FishbowlNY TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘pitch’

How to Write a Successful Magazine Pitch

a8463

Sending a cold pitch to a major publication such as AARP The Magazine can be daunting. Freelancer Joan Trossman Bien knew she needed to get the editor’s attention fast, and that her subject had to be relevant and timely. She ended up pitching a story about Dulanie Ellis, a 64-year-old documentary filmmaker who found her passion in the second stage of her life.

The mag’s features editor Margaret Guroff thought the piece was a better fit in the FOB, and she passed it along to another editor, David Dudley. “The bottom line here is that Joan’s idea had at least three or four big things going for it,” said Dudley. “It hit on an issue that we’d been wanting to write about (the fact that American farmers, as a population, are getting so old on average). [And] it had a simple, easily understood premise that would make sense even in a short 200-word piece.”

THE PITCH:

Ms. Guroff:

I would like to write a profile for you about a woman who has truly found herself in the second act of her life and has made the many changes needed to accomplish her new passion. There is a new trend developing among baby boomers, brought about by a combination of circumstances and a belief that once you step aside, you lose your involvement in life. The majority do not intend to retire. Dulanie Ellis counts herself in that crowd.

Read the full pitch and find out why editors bit: Pitches That Worked: AARP The Magazine.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

How to Find the Right Market for Your Work

right-market

There are so many outlets for freelancers to write for. From glossies to blogs to literary reviews, the choices are endless. So how can a writer decide who to pitch to?

In the end, it comes down to your style of writing and where you are in your career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, veteran scribes gave their advice on how writers can find the best readers and keep the assignments coming:

Successful freelancers, like any entrepreneurs, will tell you that repeat business is essential to furthering your career. Once you’ve established a connection with an editor, it’s much easier to pitch a new idea to that editor than to break into a new market. Koa Beck, EIC of Mommyish.com, gives an editor’s perspective: “Keep pitching and follow up. I receive so many pitches from good writers that aren’t a good fit for us, but that doesn’t mean I’m not interested in anything else you might come up with.” Personally, I often send two or three ideas in my follow-up pitch letters to demonstrate my expertise and willingness to write more on a topic. However, when I’m first contacting an editor, I typically only submit one very fleshed-out idea to make a good first impression.

For more advice on pitching, read: Finding The Right Market for Your Work.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Washingtonian Wants Your First Person Stories

This week brings the third part of our popular series, Personal Essay Markets. The first and second installments highlighted 30 pitchable personal essay markets, and the latest installment brings you 15 more.

Some of the featured outlets offer up to $2 a word for your first-person piece, so whether your reflecting on running for Runner’s World or on D.C. for Washingtonian, our guide can help you find the right pub for your musings.

Read more at Personal Essay Markets, Part III. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

The Top Reasons Editors Reject Pitches

The benefits of being a freelancer are plenty — flexible hours, working from home and being your own boss, just to name a few. But it brings its own set of challenges, and dealing with rejection might be the toughest one. A pitch that you’ve spent a lot of effort crafting could be met with silence, or a meager “Thanks, but no” response. Luckily, not all hope is lost, and there’s always room to learn from your rejected pitches.

In the latest article for Mediabistro’s Journalism Advice series, freelance writer Kristen Fischer dissects some of the typical rejection responses that editors are known to give. Did you know that “we’re not assigning features at this time” is editor-speak for “Try pitching front-of-book pieces instead?”

For more on how you can learn from rejected pitches, check out The Real Reason Your Pitch Was Rejected. [subscription required]