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Posts Tagged ‘Nate Beeler’

Washington Examiner Bids Farewell to Editorial Cartoonist

The Washington Examiner is losing its editorial cartoonist Nate Beeler, who is leaving Washington to go to work for his hometown newspaper, The Columbus Dispatch.

The reason he gave for leaving was to be with his mother and father who live in Columbus.

An excerpt from the notably gracious internal memo by Editor Stephen Smith:

“Only 31, Nate is a fine draftsman, a natural wit, and a first-rate journalist. And while each of his cartoons has a distinct point of view, he is no ideologue. We may have endorsed Romney for the Republican nomination, but Nate subsequently drew him as Frankenstein, proving emphatically that he is no slave to editorial policy.”

See the full memo…

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Examiner Cartoonist Exposed (For a Good Reason…)

Washington Examiner‘s award-winning cartoonist Nate Beeler is getting exposed — as in, his exposure is getting raised. U.S. News & World Report “Washington Whispers” Columnist Paul Bedard, with the permission of Examiner Editor-in-Chief Stephen Smith, is now using his work for the magazine and digital edition.

Beeler’s not getting royalties, but the exposure is positive. U.S. News is running cartoons that have already been published by the Examiner.

Bedard is intent on helping Beeler win a Pulitzer and sings his praises. “His work is the best at [getting] in the Washington weeds and making it understandable,” Bedard said over e-mail. “Also, I think, it helps that he is in Washington and gets the city’s unique feel for the issues and scandals.”

As for a byline and no money? Bedard says, “That’s the new journalism isn’t it?”

So far, Nate has no comment.

WaPo and NYT Lead Overseas Press Awards

2677-congratulations_greeting_cards.jpg WaPo has raised its Overseas Press Awards award total to 37. This year’s awards are being announced in Manhattan tonight.

The reporting team of Bob Woodward, Rajiv Chandrasekaran and Karen DeYoung won for best news interpretation for their series on the Obama Administration’s search for a new Afghanistan strategy. WaPo photographer Sarah Voisin won for images of residents in Mexican communities affected by drug wars.

The John Faber Award for Best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services went to WaPo’s Sarah Voisin.

Not included among the 37 OPC awards won by the newspaper, a book called The Good Soldiers by WaPo’s David Finkel. Finkel won the Cornelius Ryan OPC Book Award for his account of eight harrowing months with the 2-16 Ranger Army Battalion in Iraq.

NYT Magazine’s Alissa Rubin won for best magazine reporting for a story on a would-be female suicide bomber in Iraq. The TimesÂ’ second OPC award went to Keith Bradsher for best business reporting on the contradictions and promise of China’s environmental push.

WSJ’s Farnaz Fassihi won the coveted Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad for”"Hearts, Minds and Blood: The Battle for Iran.”

The AP won the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for best photo reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage. Noteworthy: “Khalil Hamra’s pictures of the Israeli military incursion into Gaza showed bravery, especially as combatants mingled among the civilians.”

CBS’s Andy Rooney received the President’s Award for lifetime achievement and David Rohde, the NYT correspondent who escaped his Taliban captors, will light the Press Freedom Candle in honor of the 71 journalists killed last year in the line of duty.

In the cartoon category, THE THOMAS NAST AWARD for best cartoons on international affairs went to Nate Beeler, of The Washington Examiner.

See a complete list of award winners after the jump…

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NPF Awards 2009: Celebratory Funeral

In case you haven’t heard: newspapers are dying… people are getting fired… laid off… buyouts are the new bonus.

If for any reason attendees at the 26th Annual NPF Awards had forgotten about the dismal state of their industry, there were plenty of speakers on hand to remind them.

While guests dined on roasted chicken, they were given a heavy helping of “sad” from nearly everyone that took the stage to accept, present and even MC the event. Len Downie Jr. praised the Graham family for an investment that has enabled WaPo to brave the tough economic times. Charles Gibson pondered how newspapers could profit from their websites so that news wasn’t given away.

