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Posts Tagged ‘Quin Hillyer’

The FishbowlDC Interview With The Daily Caller’s Southern Scribe Alex Pappas

When I spoke with The Daily Caller reporter Alex Pappas Thursday afternoon, he mentioned that his boss, Tucker Carlson, had consulted with him on what Carlson should say about him when approached. I told him that wasn’t legal. “I told him he had to say all bad things,” Pappas assured through a slow drawl. A Mobile, Ala. native, he graduated college and began working for the the Mobile Press Register. A year and half ago he’d heard from D.C. contacts that Carlson had a new website. On a whim, he sent in his resume. To his amazement, he got the job and started in on the ground floor. But in December of 2010 he left for the Washington Examiner. Back in Mobile he’d covered local news. “I love local news,” he said, explaining the draw of the old-time newspaper track. “They know I’m a young guy and I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do.” Carlson let him go but immediately wanted Pappas back. “We’ve lost a number of people over the past year and a half, but he’s the only one we’ve aggressively wooed back,” he said, explaining that he mounted “Operation Homecoming,” in which they slowly lured him back to the The DC, “mostly with promises of more and better office parties.” About two months into his new job, Pappas received an email from Carlson saying that Gov. Tim Pawlenty had entered the 2012 presidential race. “You want to come back?” Carlson asked. “At that point I was so fresh into the job, but I’d been a political nut for as long as I could remember. I couldn’t get the email out of my mind.” A total of four months after he left, Pappas returned to The Daily Caller. “It’s a great fit for me,” he said. “It definitely feels like I’m back home.” His 80-something Grandma Reedy is also relieved. As a Fox News junkie, she loves Carlson. “It made her year that I decided to come back,” he said.

If you were a carbonated beverage which would you be? Coke in a glass bottle.

How often do you Google yourself? Google alerts do it for me.

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor? My computer just crashed. I’ve lost my story.

Who is your favorite working journalist and why? Tucker Carlson is the best writer I know.

Do you have a favorite word? ubiquitous.

What word or phrase do you overuse? Roll Tide. How so? It’s a football slogan from the University of Alabama. I didn’t go there but I’m a big fan. [Pappas attended the University of the South in the mountains of Sewanee Tennesee.]

Who would you rather have dinner with –  MSNBC’s Chris Matthews or FNC’s Chris Wallace? I’d play Hardball.

You are ordered to go on a road trip to an undisclosed location. You can go with White House Spokesman Jay Carney or Bo, the President’s Portuguese Water Dog. No ones feelings will be hurt. Who do you take? Carney. It would be great for The Daily Caller to get some exclusives from the White House. I don’t know how much of that we’d get from Bo.

What’s the name of your cell phone ring? Classic phone remix.

It’s 3 a.m. and you get up to use the bathroom or get a drink of water. Do you check your BlackBerry? I check my phone several times throughout the night.

What word do you routinely misspell? Initiative.

What swear word do you use most often? All of them.

If you weren’t a journalist what would you be? I’d write movies and TV shows.

You’ve just been told the big news: You get to have your own Sunday morning talk show. Who will be on your roundtable? (Pick four journalists or pundits types.) 50 Cent, Grover Norquist, [FishbowlDC's] Betsy Rothstein and [WaPo's] Ezra Klein.

When you pig out what do you eat? All types of fast food.

When did you last cry and why? When asked to do this interview.

Find out how often Pappas checks his BlackBerry after the jump…

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Not to Worry, Quin Hillyer’s Job Will Still be ‘Senior’

The Center for Individual Freedom has snagged award-winning columnist Quin Hillyer away from TWT. Hillyer, who will be a Senior Fellow, has spent the past two years as Senior Editorial Writer.

Hillyer will continue being an “investigative columnist” on public policy issues, with special focus on legal, regulatory and budgetary matters.  A release states that he’ll work in both Mobile, Ala. and at HQ in Alexandria, Va.

