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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Engel’

Morning Reading List, 12.18.08

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Morning Reading List, 03.21.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you will watch NCAA basketball this weekend.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Judy Lewis its new advertising manager. The announcement was made by Elizabeth Marincola, president and publisher of Science News.”

  • An AARP release announced, “AARP, the largest membership organization for people 50+, today announced that renowned travel expert Peter Greenberg has signed on to become AARP’s new travel editor at large.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • My Ten Point Plan to Reinvent The Newspaper Business.” By Ted Leonsis.

  • We’ve been asked a few Politico-related questions lately, so here are the answers: Although their chats have basically disappeared lately, the have not been permanently cancelled and may resume some day in the future. As for why some of the columns have disappeared from the home page as a result of the redesign, it’s not because they’re cancelled but rather they’ve been moved to different parts of the website because they aren’t updated as frequently.

  • Before the Chronicle’s Editor at Large, Phil Bronstein, interviewed noted journalist Carl Bernstein, at San Francisco’s Jewish Community Center they hooked up backstage for a lively conversation about current events.

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “On the eve of Barack Obama’s major speech on race and politics, most Americans said they had heard at least a little about the videos showing the Rev. Jeremiah Wright making racially-charged statements to his Chicago congregation. At the time of the survey, however, there was greater public awareness of other recent campaign events. More Americans said they had heard a lot about Geraldine Ferraro’s statements asserting that Obama’s race has been a major advantage in his campaign than had heard about videos of Wright preaching to his congregation.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “As newspapers across America shrink in readership, page count and format, the price of the paper they are printed on has been rising, piling yet another worry onto the industry.”

  • Reuters reports, “Several top U.S. newspaper publishers said on Thursday they will devote online advertising space to a new network that wants to make it easier to place ads on hundreds of newspapers’ Web sites at a time.”

  • Reuters reports, “Media General Inc urged shareholders on Wednesday to reject board candidates proposed by dissident investor Harbinger Capital Partners, saying the nominees are not good enough to guide the newspaper and television company.”

  • The Washington Independent reports, “How Two Leading Journalists Played the Public to Help Bush Sell His War”

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    TV

  • Schieffer to Face the Nation a Bit Longer

  • Some readers didn’t like Gwen Ifill’s interview with Sen. Obama.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, March 16, 2008, ABC News’ ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. This is the 15th time this season ‘This Week’ beat ‘Face’ in Total Viewers and the 13th time beating CBS among the key Adults 25-54 demo”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 16, 2008 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.218 million total viewers”

  • A NBC release announced, “NBC News Middle East Correspondent and
    Beirut Bureau Chief Richard Engel has been named the 2007 winner of the Medill Medal for Courage in Journalism. Engel was chosen for this outstanding work in MSNBC’s ‘War Zone Diary.’ The one-hour documentary, which was compiled from Engel’s video diary, gives a rare and intimate account of the everyday realties of covering the war in Iraq.”

  • Portfolio reports, “The commission schedules a second public hearing on network neutrality after a cable company stacked the first one.”

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News, the National Constitution Center and WPVI-TV will host a Democratic Presidential Candidate debate in Philadelphia on Wednesday, April 16th. The live 90-minute debate, moderated by ABC News anchors Charles Gibson and George Stephanopoulos, will air from 8-10 PM ET/PT on the ABC Television Network. The debate between Senators Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama will be held at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. The format of the debate and information about media credentialing will be announced at a later date.”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “During Barack Obama’s media blitz last Friday, in which he started here on the Huffington Post and continued to hit the three cable news stations, he spoke with MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann about the controversial statements of his former paster, Jeremiah Wright. Last night, David Letterman presented the ‘Barack Obama ‘Uh’ Count,’ in which they parsed his appearance with Olbermann and counted the verbal pauses of the candidate often praised for his eloquence.” Watch it here.