Though unlike an Irish wake, booze was limited. Only two bottles of wine (one white one red) were provided per table.

Cartoonist honorary Nate Beeler and CQ’s Jonathan Allen seemed to be the lone soldiers in the war for a lighter mood. Golf claps to them for not mentioning the terrible state of the news business… did we mention that the news business is in a terrible state?

Beeler Wins Berryman Award For Editorial Cartoons

My talented colleague at the Washington Examiner — editorial cartoonist Nate Beelerhas taken home the National Press Foundation’s Clifford K. & James T. Berryman Award for Editorial Cartoons.

    The Berryman judges said they were “taken with Nate Beeler’s technical skill and wry sense of humor. His grasp of politics is excellent, which is particularly important when you’re drawing for an audience of Washington insiders. Beeler is a new talent in one of the most popular forms of journalism.”

Morning Reading List, 10.30.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.30.08

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 03.17.08

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day Washington.

  • Sunday was Ellen McCarthy’s birthday. Today is Tim Burger’s and Mark Paustenbach’s and Saturday was Jenny 8 Lee’s.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Email is your favorite way to communicate.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Karen Hosler has left the Baltimore Sun.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • A release announced, “The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel is the winner of the 2007 Thomas L. Stokes Award for Energy Writing. Reporters Thomas Content, Lee Bergquist and Joel Dresang will share a $1,000 check and receive individual citations for the yearlong project.”

  • Justice and the Press

  • The AP reported that The Washington Examiner’s Nate Beeler won a Virginia Press Association award “for a portfolio of three editorial cartoons.”

  • Clark Hoyt says the Times was fooled again.

  • Deb Howell on “A Reporting Coup and Its Critics.”

  • Celebrated History of the CIA Comes Under Belated Fire

  • With Order to Name Sources, Judge Is Casting a Wide Net

  • Are job cuts death knell for America’s newspapers?

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “When some people first heard the news about New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a prostitution ring, they thought: How awful, how tragic, how corrupt. When I first heard it, I thought: Thank God for newspapers.”

  • E&P reports, “A dispute over a Pulitzer Prize finalist in investigative reporting has emerged between The Denver Post and the Charlotte (N.C) Observer. The conflict sparked a phone call Wednesday from Observer Editor Rick Thames to Post Editor Greg Moore, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. Moore says he is now ‘writing a letter about it.’”

  • Walter Pincus Rips into Newsroom Neutrality

  • The Washington Post reports, “In his youth, Ivory Wilson says, he drove a Bentley, drank Hennessy and rolled joints with $100 bills. Now he’s a middle-aged man, bent but not broken, homeless but not hopeless, writing fiction for Street Sense, the District’s twice-monthly newspaper written by and about the area’s homeless.”

  • The Q&A Cafe will feature The Washington Post’s Len Downie on April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “You know a presidential primary is really important when…a news program that rarely goes on the road decides to pull up stakes and do just that. With Pennsylvania the focus of attention on April 22, PBS anchor Jim Lehrer will broadcast The NewsHour from Pittsburgh during the week of April 21.”

  • Bob Schieffer: Who says there isn’t life after TV?

  • Iraq war disappears as TV story

  • Rove on Fox: It’s Fair to Say He’s Mellowed

  • Business Week reports, “Ever since Brian L. Roberts abandoned a hostile bid for Walt Disney (DIS) four years ago, Wall Street has wondered when the Comcast (CMCSA) chief executive and serial acquirer might make a play for another big media prize. The chatter picked up last fall, just before America’s largest cable company confessed that it would add fewer subscribers than expected in the fourth quarter. Some investors worried that, with growth slowing, Roberts might try to pick off Yahoo! (YHOO) or NBC Universal (GE) — diversifying away from cable by wading into the murky waters of ‘content.’”

  • Information Week reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is defending the way it tracks complaints, investigations, and enforcement, and it claims a critical government report is based on several inaccuracies. The U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a 53-page report this week saying the FCC doesn’t properly collect and analyze data, making it impossible to analyze the effectiveness of its enforcement.”

  • Michael Calderone reports, “Fox launches ‘Obama Watch’”

  • TVNewser reports, “A tornado that tore through downtown Atlanta did not spare the CNN Center. This morning the network has been covering the aftermath of the severe weather, and the potential for more today. Anchor Betty Nguyen took viewers on a tour of part of the newsroom ‘where our writers and our producers sit.’ It is now covered with blue tarp. The tornado shattered windows in the newsroom and damaged the roof in the atrium which, until 2003, was the studio for the CNN daytime program, Talk Back Live.” And, “After last night’s tornado, CNN was taking no chances today. The blog Newscast Studio added, ‘Today CNN was thrown another curve ball…CNN’s Frederica Whitfield uses the CNN International set to bring the news to the viewers.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Project for Excellence will release the State of the News Media 2008 report today at www.stateofthenewsmedia.org.

  • Richard Prince writes, “A front-page photo of Sen. Barack Obama in the New York Times last week showed the Democratic front-runner on his campaign plane as a number of hands holding tape recorders reached up to him. None of the hands appeared to be black or brown. It seemed ironic in that Obama is the first African American with a serious chance to be president, running in a campaign in which the nuances of race have been discussed as never before.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Newspapers and online publishers appear to be heading back into battle against search engine behemoth Google.”

  • Politico.com has been redesigned.

  • Web Has Unexpected Effect on Journalism

  • Find out here what His Extreme-ness calls “Just Whore-ible”

  • strong>Laurel Touby Holds Fake Presser

  • The AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said Thursday he expects the next decade to bring even greater technological leaps than the past 10 years.”

  • Is KickApps Next to Board AOL’s Gravy Train?”

  • A release announced, “OhMyGov!, the only website devoted to improving bureaucracy through the spread of information, ideas, innovative online tools, and strategic satire, today announced the launch of its pilot site, www.ohmygov.com, for beta testing.”

  • Conde Nast’s Portfolio asks, “Google’s business model of internet-search-driven advertising has become so dominant that competitors Microsoft and Yahoo can hardly compete. But will C.E.O. Eric Schmidt be able to keep Google true to its roots?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • It’s that time of year again. “Nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2008 Campaigns & Elections’ Politics magazine Rising Stars.” Entries should be submitted by April 18, 2008 and emailed to risingstars@campaignsandelections.com.

  • The New York Observer reports, “At Columbia, The Inadvertently Boldface Joanne Lipman Sticks to the Script”

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jon Meacham and his wife, Keith, are celebrating the arrival of No. 3 — Margaret Randolph Meacham, to be called Maggie. You’d never know her folks are from Tennessee and Mississippi. They’ll see you in 18 years.”

  • Also from Mike Allen, “Jay Carney and Claire Shipman opened their home to a celebration for TIME Nation Editor Amy Sullivan’s new book, ‘The Party Faithful: How and Why Democrats Are Closing the God Gap.’ TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel was also a host. Guests included Mike McCurry, Walter and Cathy Isaacson, Sally Quinn, Dana Bash, Howard Kurtz, Sam Feist, Chris Matthews and David Bohrman. Among many others, Sullivan thanked her fiance, The New Republic’s Noam Scheiber.”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman tells us about, “Three magazines that deserve better fates”

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    RADIO

  • Innovator rethinking Tribune ways

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “The future of Time Warner, MGM, Lionsgate, Liberty Media, satellite radio and the general outlook for mergers and acquisitions in the media and entertainment field were in the spotlight Thursday at McGraw-Hill’s 2008 Media Summit New York. ‘There is going to be a lot of M&A activity’ despite the recent credit crunch, said Santo Politi, co-founder and general partner of Spark Capital, during a panel on the industry’s deal outlook. His rationale: Media giants have become more active in pursuing digital companies as they embrace the digital future and private-equity firms’ ability to bid in deals is hurt by the crunch.”

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    BOOKS

  • Jennifer 8. Lee will be at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue at 600 I Street, NW tonight for a Politics & Prose event.

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Writer/ Producer.

  • Child Welfare League of America is looking for an Associate Editor/Writer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Web Reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Need To Know News is looking for a Financial Reporter.

  • NSSEA is seeking an Entry-Level Editorial Assistant.

  • World Resources Institute is looking for a Communications Coordinator — GHG Protocol, World Resources Institute.

  • National Journal Group is looking for an Account Executive.

  • Dickstein Shapiro LLP is looking for a Website Administrator.

  • Food & Water Watch is looking for an Advocacy Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for a Destination Account Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Defense Reporter and an Energy Policy Reporter.

  • A New Web Channel is looking for a Capitol Hill Correspondent/Fill-in Anchor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Interactive Designer.

  • National Consumer Magazine is looking for an Associate Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think journos make good dinner guests, or is it that they make better dinner guests than your family?

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of October 29-November 2. Averaging 8.57 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/9 among Adults 25-54, the ABC broadcast outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 310,000 Total Viewers and 80,000 key demo viewers.”

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News in partnership with HotChalk is launching today the most comprehensive digital, curricular resource ever available on American presidential politics. The pioneering Decision ’08 resource, designed specifically for classroom
    instruction, offers the latest, up-to-the-minute presidential election news through a video-on-demand user interface, allowing teachers to effortlessly customize their lesson plans with compelling and relevant content to bring the election process and political issues to life.”

  • Eric Boehlert on “Hillary, the debate, and the media folly

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com increased unique visitors 21% to 15.7 million in October 2007, versus the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. ABCNEWS.com saw 150.8 million page views, up 19% from the previous month and 9% year-over-year.”

  • A tipster tells us, “former Washington Times staff photographer Liz O. Baylen, who left the Times in the summer of 2006, has been hired as a staff photographer at the Los Angeles Times.”

  • The CPB announced,Chris Boskin Elected Chair of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting”

  • Radar presents, “The New York Times’ Andrew Rosenthal on Iraq, Times Select, and his father’s secret past”

  • The Washington Times reports, “Is the right-wing conspiracy so vast as to include even Mark R. Levin’s dogs? The conservative talk-radio host disavows any political or ideological motive behind his new book, ‘Rescuing Sprite: A Dog Lover’s Story of Joy and Anguish.’” The book is currently #2 on Amazon’s top 100.

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for the week of Oct. 28 shows, “The presidential race was easily the biggest story in the media last week. But while much of the coverage focused on the attacks on Hillary Clinton at the Democrats’ Drexel University debate, the press also reassessed several other candidates.”

  • Bloomberg reports, ” Google Inc., seeking to expand beyond the Web, said it plans to create a mobile phone operating system for handsets sold by Sprint Nextel Corp. and T-Mobile USA Inc.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Taking the reins at a time of intense pressure for change, Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc.’s chief executive-elect, said he would consider all options for restructuring, and he acknowledged that the media company is unlikely to look the same in two years.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Just minutes after the announcement Monday that Time Warner Inc. chief operating officer Jeff Bewkes was chosen to succeed Dick Parsons as chief executive officer of the conglomerate, rumors of structural changes at the company, including a possible Time Inc. spin-off, started again.”

  • His Extreme-ness launched a new campaign for the Weblog Awards.

  • A reader asks, “Anybody else wondering if the Taylors named their baby after Bruce Willis’ character in Die Hard?”

  • Doug Elfman writes, “Howard Kurtz gave his new book the wrong title. Reality Show: Inside the Last Great Television News War is really about The First Inconsequential Television News War, since it’s obsessed with the current TV news anchors.”

  • PJNet’s Leonard Witt writes, “we have to make a distinction between reporters and the writers who are writers and reporters too. I think in terms of a continuum from straight news reporting to feature writing to literary nonfiction.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Five of the nation’s top newspaper companies are taking steps to create a national online advertising network they hope will help them recapture ad revenue leaking away from their print products. Sources close to the situation said Gannett Co., Tribune Co., Hearst Corp., Media News Group and Cox Newspapers may band together to form a common ad sales force that could offer national advertisers ‘one-stop shopping’ for ad space on big-market Web sites across the nation.”

  • MediaWeek reports, “Magazine publishers have heard it all before, and speakers at the American Magazine Conference last week only reinforced it: They are behind on integrated marketing, they need to catch up to consumers’ online habits and their Web sites are dwarfed online by the big foots of the digital world.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Copyrighted work like a news article or a picture can hop between Web sites as easily as a cut-and-paste command. But more than ever, as that material finds new audiences, the original sources might not get the direct financial benefit — in fact, they might have little idea where their work has spread.”

  • Mediabistro says, “Get on your soapbox and pitch ‘Culturebox,’ the Slate section that’s the best way to get in the door,” when pitching Slate.

  • A reader sends us this, “To Chris Anderson…from a flack. This lazy jackass whines because he gets 300 emails a day? That’s sounds like the abridged version of my daily inbox. Tell him to go work at the 7-11 if he can’t handle the overwhelming, time-consuming flood of communications that online journalists like have forced upon us, thanks to their 24 hour newscycle and constant search to make news when there isn’t any.”

  • Stars and Stripes reports, “Stars and Stripes is parting ways with America Supports You, the Defense Department program that gives publicity to groups supporting U.S. servicemembers.”

  • Associated Press reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s chief executive and top lawyer on Tuesday defended their company’s involvement in the jailing of a Chinese journalist. Irate lawmakers accused them of collaborating with an oppressive communist regime.”

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Sunday newspaper sales have fallen to a 32-year low of about 51.3 million, according to projections based on the latest report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “The editor of Timesonline today told the Society of Editors conference that Google was ‘hugely dangerous’ to the newspaper industry.”

  • The Daily Cartoonist reports, “E&P report that Washington Examiner editorial cartoonist Nate Beeler and Chicago cartoonist Eric Allie have been picked up by Cagle Cartoons syndicate. Both cartoonists tend to be right-leaning.”

  • New York Observer reports, “The first President George Bush—the one with two middle names—is 83 years old now and isn’t one to give many interviews. And when he does consent to a sit-down, they always seem to be done with an understanding — either explicitly stated or an agreement between gentlemen — that he is not to be uncomfortably probed about his son’s presidency and the seemingly vast foreign policy differences between father and son. It is probably unfair, then, to blame Chris Wallace, the host of ‘Fox News Sunday,’ for conducting a lengthy, exclusive interview with the former President that left every relevant question unasked.”

  • PRWeek reports, “Salon.com still thriving as brand evolves”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Time Warner Inc. said Tuesday that its chief financial officer, Wayne Pace, will retire at the end of 2007.”

  • Information Week reports, “Big media companies’ efforts to extend copyright are hurting creators’ abilities to find audiences for their work, argues cyber-rights activist Cory Doctorow.”

  • Reuters reports, “Four out of five U.S. adults go online now, according to a new Harris Poll.”

  • Content Bridges reports, “The newspaper industry’s circulation swoon continues, and at a pace that hasn’t changed much over the last three years.”

  • Portfolio looks into “Chris Anderson vs. Public Relations Spam”

  • Jenny 8. Lee is back.

  • Jonah Goldberg writes, “Yes, FEMA’s fakery was foolish. But — and here’s what really bugs me — what isn’t in the TV news business these days?”

    Jobs

  • Talk Radio Network is looking for a Producer.

  • U.S. House of Representatives is looking for a Online Producer and Website Manager.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for an Online Ad Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Product & Marketing Manager, Health.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext