news articles. They think that’s disrespectful and that he should always be called President Bush.”

  • Deborah Howell writes, “A new president will be elected a year from now. Voters will look to the mainstream media, to alternative bloggers and to the candidates’ Web sites to help decide who that president will be. A perennial complaint is that the media cover politics too much as a horse race instead of reporting more on the candidates’ backgrounds, where they stand on issues and how they would lead the nation. But is it true? I intend to find out — at least at The Post — and report back to readers.”

  • The Columbia Tribune reports, “Consider the name: Pulitzer. Joseph Pulitzer and the prize named after him enjoy recognition and respect, especially in this town, home to the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. But how many people, including working journalists, know and appreciate the rich stories — both human and historical — behind those coveted gold medals? As it turns out, not very many, said Roy Harris Jr. — the author of ‘Pulitzer’s Gold’ — whose book fills a huge gap of knowledge about the coveted Public Service awards given for coverage of some of the biggest stories of the past 90 years, including the Ponzi scheme, the Great Depression, civil rights, Watergate, the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and Hurricane Katrina.”

  • “FBNY discusses Slovenia, the age gap in comedy, the profitability of print media and a few other things” with The Onion’s Scott Dikkers.

  • CNN.com reports, “So, what exactly is news in a virtual world? CNN has opened an I-Report hub in the virtual world of Second Life. CNN aims to find out by opening an I-Report hub in Second Life, a three-dimensional virtual world created entirely by its residents.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to impose significant new regulations to open the cable television market to independent programmers and rival video services after determining that cable companies have become too dominant in the industry, senior commission officials said.”

    Jobs

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Writer.

  • New Media AE is looking for DBC Public Relations Experts.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for a Staff Correspondent to cover the White House for National Journal.

  • Home Front Communications is seeking Detail-Oriented Web Project Manager.

  • WUSA9 is looking for a Producer and an Executive Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Vitamin Water wins out over Gatorade.

  • We looked into this, “missing? washington post’s technorati supplied ‘who’s blogging’” and discovered the Washington Post did not get rid of the feature. It just wasn’t ready for the new home page launch. The paper tells us the “what blogs are saying” feature will be back in a few weeks.

  • Fox News announced, “FOX News Channel’s Greta Van Susteren will conduct an interview Thursday with former President Bill Clinton. The interview will air on FOX News Channel’s On the Record with Greta Van Susteren from 10-11PM/ET.”

  • Glynnis MacNicol and Rachel Sklar live blog the Dem debate (and “Dems debate Tim Russert’s giant noggin.”)

  • “During a panel discussion at the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Washington, D.C., former White House Press Secretaries Ron Nessen, Larry Speakes and Mike McCurry will join Dr. Martha Joynt Kumar, a professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University, to discuss what their jobs were like and whether they would be harder in today’s climate. Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR, will moderate the discussion. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Columbia B room.” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports that the witness list for today’s Senate hearing on Google’s proposed $3.1 billion purchase of ad firm DoubleClick “is more notable for who is not testifying than for who is. The five witnesses slated to appear before the panel, including company officials, analysts and consumer privacy experts, are divided between those for and against the deal. Google’s chief legal officer, David Drummond, will appear before the panel, along with his counterpart at rival Microsoft, General Counsel Brad Smith.”

  • Rumormonger reports, “There’s not much surprise left, given the drumbeat of rumors that AOL would be pursuing mass layoffs later this year. But we now hear that layoffs have started at the Internet giant, even earlier than expected, with a number of middle managers getting the chop Tuesday afternoon.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Justice Department is moving ‘as quickly as possible’ in its antitrust review of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s acquisition of XM Satellite Radio Inc, a senior department official said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “In a major reorganization that affects all of its top executives, ABC News president David Westin Tuesday appointed a single executive to oversee all programs. Dave Davis, formerly general manager of WABC in New York, was named executive vice president responsible for ABC News programs including Good Morning America, World News, 20/20, Primetime, Nightline, This Week with George Stephanopoulos and the overnight broadcasts. Davis will report to Westin.”

  • USA Today reports, “Arianna Huffington’s business plan: start an online news site, fueled by blog reports from her celebrity and influential friends. And have them all work for free, in exchange for using her bully pulpit. Nearly 2 1/2 years and $10 million later, the experiment has nearly paid off. The Huffington Post is the fifth-most-linked-to blog on the Internet, according to
    measurement firm Technorati.”

  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, “Consumers are in control, and advertisers should get used to it. That was a common theme as marketing industry leaders gathered in Manhattan on Monday to ponder how the Internet has turned their world upside down.”

  • Julie Mason, Houston Chronicle’s White House Correspondent, has been added to the regular rotation for Hardball.

  • B&C reports, “The Justice Department agreed to seek Supreme Court review of the Second Circuit court’s smackdown of the Federal Communications Commission’s crackdown on fleeting profanities.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Poynter’s ongoing Eyetrack research project has taught us some important basics, such as: Online audiences focus heavily on headlines, and in some cases almost ignore pictures. But other research tools make me want to challenge — or at least supplement — this finding.”

  • A release announced, “National Journal Group, Washington’s leading publisher of political and policy news and analysis, today announced the lineup for the inaugural edition of National Journal On Air, its new weekly show on XM Satellite Radio’s P.O.T.U.S.’08 channel. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will headline National Journal’s first show in the featured newsmaker interview with host Linda Douglass. Also scheduled to appear on the show are National Journal political writer Jim Barnes, National Journal White House correspondent Carl Cannon, and Senior Editor of The Hotline, John Mercurio.”

  • The Hill reports, “It’s always preferable to conduct interviews face to face, but hey, if Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) wants to visit via satellite from a barn in New York, who was Fox News to complain? That’s ‘Fox News Sunday’ host Chris Wallace’s take on Clinton’s appearance last weekend on his show.”

  • We have to ask, in light of the Washington Times hiring two new hires on the copy desk, does that mean the paper’s hiring freeze is off?

  • A reader tells us, “You should know that there is an error in the Michel du Cille internal memo from the Washington Post. Contrary to their statement, there is no ‘University of Indiana’. Rather, the appropriate institution to which they refer is ‘Indiana University’… a very important difference.”

  • Featured on Kudlow & Company, Brent Bozell revealed the results of the Business & Media Institute’s yearlong study analyzing how businessmen and women were characterized by ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN and Fox News’ evening newscasts. The results reveal how network news portrays our nation’s corporate leaders — as criminals, crooks, villains and filthy rich big-wigs. The full 18-page study — with audio and video — is available at www.businessandmedia.org.

  • Ad Week’s Mike Shields writes, “Political candidates from both parties are demonstrating a stubborn devotion to traditional media, along with a cautious streak that is holding them back from embracing the Web as an outlet for political ad dollars, according to a group of panelists speaking during a Mixx Conference session” held Tuesday.

  • B to B reports, “DoubleClick announced the launch of DoubleClick Mobile, a new service for mobile advertising. DoubleClick Mobile integrates operational processes for scheduling, targeting, selecting and delivering ads on mobile Web pages with publishers’ existing digital channels.”

  • Multichannel reports, “TV Guide Broadband, the digital video entertainment programming service launched one year ago by TV Guide Network, has signed a new distribution deal with Comcast’s portal site, officials said Tuesday.”

  • Reuters reports, “Steve Case, the founder of the AOL Internet service, is backing a new online payment company that promises to let users transfer funds for free and offer a credit card with sharply lower fees for merchants.”

  • Ad Week reports, “WPP Group joined in a $12 million round of funding for blog and social network tracking service Visible Technologies.”

  • New York Observer reports, “It’s still nearly two months until News Corp. officially closes on Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal’s parent. But there’s growing evidence that at The Journal, the Rupert Murdoch era has already begun. On September 17, the paper announced that it would launch Pursuits, a glossy magazine supplement covering the exploits of the superrich. The press release sent out by The Journal quoted publisher Gordon Crovitz and managing editor Marcus Brauchli — but according to one staffer, the prototype for the new venture had already passed through the hands of Mr. Murdoch, who gave it the green light.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s Fortune and Money business magazines plan to contribute several hours of video news to the company’s CNN Money Web site each day to lure users and advertisers.”

    Jobs

  • E&E Publishing/E&ETV is looking for a Video Producer.

  • Media General is looking for a Senior Multimedia Reporter.

  • The Center for Democracy & Technology is seeking Dynamic Communications Director.

  • The Society For Neuroscience is looking for a Staff Writer/Editor (Print).

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.13.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Third party in ’08? You think it is not going to happen.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the seventh consecutive week, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. Averaging 7.71 million Total Viewers and a 1.9/8 among Adults 25-54, ‘World News’ outperformed NBC by 280,000 Total Viewers and 80,000 key demo viewers. With last week’s win, ‘World News’ has now finished first among Total Viewers fourteen times in the last eighteen weeks and has placed first among Adults 25-54 thirteen times in the same period. This also marks ABC’s eighteenth win this season among key demo viewers.”

  • Deets from David Halberstam’s funeral service.

  • James Carville call your agent

  • A RCN release announced that the company won Stevie Awards for the categories of Best Turn Around Business and Best Communication Organization in The 2007 American Business Awards.

  • Slate is introducing an online video magazine. “In late June, Slate will launch Slate V, a new video-only site. Each weekday, Slate V will publish fresh video that brings the Slate sensibility to the news, politics, arts, culture, technology, business, and more.”

  • It’s your turn freelancers: “30 freelancers sound off on rules they’d wish their editors would follow

  • From DCRTV:

      Shales Mixes Up Scarboroughs – 6/13 – In the above Tom Shales DC Post piece on Dan Rather, Shales writes: “Rather said that he never planned an attack on the ‘Evening News’ or on Couric, but that he was asked about it by Chuck Scarborough, who has replaced the deposed Don Imus on morning radio and MSNBC-TV. ‘He asked me directly what I thought,’ Rather said. ‘It is my wont to answer a question directly. It was not planned.’” Ah, wasn’t he asked the question by Joe Scarborough, the MSNBC talker and former Congressman from Florida, and not Chuck Scarborough, the longtime NYC anchorman at WNBC-TV in NYC? Hmmm…..

  • Clarification to this post: Contrary to how he was described on the Politico’s website, David Baumann was not a staff writer but a contract writer, who had signed on to contribute for a few months.

  • Censure of Opie, Anthony irks fans

  • Robin Reid has a confession to make: “As a senior editor of The Politico, I have a terrible confession to make: I am not a politico.”

  • Paris Hilton’s problems represented only the second celebrity tabloid tale this year — the first being Anna Nicole Smith’s death — to make the roster of top five stories, according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index from June 3-8.”

  • The State Journal reports, “Three years after the parent company of The Charleston Gazette purchased its capital city rival, the Charleston Daily Mail, the U.S. Department of Justice has stepped in, declaring the sale as illegal.”

  • From the Washington Post: “Religion Finds a Home On TV, Then Adds On”

  • Politico reports, “Mitt Romney and Rudy Giuliani have both ‘personally assured’ Tim Russert that they will appear on ‘Meet the Press’ as part of the show’s meet the candidate series, according to ‘Meet’ executive producer Betsy Fischer.”

  • Bob Woodruff writes about and meeting with an interpreter in Syria who saved his life after the IED attack.

    Jobs

  • National Geographic is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • NPR is hiring for everything.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An NBC release announced that “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ topped the Sunday morning public affairs competition, winning the week ending Sunday, June 3, 2007 in total viewers, homes and in the key demographic adults 25-54.” On Sunday, “Meet the Press” attracted 3.308 million total viewers, a 37% advantage over CBS “Face the Nation”, 40% more than ABC “This Week”, and a 202% lead over FOX “News Sunday”.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of May 28 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continued its growth trend in Total Viewers. ‘Nightline’ grew year-to-year while its competitors declined. In addition, second quarter to date, ‘Nightline’ increased 4% in Total Viewers while both ‘Letterman’ and ‘The Tonight Show’ decreased.”

  • “News about an Atlanta man infected with a dangerous form of tuberculosis drew a large audience last week. The saga of the man’s illness and his travels abroad was the second most closely followed news story of the week – trailing only the situation in Iraq,” according to the Pew News Interest Index for the week of May 28.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “generation ago, federal regulators opened the way for consumers to buy telephones rather than rent them from the phone company. Now, the government has its sights on the television set-top boxes that consumers rent from cable or satellite companies.”

  • Freelance writer Kelly DiNardo has started her own blog.

  • Reuters reports, “General Electric Co.’s NBC Universal said on Wednesday it will allow personal Web sites to link to video snippets of NBC programs such as ‘Access Hollywood’, underscoring the Internet as a growing destination for video entertainment.”

  • Multichannel.com reports, “The newly anointed NBC Entertainment co-chair, Ben Silverman, is complaining that Nikki Finke ruined his big weekend when she blew out the blogsphere with her breaking news that Silverman would replace Kevin Reilly, and then said, ‘but as one source tells me, 36-year-old Ben ‘can barely manage his way out of a paper bag’ because of his extreme lifestyle, relentless ass kissing, and constant jetting around in his private plane.’”

  • MediaWeek.com reports, “Anyone who’s spent time watching lots of bad videos online in search of a few good ones knows Michael Caruso’s frustration. Caruso, the former editor of Wenner Media’s Men’s Journal and of Condé Nast’s Details, has channeled that frustration into a new Web site he founded, The Daily Tube, that promises to compile the best new videos across several subject areas: humor, celebrity, music, late-night category, political, sports and Web-based stars.”

  • Reuters reports, “Online auctioneer eBay Inc. said on Tuesday it is ready to begin auctioning advertising airtime on 2,300 participating U.S. radio stations, expanding on an existing plan to sell cable television ads.”

  • “Newspapers hoping to retain their readers and survive in the technological age must venture into the online and cellphone spheres, a World Association of Newspapers (WAN) meeting heard on Tuesday.”

  • ABC.com reports, “Last.fm, How Stuff Works, Comedy Central’s Honesty and EepyBird.com are among the top winners of this year’s Webby Awards.”

  • Media Matters has looked into how the press is covering the various looks of the White House candidates, including Rudy Giuliani, John McCain, Mitt Romney, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and John Edwards.

  • A reader writes, “Milbank has funniest little antenna extending 3 inches from his cell phone, which is clipped to his belt. Sweet, but nerdy.”

  • Old-House Journal is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • Thomas B. Fordham Foundation is looking for a Communications Director/Associate.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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