  • AdAge.com reports, “Broadcast-network TV’s place in the media landscape is changing, acknowledged NBC Universal CEO Jeff Zucker this morning, and as such, consumers can probably expect less scripted fare, but more shows aimed at reaching broad swaths of audience.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “NBC Universal plans to sell owned-and-operated television stations in Miami and Hartford, Conn. to place more emphasis on its outlets in the top 10 U.S. markets, according to an internal memo sent to employees Wednesday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Sundance Channel, the cable network built around Robert Redford’s annual film festival, is for sale and Cablevision Systems Corp. may be the eventual buyer, according to Pali Research.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Confusion surrounded the buyout of Clear Channel Communications Inc. yesterday amid escalating tensions between the private-equity companies behind the deal and the banks that have agreed to finance it. As a key deadline approached, it was unclear whether the deal would close, some 16 months after it was announced. These doubts prompted a nearly 9% drop in Clear Channel’s shares to $32.60, below the $39.20 per share Thomas H. Lee and Bain Capital LLC agreed to pay for the company in May, suggesting the market is betting the transaction won’t close. If the deal isn’t completed by the end of a so-called marketing period, which ends next week, Clear Channel could turn to the courts to force the private-equity concerns and the banks to finish the deal.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Okay, rule #1 for cable news anchors, don’t talk to the press, even blogs, especially blogs, unless your boss or PR knows about it. Or, if you’re gonna do it, don’t use your name! FNC’s Ainsley Earhardt learned that the hard way. We hear she was given a talking to this morning after she talked to a blogger, on more than one occasion, about her fill-in gig on Fox & Friends Weekend. A TVNewser reader tipped us off to the existence of the blog Carpe Diem late yesterday.”

  • A reader tells us, “Marvin Kalb, still very much alive, was the last network news hire of Edward R. Murrow. (At least so he said at one of his Newseum sit-downs).”

  • Hotline’s On Call reports, “ABC News sent out its official announcement for the 4/16 Dem debate in Philly. However, 4/16 has another meaning for a lot of Washingtonians — it’s the night of the annual Radio and TV Correspondents Dinner. The dinner is considered the secondest biggest event of the Washington ‘prom season’ — right after the White House Correspondents Dinner — and typically features all the big-name DC media types. An ABC spokesperson said that date was chosen because it was the night that worked in the candidates’ schedules. No word yet on how much of ABC presence there will be at the dinner. George Stephanopoulos is listed as co-moderator of the debate, along with Charles Gibson.”

  • Huffington Post presents,Richard Engel’s Emotional Return To The Palestine Hotel: ‘This Is Where My Colleagues Were Killed’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Economist reports, “Social networking will become a ubiquitous feature of online life. That does not mean it is a business”

  • Venture Beat reports, “Online ad network Federated Media, which serves Web sites like VentureBeat and hundreds of others with ads it gets from large companies, is close to raising a $30 million round at a $200 million pre-money valuation, according to a well-placed source.”

  • DCist reports, “The literary Web site Hitotoki (pronounced hee toe toe key) is looking to launch a D.C. edition, but the editorial staff is facing a small problem — they need content. … If you’re interested in writing for Hitotoki, download a submission form or check out the site’s temporary D.C. page. Stories should be 200-500 words long, focus on a single moment in a specific place and authored by someone who either lives in or has visited the city.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Why the National Magazine Awards are a crock

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The Financial Times is to give its FT Wealth supplement an upmarket relaunch to target the interests of the ‘very wealthy’ global citizens. Published quarterly, the tabloid will now appear as a magazine in a ‘unique’ format.”

  • Mr. Magazine names “the 30 most notable launches of 2007″

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Jezebel reports, “Remember Bush Administration spokespretty Dana Perino and that tough time she had remembering just what the Cuban missile crisis was? Well the other day she had another little missile crisis on Fox News Sunday, which is to say, she explained, she doesn’t really know what a missile is sorta, because, um, totes, kthanxbai, she was born a girl.”

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    JOBS

  • The Gazette is looking for a Reporter, a Business Writer and a Copy Editor.

  • The Catholic Review is looking for a Seasoned Staff Writer.

  • The Free Lance-Star Publishing Companies are looking for a Photojournalist.

  • The Army Times Publishing Company is looking for a News Editor for Marine Corps Times.

  • Condé Nast Publications is looking for a Brides.com Online & Local Print Account Executive.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Editor.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for an Editor-Page layout/design.

  • Dow Jones & Company is looking for a Reporting Assistant.

  • Need To Know News is looking for a Broadcast Reporter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.27.07

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    Good morning Washington.

  • You are not encouraging your kids to follow in your journalism footsteps.

    Television

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of November 12, 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54.”

  • The Carville-Matalin Joke Is on Us

  • New York Magazine reports,Dan Rather’s Last Big Story Is Himself”

  • Brokaw disses Limbaugh.

  • New York Times reports, “The head of the Federal Communications Commission is struggling to find enough support from a majority of the agency’s commissioners to regulate cable television companies more tightly.”

  • Looking into Fred Thompson’s claim against Fox News, The Huffington Post reports, “Evidence actually suggests a strong relationship between the Tennessean and the network that reports so that you can decide.”

  • The Street reports, “For investors, new media ownership rules proposed by the Federal Communications Commission are a sign that TV companies have little prayer of getting bigger anytime soon.”

  • FOX News Channel will carry a live feed of the Des Moines, Iowa Democrat and Republican debates hosted by Iowa Public Television and the Des Moines Register. Both debates will air on FNC at 2:00 p.m. EST with the Republican debate on Wednesday, Dec. 12th and the Democratic debate on Thursday, December 13th.

  • TVNewser reported last week, “MSNBC’s Tucker Carlson, a Dancing with the Stars contestant last year, made a return appearance on tonight’s show. In a spoof skit, Carlson — along with fellow ex-contestants Lisa Rinna, Harry Hamlin, and Laila Ali – check into ‘dance rehab’ (who knew?) in Malibu because they ‘haven’t been able to let go of being on Dancing With the Stars.’”

  • This Wednesday, the Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington will present Michael Jack, President and General Manager of WRC-TV the Silver Medal Award at a luncheon event at the Willard Hotel.

  • “Not only was Keith Olbermann doing his normal Sunday night gig on NBC’s Football Night in America, he also lent his voice to two popular Fox sitcoms,” TVNewser reports.

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “When Tom Brokaw, an old-time mainstream media figure in his own right, says he thinks print newspapers won’t be around in 10 years, that’s probably not a good sign for the industry.”

  • CNN’s Christiane Amanpour explains the safari-jacket look that has become her signature style.

  • Washington Post reports,George W. Hughes, 67, a retired broadcast engineer with ABC News and a dedicated model-train enthusiast, died Nov. 16 of respiratory failure at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington County. He was a resident of South Riding.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News correspondent Lara Logan and her team won the Association of International Broadcasters’ award for ‘Clearest Coverage of a Single News Event.’”

  • “mediabistro.com’s series So What Do You Do? features NBC News’ Middle East correspondent Richard Engel.”

  • Thompson Slams Fox News While On Fox News

    Radio

  • Washington City Paper’s Dave McKenna explores, “The decline of Sam Huff and Redskins radio”

    Online Media

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News and Facebook have launched a partnership focused on the 2008 presidential election. In this first of its kind collaboration, Facebook will feature an application that will provide its 56 million active users with tools for supporting candidates and discussing the campaign on Facebook combined with ABC News political content and information, including the latest news from the campaign trail.”

  • Slate reports, “You know it’s 2007 when a candidate, in this case Mike Huckabee, holds a bifurcated conference call, first with reporters, then with bloggers. I listened in on both calls to see what the differences were. The reporters’ questions were much more concise and polished. But the bloggers’ questions were more substantive by a long shot.”

  • Sky News reports, “The man behind one of the world’s most influential news websites says there’s everything to play for in the battle to win the trust of TV viewers, newspaper readers and web users — and, he says, it won’t all go the way of the big corporations. Matt Drudge of www.drudgereport.com was speaking to Sky News in his first interview for four years.”

    Newspapers

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes,Joan Walsh, editor-in-chief of Salon.com, posted a column Monday asking me to get involved in the recent ‘brawl’ on the op-ed page of The Times over the meaning of Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign visit to Philadelphia, Miss., where he told a mostly-white crowd, ‘I believe in states’ rights.’ Was it a coded appeal to Southern whites to vote Republican because Reagan and his party would side with them against efforts by blacks to achieve equal rights, as liberal columnists Paul Krugman and Bob Herbert contended?”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “The Washington Post stands accused this week of jumping the gun for published information embargoed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. The Post story, by Johannesburg correspondent Craig Timberg, scooped the competition by reporting the United Nations’ plans this week to announce that it was drastically cutting its estimate of the size of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic from about 40 million to about 33 million. The Post published the story to the Web on Nov. 19, and led with the story in its Nov. 20 print edition.”

  • “While the national news media focused heavily on the 2008 presidential campaign last week, the public divided its interest between the campaign and the Iraq war. More than one-fifth of the national newshole (21%) was devoted to the presidential campaign, while news about the war — including the situation in Iraq, returning U.S. troops and the Iraq policy debate — drew only about half as much coverage,” according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

  • The Independent reports, “Rupert Murdoch has admitted to a parliamentary inquiry that he has ‘editorial control’ over which party The Sun and News of the World back in a general election and what line the papers take on Europe.”

  • Reuters reports, “The U.S. media industry is on the brink of a second downturn in a decade, one that could accelerate the divisions between fast-growing targeted advertising and traditional formats aimed at mass audiences.”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is rumoured to be in takeover talks with LinkedIn, the professional networking site founded by Reid Hoffman.”

  • New York Times reports, “The curious relationship between Hillary Rodham Clinton, presidential candidate, and Rupert Murdoch, media baron, flashed briefly before the eyes of Iowans on Saturday night during a Clinton campaign event.”

  • Washington Post reports,Juanita Daigle of Baton Rouge is listed as one of the thousands of people who sent e-mails to the Federal Communications Commission opposing the proposed merger between the satellite radio networks XM and Sirius. But Daigle said she never sent an e-mail and is distressed that anyone would think she did. ‘How did they get my name?’ she asked. ‘I don’t want someone using my name for something I don’t even know about.’ A check by The Washington Post of 60 people whose names were attached to identical, anti-merger e-mails instigated by the National Association of Broadcasters, a major opponent of the merger, produced mostly unanswered phone calls and recordings saying the phones were disconnected. Of the 10 people reached, nine said they never sent anything to the FCC, and only one said she remembered filling out something about Sirius but did not recall taking a position on a merger.”

  • “Fifty three percent of 300 media, advertising and entertainment executives believe writers should continue to ‘hold out for everything they want,’ with 47 percent voting for them to ‘pick up their pencils and get back to work.’ According to the poll conducted at www.jackmyers.com, a slight majority of a group that should be expected to be more sympathetic to the networks and studios express support for the Writers Guild of America.”

  • Vote now for the I Want Media 2007 Media Person of the Year.

  • Everything you have always wanted to know about André Wells’ style is right here.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “New York Daily News publisher Mort Zuckerman has told a House of Lords committee that new online business models for newspapers are just substituing ‘pennies for dollars’.”

  • DMNews reports, “The Wall Street Journal Europe has signed an agreement with The Jerusalem Post, putting the Post in charge of all distribution, printing, sales and marketing for WSJE in Israel.”

  • PRWeek reports, “The Economist has kicked off an online debate series to extend its brand to the social-media sphere. The first debate series, tackling education, launched last month. The second series is set for December.”

  • 23/6 reports, “With George W. Bush’s hapless former press secretary Scott McClellan issuing bleats of blame about having been tricked into lying to the press about the Plame affair, Paul Slansky looks back at some other White House mouthpieces.”

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “In liberal Democratic circles, the debate over Social Security has taken a dangerous ‘don’t worry, be happy’ turn. … One prominent practitioner of this misguided approach is New York Times columnist Paul Krugman.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Back in August, Dow Jones and News Corp announced the names of five elderly appointees to the board that will oversee the editorial independence of The Wall Street Journal—a body established in response to Rupert Murdoch’s takeover. A month later, one of those appointees, former Republican Congresswoman Jennifer Dunn, died. The group hadn’t even met, and it was already down one.”

  • The City Paper has now launched a video component.

  • A release announced, “The Society of Professional Journalists is pleased to announce that it is now accepting entries for the Sigma Delta Chi Awards, which honor excellence in professional journalism in 48 categories, covering print, radio, television, newsletters, photography, online and research.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “The proposed merger between XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. looked dead on arrival back in February, with federal regulators appearing unlikely to give their approval of the $5 billion merger. Nine months later, Wall Street is picking up a different signal: that the deal might somehow pass muster”

  • Jonathan Miller has reappeared on the Internet scene, this time as a member of the board of directors for online search ad management startup, Clickable. Miller’s return comes after a rancorous departure from Time Warner, where he served as CEO of AOL. His landing pad, called Clickable, recently debuted their technology at the TechCrunch 40 conference in September.”

  • Politico reports, “On the evening of Nov. 13, the Wall Street Journal’s Paul Steiger received the prestigious Fourth Estate Award from the National Press Club, in Washington D.C., following a light-hearted roast from guests such as Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie.”

  • Clinton Will Honor CBS Picket Line If Writers Strike

  • Wall Street Journal reports,Janet Grimley had some hard-won investment wisdom to share with colleagues at a gathering earlier this fall of the American Association of Sunday and Feature editors in Savannah, Ga. ‘Look at your comics pages like a stock portfolio,’ advised Ms. Grimley, an assistant managing editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. ‘Diversify. You need to have some risky comics,’ for instance the slightly subversive observational strip ‘F Minus,’ and ‘some safe purchases like the old favorites.’ Such ‘safe purchases’ would include blue chips like ‘Blondie,’ ‘Beetle Bailey,’ ‘Dennis the Menace’ and ‘Hagar the Horrible.’”

  • The Daily Princetonian reports, “In an age where print magazines are increasingly giving way to online journalism, The New Yorker is more important than ever, editor-in-chief David Remnick ’81 told a packed audience of senior citizens, faculty members and students.”

    Jobs

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. is looking for an Editor and a Reporter.

  • Transport Topics Publishing Group is looking for a staff Reporter.

  • American University is looking for a Communications Career Advisor.

  • Danville Register & Bee is seeking a sports reporter/page designer.

  • Observatory Group, LLC is looking for a ECB Analyst.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.20.07

  • Picking the next president is easier than picking the NCAA College Basketball Champ.

  • NPR Files For Streaming-Royalty Rehearing

  • Michael Murphy joins Fox News Channel’s Washington bureau as the Senior Manager of Media Relations. He was formerly an account supervisor at Ketchum Public Relations in DC.

  • Congrats to The Hill for scoring some front-page love on last night’s Colbert Report.

  • Crawling through commercials at MSNBC

  • Dear Author.com reports that Sterling Publishing’s Union Square Press imprint will be putting out a book titled “The United States v. I. Lewis Libby” in April. “The book will be edited by investigative journalist Murray Waas of the National Journal.”

  • Sometimes you just can’t win…First, they’re a “GOP Shrill” then “It’s Unanimous: All Dem-Friendly Stories This Morning at The Politico.”

  • From a tipster: “Just noticing that ABC has item about 1984 ad, something reported in the Washington Times a week ago.”

  • Huh? What is this website all about?

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “Fifteen percent of stories on the network evening news in each of the last two years were reported by minorities, an all-time high that is more than double the level of 1990.” Women reported 28 percent of the pieces, just under the high-water mark of 29 percent set in 2002.

  • Is washingtonpost.com “spraying bullets“?

  • From a tipster: “There’s a new Jeff on K Street. Patch beats Birnbaum to the (same) story … by six days. Who’s editing In The Loop?! “Retailers, Banks Duke It Out Over Transaction Fees” – Jeff Patch, The Politico (March 14, 2007) “Retailers, Credit Card Companies Quibble Over Footing The Bill” – Jeffrey H. Birnbaum, The Washington Post (March 20, 2007) )”

  • The AP reports that “about one-third of the people living in the national’s capital are functionally illiterate, compared with about one-fifth nationally, according to a report on the District of Columbia.”

  • Cathy Seipp’s daughter, Maia, informs Seipp’s blog readers of her current condition.

  • CBS Leans On Sources & ‘Our Partners At Politico.com’ To Say Gonzales Is A Goner

  • Roll Call made its own March Madness fun, matching each school in the NCAA tourney with its Representative. They will fill in the winners as the tournament progresses.

  • Wolf Blitzer drives himself to work!

  • E&P reports that despite the toll the Iraq War is taking on papers, “top news outfits, from The New York Times to Associated Press, remain committed to covering the war, with no immediate plans for cutbacks.”

  • If FNC & CBC Partner For Debates… Will We See A ‘Massive Grass-Roots Backlash?‘”

  • The AP has a piece on NBC and ABC Iraq correspondents Richard Engel and Terry McCarthy, both of whom have been covering the war since the beginning. “This week their respective networks will be showcasing their work, which has included dodging bullets and escaping carjackings while trying to hold onto a personal life at home.” (via Eat the Press)

  • Over the weekend, Slate points out that The Post apparently isn’t much fond of firearms. In a recent piece by Paul Duggan on the overturned ban on handguns, there are phrases like “lawsuit that gutted the District’s tough gun-control statute,” “recruited a group of strangers to sue the city and bankrolled their successful litigation” and even the headline refers to the “lawyer who wiped out [the] D.C. gun ban.”

  • Who will win the “I’m Not A Political Genius But I Play One On TV” award?

  • Washington Whispers reports that Scott McClellan “is shopping a book proposal around and hopes to land a deal this month.” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is also writing a book on his roots and his start in Washington. And… former Sen. Fred Thompson is planning more fundraisers for convicted perjurer Lewis “Scooter” Libby. “Friends say it will help him show conservatives that he not only believes in the Bush team but is not a fair-weather friend.”

  • National Journal’s Andrew Noyes reports that C-SPAN “recently decided after some haranguing to expand access to its repository of footage from congressional hearings, federal agency briefings, and White House events.”

  • Washington Whispers also reports, “White House spokesman Tony Snow, takes a center-stage role in PBS’s two-hour special, The Boomer Century 1946–2046, on March 28. It will show three pics of Snow: as a kid, playing his rock flute, and dressed up as the prez’s spokesman.”

  • In DCist’s opinion, 94.7 “the Globe” is “not half bad.”

  • Acorn Media Group, “a leading independent global media company,” announced in a release that Miguel Penella is taking over as the new Chief Executive Officer effective April 1.

  • TVNewser reports that David Bloom’s wife, Melanie Bloom, spoke to MSNBC’s Chip Reid yesterday about her husband’s work and his untimely death.

  • A reader offers his take on the hot (or lack there of) D.C. journos:
      That’s somewhat ridiculous! There are literally thousands of working journalists in the D.C. area. To assume that not one of them — I’m referring to girls here, since that’s my particular focus — isn’t “hot” is just a ridiculous generalization. The short answer is “yes.” In fact, there are “hot,” or attractive, women at small local papers in the suburbs, at papers in the Baltimore area, at papers, radio stations, television stations and internet sites throughout the D.C. area, and at many of the bureaus of the larger national publications in those offices at the National Press Building. There are attractive women at newsletters, publishers, p.r. firms, lobbying firms, marketing firms, and whatever else type of journalism office you can name. All you need to do is head out to social events (not even the high-end glitzy ones — those are bogus) such as happy hours, get-togethers, parties and Press Club functions, and you’ll see that there are literally plenty of attractive single women in journalism throughout the Baltimore and D.C. metropolitan areas.

  • Gawker’s “ThemTube: Spinning Tucker’s Bow Tie

  • In addition to losing some comics from the Post, DCist reports, “There’ll be a few other changes, too, including the removal of some panel cartoons in favor of others and the tossing-in of six-days-a-week Scrabble Gram and Stickelers puzzles.”

  • DCeiver exposes the Washington Post’s sports bias.

  • Sunday Talk Show Preview

  • Meet The Press: Tony Snow, Sen. Jack Reed, Sen. Chuck Hagel, Richard Engel

  • Face The Nation: Sens.Joe Biden and Dick Lugar .

  • This Week: Former Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife Ann Romney
    Roundtable: George Will, Fareed Zakaria and Katrina vanden Heuvel
    Plus, actor Michael Douglas.

  • Fox News Sunday: Former Speaker Newt Gingrich, Sen. Carl Levin and Washington Wizards coach Eddie Jordan.

  • Late Edition: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Gov. Bill Richardson, former Lieutenant Governor Michael Steele and entertainer/magician Penn Jillette.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Admiral Thad Allen, Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard. Patricia Kime of the Navy Times and John Robinson of the Defense Daily participate with C-SPAN in the questioning. Sen. Kent Conrad. Guest reporters include the Washington Post’s Lori Montgomery and Cox’s Marilyn Geewax.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Washington Post’s Bob Woodward , NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, New York Time’s David Brooks and CBS’s Gloria Borger.

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