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Posts Tagged ‘Peter Chernin’

Morning Reading List, 11.09.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Pricey shampoos are your thing.

  • Can you answer this week’s CQ Political Trivia?

  • The Associated Press reports, “Newspaper publisher Lee Enterprises Inc. said Thursday its fourth-quarter profit nearly doubled versus a year ago with much of the gain attributed to one-time benefits of tax changes and other issues.”

  • We knew we were forgetting something. John Kelly tells us that yesterday was Journalist Day.

  • McClatchy again hit by setbacks.

  • The 2007 Weblog Awards announced…with the Extreme-ness taking a bronze!

  • Wonkette: “WaPo Repressing Horrible Headline Word Choice

  • FEMA Press Secretary Directed Fake News Briefing, Inquiry Finds

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “Time Warner must focus on being ‘the most profitable, not the biggest’ entertainment company, and his team must concentrate on boosting the stock ‘now,’ CEO designate Jeffrey Bewkes said here Wednesday in his first public appearance since being tapped for the promotion.”

  • Rachel Sklar says, “Goodbye my Finger Bowl.”

  • Digital Drives Discovery Results

  • David Westin’s ABC News Re-Org Continues

  • Stars and Stripes Ombudsman: “ASY arrangement threatened Stripes’ objectivity

  • Confederate Yankee reports, “At least two of the leading advertisers for The New Republic are reconsidering their advertising relationships with the magazine in the wake of the magazines handling of the Scott Beauchamp “Shock Troop” scandal.”

  • FT.com reports, “Warner Bros has signalled its intention of expanding more aggressively into the video games industry with the acquisition of TT Games, the UK publisher of the LEGO Star Wars series which has sold 12m copies around the world.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “You might expect a former studio chief like Michael Eisner to side with the studios over the current writers strike, and you would be very right. Speaking at the Dow Jones/Nielsen Media and Money conference this morning, the ex-Disney honcho called the Writers Guild work stoppage ‘stupid,’ ‘misguided’ and ‘insanity.’

  • Another FEMA Official Leaves In Wake of Scandal

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Three days in, the writers strike is hitting television hard as schedules are being juggled, overall deals suspended, production on series shut down and layoffs kick in.”

  • New York Post reports, “NBC may be trying to claw its way out of the prime-time TV ratings cellar, but that’s not stopping the network’s party-hearty new savior, Ben Silverman, from praising himself and bashing the top dogs at rivals ABC and FOX.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, said first-quarter profit fell 13 percent from a year earlier, when a gain from the sale of investments boosted results. Sales topped analysts’ estimates.”

  • RumorMonger reports, “Digg is close to announcing its sale to a major media player for $300 million to $400 million, according to sources close to the company, I hear.”

  • Reuters reports, “Digital video recorder company TiVo Inc is offering a new service giving advertisers detailed profiles of its users, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday in its online edition.”

  • B&C reports, “On the News Corp. earnings conference call Wednesday, president and chief operating officer Peter Chernin said, ‘A strike is probably a positive for the company.’”

    Jobs

  • International Justice Mission is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.25.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think Jon Stewart could totally take Tucker Carlson in a fist fight.

  • CBSNews.com’s Matthew Felling — fresh back from his stint on “Morning Joe” — is hosting today’s “Kojo Nnamdi Show” on WAMU 88.5FM from noon to two.

  • Printing poll on Iraqi deaths would be irresponsible

  • Keith St. Clair, an AME at the Examiner since March 2006, is joining the Associated Press as a Night Supervisor based in Los Angeles.

  • Webpro News reports, “This hot little rumor has been bouncing around through the weekend: Google could be willing to purchase satellite radio provider Sirius.”

  • Brokaw Honored for ‘Taking a Stand for Press Freedom’

  • CNN Election Bus Rolls Through NYC

  • FCC proposes ‘fake news’ fine

  • Market Watch reports, “Shares of Google Inc. hit an all-time high Friday, amid a flurry of upbeat news including new share rankings for the Internet-search market and an analyst’s report on ways the company may one day reach $100 billion in annual revenue.”

  • On “tomorrow’s newsrooms.”

  • Scotsman.com reports, “Peter Chernin, the president of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, promised the media giant will ‘crush’ the Financial Times after acquiring its big rival in America.”

  • Sage advice for aspiring journalists

  • Clinton campaign kills negative story

  • FT.com reports, “Online advertising spending is widely predicted to continue its strong growth even if a US economic downturn squeezes the advertising sector as a whole.”

  • Mediabistro.com “will mark its 10th anniversary with a gala celebration on Thursday, October 4th at The Plumm, 246 West 14th Street in New York City. To celebrate mediabistro.com’s remarkable growth over the past decade, mediabistro will honor ten individuals whose media careers have skyrocketed during the same period with Golden Boa Awards in the 10 verticals that mediabistro.com serves. Festivities will begin at 7:00 pm.” For more info, click here.

  • Test your news IQ with Pew!

  • A ICFJ release announced, “Anton Kazarin, editor-in-chief of the business magazine group Delovoy Kvartal, has been named winner of the 2007 Paul Klebnikov Fund Prize for Excellence in Journalism. Kazarin will be honored at ICFJ’s Annual Awards Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., on November 13.”

  • AFF “announced a contest for the best college blog with a grand prize of $10,000. The purpose of the contest is to encourage original liberty-minded blogger journalism on college campuses and to identify young conservative and libertarian talent who wish to pursue careers as journalists and writers. The contest is open to all graduate and undergraduate bloggers age 25 and younger.” For more info, click here.

  • Poynter Online reports, “This week, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee will take up the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007, sponsored by senators Arlen Specter R-Pa. and Charles E. Schumer D-N.Y. There are 10 co-sponsors from the Senate and 71 from the identical House version.”

  • A tipster tells us, “BBC World News America is building a new set in Washington at the moment. They are also preparing for World News Today on Oct. 1.”

  • A Sierra Club release announced, “A former vice president, a New York Times reporter, and a California Assemblyman who have helped raise awareness of global warming are among those receiving awards from the Sierra Club this year.” They include former Vice President Al Gore, Tom Friedman and Congressman Mike Thompson.”

  • Media Matters is calling on readers to contact their local papers and “help end the conservative advantage” of syndicated columnists.

  • The 2007 MacArthur Fellows, awarded by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced on this morning. For more information, click here.

  • Center for American Progress says, “Know Your Sources: The Mainstream Press Keeps Finding Wacky Immigration ‘Experts’”

  • “The Moving Picture Institute will host the world premiere of Indoctrinate U at the American Film Renaissance Film Festival in Washington, D.C. on Friday, September 28, 2007, at 7:30 pm ET at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Auditorium.” Tickets are available for $10 and can be purchased by calling 877-933-4730 or clicking here.

  • The AP reports, “An experimental online ‘mashup’ — a build-your-own Democratic presidential debate — attracted more than 1 million viewers in the past 10 days, many of them young people drawn to the interactivity of the Internet. … Yahoo, HuffingtonPost.com and Slate.com conceived the format as a way to give online viewers the ability to build a debate with video blocks of each candidate answering different questions on education, health care and the war from PBS host Charlie Rose.”

  • Amy Doolittle is covering transportation issues for DCist.

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “With only one new non-heterosexual regular character this coming season — Bonnie Somerville’s bisexual Caitlin Dowd on ABC’s drama ‘Cashmere Mafia’ — the number of portrayals of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people on scripted network series declined for a third straight year, according to the annual ‘Where We Are on TV’ study by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.”

  • Guardian reports, “BBC News is to join the media stampede for integration by merging its TV, radio and online newsrooms, although the new set-up will immediately face an annual budget cut of 5% over the next five years.”

  • Ad Age’s Simon Dumenco writes, “Internet Company’s Headed to Big Apple, and This Columnist Is Rooting for the Suddenly Agile Giant”

  • Media 3.0 reports, “MySpace recently announced a deal with Marshall Herskovitz and Edward Zwick, the team behind Thirtysomething and My So-Called Life to create Quarterlife, an online show about post-college twenty-somethings. Unless it was a very slow news day, this would not be on most people’s radar — at least not until the show was a hit. However, what makes this particular press release interesting is that the producers have announced that the hour long show (which will be broken up in to segments for online viewing) will have ‘TV-level production values’ and ‘TV-level production costs.’”

  • New York Times reports, “Media consumers have said, loudly and repeatedly, that they want to watch what they want, when and where they want it. Last week NBC called that bluff, saying that its prime-time broadcast schedule would be there for free downloading for a week after being shown on television. In doing so, the network is leaving behind a business model that is as old as “I Love Lucy”: audiences who make appointments with their favorite shows and who then show up in numbers that open up advertisers’ wallets.”

  • “‘What would students do,’ one journalism researcher wondered, ‘if they got to create a media by them, for them — to create whatever they want, and not have to worry about what’s always been?’” Curious? Insider Higher Ed has the answer.

  • Market Watch’s John Dvorak writes, “With the recent discussions of various news organizations eliminating subscription or paid services, whether it’s Dow Jones & Co. or the New York Times Co., it might be time for shareholders to evaluate the future prospects of all the newspaper-publishing companies.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “Among the investments that Jim Savage, a Waltham venture capitalist, is considering is a North Carolina company introduced to him in an unorthodox way: The entrepreneur posted a comment on Savage’s blog.”

  • AP reports, “The social networking Web site MySpace is launching a free, advertising-supported cell phone version Monday as part of a wider bid by parent News Corp. to attract advertising for mobile Web sites.”

  • Media Week reports, “The Week, Felix Dennis’ tightly edited news digest, has launched a new Web site that will attempt to do every day what the magazine does on a weekly basis.”

  • B&C reports, “PBS is looking to avoid airing profanities ‘in the teeth’ of the Federal Communications Commission’s enforcement regime. While the commission’s crackdown on cussing has been called into question by a federal court, PBS is taking no chances, or at least fewer than it could, with Ken Burns’ documentary, The War.”

  • Yesterday was “National Punctuation Day”

  • ABC Digital Chief: The Network Still Matters

  • The AP reports, “Starbucks Corp. plans to give away 50 million free digital songs to customers in all of its domestic coffee houses to promote a new wireless iTunes music service that’s about to debut in select markets.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think the Yankees will make it to the playoffs.

  • Starting on Friday, C-SPAN Radio 90.1 FM in the Washington/Baltimore area is now broadcasting three channels in HD. If you have an HD radio, you’ll be able to hear these three C-SPAN Radio stations for free at 90.1. For more info, click here.

  • A release announced, “In an effort to ensure transparency and accountability in the continuing debate over the future of media ownership in America, Representatives Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Bart Stupak (D-MI), Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) … wrote to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin to request his immediate attention to a number of controversies surrounding the FCC’s activities on ten scientific studies released by the agency in late July.”

  • Shelly Palmer, “award-winning inventor, technologist, composer and television producer” will be the featured speaker at a seminar hosted by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. “Mr. Palmer’s presentation takes place 7- 9pm, Wednesday, September 26th at the Intelsat Building, 3007 Tilden Street, NW, Washington. Admission is free to students and NATAS members, $15 for non-NATAS members, payable at the door.”

  • Cable Takes A Ratings Hit

  • TheGarance has a guide to Iowa every political reporter should check out.

  • New York Magazine reports, “Denizens of the Wall Street Journal’s genteel newsroom were in need of smelling salts last Wednesday after reports surfaced that the paper’s new owner, Rupert Murdoch, brought Col Allan, the editor-in-chief of the New York Post, to a kick-the-tires meeting with their bosses.”

  • Al Neuharth, USA TODAY founder and former chair and chief executive officer of Gannett Co., Inc., addressed more than 1,200 guests and staff at a reception at USA TODAY’s headquarters in McLean, Va., on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the nation’s newspaper. Founded in 1982, USA TODAY’s launch was the most expensive and closely watched newspaper debut in history; 25 years later it is the nation’s top selling newspaper.” Check out his remarks here.

  • FishbowlNY reports, “The Kurt Eichenwald underage porn/cash payment story just got a hell of a lot more creepy.”

  • “PoliticsOnline and the World E-Gov Forum are proud to announce the list for nominations of the Top 10 Who Are Changing the World of Internet and Politics.” Check it out here.

  • Portfolio’s Jack Flack has “10 things that Rupert Murdoch may need to do with Dow Jones”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced, “Three leading journalists with long experience in business journalism will join the international faculty of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program at Beijing’s Tsinghua University. They include Robert J. Dowling, former managing editor of BusinessWeek International; Ann M. Morrison, former editor of Time Europe; and Nailene Chou Wiest, who was a Knight International Journalism Fellow in China and had worked for Reuters there. Wiest also will serve as the program’s co-director.”

  • The Etelos Ecosystem has partnered with the Web application company Entrecore.

  • Reuters reports, “Fears that a possible U.S. recession will sap advertising spending have soured investors on the media industry, but some entertainment companies just might be more resilient than Wall Street thinks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The New York Post is about to find out whether a glossy magazine can lift the fortunes of a gritty tabloid. Hoping to increase Sunday circulation and high-end advertising, the Post is introducing Page Six Magazine starting this Sunday.”

  • Fox Business Network has a new logo.

  • Connecticut Post’s Paul Janensch writes, “Q: Professor News, why did many journalists call USA Today ‘McPaper?’ A: Because, they said, it was the news equivalent of fast food — easy to swallow but not very nourishing. The criticism may have been warranted in its early years. But ‘The Nation’s Newspaper,’ which turned 25 last week, has proven to be enormously successful and widely imitated.”

  • At 25, ‘McPaper’ Is All Grown Up

  • Reuters reports, “Six months after grabbing Oscar glory for his eco-documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ former Vice President Al Gore collected an Emmy Award on Sunday for his fledgling youth-oriented cable network, Current TV.”

  • Economist leaves news fluff to others

  • The Associated Press reports, “Shares of New York Times Co. hit a 52-week low for the second day in a row Thursday as a Goldman Sachs analyst cut his price target and lowered some earnings estimates, citing disappointing August ad revenue results.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “NYT Has Seen Future: It’s All the Blogging That’s Fit to Print”

  • WAMU 88.5 announced, “Senior Commentator and Washington, D.C., radio veteran Fred Fiske will celebrate 60 years on the airwaves in Washington, D.C., on September 27.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Reed Elsevier Plc and Wolters Kluwer NV, two publishers that abandoned a merger in 1998, should again consider combining because of the ‘compelling’ strategic and financial logic of such a step, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Dow Jones & Company and its main labor union have moved close to agreement on a contract for reporters and other employees at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires, union officials said yesterday.”

  • From the Houston Chronicle, “Hardly a day passes without a reader (or two) accusing the paper of having an unabashed affinity for the opinions of ‘liberal’ columnists — eschewing those of conservatives. It’s a spurious assertion to which I reply: ‘What paper are you reading?’”

  • Chicago Tribune’s Michael Tackett writes, “The president lost another member of his senior staff Friday when Tony Snow ended his stint as White House press secretary. Snow is the third man to hold that job for President Bush, and by almost any measure, the best. His loss may be felt even more directly than that of the talented Mr. Rove.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “A newsroom without news editors might be the dream of many a trod-upon reporter. But if that really were the case, and it was online users instead who set the news agenda, a new report from The Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests the stories they’d choose to lead the day, and the sources of news to which they’d pay attention, would put us in a very different world of news.”

  • Check out Andrew Sullivan’s first reader contest and vote for the best movie line ever.

  • Daryn Kagan’s documentary film, “Breaking the Curse”, aired last night on WETA and will re-air tonight at 5PM.

  • Laura Rozen reports, “The network says it acted quickly when it discovered consultant Alexis Debat had misrepresented his credentials. But sources say a real investigation of his work is beginning only now.”

  • Gawker reports, “Times deputy managing editor Jonathan Landman, in one of his weekly memos to the staff about ‘Innovation,’ lays this deepness on you (emphasis ours): ‘Times have changed. Our online storytelling skills have evolved to the point where you really can get the whole story without reading a newspaper article.’”

  • The cover of Alan Greenspan’s new book, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World, features a cover portrait shot by U.S. News & World Report’s Jeff MacMillan several years ago for the magazine.

  • The Washington Post’s Frank Aherns writes, “The head of a burgeoning Afghan media empire looked down at his new BlackBerry, vibrating against a table in Washington earlier this week. ‘Afghan civilians injured in Gereshk suicide bombing,’ read the e-mail headline. Another day, another suicide bombing in another town. Another too-typical news event for Saad Mohseni’s stations to broadcast across a country where prime-time programming is scheduled to fit the nighttime hours when electrical generators are switched on.”

  • “News media organizations must become portfolio entrepreneurs that make experimentation and ‘iteration’ a way of life and that ‘put risk and speed at the center of the corporate altar,’ a new report from the Media Management Center concludes.”

  • A tipster tells us, “hotline is having a party, just later this fall. or so i hear.”

  • Variety reports, “News Corp. topper Peter Chernin has urged British TV chiefs to adopt innovative, risk-taking strategies and embrace new media — or risk extinction.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc is testing an experimental social network service called Mash that makes it easy for Yahoo users to share tidbits of their lives with friends and family online, the company said on Sunday. Mash, to which a limited number of public users began being invited as testers on Friday, was described by a spokeswoman as a new, next-generation service that is independent from the company’s 2-1/2 year-old Yahoo 360 degree profile service.”

  • NY Post reports, “By the time many of this fall’s new TV shows premiere later this month, a number of Web-savvy viewers will have already given their thumbs-up or thumbs-down. That’s because networks including NBC and Fox are offering free sneak peeks of the pilot episodes of their new shows online.”

  • Slate reports, “Why the WSJ Exodus Is Good for Murdoch”

  • New York Times reports, “Next year, The Wall Street Journal will introduce Pursuits, a glossy monthly magazine about the lifestyles of the rich, in hopes of drawing more ads for expensive consumer goods”

  • A reader writes in, “From a fan: Is Jose Antonio Vargas bumping fogies like Woodward off the front page? Vargas has had 9 front page stories on his online political beat. Where’s the NYT and WSJ?”

  • Forbes reports, “How’s USA Today celebrating it’s 25th anniversary this weekend? With shares of parent company Gannett at their lowest closing level in 10 years.”

  • AP reports USA Today “starts its second quarter century with plans to expand its brand beyond the world of journalism.”

  • E&P reports, “In another Web first, The New York Times has posted on its Web site a video Letter to the Editor from Charles Ferguson, the anti-war filmmaker, responding critically to L. Paul Bremer’s recent Op-Ed defending his order to dismantle the Iraqi Army in 2003 after the U.S. took Baghdad.”

  • Reuters reports, “Your cell phone may be one of the last spots around that’s relatively free of advertising — but not for long. Media and advertising companies have found a way of latching on to people’s handsets by beaming ads to them via Bluetooth, the same technology used in some hands-free headsets.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Screen Actors Guild announced Friday that it signed a contract to cover performers on “quarterlife,” a Web series that will debut Nov. 11 on MySpaceTV.com”

  • Need to Know News, LLC is looking for a Financial Markets Reporter.

  • The Guardian is looking for an Online Journalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Medical Writer.

  • The American Institute of Physics is looking for a News Reporter/Writer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a higher ed reporter.

  • ThinkTalk is seeking a Smart Dynamic Host.

  • UCG is looking for a Medical Coding Reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Editor.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Photo Graphics Technician.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • The Washington Center for Politics & Journalism is offering a Politics & Journalism Semester Internship.

  • Campaign for America’s Future is looking for a Senior Communications Associate.

  • Spitfire Strategies is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • US Newsventures is looking for an Editor.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • Girls’ Life is looking for an Online Editorial Director and Online Editorial Assistant.

  • TeamPeople is looking for a General Manager: Media Support, AV.

  • Legal Times is looking for an Advertising Director.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for a production designer/web assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.10.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Jeff Golimowski, investigative reporter, is no longer with CNSNews.com

  • Longtime producer Michele Michaels has left News 4 to go to Washington Hospital Center. (Trend alert? Producer Lydia Postlewaite left WTOP earlier this year for Washington Adventist Hospital and longtime Montgomery Gazette editor Tom Grant joined Adventist HealthCare in December.)

  • The NPF announced, “The Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award encourages young science writers by recognizing outstanding reporting in all fields of science. The winner of the 2007 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, and its $1000 prize, is Jia-Rui Chong, of The Los Angeles Times.”

  • NPR reporter: I’m only worth $100,000 if kidnapped in Iraq?”

  • Big tech problems at last night’s debate?

  • New York Post reports, “WPP Chief Executive Martin Sorrell – who’s been on the prowl since buying online ad firm 24/7 Real Media earlier this year — could be close to making another significant acquisition in the digital ad space. Sorrell revealed this week that he would announce the purchase of another U.S. Internet ad firm in the ‘coming days,’ sparking a guessing game on Madison Avenue.”

  • The 8pm Cable Picture Comes Into Focus

  • Following their testimony to Congress tomorrow on the progress of U.S. strategy in Iraq, General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker will appear exclusively on FOX News Channel at 9 P.M. for an hour-long sitdown interview with Washington Managing Editor Brit Hume. This live FOX News Special will begin at 9PM ET Monday night.

  • Amanpour: “On The Warrior Path

  • Media Daily News reports, “At least two class-action suits have been filed by shareholders in Hearst-Argyle, looking to derail Hearst Corp.’s efforts to buy out investors and take the station group private.”

  • His Extreme-ness tells us how not all Reagans are the same.

  • The National Press Foundation will present a four-day seminar for journalists on “Retirement Issues in the 21st Century III,” in Washington, D.C., September 16-19. Sessions featuring Mark Iwry of the Brookings Institution, Dallas Salisbury of the Employee Benefit Research Institute, and Barbara Bovbjerg of the GAO, will be open to journalists across the country through conference call. Contact philip@nationalpress.org to participate and click here for more information.

  • Cronkite: Couric’s ‘As Good As Ever’

  • Market Watch reports, “The U.S. Department of Justice could be ready to make a ruling on Sirius Satellite Radio’s proposed acquisition of XM Satellite Radio within the next 30 to 60 days, with a more than 50% likelihood of approval, an analyst said Thursday.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “There’s a new twist in the ongoing drama of the poor beleaguered mainstream media. Rather than merely bemoaning the plight of traditional news outlets, some people are suggesting that users of the new media — pretty much all of us — should feel guilty for undermining the blue-chip operations that are struggling to stay alive.”

  • The National Press Foundation is accepting entries to for the 2007 awards for accomplishment in journalism. “Awards include the $5,000 Dirksen Awards for Coverage of Congress by print and broadcast journalists, the $2,500 Berryman Award for editorial cartoonists, and the $2,500 Excellence in Online Journalism Award. The awards will be presented at the 25th NPF Annual Awards Dinner in Washington, D.C. on February 28, 2008.” All entries must be received by October 5. For more information, click here.

  • Capital Emmy’s is hosting an event to mark the end of the baseball season. For $28, you can “a great excuse to leave work early on a Friday,” a free ride to the ballpark and free drinks. For more info, and to RSVP, click here.

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Time Warner was the victim Thursday of an unusually scathing Wall Street report by an analyst who called for a breakup of the company, told his clients that top executives aren’t to be trusted and called Richard Parsons a ‘lame duck’ chairman and CEO.”

  • FT.com reports, “Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corp, is widely regarded as the world’s most influential media executive but he is not the highest paid employee in the global media group he founded, in spite of receiving $32m in compensation. Peter Chernin, president and chief operating officer, received higher total compensation than Mr Murdoch in the 2007 fiscal year, notching up salary, stock awards, pension benefits and other compensation worth $34m, according to regulatory filings released on Thursday.”

  • “NPF has received a grant from the McCormick Tribune Foundation to present a McCormick Tribune Specialized Reporting Institute on presidential candidates health care proposals, November 11–14, 2007 in Washington, D.C. Up to 18 all–expense–paid fellowships are available for this program. Participating journalists will gain the knowledge, skills, resources, and sources to cover the candidates’ health care proposals for their print, broadcast, and online audience. Applications are due Friday, October 5, 2007.”

    Jobs

  • PBS is looking for a Sr. Associate, Conference Management.

  • www.HealthCentral.com is looking for a Manager of Public Relations
    and B-to-B Marketing

  • The Transport Topics Publishing Group is looking for a Staff Reporter.

  • Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Managing Editor at the Link

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 05.10.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you have a book in you, somewhere.

  • NBC announced that “Lester Holt will become anchor of the top-rated Saturday and Sunday editions of NBC ‘Nightly News,’ effective immediately. According to the release, “In addition to this new role, Holt will continue to co-anchor the weekend editions of ‘Today.’ He will also serve as a fill-in anchor and correspondent for ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ and the weekday ‘Today’ program.”

  • A reader offers “another snapshot of the Capitol Hill pubs: Months in Existence: Roll Call: 624 The Hill: 156 Politico: 4 Looks like somebody is growing pretty quickly…”

  • Seattle Times reports, “Microsoft thinks the advertising business model for traditional media — venues where advertisers still channel most of their spending — will fall apart faster in the coming five years.”

  • Check out the online chat Washington Post ombudsman Deborah Howell did yesterday, discussing “her weekly column and her role in improving public understanding of the newspaper and journalism.”

  • The New York Observer has the run down of Tuesday night’s Time 100 gala.

  • E&P reports, outgoing New York Times Public Editor Byron Calame said, “The prospect of Mr. Murdoch owning the Journal is disturbing and disconcerting to me.”

  • Potomac Flacks is looking for a new blog contributor. If you are interested in being a contributor, please contact Matt Mackowiak at matt.mackowiak@gmail.com.

  • CNET News.com reports, “While Microsoft is working to catch up to Google in areas such as search, it is also looking to technology to provide new types of Internet content and advertising that it hopes will change the rules of the game.”

  • From a reader: “I think CBS should change the name of their newscast to ‘CBS Evening Blues’”

  • Ben Smith reports that yesterday “Rubert Murdoch introduced Bloomberg at News Corp.’s announcement that the company is going green.”

  • Reuters reports, “Old media turns combative against new media”

  • David Bauder reports, “In TV’s worst spring in recent memory, an alarming number of Americans drifted away from television the past two months: More than 2.5 million fewer people were watching ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox than at the same time last year, statistics show.”

  • Forbes reports that Google “is in the early stages of a partnership with publishers such as the New York Times Co. and Tribune to sell print ads in newspapers, part of the company’s broader efforts to move into traditional, offline forms of advertising.”

  • The AP reports, “Macy’s Chief Marketing Officer Delivers Tough Love Speech to Newspapers”

  • Forbes reports, “Analysts say competition concerns will be the deal’s main stumbling block” in the deal between Thomson and Reuters Group.

  • The AP reports, “News Corp. President Peter Chernin told a cable industry gathering Tuesday that ‘this is a world in which the big get bigger.’” The AP also reported from the conference, Comcast Corp. Chief Executive Brian Roberts showed off “new technology that enabled a data download speed of 150 megabits per second, or roughly 25 times faster than today’s standard cable modems.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Simon & Schuster Inc. announced that it is launching a digital video channel to promote the company’s authors and forthcoming releases.”

  • Reuters reports, “Media executives on Tuesday criticized potential further U.S government involvement in regulating what Americans watch on television and called on industry lobbyists to prepare for a battle in Washington.”

    Jobs

  • Environment & Energy Publishing, LLC is seeking a senior reporter.

  • Safety Net Hospitals for Pharmaceutical Access Staff is looking for a Writer/Newsletter Editor.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Energetic Reporter/Editor.

  • American Society for Engineering Education is looking for an Editor.

  • America’s Promise/The Alliance For Youth is looking for a Web Content Manager.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext