TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Leahy’

Weekend Show Preview: 1.17 – 1.19

SundayShows12Who’s on the weekend shows this week? Glad you asked:

CBS’s “Face the Nation“: Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI), Intelligence Committee Chairman; Sen. Mark Udall (D-CO), Intelligence Committee; Tom Donilon, former Obama national security adviser; Mike Morell, former deputy CIA director, WaPo’s Ruth Marcus; LATimes’ Christi Parsons; and NYTimes David Sanger.

“Fox News Sunday”: Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT); Gen. Michael Hayden, former head of the CIA and NSA.

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Congressional Intelligence Committee Chairs Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI) and Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA).

ABC’s “This Week“: Russian President Vladimir Putin; Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), chair, House Homeland Security Committee; James CarvilleMary Matalin; Wall Street Journal Columnist Peggy Noonan; New Yorker Editor David Remnick; and TV and radio host Tavis Smiley.

CNN’s “State of the Union“: House Intelligence Chair Mike Rogers (R-MI).

CNN’s “Reliable Sources” : ”Reliable Sources” goes to the Sundance Film Festival. A special live show will look at documentaries in the digital age and the state of the film business.

Univision’s “Al Punto” : TBA

PBS’s “McLaughlin Group” : TBA

PBS’s “Washington Week” : NYTimes’ Peter Baker; NPR’s Tom Gjelten; ABC News’ Jeff Zeleny; and Reuters’ Joan Biskupic.

BTV’s “Political Capital” : TBA

We’ll update ‘em as we get ‘em (email fishbowljames@gmail.com).

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketing and more. Register now! 

Politico Issues First Annual Report Cards

Politico and its sister outlet Politico Pro handed out “Policymaker of the Year” awards at the Mandarin Oriental Tuesday night. It was their version of report cards, and if they were to issued themselves a letter grade, it would be one notch above an A-plus.

The “welcome” table, stage banners, cocktail table tops, pens and even the napkins were branded with the publications’ names. Call it marketing, but we’re still seeing red spots when we blink.

Kicking off the evening was a “Year in Review” panel discussion with Politico 2012 reporter Alex Burns joined by Pro reporters Elizabeth Wasserman, Dan Berman, and David Nather. The event was led by Executive Editor Jim Vandehei and Chief White House Correspondent Mike Allen. Breakout sessions with policy experts on health care, technology and energy followed.

Allen also moderated the health care panel, nodding his head when he agreed with the speakers, looking out into the audience every three minutes and smiling like a proud son of Politico‘s Founding Fathers.

We didn’t take away much from the session because, coincidentally, there was a lot of coughing going on, making it hard to hear as we feared for our health.  But we noticed the stylish cufflinks Allen wore and asked him about them at the cocktail reception after. He said he bought them in Manhattan from Pink, though “someone thought they were Lego.” The cufflinks are pictured at the right.

Politico Pro is just over a year old. Part of the evening was to celebrate it. An attendee who works in the health insurance industry spoke with us at the reception, though she was too shy to be named. She told us she likes Pro, but said it might be becoming too pricey. (In explanation…The rates are tricky. They have varying rates depending on which policy area you want, if it’s for a company or individual, etc. For an individual, Pro Health Care is $2495/year — a rate that will jump to $4495 in the new year. Happy New Year, folks.)

After cocktails, “Policymaker of the Year” awards went to Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.), Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Tex.) and EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson.

The bar was a big hit. Overheard during the reception…

Attendee 1: I found the bar faster than you.

Attendee 2: I can’t believe that.

Sunday Show Preview for 05.31.09

So our headline has become a bit misleading…really should read “Weekend Show Preview.” That said, I think it is just about complete.

NBC’s Meet the Press with David Gregory: Chairman of the Judiciary Committee Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) to discuss Sotomayor confirmation hearings.

ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos: Sens. Charles Schumer (D-NY) and John Cornyn (R-TX) and roundtable with former Bush adviser Ed Gillespie, PBS’ Gwen Ifill, New York Times columnist and Nobel laureate Paul Krugman, and ABC News’ Legal correspondent Jan Crawford Greenburg and columnist George Will will discuss the impact of a potential GM bankruptcy, the North Korean nuclear threat, and the rest of the week’s politics.

CBS’ Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer: Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)and Jon Kyl (R-AZ) and roundtable with WaPo’s Bob Woodward and NYT’s David Brooks

Washington Week with Gwen Ifill: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Joan Biskupic of USA Today and James Kitfield of National Journal will have analysis of the Obama administration’s efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons and secure a new arms reduction treaty with Moscow.

Bloomberg’s Political Capital w/ Al Hunt: World Bank president Robert Zoellick will discuss global financial conditions.

Fox News Sunday: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) with Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA) and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.

CNN’s State of the Union with John King: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) to discuss Obama’s Sotomayor nom., the economy and the future of the GOP.

Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Rachel Brand, Former Assistant Attorney General; Emily Pierce, David Drucker and Emily Heil from RC newspaper.

The Chris Matthews Show: NY Mag’s John Heilemann, NYT’s Helene Cooper,NBC DC Bureau Chief Mark Whitaker, WaPo’s Anne Kornblut will discuss Sotomayor and the Prez’s trip to Egypt.

CNN’s Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer: David Axelrod & Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)on Sotomayor, Rep. Joe Sestak (D-PA)on Penn Senate race, Alberto Gonzales on interrogation investigations and Richard Ben-Veniste on his new book “The Emperor’s New Clothes.”

FAREED ZAKARIA GPS: Henry Kissinger on diplomacy with rivals, Selig Harrison and Charles Prichard on N. Korea tests, Joshua Cooper Ramo and Niall Ferguson on global recession.

Morning Reading List, 11.06.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Eventually, you want to have kids.

  • News University is hosting, The Electronic Election: Covering the 2008 Vote: A NewsU/Poynter Webinar on November 14. Register here.

  • Poynter Online reports, “NewAssignment.Net, the professional-amateur (pro-am) journalism effort spearheaded by NYU prof Jay Rosen, has a new project underway — and they need beat reporters to help”

  • TVNewser reports, “A cable insider tells TVNewser HOT (the largest cable operator in Israel) took CNN off the air from both their digital and analog platforms at 11:30am local time (5:30amET) this morning. It was replaced with FOX News Channel.”

  • Inside Cable News looks into the “Anatomy of a misquote…”

  • The Huffington Post reports,Mariane Pearl, the widow of murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, spoke out against the media establishment Thursday evening at a party hosted by Glamour to toast the book debut of her collected reporting for the magazine, In Search of Hope.”

  • Wonkette points out the latest snafu from MSNBC.

  • Check out the latest Washington Social Diary.

  • Check out NPR Music, ‘a new, free, comprehensive multimedia music discovery Web site. Featuring on-air and online content aggregated from NPR and the participating stations as well as original-to-NPR Music materials such as interviews, reviews, blogs and live performances.” It launched yesterday.
  • Politico’s Mike Allen writes, “MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, coming off a textbook interview with Michael Gerson, introduces a new feature exclusive to the show’s 7 p.m. edition: ‘The Hardball Power Rankings,’ showing who’s winning at that moment.”
  • TVNewser reports,Bob and Lee Woodruff, both now working for ABC News, are, it turns out, the namesakes for two new characters on ABC’s Desperate Housewives. Marc Cherry, the program’s creator, says in a USA Today interview that the characters, gay partners Bob and Lee, were named for the Woodruffs after Cherry met them at a dinner”
  • B&C reports, “As executive vice president of Fox Business Network, Kevin Magee oversees the channel’s day-to-day operations. Like many people at the just-launched channel, Magee is a veteran of CNBC, cable’s business-news leader in distribution, ratings and revenue. But Magee was not daunted by his former employers’ competitive advantage. ‘Everyone loves a good fistfight,” he said.’”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It sounded like a great gotcha story: the Hill newspaper accusing Hillary Rodham Clinton of failing to show up for a Senate hearing on nuclear waste disposal that she herself had requested. And Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.) was quoted as criticizing the Democratic presidential candidate. But it turned out that Clinton was there — and Inhofe’s quotes were taken from a July press release — prompting an embarrassing correction. ‘Any mistake is regrettable,’ says Hugo Gurdon, the Hill’s editor, ‘but it’s more painful when it negates the story entirely.’”

  • The New York Times reports, “Journalists often call publicists ‘flacks’ and publicists call journalists ‘hacks,’ though rarely in earshot of one another. But the gloves came off last week after Chris Anderson, the executive editor of Wired magazine, chided ‘lazy flacks’ who deluge him with news releases ‘because they can’t be bothered to find out who on my staff, if anyone, might actually be interested in what they’re pitching.’”

  • National Journal hosted a panel discussion featuring National Journal’s Ronald Brownstein and Linda Douglass, The Hotline’s Amy Walter, and moderated by XM’s Rebecca Roberts. Click here to hear the broadcast of the event.
  • What are your favorite political reporters doing for New Year’s Eve? Top of the Ticket takes His Extreme-ness’ story one step further.

  • A reader writes in, “Someone needs to note somewhere that that ’60 Minutes’ piece last night, Sunday, Nov. 4, on the revelation of the con man known as ‘Curve Ball’ who duped the entire United States government, military and 16 intelligence agencies into forging ahead into an unnecessary war that has cost the U.S. about 3,800 lives, was one of the best investigative pieces aired on the show in many, many years. The piece was well-researched and well-produced, and the story produced actual, revelatory, groundbreaking real news on a real, relevant story. The scoop, with worldwide implications, was the type of piece that the show used to do all of the time. Then, two pieces later, the show aired a completely inane, juvenile, non-relevant dog-and-pony show by a flustered, somewhat confused Lesley Stahl about some billionaire who decided to buy a yacht. The piece was worse than some of the newsbreaking pieces in the current issue of ‘National Enquirer.’ In an odd juxtaposition, ’60 Minutes’ revealed a flash of what used to make the show great and displayed a waste of time that showed why the show has tanked for many people.”

  • E&P has “some of the top daily gainers for the six-month period ending September 2007, based on today’s FAS-FAX. The daily average is based on Monday-Friday.”

  • Riehl World View reports, “A few dots to connect here, but it looks like a journalist, John Cheeves of the Lexington-Herald-Leader, with current and previous ties to McClatchy and Knight-Ridder respectively, has been involved in one dubious scheme that at least suggested pay for play journalism. And given where his name also turns up, he might not be the most objective journalist to be leading a witch hunt against current Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.”

  • The Associated Press reports, “The PC’s role in Japanese homes is diminishing, as its once-awesome monopoly on processing power is encroached by gadgets such as smart phones that act like pocket-size computers, advanced Internet-connected game consoles, digital video recorders with terabytes of memory.”

  • The Los Angeles Times launched, “The Strike Zone: The Latest on WGA Strike”

  • The Associated Press reports, “An influential advisory firm for institutional shareholders recommended its clients vote in favor of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.’s planned acquisition of rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The broadcast networks are clearly adopting more of an ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em’ philosophy toward the Internet. Harnessing a natural human inclination toward gossip, complaint, prediction and obsession, they are using TV show Web sites to offer clips, outtakes, interviews, games, message boards and blogs — not to mention entire episodes.”

  • Don Surber reports, “Blaming the media for victory”

  • A release announced, “Gibraltar Associates, LLC, a consultancy specializing in risk and reputation management, public affairs and business development, today announced that Tarah Donoghue has joined the company as an Associate in the Washington, DC office. Ms. Donoghue will focus on client communications strategy, policy and strategic messaging. Ms. Donoghue joins Gibraltar Associates from the White House, where she served as Deputy Press Secretary to First Lady Laura Bush from May 2006 to August 2007.”

  • William Powers writes, “To truly understand high-end political journalism requires a secret decoder ring. The actual message of a story is often embedded between the lines or in a passing descriptive detail far down in the text. In this case, the operative moment came well after the jump, at paragraph 18: ‘In a 53-minute interview over a breakfast of boiled eggs (he ate only the egg whites), aboard a chartered jet that brought him here from Chicago, Mr. Obama said Mrs. Clinton had been untruthful or misleading in describing her positions on problems facing the nation.’”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Newsweek’s new management plans to chop its guaranteed paid circulation by 500,000 copies, dropping its promise to advertisers down to 2.6 million paying readers from 3.1 million, those with knowledge of the move said today.”

  • PR People: Are you on this list?

  • Beltway Blogroll reports, “A weekend journalism discussion at the Phillips Foundation has sparked a mini-debate about whether ‘backpack journalism,’ where reporters carry more than pen and pad, is a good development.”

  • Associated Press reports, “Tom Curley, CEO of The Associated Press, called on news executives Thursday to “stop pining” for the past and adapt to the new ways that news is being distributed and consumed.”

  • New York Times reports, “Copyrighted work like a news article or a picture can hop between Web sites as easily as a cut-and-paste command. But more than ever, as that material finds new audiences, the original sources might not get the direct financial benefit — in fact, they might have little idea where their work has spread.”

  • The Deal reports, “And now for something completely different: ‘The long-term outlook for the [newspaper] industry appears to be healthier than that implied by current share prices.’ So Joe Arns of Banc of America Securities LLC reports on initiating coverage of the newspaper sector. Although he may be new to the beat, that doesn’t mean he’s Pollyannaish. In fact, Arns’ forecast for a 5% decline in newspaper ad revenues next year is more bearish than the Street consensus of a 3% decline.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Wall Street Journal said on Sunday that its Web site now has 1 million subscribers, a milestone for a site that charges for access even as other sites are throwing themselves open for free.”

  • “Daily News TV critic David Bianculli says ‘So long & thanks’”

  • FT.com reports, “Tribune Company and the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission are locking horns over the proposed $8.2bn buy-out of the media group by Sam Zell, the real estate entrepreneur, in a stand-off that threatens to derail the deal.”

  • Heard On The Hill reports, “Sen. Patrick Leahy tried out the time-honored strategy of turning the tables in an effort to fend off an aggressive press corps on Wednesday. Cornered by a pack of scribes anxious to query the Vermont Democrat about the troubled nomination of Michael Mukasey to be attorney general, Leahy was attempting to exit the Capitol through a second-floor exit.”

  • Media Matters reports, “In a November 5 post on his campaign news website The Page, Time magazine editor-at-large and senior political analyst Mark Halperin claimed that a Chicago Sun-Times column raising questions about the transparency of Sen. Barack Obama’s (D-IL) presidential bid was the product of opposition research provided by the campaign of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY).”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The digital revolution has given journalists some fantastic tools. Web sites like Google and Wikipedia give us instant access to voluminous research on virtually any subject. Cell phones enable us to become news photographers. Sparked by blogs and YouTube, the Citizen Journalism boom has taken shape.”

  • The Guardian reports,Rupert Murdoch plans to install Times editor Robert Thomson as publisher of the Wall Street Journal next year, according to a senior US media executive.”

  • CJR reports, “The Rhetoric Beat: Why journalism needs one”

  • Whoops. CNBC should know by now how to spell Karl Rove.

    Jobs

  • Politico is hiring a Special Projects Assistant.

  • The Hill is seeking a Political Journalist.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for a Producer, Design Dept. and a digital storyteller.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a freelance travel writer, a
    Health Editor and a Copy Editor.

  • Publishing Services LLC is looking for an Associate Publisher.

  • The Montgomery County Sentinel is looking for an Entry Level Reporter.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • Elsevier is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.16.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you do use supplements regularly.

  • An ABC release announced, “‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ will produce the first Democratic presidential debate of the 2008 presidential election to be aired on broadcast television. The debate will be moderated by ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos with additional questioning from David Yepsen of The Des Moines Register and will be held at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa on Sunday morning, August 19, 2007.”

  • Don’t forget that The Washington Blogger Meetup is today! You can see who’s coming and RSVP here.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC’s SVP of programming, Bill Shine announced the network ‘will not continue the Half Hour News Hour beyond its current 15 episode run.’”

  • “Channel 9′s Tracey Neale, who is headed to Africa to pick up her kids. The WUSA anchor announced the news on Tuesday’s broadcast: ‘I’ll be adopting 1-year-old twins, so I’m going to have my hands full,’ she told viewers.”

  • Why is there a Black journalism organization?”

  • A tipster writes in, “Good for Plante for shouting an intelligent question–and a valid one, and an important one, and a relevant one. Good for Plante. He was doing his job. The question was a good one.”

  • From CJR: “The WSJ editorial page launches baseless attacks on its competitors’ motives—it will fit right in at News Corp.”

  • Slate’s Christopher Beam tells us, “How to mash together the ultimate search engine”

  • Julian Friedland writes in the Denver Post, “Last week, the New York Times reduced the width of its pages by an inch and a half — joining a trend that has reduced both the space devoted to news and commentary and the staff sizes of many daily newspapers throughout the country. And, recently, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation won its fight to buy The Wall Street Journal.”

  • Denver Post reports, “At an Aspen forum, executives in media new and old say papers are staying relevant by changing their mind-set about delivery”

  • From The Hollywood Reporter: “Sirius Satellite Radio — more popular in automobiles than in living rooms — is making it easier to get Howard Stern, along with dozens of commercial-free channels, on home-based radios.”

  • Ad Week reports, “Since Facebook opened its site to developers in May, it has been flooded with mini-programs that let users throw virtual food at one another, post movie reviews and share YouTube videos. The influx of applications, now up to over 2,800, is leading to the creation of ad networks designed to let developers profit from their work and help advertisers reach Facebook’s growing user base.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The October issue of Condé Nast Portfolio is already closing and it looks like it will rack up a nice, healthy 121 ad pages for its third issue. That’s only one ad page down from the magazine’s September issue, which went on sale today with 122 ad pages – the third-best ad-page tally for a second issue in magazine publishing history, behind O, The Oprah Magazine and the late John F. Kennedy Jr.’s now-defunct George magazine, which racked up 125 ad pages in its second outing.”

  • CNN reports, “He’s a veteran statesman and hard-hitting chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. But Sen. Patrick Leahy is set to leave the marble halls of Washington for the bright lights of Hollywood — at least briefly. Vermont’s senior senator has landed a speaking role in the newest Batman movie, CNN affiliate WPTZ reports and confirmed by Leahy’s office.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. and its YouTube video- sharing site staved off the threat of legal action from Belgium’s soccer association by offering a technology that will allow the group to monitor where its matches are broadcast.”

  • Variety reports, “Viacom has pledged $1 million in cash and more than $500,000 in media value to support the construction of a memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.”

  • Fortune reports, “Readers of the The Sun, a British tabloid best known for its bare-breasted Page Three girls, opened their newspapers to see a young woman named Keeley Hazell wearing only green paint. Ms. Hazell is the face — well, not just the face — of the paper’s campaign against global warming.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yahoo! Inc., fighting Google Inc. for local advertisers, added more city-specific Web pages with information on movies, events and neighborhood restaurants.”

  • MediaLife reports, “Since April, more than 900 newsroom jobs have been cut in these days of declining circulation and shrinking ad revenues. Now the paper cuts are extending even to those who’ve made an effort to avoid them in the past.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “This summer has been an unusual hunting season for the start-up world, with nascent Internet companies firmly in the crosshairs of major media conglomerates.”

  • Poynter Online points us to this gem from ABCnews.com: “CIA recently updated its FOIA requests policy to allow bloggers to get special treatment once reserved for old-school reporters. Last August, the NSA issued a directive to report leaks of classified info to the media — ‘including blogs.’”

  • American University School of Communication professor Kathryn Montgomery has new book, Generation Digital: Politics, Commerce, and Childhood in the Age of the Internet. Check it out here.

  • Express reports, “Since 2003, many people have been confused about the restaurant at the corner of 21st and M streets NW. Is NBC News’ chief White House correspondent and sometime ‘Today’ show fill-in David Gregory, at right, also a restaurant owner? The answer has always been an emphatic no; after all, the restaurant’s name has one ‘g’ more than the journalist’s. And now, David Greggory — named after chefs and onetime business partners David Hagedorn and Greggory Hill — is no more.”

  • BtoB reports, “As it prepares to celebrate its 25th anniversary in September, Gannett Co.’s USA Today is bucking the downward trend in U.S. newspaper circulation and branching out online to offer the kind of user-generated content that has growing appeal for b-to-b marketers.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “Gawker gets respectable — and remains humorous”

    Jobs

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a Advertising Sales Representative.

  • Vandenburgh Media is looking for an Advertising Database Manager.

  • AARP is looking for a Web Content Producer and an Online Copy Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Michael Leavitt, Margaret Spellings, Col. Gerald Massengill, Tom Ridge, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Gregory, Jon Meacham, Pete Williams.

  • Face the Nation: Sen. Patrick Leahy , Jim and Sarah Brady, and criminal profiler Gregg McCrary.

  • This Week: Newt Gingrich, Sen. Chris Dodd and Jackie Dodd.

  • Fox News Sunday: Virginia Lieutenant Governor Bill Bolling , GWU Pres. Stephen Trachtenberg, and Sens. Arlen Specter and Chuck Schumer.

  • Late Edition: Sen. Sam Brownback , Virginia Attorney General Bob McDonnell, New York Times’ Thomas Friedman, ex-Clinton counsel Lanny Davis, and a roundtable with CNN’s Bill Schneider and CNN’s Jeanne Meserve.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Howard Fineman of Newsweek; David Brooks, New York Times; Katty Kay, BBC Washington correspondent; and Kelly O’Donnell, NBC News.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Homeland Security Committee Chairman, Rep. Bennie Thompson.