Hillyer will remain a Senior Editor at The American Spectator.

In case you didn’t know… He was press secretary to then-Appropriations Chairman Bob Livingston (R-La.) from 1991-1996. He graduated cum laude from Georgetown in 1986.

A Media Reporter’s Guide to CPAC

The agenda for CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference happening in D.C. this weekend, has been posted, and journalists and media types are invading.

  • Tucker Carlson, editor-in-chief of The Daily Caller will speak at an event sponsored by Accuracy in Media on Thursday and, later that night, will serve as Master of Ceremonies for CPAC’s Presidential Banquet honoring Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.
  • S.E. Cupp, a Daily Caller columnist, will sign her book, Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media’s Attack on Christianity, on Friday before taking part in a Saturday panel for students on how to become a columnist. Also on the panel: The Weekly Standard‘s Fred Barnes and Andrew Ferguson, and NYT‘s Ross Douthat.
  • BigJournalism’s Andrew Breitbart will speak in the main ballroom on Saturday morning, and he’ll be introduced by Townhall‘s Guy Benson.
  • Dana Loesch, also of BigJournalism, will participate in a panel on new media activism along with Matt Sheffield of the Washington Examiner on Thursday.
  • More from the Washington Examiner: Mark Tapscott will be on a panel on Friday morning, Tim Carney will be on another on Friday afternoon, and Michael Barone will be on one Saturday evening. Also on Barone’s panel: John Gizzi of Human Events and FNC contributor Margaret Hoover.
  • Conservative pundit Ann Coulter will speak to CPAC students Friday night along with FNC’s “Red Eye” gang: Greg Gutfeld, Bill Schultz, and Andy Levy before taking the main stage on Saturday, following National Review‘s Jonah Goldberg.
  • Also on different panels (so, so many panels): Human EventsJason Mattera, WaPo‘s Julia Duin (as a moderator. Need a refresher? We had dinner with last week), Quin Hillyer of TWT (also as a moderator), Andrew McCarthy of National Review, and WSJ‘s John Fund.
  • CNN contributor and Red State managing editor Erick Erickson will be the guest of honor at a student luncheon on Friday.
  • CPAC’s 2010 Blogger of the Year Ed Morrissey of HotAir will present this year’s award to Javier Manjarres of The Shark Tank.

FishbowlDC has obtained a press pass, but it doesn’t come with many perks (other than free admission). They’re holding our badge at the Media Check-In desk, so that’s nice of them. Credentialed press “do not necessarily have access” to the CPAC Bloggers’ Lounge according to their e-mail, and we’ve requested several interviews with speakers using CPAC’s guidelines for doing so. No word yet. Stay tuned…

TWT Snags Examiner‘s Hillyer

Quin Hillyer has moved from Washington Examiner to the Washington Times, as a senior editorial writer and columnist.

Morning Reading List, 12.21.07

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Good morning Washington. You don’t plan on watching any college football games on New Years Day. And, this morning, Kiefer Sutherland celebrates his 41st birthday sober, and in jail.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The Washington Post put together a quick audio slideshow that deconstructs Barack Obama’s fashion choices. Surfacely it seems that Obama is almost always wearing the same dark suit, and often without a tie. Robin Givhan and Nancy Donaldson look closer to see what these vestments signify. According to them, it shows that Obama is a modern leader, echoing the relaxed but still professional mindset of the American workforce.”

  • John Boehner is a fashion cop for reporters.

  • Bloomberg reports, “The chief executives of Gannett Co. and Media General Inc. personally lobbied top U.S. regulators before winning exceptions to rules that limit newspaper and broadcast ownership in the same markets.”

  • New York Times’ David Pogue explores, “The Generational Divide in Copyright Morality”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “A new era at Tribune Co. began taking shape Wednesday with the departure of Chairman and Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons and the expected arrival of new leadership under Chicago billionaire Sam Zell. The changing of the guard represents a make-or-break proposition for the 160-year-old media concern, struggling to transform itself for the Internet age by going private in a daring, debt-laden $8.2 billion deal.”

