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Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Ryan’

Afternoon Reading List 07.18.13

That’s “Mr.” to you — Though the lede mentions the Trayvon Martin verdict, don’t worry. It’s not another opinion piece about the trial or verdict. Instead, Slate’s Katy Waldman looks at the difference in applying for a job as a man versus a woman. Specifically, she outlines the case of Australian business manager Kim O’Grady. His account of gender bias as he applied for a series of jobs in the late 1990s, titled “How I Discovered Gender Discrimination” (such a compelling title) went viral this week. In the account, O’Grady said he was “experienced in managing technical & trade supply businesses” as well as engineering and sales. He figured it should be easy to find a job. But he wasn’t contacted once in four months, and the rejection letters began to pile up. After closely examining his CV, he noticed the ambiguity of his first name. Not that he thought it would make a huge difference, but just in case, he added “Mr.” in front of his name. After the next round, he netted two interviews. A Yale study 10 years later yielded similar results. Though this has been identified as a problem, Waldman points out that there really isn’t a solution, other than giving your daughter a man’s name, which is probably not the best idea.

Why you should read it: Gender discrimination is widely talked about, Waldman provides succinct anecdotal evidence that helps illustrate just how big of a problem it can be.

Looking back at The Hill‘s Most Beautiful List — If you’ve ever heard of The Hill, chances are you’ve at least heard of, if not excitedly anticipated each year, the 50 Most Beautiful People List. For those unfamiliar with the list, it’s a reader-nominated list of the best-looking men and women on Capitol Hill. This year will be the 10th anniversary of the list, so Emily Goodin of The Hill (where else?) looked back at its start. The first list came out in 2004, and was the brainchild of one Betsy Rothstein, now the editor of FBDC and my boss. Audra Ozols Gannon was rated No. 1 on that first list, and she said recently that she was “surprised, flattered and a little bit unsure of what it was” when she found out she was on the list. Others had similar reactions and getting photos of all of them proved difficult. Rothstein, who got the idea for the list from a still-unnamed source, said sometimes, in the early days, putting the list together involved staking out hallways of office buildings and waiting for someone worthy to walk by. “We’d literally chase people down the hallway,” Rothstein said. The next year, however, was much easier. As photographer Patrick Ryan said, the difference between year one and two was “night and day,” and people began campaigning to get on the list. Each year, the list has grown in popularity to become a widely-anticipated part of summer for those on the Hill.

Why you should read it: The list is a pretty big deal around Washington, and Goodin looks back at how it got started. Plus it mentions my boss, so this is me sucking up. Editor’s note: Austin, you can take the rest of the day off! Go enjoy yourself.

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Hitchens Reading List 12.19.20

With the passing of Vanity Fair Contributing Editor Christopher Hitchens came an outpouring of personal stories by journalists about their relationship with their friend, their mentor, their hero and in one case, someone they had met just once. We rounded them up for you here with a poignant line or excerpt.

Portrait by Patrick Ryan.

The Weekly Standard/Daily Caller’s Matt Labash writes for Slate on traveling with Hitchens in Iraq. “After a protracted tussle in which Yacoub demanded Hitchens’ press badges, then after a cooling off in which he gave them back, then after a resumption of hostilities when Hitchens decided he didn’t want his Kuwaiti press badge back as the Kuwaitis were proving themselves the tramplers of liberty, Yacoub screamed that Hitchens would ‘leave Kuwait tonight!’ It’s pretty hard to get kicked out of a war. But Hitchens almost managed.”

David Frum writes about the man he couldn’t resist even after meeting him.

Washington Photographer Patrick Ryan once spent a morning smoking and drinking with the great writer. “He came over to greet me wearing socks and we immediately started talking as though we’d known each other for years.”

Townhall columnist and WMAL’s Derek Hunter writes about the pitfalls of Hitchens’ literal interpretation of everything. Like vodka for instance. Or toads. “Speaking of emails, I remember one that he signed, ‘Wishing you well in this toad-filled season.’ I thought, ‘What the Hell does that mean?’ I Googled it, I asked everyone. I found nothing to explain it. Finally I asked Grover if he knew what it meant, because I didn’t want to ask Hitchens and risk looking stupid. Grover looked up from his desk and said, ‘I don’t know. Maybe he’s just some place with a lot of toads.’”

WaPo syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker wrote about how she “devoured” Hitchens’ writing. Eventually she met him one day in the makeup room of NBC. “To say I was a friend of Hitchens would be an exaggeration, though I did enjoy the pleasure of his company on several occasions. But one needn’t have known a writer to mourn his passing or to feel profound sadness about all the silent days to come. No matter what the topic, I always wanted to know what Hitchens thought about it and, lucky for the world, he seemed always willing to end the suspense.”

Christopher Buckley‘s was fittingly among the first eulogies to emerge on Hitchens in The New Yorker. He starts out, “We were friends for more than thirty years, which is a long time but, now that he is gone, seems not nearly long enough.”

D.C. Photog Captures Famed Smoker

At this point GOP Presidential contender Herman Cain‘s Chief of Staff Mark Block is as famed for his smoking as he is for anything else. Today Washington photographer Patrick Ryan gets a few closeups of Block doing — what else? — SMOKING outside the National Press Club, where his boss was speaking today during a sold-out luncheon.

Block told Ryan, “You know what funniest thing is since this started? Yesterday somebody asked me to autograph their cigarette.”

See the post here.

A Big Crazy Thumbs Up for the Salahis

Snarkinfested.com’s Patrick Ryan, a freelance photographer around town, snapped this classic shot of Tareq and Michaele “Look at my Michele Bachmann expression” Salahi at last night’s Roll Call/FamousDC soiree at Cava. If that doesn’t satisfy your Salahi fever, there’s more where this came from. See here.

Stephen Colbert: The Birthday Boy

Local freelance photographer Patrick Ryan snagged this shot of Comedian Stephen Colbert leaving the Federal Election Commission Friday afternoon. It was his birthday. He turned 47.

See here for more.

In Celebration of a Terrorist’s Death…

Late last night D.C. Freelance Photographer Patrick Ryan of SnarkInfested.com took to Layfayette Park in front of the White House to take in the celebration of the death of Osama bin Laden. See more here.

Good Morning FishbowlDC Readers

QUOTES of the DAY

The Cherry Blossoms by Washington freelance photographer Patrick Ryan, whose blog is www.snarkinfested.com.

Political director wants spring to meet its deadline

“Dear spring, you are so NOT #winningthefuture” — ABC News’s Amy Walter in a weekend tweet. But Media Matters Communications Associate Tyrone Gale begs to differ this morning, saying, “High in DC rumored to approach 85-90 today, highs of 60 and 70 all week. #SpringHasSprung.”

In a weekend tweet… WaPo columnist Gene Weingarten went on a quest to make new friends by sharing this: “‘Please don’t follow me unless you have at least 500 followers.’ #mostobnoxioustweetever.”

What your DVR says about you

“I think your DVR says a lot about you. For example, I record: The Golden Girls, Murder She Wrote, E! Fashion Police, House Hunters International, Law & Order CI/SVU, Chelsea Lately and Degrassi. Clearly I have TV Bipolar Disorder (not in the DSM IV)” — CNN.com’s Ed Hornick in a weekend Facebook update.

Host gets stopped by stranger

“A lady in Georgetown just stopped me on the street and asked if people who live in DC get to vote. I said ‘For what?’” — Tim Corrimal in a weekend tweet. Corrimal produces a radio show on Tim Corrimal.com MeatFreeRadio.com.

FNC host and anchor hang out in Sin City

“In Vegas. Going to meet Bret Baier with OTR staff.. Bret is here w/ friends so we are meeting.” — FNC “On the Record” host Greta Van Susteren in a weekend tweet.

Inskeep getting hooked on Miley

“Five words describe driving 6yr old lately: Miley Cyrus song on ‘repeat.’” — NPR’s Steve Inskeep in a Monday morning tweet.

Aussi-born reporter is huge Ke$ha fan

“Ke$ha deserves a lifetime achievement award for music that simultaneously works for both time-outs at an NBA game and a strip club #wizards” — WSJ video reporter Neil Hickey in a weekend tweet.

The Prognosticator

“I hear Al Gore will be getting fat this week.” — TPM‘s Brian Beutler in a weekend tweet.

The Critic

“There is no coherence to a NBC ‘Meet the Press’ roundtable.” — The Daily Caller‘s media writer Jeff Poor in a  weekend tweet.

Name Game: Who’s the Real “Hollywood on the Potomac”

When the book “Hollywood on the Potomac” was recently released in Washington, long-time DC publicist Janet Donovan bit her tongue. But she’s talking now to FBDC…

Donovan writes about celebrities and happenings around town on her blog “Hollywood on the Potomac” and for a Washington Life column by the same title– she even owns the Trademark rights. So she was a bit surprised, to say the least, when Jason Killian Meath‘s photo book was published with that name.

Tell us about how you came up with “Hollywood on the Potomac.”

When I first came to Washington some of my friends would show up on movie sets as extras to make some money. Occasionally I went with them. I think I even showed up in something with Burt Lancaster but probably ended up on the cutting room floor. Because I live in Georgetown, many films have been shot here including right outside of my old house on O Street. The amount of work that goes into these shoots is staggering and it was fun interacting with the crews. I have always had a great respect for the movie industry. Imagine life without Sesame Street for children, old Betty Davis movies for folks in retirement living, Disney family night at the cinema…

Around 2000 I started thinking maybe there is Hollywood on the Potomac and started following it. Now, of course, it is a mega attraction for the industry, not only in the film business but lobbying for various causes. Ironically, all of my children ended up in this creative world. My oldest son became a film producer, my youngest went to USC Film school and is now on staff there, my daughter went to journalism school at NYU and is Senior Product Director Interactive One LLC, a Radio One Company.

What makes you “Hollywood on the Potomac?”

I got there first. I also took it to the conventions a few elections ago where I did a daily column for CQ and covered the stars in Boston and New York.

Donovan photograph by Patrick Ryan and with Matt Drudge.

Continued after the jump…

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