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Posts Tagged ‘Paul Steiger’

Press Club To Honor Amanpour

CNN chief international correspondent Christiane Amanpour will receive the National Press Club’s Fourth Estate Award, its highest honor for excellence in journalism. The Fourth Estate Award is given annually to an individual who has achieved distinction for a lifetime of contributions to American journalism.

The award will be presented to Amanpour at a black-tie dinner at the National Press Club on November 21. Part of the tradition includes some friendly roasting of the award recipient. Doing the honors this year will be Wolf Blitzer, Madeleine Albright and Richard Cohen.

Previous Fourth Estate winners include Walter Cronkite, Eric Sevareid, David Brinkley, Brian Lamb, Helen Thomas and most recently Paul Steiger of the Wall Street Journal.

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Morning Reading List, 02.15.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think MSNBC has some serious issues with sexism and obnoxious statements.

  • And, it is close, but more than half of you are in loooove.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Barack Obama is seen by most Democrats as inspiring and as most likely to bring about change. Hillary Clinton is widely viewed as prepared to lead the country, but also hard to like.”

  • Rochester Paper, WashingtonPost.com Reach Most Adults

  • Regarding this, a reader writes in, “shouldn’t it embarrass the Post newsroom downtown just a little bit that it’s been 10 years and they’re still having the same freak-bouts about .com as they were when it started? Seriously. wp.com ain’t the one with dropping circulation numbers, people — get on board or get off. Short-sighted and silly.” And, another reader says, “Maybe the Posties at 15th and L ought to spend their time figuring out how to beat the competition, rather than eating themselves alive from within — and whining at every turn about how they just don’t understand what’s happening to the news business.”

  • Gannett, NYT, Tribune, Hearst in online ad sales venture

  • Dallas Morning News Managing Editor George Rodrigue writes, “Several readers wrote to ask why we ran a photo of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton at the top of Wednesday’s front page, after Sen. Barack Obama had just won primaries in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. ‘If I just looked at a glance I would have bet the farm that Hillary Clinton had won all the marbles in Tuesday’s primaries,’ said Yvonne Crum of Dallas. ‘Obama wins eight states in a row, yet Hillary gets the front page spread. Fair and balanced? I don’t think so, and I am not even a Democrat,’ said Joe Womack of Dallas. On the photo, we simply made the wrong call. The headline (‘Obama wins three more’) and the photo were out of synch. We should have run the photo of Mr. Obama, which was down-page, in the lead position occupied by the image of Mrs. Clinton. But the fact that our layout desk featured Mr. Obama’s victories in the headline should answer any worries about deliberate bias.”

  • A release announced, “The New York Daily News is preparing to write a new colorful chapter in its rich history with the announcement of its purchase of state-of-the-art, high-volume full-color press equipment. By the end of 2009, the Daily News will become the first major market daily newspaper in the United States to be produced in 100% color on new press equipment manufactured by KBA, a global leader in printing technology. The new Commander CTÃ’ presses will give the Daily News the ability to efficiently produce all copies of all editions in color, reinforcing its future as the country’s leading tabloid and enabling its millions of readers to enjoy the city’s first full-color newspaper.”

  • Forbes.com asks, “Do newspapers still need The Associated Press? And does The Associated Press still need newspapers? Until recently, these would have been ridiculous questions. But print circulation is tumbling. So is advertising revenue. Editors are slashing budgets and making do with less. Readers are moving online, where they get all the national and international news, sports scores and celebrity gossip they can read–for free, updated constantly, and often by AP.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Media observers already are noticing the changes in a Rupert Murdoch-owned Wall Street Journal — a British editor for the glossy magazine launch, talk of a sports section, a move to Midtown. Now word around the Journal newsroom is that a prototype is being developed for a culture section, possibly to run weekly. The project is in the very early development stages, and a spokesman for The Journal declined comment Tuesday.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “The U.S. Department of Journalism under assault — from another branch of government!”

  • Wall Street Journal’s The Numbers Guy reports, “Election Handicappers Are Using Risky Tool: Mixed Poll Averages”

  • Radar’s Full Court Press writes “The estimable Warren P. Strobel of McClatchy Newspapers, who has a fine record of questioning all of the Bush administration’s lies on the way to the war in Iraq. But this time he seems to have been a bit sloppy. Strobel wrote that Weekly Standard editor and New York Times columnist Bill Kristol is part of ‘McCain’s foreign-policy team.’ But Strobel didn’t bother to confirm this with Kristol. When Times editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal asked Kristol about it, he flatly denied it.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 10, 2008 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.497 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of February 4, 2008, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with CBS’ ‘Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. The program posted 3.6 million total viewers and 1.75 million Adult 25-54 viewers, its best performance since the week of December 3, 2007. Among Adults 25-54, both CBS’s and NBC’s leads over ‘Nightline’ have declined for the 5th consecutive week.”

  • TVNewser asks, “Did ‘Blurred Lines’ Lead to Shuster Suspension?”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “MSNBC Spokesperson: Shuster Will Not Be Fired And Will Return To Network”.

  • TVNewser reports,Hillary Clinton Confirmed for MSNBC Debate”

  • “Legendary broadcast journalist Daniel Schorr will speak about and sign his book, Come to Think of It at a luncheon program co-sponsored by the English-Speaking Union on Tuesday, February 19 at the Woman’s National Democratic Club. … The cost of the program is $30. For tickets, contact the English-Speaking Union at esuwdc.net/(202) 234-4602, or the Woman’s National Democratic Club at (202) 232-7363.

  • Chris Matthews blasts Clinton press office

  • “TVNewser obtained an email that American Morning EP Edward Litvak sent last night to the A.M. staff: ‘Chez Pazienza has left ‘American Morning’ and CNN. We wish him well in all of his future endeavors.’ A CNN insider tells TVNewser Pazienza was let go because, “he did not get permission to publish personal writings. Those personal writings come from The Huffington Post, where Pazienza has been blogging since January 23. His most recent post, on February 10, took on the controversy surrounding MSNBC correspondent David Shuster.”

  • Brand Republic reports, “News International is considering taking The Sunday Times compact, as part of a planned series of major changes to the title.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, may have to buy back more stock or pay a dividend to satisfy investors after a 35 percent drop in the shares last year.”

  • The New York Observer asks, “MSNBC’s David Shuster: Defender of Clinton Family Honor?”

  • TVNewser asks, “What Could Tucker Possibly Be Referring To?” Check out the video here.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mediabistro.com asks, “So What Do You Do, Paul Steiger, Editor-in-Chief, ProPublica?”

  • Inside Cable News says goodbye. “I can’t keep ICN going in its current form anymore. If you’d noticed it’s been slipping a bit this week as I floundered to try and ‘do it all’. That was a wake up call. Time to call it a day. Time to reclaim those five hours a day of of my life that are devoted to doing something I like but which I can’t make a living off of. And then there’s my real job which pays me more than I could probably make blogging.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Yes, MSNBC consistently has the lowest ratings among the cable news channels. But all is not lost. It does stand out in one underappreciated category: embarrassing, mealy-mouthed apologies.”

  • AlwaysOn reports, “We all know VCs and startups have to be bullish about 2008, despite a rocky economy, but when a top analyst says digital media M&A will be up, even after an explosive 2007, it’s worth another look.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Veteran journalist Philip S. Balboni, who built New England Cable News into the nation’s largest regional news network, is leaving the station next month to start the first US-based website devoted exclusively to international news. The site is expected to launch early next year with correspondents in nearly 70 countries. The company, Global News Enterprises LLC, will have its headquarters on the historic Boston waterfront at the Pilot House on Lewis Wharf.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner Inc’s Internet division AOL and IAC/InterActiveCorp’s Citysearch site will announce on Thursday a partnership to share local content and advertising resources. Under the deal, Citysearch will provide its local business reviews, videos from merchants and promotions for AOL Web sites such as AOL CityGuide, AOL Local Search and MapQuest.”

  • Tech Crunch reports, “At the start of the Microsoft/Yahoo saga we reported that News Corp. was scrambling to put together a bid to compete with Microsoft, but backed down because they were unable to find outside funding to make the deal lucrative enough (the sorry state of the debt markets contributed to the problem). Yesterday Silicon Alley Insider reported that talks between the two were continuing. We’ve confirmed the rumor — Yahoo and News Corp. are in the middle of marathon discussions, and have more details.”

  • “CNN’s iReport.com Makes Its Debut”

  • Kim McLarin writes about “Surviving on a blackness-only diet.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah explores Michelle Obama’s Reuters Halo!”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “In yesterday’s review of MSNBC’s primary night coverage, Alessandra Stanley made one huge, glaring error that proved to anyone even casually watching the coverage that she had no credibility on the matter, at all. The error was this: Attributing the slogan ‘the best political team on television’ to MSNBC and not CNN, where that slogan is shoehorned into pretty much every segment, debate, pre-commercial sign-off and available chyron. It is a constant refrain, one which I find I can’t read without hearing Wolf Blitzer’s voice awkwardly intoning it in my head.”

  • Private Equity Hub reports, “Tributes.com, a new spinout from Eons, has raised $4.3 million in funding from Dow Jones, Eons and other strategic backers. VentureWire reports a post-money valuation of $8.9 million. Tributes.com is an online content company focused on obituaries and related information, which means it will compete with sites like Legacy.com. Eons is a social network for the baby boomer set, and has raised $32 million in VC funding to date.”

  • Folio reports, “Time Editor: Someday There Will Be People Who Don’t Know There’s a Print Version”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Traffic to Magazine Web Sites Grows 8.1 Percent in Fourth Quarter”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Vanity Fair’s JFK Love Child Goes Public”

  • On Tuesday, Ronald Brownstein, the Political Director of Atlantic Media, will discuss his latest book at The Aspen Institute from 12:00-2:00 pm.

  • New York Post reports, “BUSINESSWEEK, the McGraw-Hill flagship magazine that was rattled by pre-Christmas layoffs in the editorial department, has pushed another 20 people with contracts closer to the door. Last Friday, Executive Editor John Byrne on a conference call told the contract workers they were being reassigned to a contract with Kelly Services.”

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    RADIO

  • The AP reports, “The Justice Department on Wednesday approved the $19.5 billion sale of Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. operator of radio stations and the world’s largest billboard company.”

  • Also from The AP, “The owner of a radio station that promoted a rock concert where pyrotechnics ignited a deadly blaze reached a tentative $22 million settlement with survivors and victims’ relatives, according to court papers filed Wednesday. The deal with Clear Channel Broadcasting is the latest in a series of settlements stemming from the Feb. 20, 2003, fire at The Station nightclub in West Warwick that killed 100 people and injured more than twice that many.”

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    JOBS

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Web Producer.

  • Jane’s is looking for a Maritime Reporter.

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division /writer.
  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Editor (Copy), News & Information.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist, Int’l Children’s Magazines.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Advertising Sales Manager.

  • FOX News Channel is looking for a Producer.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a Director, Public Relations and Communications.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Senior Video Producer.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Editorial Assistant.

  • Retirement Living Live show is seeking a Creative Producer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning More Like Noon Reading List, 01.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

    We blame Iowa for the delay.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “Discovery Communications will announce today that company veteran Mark Hollinger will be promoted to the newly created job of chief operating officer, wrapping up a frenetic year of reorganization, acquisitions and layoffs at the Silver Spring cable television network.”

  • A release announced, “Macon Morehouse has joined the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) Department of Federal Affairs as an assistant director. She will be responsible for media relations and lobbying on issues such as Internet safety and the impact of advertising on children.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • LA Observed reports, “Times publisher David Hiller has let staffers know that he was back home for the holidays but has returned here refreshed and ready to carry out the Sam Zell agenda. Turns out Zell gets credit (or blame) for the banners hung inside the Times building that staffers have been rolling their eyes over.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the first time in polls since 1996, this ABC News/Facebook survey finds the Internet rivaling newspapers as one of Americans’ top two sources of news about the presidential election. It’s also the only election news source to show growth, doubling since 2000. One reason is the Internet’s advance overall: Seventy-three percent of adults now go online, the most in polls since the dawn of the Internet age. Forty percent use the Internet specifically for news and information about politics and the election, surpassing the previous high, 35 percent in a 2004 survey.” Check out the full analysis and results.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, has boosted the newspaper’s US-based news operation by purchasing an American site offering news and commentary on the money management industry. Money-Media, bought from its sole shareholder and CEO Michael Griffin, offers live news services on the American world of ‘high-net worth’ asset management and mutual fund trustees. Its Agenda section claims to be ‘the most influential source of intelligence for today’s corporate directors’.”

  • The National Legal and Policy Center reports, “The long-term decline in newspaper circulation presents the conservative movement with an excellent opportunity to increase its influence with the media. Falling readership and tighter budgets are forcing newspapers to dedicate fewer staff to investigative reporting. As a result, they are increasingly relying upon nonprofit organizations to fill the gap. A 2005 Arizona State University study found that 37 percent of the 100 leading daily newspapers had no full-time investigative reporters.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Paul Steiger thinks there’s a possibility Bloomberg LP and The New York Times Co. could merge sometime after the election, assuming Mike Bloomberg doesn’t win the presidency. Jim Cramer agrees.”

  • Secrecy News reports, “On December 31 President Bush signed into law the “Openness Promotes Effectiveness in our National (OPEN) Government Act of 2007,” which amends the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The new law makes several constructive procedural changes in the FOIA to encourage faster agency response times, to enable requesters to track the status of their requests, to expand the basis for fee waivers, and more.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage Sleepless in Seattle, Billich gets his TV job when he wants it, Playoff Preview”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It’s a very big win for Barack Obama, in part because he knocked off the former first lady and in part because the media have been hankering to write the upset story. But remember all the pundits taking Hillary Clinton’s inevitability for granted most of the year, and despairing during the summer and fall that Obama could never catch up because he wasn’t pummeling her? He never hammered Hillary all that hard, and he still caught up.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “CNBC, First in Business Worldwide,
    had robust ratings growth in 2007 and had its best year in Business Day programming (5 AM-7 PM ET) since 2003 in the key demographic of adults 25-54. In total viewers, CNBC had its best year since 2002.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser has learned the CBS News blog PublicEye, once described as a “de facto ombudsman” of CBS News, has ceased operations. CBS Interactive cut several staff members last month, including Matthew Felling who was editor of the site. A spokesperson for CBS Interactive tells TVNewser, ‘We weren’t able to find a sustainable business model for Public Eye. We are exploring ways to maintain a similar spirit of public discourse by engaging the CBSNews.com audience and building a community around multiple voices.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Writers Guild of America said it will picket the Golden Globe Awards, rejecting a call by the show’s owners to let a scripted show air on Jan. 13 without protests.”

  • Silicon Valley Insider reports, “We know several people who watch the Fox Business Network, but that’s because all of them appear on the newly launched cable channel from time to time. The rest of America, it seems, is soundly ignoring News Corp.’s newest offering: Nielsen says an average of 6,300 people a day watched FBN in the first two months of its launch last fall — a little more than 2% of CNBC’s audience of 283,000.”

  • DCRTV reports, “The still relatively new French ambassador to the US, Pierre Vimont, will be the guest on “The Q&A Cafe With Carol Joynt” on 2/7. It will air on NewsChannel 8 that weekend and DC Cable the following Friday. The cafe begins its new season next week with syndicated columnist Robert Novak”

  • The AP reports, “ABC News is eliminating Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter and Democrats Dennis Kucinich and Mike Gravel from its prime- time presidential debates Saturday night because they did not meet benchmarks for their support.”

  • Brian Stelter takes New York Times readers “Inside CNN’s Control Room, Balancing Projections With Patience”

  • TVNewser reports,Shepard Smith, talking with Greta Van Susteren and Susan Estrich went there during the late-night coverage of the Iowa caucuses. Smith was talking about Rep. Ron Paul’s 10% support from caucus-goers. ‘More than double’ what Rudy Giuliani got, Smith said. Then he asked the question: ‘Should Fox News reconsider’ and allow Paul in the GOP forum set for Sunday night?”

  • Also from DCRTV: “Landmark Communications, the parent company of the Annapolis Capital and the Bowie Blade-News newspapers, is exploring a possible sale of its businesses. That’s according to the Virginian-Pilot, the flagship newspaper of Norfolk-based Landmark, which owns a batch of media properties, including The Weather Channel”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When Jim Stewart stepped down from CBS News in November 2006 after some 16 years of reporting on a range of topics for the Tiffany Network, the longtime Washington-based correspondent retired to the warmth of Florida. Now, depending on a judge’s ruling in an ongoing case, Mr. Stewart could be spending a part of his golden years in a much less sunny position—namely in contempt of a federal court.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Television’s late-night impresarios burst back on the air Wednesday after a forced two-month hiatus, expressing support for the striking writers even though several of the hosts crossed the picket line to resume their shows.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Wednesday was not just the first trading day of the year. It was also the first working day for Jeffrey Bewkes in his role as the new chief executive of media octopus Time Warner. Mr. Bewkes’s move to the C.E.O. chair, recently occupied by Richard Parsons, comes amid rampant chatter about whether he might decide to sell some of Time Warner’s parts, such as AOL or its publishing arm. Much of this speculation is old. And so far, Mr. Bewkes hasn’t tipped his hand. But in a report Wednesday, an analyst from UBS sounded skeptical that a sale would come soon and argued that such a move might not add much value anyway.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “On Saturday, January 5, 2008 — only two days after the critical Iowa caucuses and three days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary — ABC News, Facebook, and ABC affiliate WMUR will team up for a historic debate night.” For more details, click here.

  • Eat The Press reports, “TVNewser has the confirm: CBS’ Public Eye Blog is no more (seriously, look for it — it’s gone from the list of blogs). After last month’s round of layoffs at CBS (joyeux noel!), we wondered if that meant ‘Bye to the Eye.’ We’d asked CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock who specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated and claimed that political reporter (and former PubEye co-editor) Brian Montopoli would be taking Felling’s spot.”

  • The Boston Herald reports, “Back in 2004, YouTube, the Internet-based video-sharing site, hadn’t been created. Now, the site, and the millions of the videos posted on it, has a coveted, influential spot in the current presidential campaign. On Monday night, the site and its owner, Google, plan on celebrating that role, by hosting an epic bash for all the reporters and photographers who are working the campaign trail. The party will be held at a Manchester, N.H., science center, the night before the state’s voters winnow down the list of presidential candidates.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “A new study found that many uses of copyrighted material in online video, including mash-ups and satire, are legal and could be endangered by new censorship practices.”

  • Based on the number of anonymous tips we’ve received, you’ve picked up on a change on Wonkette’s masthead. Ken Layne is no managing editor and John Clarke, Jr. has left the website.

  • Kara Swisher shares, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Learned to Love the Blog: Goodbye Dead Trees!”

  • CyberJournalist.net reports, “Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007″

  • Jon Friedman tell us, “How the media let us down at the Iowa caucus”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Less than three months after its much-ballyhooed launch, Fox Business Network is drawing an average of 6,000 daytime viewers. The Nielsen number, for the period Oct. 15 through Dec. 16, rises to 15,000 during prime time. Taken in isolation, the debut might be judged an abysmal failure. But no one — including Fox executives — expected the fledgling channel to make a serious run at the top business network, CNBC, until it had been on the air for at least a year.”

  • Eat The Press represents, “More Media Winners, Iowa Edition”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Age reports, “Time Inc to challenge Soeharto’s $125 million libel win”

  • A tipster tells us, “Sonny Bunch from Weekly Standard also sporting a ‘strike beard’”

  • Business Week reports, “As if media companies didn’t already have enough going on, now they have something else to look forward to in 2008: scarcity. I don’t mean the ‘scarcity’ media knew in easier times, back when owning printing presses or broadcast towers gave you a stranglehold on distribution, back when there was no newfangled noisy megaphone—the Internet—through which those whom traditionalists call ‘nonprofessionals’ could broadcast their own media.”

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    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

  • Matthew Felling to the The Kojo Nnamdi Show on NPR next Monday and Tuesday.

  • UPI reports, “For the first time, a national radio station will be devoted to the U.S. presidential race 24 hours a day, seven days a week, XM Satellite Radio said.”

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    JOBS

  • US News & World Report is looking for a Manager, Audience and Business Development: Health and a Manager, Audience & Business Development: Money

  • The Development Executive Group is looking for an Editor for Leading International Dev’t Website.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a
    Public Relations Coordinator.

  • Allison & Partners is looking for a Senior Account Executive and Account Manager.

  • Virilion is looking for a Copywriter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.27.07

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    Good morning Washington.

  • You are not encouraging your kids to follow in your journalism footsteps.

    Television

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of November 12, 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54.”

  • The Carville-Matalin Joke Is on Us

  • New York Magazine reports,Dan Rather’s Last Big Story Is Himself”

  • Brokaw disses Limbaugh.

  • New York Times reports, “The head of the Federal Communications Commission is struggling to find enough support from a majority of the agency’s commissioners to regulate cable television companies more tightly.”

  • Looking into Fred Thompson’s claim against Fox News, The Huffington Post reports, “Evidence actually suggests a strong relationship between the Tennessean and the network that reports so that you can decide.”

  • The Street reports, “For investors, new media ownership rules proposed by the Federal Communications Commission are a sign that TV companies have little prayer of getting bigger anytime soon.”

  • FOX News Channel will carry a live feed of the Des Moines, Iowa Democrat and Republican debates hosted by Iowa Public Television and the Des Moines Register. Both debates will air on FNC at 2:00 p.m. EST with the Republican debate on Wednesday, Dec. 12th and the Democratic debate on Thursday, December 13th.

  • TVNewser reported last week, “MSNBC’s Tucker Carlson, a Dancing with the Stars contestant last year, made a return appearance on tonight’s show. In a spoof skit, Carlson — along with fellow ex-contestants Lisa Rinna, Harry Hamlin, and Laila Ali – check into ‘dance rehab’ (who knew?) in Malibu because they ‘haven’t been able to let go of being on Dancing With the Stars.’”

  • This Wednesday, the Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington will present Michael Jack, President and General Manager of WRC-TV the Silver Medal Award at a luncheon event at the Willard Hotel.

  • “Not only was Keith Olbermann doing his normal Sunday night gig on NBC’s Football Night in America, he also lent his voice to two popular Fox sitcoms,” TVNewser reports.

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “When Tom Brokaw, an old-time mainstream media figure in his own right, says he thinks print newspapers won’t be around in 10 years, that’s probably not a good sign for the industry.”

  • CNN’s Christiane Amanpour explains the safari-jacket look that has become her signature style.

  • Washington Post reports,George W. Hughes, 67, a retired broadcast engineer with ABC News and a dedicated model-train enthusiast, died Nov. 16 of respiratory failure at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington County. He was a resident of South Riding.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News correspondent Lara Logan and her team won the Association of International Broadcasters’ award for ‘Clearest Coverage of a Single News Event.’”

  • “mediabistro.com’s series So What Do You Do? features NBC News’ Middle East correspondent Richard Engel.”

  • Thompson Slams Fox News While On Fox News

    Radio

  • Washington City Paper’s Dave McKenna explores, “The decline of Sam Huff and Redskins radio”

    Online Media

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News and Facebook have launched a partnership focused on the 2008 presidential election. In this first of its kind collaboration, Facebook will feature an application that will provide its 56 million active users with tools for supporting candidates and discussing the campaign on Facebook combined with ABC News political content and information, including the latest news from the campaign trail.”

  • Slate reports, “You know it’s 2007 when a candidate, in this case Mike Huckabee, holds a bifurcated conference call, first with reporters, then with bloggers. I listened in on both calls to see what the differences were. The reporters’ questions were much more concise and polished. But the bloggers’ questions were more substantive by a long shot.”

  • Sky News reports, “The man behind one of the world’s most influential news websites says there’s everything to play for in the battle to win the trust of TV viewers, newspaper readers and web users — and, he says, it won’t all go the way of the big corporations. Matt Drudge of www.drudgereport.com was speaking to Sky News in his first interview for four years.”

    Newspapers

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes,Joan Walsh, editor-in-chief of Salon.com, posted a column Monday asking me to get involved in the recent ‘brawl’ on the op-ed page of The Times over the meaning of Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign visit to Philadelphia, Miss., where he told a mostly-white crowd, ‘I believe in states’ rights.’ Was it a coded appeal to Southern whites to vote Republican because Reagan and his party would side with them against efforts by blacks to achieve equal rights, as liberal columnists Paul Krugman and Bob Herbert contended?”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “The Washington Post stands accused this week of jumping the gun for published information embargoed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. The Post story, by Johannesburg correspondent Craig Timberg, scooped the competition by reporting the United Nations’ plans this week to announce that it was drastically cutting its estimate of the size of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic from about 40 million to about 33 million. The Post published the story to the Web on Nov. 19, and led with the story in its Nov. 20 print edition.”

  • “While the national news media focused heavily on the 2008 presidential campaign last week, the public divided its interest between the campaign and the Iraq war. More than one-fifth of the national newshole (21%) was devoted to the presidential campaign, while news about the war — including the situation in Iraq, returning U.S. troops and the Iraq policy debate — drew only about half as much coverage,” according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

  • The Independent reports, “Rupert Murdoch has admitted to a parliamentary inquiry that he has ‘editorial control’ over which party The Sun and News of the World back in a general election and what line the papers take on Europe.”

  • Reuters reports, “The U.S. media industry is on the brink of a second downturn in a decade, one that could accelerate the divisions between fast-growing targeted advertising and traditional formats aimed at mass audiences.”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is rumoured to be in takeover talks with LinkedIn, the professional networking site founded by Reid Hoffman.”

  • New York Times reports, “The curious relationship between Hillary Rodham Clinton, presidential candidate, and Rupert Murdoch, media baron, flashed briefly before the eyes of Iowans on Saturday night during a Clinton campaign event.”

  • Washington Post reports,Juanita Daigle of Baton Rouge is listed as one of the thousands of people who sent e-mails to the Federal Communications Commission opposing the proposed merger between the satellite radio networks XM and Sirius. But Daigle said she never sent an e-mail and is distressed that anyone would think she did. ‘How did they get my name?’ she asked. ‘I don’t want someone using my name for something I don’t even know about.’ A check by The Washington Post of 60 people whose names were attached to identical, anti-merger e-mails instigated by the National Association of Broadcasters, a major opponent of the merger, produced mostly unanswered phone calls and recordings saying the phones were disconnected. Of the 10 people reached, nine said they never sent anything to the FCC, and only one said she remembered filling out something about Sirius but did not recall taking a position on a merger.”

  • “Fifty three percent of 300 media, advertising and entertainment executives believe writers should continue to ‘hold out for everything they want,’ with 47 percent voting for them to ‘pick up their pencils and get back to work.’ According to the poll conducted at www.jackmyers.com, a slight majority of a group that should be expected to be more sympathetic to the networks and studios express support for the Writers Guild of America.”

  • Vote now for the I Want Media 2007 Media Person of the Year.

  • Everything you have always wanted to know about André Wells’ style is right here.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “New York Daily News publisher Mort Zuckerman has told a House of Lords committee that new online business models for newspapers are just substituing ‘pennies for dollars’.”

  • DMNews reports, “The Wall Street Journal Europe has signed an agreement with The Jerusalem Post, putting the Post in charge of all distribution, printing, sales and marketing for WSJE in Israel.”

  • PRWeek reports, “The Economist has kicked off an online debate series to extend its brand to the social-media sphere. The first debate series, tackling education, launched last month. The second series is set for December.”

  • 23/6 reports, “With George W. Bush’s hapless former press secretary Scott McClellan issuing bleats of blame about having been tricked into lying to the press about the Plame affair, Paul Slansky looks back at some other White House mouthpieces.”

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “In liberal Democratic circles, the debate over Social Security has taken a dangerous ‘don’t worry, be happy’ turn. … One prominent practitioner of this misguided approach is New York Times columnist Paul Krugman.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Back in August, Dow Jones and News Corp announced the names of five elderly appointees to the board that will oversee the editorial independence of The Wall Street Journal—a body established in response to Rupert Murdoch’s takeover. A month later, one of those appointees, former Republican Congresswoman Jennifer Dunn, died. The group hadn’t even met, and it was already down one.”

  • The City Paper has now launched a video component.

  • A release announced, “The Society of Professional Journalists is pleased to announce that it is now accepting entries for the Sigma Delta Chi Awards, which honor excellence in professional journalism in 48 categories, covering print, radio, television, newsletters, photography, online and research.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “The proposed merger between XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. looked dead on arrival back in February, with federal regulators appearing unlikely to give their approval of the $5 billion merger. Nine months later, Wall Street is picking up a different signal: that the deal might somehow pass muster”

  • Jonathan Miller has reappeared on the Internet scene, this time as a member of the board of directors for online search ad management startup, Clickable. Miller’s return comes after a rancorous departure from Time Warner, where he served as CEO of AOL. His landing pad, called Clickable, recently debuted their technology at the TechCrunch 40 conference in September.”

  • Politico reports, “On the evening of Nov. 13, the Wall Street Journal’s Paul Steiger received the prestigious Fourth Estate Award from the National Press Club, in Washington D.C., following a light-hearted roast from guests such as Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie.”

  • Clinton Will Honor CBS Picket Line If Writers Strike

  • Wall Street Journal reports,Janet Grimley had some hard-won investment wisdom to share with colleagues at a gathering earlier this fall of the American Association of Sunday and Feature editors in Savannah, Ga. ‘Look at your comics pages like a stock portfolio,’ advised Ms. Grimley, an assistant managing editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. ‘Diversify. You need to have some risky comics,’ for instance the slightly subversive observational strip ‘F Minus,’ and ‘some safe purchases like the old favorites.’ Such ‘safe purchases’ would include blue chips like ‘Blondie,’ ‘Beetle Bailey,’ ‘Dennis the Menace’ and ‘Hagar the Horrible.’”

  • The Daily Princetonian reports, “In an age where print magazines are increasingly giving way to online journalism, The New Yorker is more important than ever, editor-in-chief David Remnick ’81 told a packed audience of senior citizens, faculty members and students.”

    Jobs

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. is looking for an Editor and a Reporter.

  • Transport Topics Publishing Group is looking for a staff Reporter.

  • American University is looking for a Communications Career Advisor.

  • Danville Register & Bee is seeking a sports reporter/page designer.

  • Observatory Group, LLC is looking for a ECB Analyst.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.22.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • The White House bids farewell to Josh Deckard.

  • A NBC release announced, “‘Meet the Press,’ the longest running television show in the world, reached a programming milestone, airing its 3,000th broadcast last Sunday, October 14. In addition, according to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press’ topped the competition on Sunday, winning in all categories across the
    country and in Washington D.C.”

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column. Clark Hoyt’s too.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 14, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fifth straight week. This marks the sixth time in seven weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers. ‘This Week’ is also the only Sunday discussion program up year-to-date (4%) among Total Viewers.”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for Oct. 7-12 shows, “The debut of Fred Thompson as a GOP debater helped make last week the second-biggest week of the year in the talk show universe for the 2008 presidential campaign. But so did a talk brouhaha over a more tangential topic involving the debate.”

  • Herald Sun reports, “Speaking at News Corp’s annual meeting of stockholders in New York, Mr. Murdoch, said the global media giant’s proven track record spoke for itself. ‘Revenues have grown an average of 14 percent a year over the past five years and operating income is up 14 percent a year on average over the past four years,’ he said.”

  • Food Service Monthly has started a blog! Check it out.

  • PBC announced that “White House Chronicle” now airs on the Washington-Baltimore area’s three major PBS affiliates: WHUT-TV, Channel 32, WETA-TV, Channel 26, and WMPT-TV, Channel 22. Also, XM Satellite Radio will air “White House Chronicle” on P.O.T.U.S. ’08 (Channel 130) every Saturday, beginning Oct. 12.

  • New York Times reports, “Media companies are often criticized for not taking enough risks in choosing television shows, authors, movies and musicians. But when it comes to technology start-ups, their appetite for risk appears to be on the rise.”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Leading Internet and media companies teamed up … to set ground rules for dealing with copyright infringement in videos uploaded to user-generated content Web sites — and demanding stronger efforts on the part of content hosts.”

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. communications regulators cited conservative commentator Armstrong Williams on Thursday for violating a ban on ‘payola’ in promoting the Bush administration’s education plan.”

  • USA Today reports, “Google’s third-quarter revenue jumped 57%, but a hiring binge and product speculation left Wall Street wondering what the search giant wasn’t revealing.”

  • A reader tells us that NBC4 anchor Wendy Rieger. said her weekly Going Green reports on NBC4 (Tuesdays at 5:00pm) and has been picked up on by New York folks and “mandated that all NBC affiliates show her reports or take up the cause on their own. Even Brian Williams started his own Going Green segment on Nightly News, mainly from what Wendy started here. Way to go!”

  • Rieger is also hosting a gay-youth assistance fundraiser, SMYAL, on November 4. Click here for more details.

  • AP reports, “To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible. An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through Comcast cable modems. We picked the Bible for the test because it’s not protected by copyright and the file is a convenient size. In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked.” Also, the AP reports, “Comcast Corp. actively interferes with attempts by some of its high- speed Internet subscribers to share files online, a move that runs counter to the tradition of treating all types of Net traffic equally.”

  • From Wonkette: “Flipping though an advanced copy of Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, one item popped off the page. Apparently, Thompson used to date Sally Quinn of The Washington Post: ‘He was always pumping me,’ she says of the late journalist’s thirst for Washington gossip.”

  • Find out why his Extreme-ness calls Campaigns & Elections Magazine’s Walter Alarkon “The Best Political Reporter Today.”

  • Roll Call is holding an Adjournment Contest! “Guess, to the minute, the exact date and time that the second chamber of Congress will adjourn sine die for the first session of the 110th Congress. The person who comes closest to the actual time wins. If there is a tie, Roll Call will hold a drawing to determine the winner.” The winner gets a $500 gift certificate to Fogo de Chão. Email your entry to contest@rollcall.com by 5 p.m. Oct. 26.

  • CQ wants to know what you think about CQPolitics.

  • A reader writes in, “perhaps Facebook is more trouble than it’s worth — it’s just another vehicle for self-important journos who are more about capped teeth than reporting…”

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Colbert ‘run’ risks breaking law”

  • Lloyd Grove interviews Donnie Deutsch for Portfolio.com, “and gets the adman and CNBC host to address the Ann Coulter interview, his show as a vehicle to pick up women, future marriage and the Fox Business Network.”

  • A reader writes in: “It would be great if Stu Rothenberg started speaking in the third person. George is getting upset!”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comedy Central is getting more of Jon Stewart. The network said late Thursday that it has signed an extension with the ‘Daily Show’ host that will keep him around until at least 2010. Stewart’s contract would have expired at the end of 2008.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Tony Snow, the Fox News host-turned White House spokesman-turned unemployed guy, has signed on to be the keynote speaker at this year’s American Magazine Conference. Larry Hackett, managing editor of People, will conduct a Q&A with him. The conversation will be on the record — a good thing, since an attempt three years ago to keep Bill Clinton’s AMC remarks from leaving the room was contemptuously ignored by journalists in attendance. A spokeswoman for the Magazine Publishers of America declined to say if Snow — who left his job as White House spokesman saying he needed to make more money would be paid for the appearance.”

  • Bloomberg reports,Dean Singleton’s MediaNews Group Inc., the largest closely held U.S. newspaper publisher, plans to triple sales from its Internet sites by 2012.”

  • B&C reports, “The Federal Communications Commission issued its first fines for a station airing Armstrong Williams’ Department of Education-paid-for plugs for its ‘No Child Left Behind’ initiative. Station-owner Sinclair Broadcast Group doesn’t plan to pay the fine and said it will take the commission to court.”

  • To clarify, Major Garrett is currently the Chief Congressional Correspondent for FNC, but he was on the trail for the 2004 Presidential race and the 2006 mid-term elections.. he is not new to the campaign trail and has experience on the road covering the beat in previous elections.

  • Check out Mixed Media’s critique of Newsweek’s new design.

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger November Meetup is Wednesday, November 14, 2007 at 7:00 PM at RFD. Click here for full details.

  • Michael Getler, the PBS Ombudsman, writes, “Frontline, the outstanding (my opinion as well as that of many others) documentary series marked the beginning of its 25th season this week with another look into the often-closed world in which Vice-President Dick Cheney operates. The hour-long debut on Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, was titled ‘Cheney’s Law.’ It was produced by Michael Kirk, who could reasonably be labeled Minister of the Interior for his efforts, over the past six years, in turning out ten Frontline programs that, in one way or another, probed those activities of the Bush administration—whether one agrees with them or not—that have largely developed and been carried on out of public view.”

  • E&P reports, “Although Washington Post Radio was dropped last month after an unsuccessful 18-month run, the paper is still dealing with the fallout. A Newspaper Guild complaint that newsroom staffers had to perform extra work on the broadcast outlet has sparked a National Labor Relations Board hearing set for next week.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some good news about the media has actually been making headlines. When was the last time that happened? 1974? The bombshell is ProPublica, a brand-new investigative journalism outfit to be launched in January by one of the most respected figures in the newspaper business, longtime Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Paul Steiger.”

  • This week’s TV Q&A from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Rob Owen responds to questions about ads on WPXI, Jerry Seinfeld’s ‘Bee Movie’ minisodes on NBC and HBO’s ‘Five Days.’”

  • A release announced, “Inspired by Lions For Lambs (starring Robert Redford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise), MGM and YOUTUBE have extended the opportunity to submit videos to Youtube in order to win $25,000 for a charity of the winner’s choice. Participants have until October 24th to submit a 90 second video explaining thoughts on key issues and causes in today’s world.” For more info, click here.

    Jobs

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Editor/Writer.

  • The Cecil Whig is looking for a Web-savvy copy editor.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • Jamestown Foundation is looking for a Publications Coordinator.

  • The Frederick News Post is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDCH is looking for an In-House News Transcriber.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Satellite Coordinator.

  • Migration Policy Institute is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is looking for a Technical Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for an entry level writer.

  • Exchange Monitor Publications, Inc. is looking for Reporters.

  • The Current Newspapers is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Systems Engineer

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend Edition, Sunday and an Assistant Editor, Digital Media News.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.16.07

  • Valerie Plame on Capitol Hill today.

  • More Money, Less Booty For BET

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending Sunday, March 11, 2007 in all categories both nationally and in Washington, D.C. The show attracted 3.599 million total viewers, a 28% advantage over “Face the Nation”, a 31% lead over “This Week” and 159% more than “News Sunday”.

  • TNR also had a story recently on the Comedy Central/Rahm Emanuel story.

  • CJR’s Paul McLeary outlines, “How TalkingPointsMemo Beat the Big Boys on the U.S. Attorney Story.”

  • E&P reports that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s confession that he killed former Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, “brought back powerful memories of Pearl’s horrific death” for Paul Steiger, the Wall Street Journal’s managing editor.

  • American Journalism Review senior contributing writer Lori Robertson spoke with Dana Priest and Anne Hull about their Walter Reed series.

  • Priest discussed the story yesterday in a WashingtonPost.com chat.

  • Eric Alterman looks at why the Bush administration’s firing of eight federal prosecutors won’t just go away.

  • Meanwhile, Powerline doesn’t think it is a story, or rather a scandal, at all.