  • We hear the Washington Times tree is back up. The first one had its needles fall off.

  • Washington City Paper reports, “To this day, the Washington Post lives by the guiding principles of fabled publisher Eugene Meyer, who decreed, among other things, the following: ‘As a disseminator of news, the paper shall observe the decencies that are obligatory upon a private gentleman.’ And these days that means not publishing the word ‘dick’ in the Style section.”

  • DCist reports, “Metro fares aren’t the only thing going up in price in D.C. If you’re in the habit of purchasing a copy of the Washington Post from a vending machine or a sidewalk hawker on your way to work in the morning, take note: the cost of the daily paper is about to go up by 15 cents. The Post’s newsstand price will become 50 cents beginning on Dec. 31. The company cited a decline in the paper’s circulation and advertising revenue as the reason for the increase.”

  • The AP reports, “The National Press Foundation will honor half a dozen journalists at its 25th anniversary dinner in February.”

  • The New York Times reports,Claudia Payne, special sections editor, is answering reader questions Dec. 18-21. Questions may be e-mailed to askthetimes@nytimes.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Editors at the Associated Press have picked the year’s top 10 stories, and we expected the presidential campaign to be like, you know, top five or something, right? Well, it lands in at #8 — coincidentally one spot ahead of the immigration debate.”

  • Drudge reports, “McCain Pleads with NY Times to Spike Story”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Thursday revenue fell 9.2 percent in November, primarily from a sharp drop in classified ads as jobs and real estate listings continue to migrate online.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, December 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ posted 3.12 million total viewers, the program’s best total viewer delivery since the week of February 4, 2007. In addition, ‘This Week’ increased the most of the Sunday discussion programs among Total Viewers compared to last year, a significant 28%.”

  • Also from ABC: “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 10, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Adults 25-54 for the third week in a row. The last time ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ three weeks in a row in the demo was May 1995.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 16, 2007. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.205 million total viewers.”

  • “CNN and NBC/MSNBC have released their coverage plans for the Iowa Caucus, Thursday Jan. 3.” Check out the full details at TVNewser.

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN will air a Special **LIVE** ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE, Sunday, December 23rd at Noon (ET), and will re-air in the normal Road to the White House timeslots of 6:30 & 9:30 pm”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News Sunday Morning continues as the #1 Sunday morning news program, and it’s growing. Last Sunday the Charles Osgood program drew 5.34M Total Viewers, up 12% year-to-year.”

  • An ABC insider tells us, “Hilarity has ensued at our bureau after a widely attended ‘facebook seminar’ earlier this month. It’s now commonplace to see highly regarded producers and correspondents asking interns about ‘poking’.”

  • USAToday reports, “If you plan to dance at your New Year’s Eve party, you might want to pick up some moves from White House correspondent David Gregory, who boogied this morning to Mary J. Blige music.” Check out the video here.

  • One year after her departure, Kathleen Matthews’ picture has finally been removed from the banner welcoming visitors to WJLA in Rosslyn.

  • Forbes reports, “Despite a growing cadre of viewing alternatives like the Web and repeat-heavy schedules on the broadcast networks, people are still watching television, a new survey finds.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle is taking participatory democracy into the newsroom. The broadcaster is asking viewers and Web surfers to submit videos about the upcoming New Hampshire primary to the station Web sites of its WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H., and WCVB-TV Boston as well as the stations’ YouTube channels.”

  • Check out the latest installment from Green Room Girl.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Beet TV reported yesterday, “Earlier today I interviewed Cynthia Farrar, the CEO and producer of PurpleStates.TV. Tomorrow, the first of nearly a dozen video segments produced by her new company and reported by non-professional citizen journalists, go up on the Op-Ed pages of the NYTimes.com The videos will be uploaded through February 5, ‘Super Tuesday.’”

  • PolitiFact is a finalist in the prestigious DigitalEdge awards by the Newspaper Association of America for best overall news site along with the Star-Tribune of Minneapolis and washingtonpost.com. You can find out more here.

  • WebProNews reports, “Bloggers from the left, center, and right sides of the political spectrum opened a group blog on Newsweek.com called The Ruckus.”

  • The LCV just launched a new website “calling the Sunday talk show hosts to task for ignoring the issue of global warming.” Check it out here.

  • Hotline’s On Call announced, “check in often between Christmas and New Year’s for On Call’s up-to-date coverage of the presidential contest.”

  • The AP reports, “Antitrust regulators approved Google Inc.’s $3.1 billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc., clearing the way for a formidable combination in the burgeoning online advertising sector. Microsoft Corp. and AT&T Inc. have lobbied heavily against the deal, but the Federal Trade Commission gave it the go-ahead Thursday.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • In the first edition of The Atlantic’s politics roundtable, Marc Ambinder, Ross Douthat, and Matthew Yglesias predict which candidates will win the primaries and debate whether Hillary’s slide is a media fabrication. Check it out here.

  • A reader points out “a notable first for DC: NYMag.com suggests that the DC food scene has something that New York doesn’t. ha.”

  • Starting this week, much of CQ content is now accessible and easy to read on your handheld device. “The new handheld-optimized pages include news stories from CQ Weekly and CQ Today, CQ Transcripts, CQ BillAnalysis and many other services.”

  • Popular Mechanics has published its first ever Geek the Vote — an online guide to all the candidates’ stances on issues related to science and technology including energy policy and climate change, gun control, science education and infrastructure investment. Check it out here.

  • The New Republic reports,Max Brantley, the editor of the alternative weekly Arkansas Times, has feuded with Mike Huckabee since the presidential candidate first appeared on the political stage during his failed 1992 Senate run. A liberal columnist married to a circuit judge appointed by Bill Clinton, Brantley penned weekly columns antagonizing Huckabee for his staunchly conservative social views, opaque campaign finance disclosures, and acceptance of gifts during his time in office. ‘Huckabee would believe I covered him obsessively, and he’d be right about that,’ Brantley says.”

  • The New Republic’s Sean Wilentz writes, “Opinion-slingers are mooning over Barack Obama’s instincts. Don’t they remember how badly that worked out last time?”

  • The Atlantic’s Megan McArdle writes, “the wild, drunken office Christmas party used to be a staple of television, books, and movies. Now I feel as if it’s dropped pretty thoroughly out of the popular imagination; the only example I can think of recently is a fleeting scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary. Were office holiday parties really that much wilder in the past? Or have we just stopped noticing, literarily?”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News and South Carolina ETV Radio (the state’s public radio network) will present an audio-only Republican Presidential Debate, to be broadcast on NPR Member stations and webcast live from 2:00-4:00PM (EST) on Wednesday, January 16. NPR News journalists and hosts Steve Inskeep, Michele Norris and Robert Siegel will act as moderators.”

  • So far, there has been over 3000 comments in response to Bryant Park Project blog post asking Ron Paul supporters to identify themselves.

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Preparing your boss for a MTP appearance isn’t an easy assignment (especially when it’s the full hour)! Many a guest has recruited high-priced talent to do their best Russert in hopes of better preparing for the grilling they will receive on Sunday. Word on the street was that former Bush Administration flack, Adam Levine did the best Russert impersonation in town. Looks as though he has some serious competition after Romney’s appearance last Sunday.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Steve Valentini, the circulation director for Politico, is jumping ship and going over to the Examiner.

  • On Jan. 2, Quin Hillyer is leaving Citizens United to begin work at the editorial page of the Washington Examiner as Associate Editor.

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    JOBS

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director of Business Development, an Editor for Morning Rundown and an Editor for the
    Afternoon Rundown
    .

  • The Daily Progress is looking for an Assistant City Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think Dan Rather has totally lost it.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to national Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top-rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 16 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.” Nationally on Sunday, the Russert-moderated program
    attracted 2.991 million total viewers, a +30% advantage over ABC’s “This Week,” a +36% lead over CBS’s “Face the Nation” and +162% more than FOX “News Sunday”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, September 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demo for the 16th time this season. In addition, ‘This Week’ is the only Sunday discussion program up season-to-date (2%) and year-to-date (5%) among Total Viewers.”

  • Smithsonian Channel To Make Its Debut, But Only on DirecTV

  • Discovery Closer to Going Public

  • Deb Howell on “Protest Coverage Worth Protesting

  • And Clark Hoyt takes NYT task for MoveOn.org’s ad.

  • Random question: Will Dan Rather’s lawsuit affect whether Chris Matthews continues to have him on “The Chris Matthews Show”?

  • Today marks the launch of P.O.T.U.S. ’08 on XM Radio.

  • TV Week reports, “Commercials in high definition not only look better, they sell better. That’s the conclusion of research tied to a major upfront deal that put Starcom USA clients on Discovery Communications’ Discovery HD Theater channel.”

  • The Nation’s Marvin Kitman reports, “The launch of Katie Couric a year ago as the anchor of the CBS Evening News was hailed by CBS as the biggest thing in news since, well, the invention of denture fixative commercials. It was also the biggest flop. The CBS Evening News Without Dan Rather or Bob Schieffer had its lowest ratings since Nielsen began tracking evening news shows in 1987.”

  • “Overall media advertising spending in the U.S. dipped 0.5 percent in the first half of 2007 compared with the first half of 2006, the Nielsen Co. said” last week, reports TV Week.

  • Los Angeles Times reports beginning last week, “season premiere episodes of seven Fox Broadcasting programs will be made available for free through Apple’s iTunes store, a move that highlights the TV industry’s race to harness the Internet and try out potential business partners.”

  • E&P reports, “The Newspaper Association of America is launching a contest that asks teens to create a YouTube video showing how they use newspapers in print or online.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Industry speculation has it that CBS might seek a quick financial settlement to avoid the spectacle of its former star taking depositions from its top brass. But [Dan] Rather dismissed that notion.” Rather “said he’ll give a ‘substantial’ portion of the money to journalism groups if he wins, reports the New York Daily News.

  • “It’s been a while since the debate over Iraq policy was the nation’s top talk show topic. But the Iraq doubters drove the suddenly re-ignited conversation on the airwaves last week. Meanwhile, the strange saga of Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick and his dog fighting operation proved a difficult topic to tackle,” according to the Pew Talk Show Index.

  • DMNews reports, “While circulation numbers continue to fall for large metro paid dailies, free papers are stepping in to meet the needs of the younger urban demographic.”

  • Last week, Google “released a free software tool that allows Google AdWords advertisers to create their own Google Print Ads for display in newspapers,” reports Information Week.

  • Poynter Online’s Amy Gahran writes, “I figured I should check out what NYTimes.com is doing in terms of online advertising, now that they’ve finally let go of the subscriber-wall model. The answer — at least from a quick perusal — was disappointing. NYTimes.com seems to still be relying mainly on large, generic banner ads that are mostly irrelevant to page content.”

  • Check out Public Eye’s Matthew Felling’s take on Dan Rather’s lawsuit against CBS/Viacom.

  • C-SPAN announced the re-design of www.campaignnetwork.org, the political network of record’s website specializing in Campaign 2008.

  • Qorvis’s Quin Hillyer has some fun with a “Fact Check” story in the Washington Post.

  • Don’t miss the upcoming deadlines for the National Press Foundation’s annual awards entries. Check out details here.

  • “During the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference, federal shield laws will be debated during a panel discussion. Serving on the panel are Randall Eliason, a professor from American University; Eve Burton, general counsel for Hearst Corp; Jim Taricani, a reporter at WJAR who was held in contempt of court, and Bruce Sanford, an attorney for Baker Hostetler. Mike Walter, an anchor with WUSA will moderate the panel. The event will take place at 10 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Ticonderoga room.” For more info, click here.
  • B&C reports, “The endorsement of stars like Oprah Winfrey, Jon Stewart or even Tiger Woods would not translate to any more votes and — somewhat curiously in the case of Stewart, Woods and several others — could actually hurt their chances.”

  • Asbury Park Press reports, “Technology threatens to replace traditional news sources with independent Web sites and blogs, making news gathering more democratic but raising questions about the veracity of stories, Myron Kandel, founding editor of CNN Financial News, said Thursday.”

  • New York Times reports, Michael Arrington, founder and (strong) voice of Techcrunch, an influential tech-centric blog about startups, is moving over to share his pulpit.
    Willingly. Starting Wednesday, Techcrunch will be co-edited by Erick Schonfeld, formerly an editor-at-large and blogger for the erstwhile Business 2.0 and a senior writer at Fortune Magazine.”

  • RCN announced in a release, “the company won its second consecutive Thoth Award for Investor Relations at the Public
    Relations Society of America National Capital Chapter’s 39th annual Thoth Awards Dinner at the National Press Club.”

  • John F. Sturm, president and chief executive officer of the Newspaper Association of America, writes in the Seattle Times, “Those who continue to support the 30-year-old ban on cross-ownership of newspapers and broadcast stations in the same market are living in a curious time warp — where a community’s communications consisted of a newspaper and, at best, a handful of local television and radio stations.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Federal Communications Commission members got an earful Thursday night in Chicago, the fifth of six public hearings around the country on its media-ownership rules. Much of the crowd at Rainbow/PUSH Coalition national headquarters applauded whenever panelists and speakers from the community called for less consolidation of media ownership and more minority representation on and as owners of broadcast outlets.”

  • A tipster tells us, “HD history that almost wasn’t The Presidential address to the nation made a little history when it was shot and fed out in High Definition for the first time. But about 5 minutes into the speech, NBC, the network pool (and all the other networks) lost transmission of the HD signal. They immediately replaced it with the standard definition signal, but when it came to the refeed the HD version to the networks later on, it turned out nobody had recorded it. The transmission had been lost somewhere between the White House and the NBC Washington Bureau, and what’s even worse, NBC staff at the White House hadn’t recorded it. Enter struggling HD outfit HDNews. The 24 hour national news network broadcast entirely in HD and available on Dish Network and several cable systems in the northeast. They had subscribed to the pool feed and instead of going to NBC to receive the signal, went to the White House and plugged into NBC’s White House pool drop instead. This week NBC contacted the HDNews Washington Bureau, and they were able to provide a copy to NBC and the other networks that had subscribed the Presidential HD pool speech. And thus, saving September 13th 2007 as the first Presidential Address to the nation in High Definition.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “With $12.6 billion, Anne Cox Chambers of Cox Enterprises fame is the richest American whose fortune is tied to the media industry, but that’s only if you don’t count the Internet as ‘media.’”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “When the Democratic-led Congress started debating a big Food and Drug Administration bill earlier this year, pharmaceutical companies worried that it would sharply restrict one of their most powerful sales-boosting tools — drug ads. But in the final bill, which passed the House overwhelmingly on Wednesday and the Senate last night, such marketing is largely spared. One major reason: the drug industry found powerful allies among media and advertising firms who were determined to protect one of their biggest and fastest-growing advertising categories.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable television service, and 10 other cable television providers were sued over claims their bundling of channels forces consumers to pay for services they don’t want.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “This just in, courtesy of our Anglophile-eyed British colleague, program coordinator Jacqueline Davies: Hypens are history, at least for 16,000 words deemed hyphen unworthy.”

  • “ABC is reaching beyond its Web site and iTunes with a deal to carry its prime-time shows on AOL Video. The agreement marks the first time ABC has offered its shows on an online portal. The deal also calls for ABC to syndicate its player to AOL Video,” reports TV Week.

  • EMDashes writes, “About that piece in the Voice that’s been getting a lot of press: good for them for creating something so timely and buzzworthy, and I’m wholly sincere; for many years, I never missed a copy of the paper. … Unfortunately, I can’t agree with Rose Jacobs here. It’s certainly true that the PEN World Voices Festival is an excellent series; I saw how fulfilling the events were (and how hard the small staff works) when I was at PEN, and it’s an inspiring program. But Jacobs’s accounts of two previous New Yorker Festival events, both of which I also attended — John Updike and David Remnick, in 2005, and Milos Forman and David Denby, in 2006 — puzzle me.”

  • Local freelance writer Kelly Dinardo makes Page Six!

  • The Orlando Sentinel editors try a Facebook experiment.

  • TV Week reports, “Electronic Local People Meters (LPMs) are set to be installed in 38 additional markets by 2011, the Nielsen Co. announced.”

  • Check out the latest installment of Mediabistro’s J-School Confidential.

  • Rachel Sklar writes, “Dan Rather Has Nothing To Lose”

  • Jay Rosen writes, “If I were to underline one thing about Dan Rather’s $70 million suit against CBS, it’s the theatricality of it, which is the key to understanding Rather himself.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “PBS seemed to be making news this week rather than just broadcasting it. The news revolves around two debates, officially called “forums,” for 2008 presidential candidates — one in Iowa for Democrats and one in Maryland for Republicans. Both were scheduled months ago, are being broadcast on PBS, and are taking place within days. And both, in odd and contrasting ways, have become controversial.”

  • ’60 Minutes’ clocks in for its 40th season

  • Lloyd Grove has an interview with Barry Diller, “The internet mogul speaks his mind on videogames, newspapers, and his own style of management.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ICN says moveon.org’s use of ‘Gen. Betray us’ was not original; that it may have come from a Countdown with Keith Olbermann broadcast on August 16.”

  • TV Week reports, “Cox Communications on Wednesday announced it will be adding four high-definition networks from Discovery Communications. High def simulcasts of Discovery Channel, TLC, Animal Planet and the Science Channel will be rolled out on a market-by-market basis, the company said. Customers will be able to see such shows as ‘Deadliest Catch,’ ‘Dirty Jobs’ and ‘Meerkat Manor.’”

  • Beltway Blogroll writes, “When Arianna Huffington and Jay Rosen announced their plan for OffTheBus early this year, I was excited by the prospect of a network of citizen journalists covering the 2008 presidential campaign. I even pondered the idea of volunteering as an OffTheBus professional mentor to the budding reporters. The more developments I see at OffTheBus, however, the more skeptical I become about whether it can fulfill its promise of offering ‘a wide variety of voices and perspectives” on the 2008 campaign.’

  • E&P reports, “After completing a two-year conversion of its 85 daily papers from 52-inch web size to 48-inch, Gannett Co. Inc. is conducting a national review for a possible second size cut to 44-inch web.”

  • New York Observer reports, “Blaise Zerega, Portfolio’s managing editor will be taking over the job of deputy editor–a position left vacant since the high-profile firing of Jim Impoco last month. Also, New Yorker managing editor Jacob Lewis will be joining Portfolio to fill Mr. Zerega’s role.”

  • Mary Mapes writes, “Gee, just when I was all excited about Wednesday’s big premiere of the new CBS cultural triumph Kid Nation, my old friend Dan Rather went and blew my whole evening out of the water by filing a massive lawsuit against the company. Here we go again.”

  • Stuart Taylor offers an apology “to MSNBC talk-show host Joe Scarborough and to The Post for the cutting description of Mr. Scarborough in a Sept. 7 op-ed, ‘Guilty in the Duke Case,’ by me and KC Johnson about the Duke lacrosse case. I wrote that description on the basis of transcripts of “Scarborough Country” programs early in the Duke case. My attention has since been drawn to transcripts of several subsequent programs, and I realize that Mr. Scarborough was one of the handful of journalists who deserve credit for calling attention early in the case to the emerging evidence of innocence.”

  • Brendan Nyhan writes, “Believe it or not: the AP has released a piece by Ron Fournier titled ‘Analysis: Is Edwards Real or a Phony?’ Talk about parroting Republican talking points! Can we expect an equivalent approach to covering the GOP candidates? (‘Giuliani: Sane or Crazy?’) Also, there’s an obvious epistemological problem here — Fournier can’t resolve whether Edwards is “real” or a “phony,” nor can anyone else. And this sort of character-focused coverage diverts attention from issues that Fournier can effectively address such as, well, policy.”

  • CJR writes about the Fournier piece, “one thing a political attack does need to work—whether it’s right or wrong—is for reporters to give it a thorough airing, to ensure that it gets proper traction with voters. Which is what Fournier does with today’s piece, headlined: ‘Analysis: Is Edwards Real or a Phony?’”

  • Harry Jaffe writes, “Now the Washington Post has come up with a surefire way to make its employees know they are valued cogs in the wheel of news production. Gary Corso, director of administration and operating services at the paper of Watergate fame, this week authored the following memo: ‘The Northwest cafeteria Coffee Cart is offering Post managers an opportunity to reward their employees with tickets for either a free box of popcorn or a free 16-ounce regular coffee. Tickets must be purchased in sheets of ten and can only be redeemed at the Northwest Coffee cart. The price is $11.00 for ten popcorn tickets and $15.50 for ten 16 oz. regular coffee tickets. (Taxes are included)’”

  • Real Clear Politics launched RealClearPolitics Fantasy ’08, “a market-based game for the 2008 election powered by Intrade.”

  • City Paper’s Erik Wemple writes, “Two reporters took on Vice President Dick Cheney. One of them will stay on the case.”

  • Bob and Lee Woodruff know how to draw a crowd. The boldface names will be out in full force Nov. 7 in New York City for the “Stand up for Heroes” gala. The event is a partnership between the New York Comedy Festival and the Bob Woodruff Family Fund,” reports TVNewser.

  • “FactCheck.org, the St. Petersburg Times, and the Washington Post smoke out the political BS,” writes Slate’s Jack Shafer.

  • “The Knight News Challenge is offering up to $5 MILLION for innovative ideas using digital technology to revolutionize community news!”

  • CyberSoc writes, “I started a post about social bookmarking but ended up writing about the apparent disappearance of technorati from the Washington Post’s article pages”

  • Rachel Sklar writes, “Color us not-surprised: Brian Stelter has…a blog! About TV!” Check out TV Decoder here.

    Jobs

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a paid intern.

  • The Aspen Institute is looking for a Deputy Dir of Communications and Public Affairs.

  • The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is looking for a Senior Manager, New Media Program.

  • National Association of Manufacturers is looking for a Graphic Designer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a Webmaster.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a Copy editor/page designer.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Westminster Reporter.

  • The Salisbury Daily Times is looking for a Page Designer/Copy Editor.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • C-SPAN is looking for an Assignment/Logistics Editor and a Washington Journal Producer.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Associate Producer for AAM TV.

  • The RAND Corporation is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Committees Reporter, a Video Producer, CQ Politics and a User Interface Designer & Developer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Reporter.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • ASCRS is seeking a Special Projects Editor.

  • American Chemical Society is looking for a Web Production Associate.

  • Reading Is Fundamental is looking for a Manager, Media Relations.

  • Bisnow on Business is looking for a Tech Reporter/Writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext