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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Siegel’

Wolf Blitzer, Robert Siegel Receive National Press Foundation Awards

CNN’s Wolf Blitzer and NPR’s Robert Siegel were honored last week by the National Press Foundation at their 31st Annual Awards Dinner at the Washington Hilton.

Blitzer received the  Sol Taishoff Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism, which recognized his “energy, encyclopedic knowledge of politics and unique ability to handle multiple story lines while continuing to inform the public.”

Siegel was given the W.M. Kiplinger Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism. He was being honored for “his insightful interviewing and calm demeanor that elevates his broadcasts.”

Other Washington journos who received awards include Mark Drajem of Bloomberg News, Maureen Groppe of Gannett’s Washington bureau, David A. Fahrenthold of WaPo, and the Boston Globe Washington bureau.

See the whole list of honorees here.

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NPR Gets David Byrne, Michael Stipe, Amb. Rice

NPR is taking the following guests to next weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner:

The List

Ambassador Susan Rice and Ian Cameron
Michael Stipe – lead singer R.E.M.
David Byrne – founding member, Talking Heads
Annie Clark – singer-songwriter, writes and records under the name St. Vincent)
Scott Z. Burns – writer/director/producer, The Bourne Ultimatum, The Informant!, An Inconvenient Truth)
Mike White – actor/writer/director, School of Rock, Nacho Libre, The Good Girl, HBO’s Enlightened)

NPR hosts and journalists attending include: Don Gonyea, National Political Correspondent; Robert Siegel and Melissa Block, hosts, All Things Considered; Michel Martin, host, Tell Me More; Guy Raz, weekend host, All Things Considered; Peter Sagal, host, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me!; Mara Liasson, National Political Correspondent; Scott Horsley, White House Correspondent; and Bob Boilen, host and creator, All Songs Considered.

NPR Personalities All Ga-Ga for Lady Gaga

In their own version of “Glee”, NPR’s radio personalities and behind-the-scenes employees have a little fun with Lady Gaga. “Stop calling, stop calling, I don’t want to think anymore,” chants Robert Siegel.

FishbowlDC Interview With NPR’s Mara Liasson

fishhead.jpg
mliasson.jpg Say hello to NPR’s Mara Liasson. She’s also a FNC contributor and appears regularly on “Fox News Sunday”, where she sits on the weekly roundtable and spars with FNC’s Brit Hume and The Weekly Standard‘s Bill Kristol. She often sides with NPR’s Juan Williams.

If you were a carbonated beverage which would you be? Seltzer.

How often do you Google yourself? Once. That was enough!

Who is your favorite working journalist? Robert Siegel, host of NPR’s “All Things Considered.”

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor (or vice versa)? You can’t fire me-I quit! (just kidding)

Do you have a favorite word? auschkaflipped

Who would you rather have dinner with – First Lady Michelle Obama or Bestselling Author and former V.P. candidate Sarah Palin? Michelle Obama.

What word do you routinely misspell? Recommend.

What’s the name of your cell phone ring? Old fashioned phone.

What swear word do you use most often? No comment.

What word or phrase do you overuse? “Heave the health care bill over the finish line” … but hopefully I will never have to say that again.

What TV show do you have to watch? None.

Where do you shop most often for your clothes? Online.

Who do you prefer for daytime talk, Dr. Phil, Oprah, Tyra or the women of The View? I clearly am a cultural ignoramus. I’ve never watched a whole show of any of them.

Pick one: Leno, Letterman or Conan? Letterman.

If you were trapped on a deserted island, which public official would you want to be trapped with and why? President Obama. He’d get us rescued fast.

Who has been your mentor? Cokie Roberts.

What’s the best advice you ever received in the course of your career? From Cokie-keep your eye on the horizon-think long term.

What and where was your first job in journalism? Reporter for the Vineyard Gazette on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts.

Read more on Liasson after the jump to find out about her embarrassing bout of seasickness…

Read more

NPR’s Michele Norris To Take Summer Off To Write Book

NPR’s Michele Norris, host of “All Things Considered,” will take this summer off to work on a book of essays about race in America. She announced this at the end of her show Friday (h/t NYO).

The book is tentatively titled “Say What?” and Norris says in an interview with the New York Observer, “People talk about race one way in public and they often- not always but often- talk about it in a different way and at a different tempo in the private sphere… And I just want to pull back the curtain a little bit.”

Norris will travel around the country this summer as research for the book, making her first stop to see and interview her family in Alabama. Her NPR co-hosts Melissa Block and Robert Siegel, as well as Madeline Brand whose show Day to Day was canceled on NPR last December, will fill in for Norris until mid-September.

Read more of this New York Observer interview here.

Morning Reading List, 03.04.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Hillary will win Ohio.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Rush and Malloy reports, “It must be exasperating to be Christopher Hitchens. Recently voted the fifth most important intellectual in the world, Hitchens was nice enough to the respected war correspondents on the panel he moderated Thursday at the IFC theater, but he eviscerated members of the audience whose comments or questions he deemed not quite up to par.”

  • The Press Gazette reports,Rupert Murdoch’s acquisition of the Wall Street Journal will not have an impact on the Financial Times because there is a ‘fundamental difference’ between the two titles, the FT Group chief executive has told analysts”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Wash Post editor says controversial piece was ‘tongue-in-cheek’”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the March 4 Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage, the Politics section and the ABC News NOW site on ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, March 4 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue until 11:00p.m., ET.”

  • A CN8 release announced, “As all eyes follow the campaign trail, tune in to CN8, The Comcast Network on Tuesday, March 4 at 9 p.m. CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special extended two-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of the pivotal primary elections in Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas and Vermont. Doyle will be joined in studio by CN8 Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief Robert Traynham; CN8 political analysts Brad Brewster, Bill Pascrell III and Steve Ayscue; and political commentator Joe Watkins, all of whom will provide viewers with an inside look at the candidates, platforms and issues impacting these states.”

  • A Bloomberg TV announced, “Bloomberg’s Peter Cook will anchor live business & the ballot coverage from Bloomberg World Headquarters in New York … Bloomberg’s Lizzie O’Leary will be with the Obama campaign, Margaret Popper with the Clinton campaign, and Hans Nichols with the McCain campaign. Bloomberg contributors Stephanie Cutter and Terry Holt provide political analysis. And Kathleen Hays talks to top Wall Street economists for their perspective.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Despite fears of a recession and a crippling writers’ strike that has left television broadcasters bleeding viewers, ad buyers and network executives say the annual ad-buying ritual known as the ‘upfront’ is likely to be stronger this year than last.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Comcast Corp. (CMCSA) has found allies in its fight to convince the Federal Communications Commission that it was doing nothing wrong when it slowed customers’ access to certain applications on its high speed Internet network.”

  • Brit Hume spoke to David Barron of The Houston Chronicle and he reflected on the election and talked about both Obama and Clinton, as well as past elections.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, the Time Warner Inc. unit trying to catch up to Yahoo! Inc. and Google Inc. in Internet traffic, plans to start at least a dozen Web sites in the next six months to attract more advertisers.”

  • The New York Review of Books writes, “Wikipedia: The Missing Manual”

  • The Times Online reports, “New York Times under fire for slow switch to online”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Jobs question as Reuters’ £8.7bn merger is agreed”

  • Blogger News Network reports,Maureen Dowd starts her New York Times column on Sunday, ‘Channeling her inner Cheney, Hillary Clinton dropped a fear bomb, as Michelle Obama might call it, implying in a new ad that if her opponent is elected, your angelic, innocent, sleeping children could die in a terrorist attack’ — a reference to her latest campaign ad (video link), which asks when the phone rings at 3 a.m. in the White House because something has happened ‘in the dangerous world,’ who do you want answering the phone? Not to be outdone, Dowd’s counterpart Frank Rich titles his column, ‘McCain Channels His Inner Hillary’ and writes that the presumptive GOP candidate ‘is emulating almost identically the suicidal Clinton campaign against Mr. Obama. He has mimicked Mrs. Clinton’s message and rhetorical style, her tone-deaf contempt for Mr. Obama’s cultural appeal, and her complete misreading of just how politically radioactive the war in Iraq remains …’ And recently within two days of each other, Boston Globe columnist Ellen Goodman and Dowd both argued that Barack Obama is channeling his inner woman. (Goodman: ‘Now we see a woman running as the fighter and a man modeling a ‘woman’s way’ of leading.’ Dowd: ‘The first serious female candidate for president was rejected by voters drawn to the more feminine management style of her male rival.’) So McCain is channeling his inner Hillary who is channeling her inner Cheney, and Obama is channeling his inner woman — which should mean that like McCain he is channeling his inner Hillary since she is the only woman in the race — but doesn’t, since Hillary is channeling her inner Cheney. Got that?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Newsweek’s Evan Thomas writes, “Is the mainstream press unbiased? No, but we aren’t ideological. What we really thrive on is conflict.”

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “New York’s senior Democratic senator, Charles Schumer, told an audience the evolution of the modern Democratic Party and its success with young voters can be traced to the party’s adaptations to the death of older news sources like the national news and weekly news magazines.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Mags Grow Online but Still Dwarfed by Web Bigs”

  • Folio’s Mark Newman writes, “Editors vs. Art Directors: They make a great team—but the editor is always right.”

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    RADIO

  • Bloomberg Radio announced, “Bloomberg Radio will begin coverage of March 4th primaries from 7pm-11pm ET tomorrow. Tom Moroney will host a special edition of Bloomberg ‘Simply Put.’ Hear Bloomberg Radio Nation wide on satellite radio: XM channel 129 or Sirius channel 130. In New York City, tune into 1130 on the AM dial”

  • An NPR release announced, “NPR News will offer live comprehensive broadcast and webcast coverage of the March 4 primaries starting at 10:00 PM (ET) with NPR newsmagazine All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel and Melissa Block as anchors. The special is slated to conclude at 11:00 PM (ET). Voters in Texas, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont will be participating in this round of primaries and the results from this critical day of primaries may determine the Democratic nominee for President.”

  • Barron’s reports, “XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) and Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) today extended their merger agreement, which had been set to expire tomorrow, to May 1. The two companies continue to wait a decision on the deal from the FCC and the Department of Justice.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Supreme Court this week may reopen for the first time in more than 30 years the debate over what qualifies as an ‘indecent’ broadcast. The media environment has changed dramatically since 1978, when the court last ruled on this issue: Today’s viewers and listeners are exposed to the more freewheeling cable TV, Internet and ‘shock jocks’ on satellite radio.”

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    BOOKS

  • New York Magazine reports, “The Hachette Book Group recently distributed hundreds of Sony Readers to its editors and publishers. ‘People are evangelical about it,’ says publisher Jonathan Karp, who has about 30 submissions on his Reader. ‘If you’re traveling, this is so much easier than lugging around manuscripts. It’s good for reading in bed, too.’ Agents selling to Hachette’s imprints are now required to e-mail their texts to acquiring editors, who download them to their Readers; paper manuscripts are no longer routinely circulated.”

  • Radar reports, “The mere mention of technology or sociology makes me want to run to The Hills and hide. Once nestled comfortably in the folds of a vapid yet soothing conversation between Heidi and Spencer at Don Antonio’s, I often forget that science even exists. It might be, however, that my aversion to expanding beyond the reaches of gossip and reality TV, makes me the ideal target audience for Clay Shirky’s excellent Here Comes Everybody, The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. All it took was peppering social-networking theory with a little blogging, Facebook, and Paris Hilton context to get me in step with the CNET crowd!”

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    JOBS

  • Atlantic Media Company is offering an Editorial Diversity Fellowship.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an Communications Specialist

  • Human Rights Campaign is looking for an Editorial & Web Content Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.25.08

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    Good morning Washington (unless you’re Jewish, in which case you’re bummed that the WHCA dinner falls on Passover). And, on this day in 1961, JFK held the first televised conference. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Maureen Dowd would take Eleanor Clift in a street fight.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Tight schedule makes NY Times endorse early

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Public interest in economic news soared last week amid continued stock market volatility and concerns about a possible recession. More than four-in-ten Americans (42%) followed news about the condition of the U.S. economy very closely and 20% listed this as the single news story they followed more closely than any other. That marks the highest level of public interest in economic news in five years. Interest was only somewhat greater during the recession of the early 1990s.”

  • The Press Gazette reports,Rupert Murdoch has become bored with Britain and his now obsessed with his ‘new toy’ the Wall Street Journal. This was the view of Andrew Neil, former editor of the Sunday Times, who told peers this today to explain why the News International tycoon was no longer ringing the editor of The Sun every day to ask what she was publishing.”

  • A release announced, “Junior Achievement today announced the inductees into its 2008 U.S. Business Hall of Fame, one of the most prestigious honors awarded for success in the business world. Junior Achievement selects inductees for their business excellence, courageous thinking and actions, vision and innovation, inspiring leadership, and philanthropy.” Among the 2008 Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame laureates is Al Neuharth, the founder of USA TODAY; Founder and former Chairman, The Freedom Forum; Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Gannett Co., Inc.

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News will broadcast President George Bush’s State of the Union address live on Monday, January 28. Coverage will begin at 9:00 p.m., ET and will also include the Democratic response. Charles Gibson will anchor ABC’s coverage from Washington, D.C. He will be joined by ‘This Week’ anchor George Stephanopoulos, Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz, and ABC News commentator George Will. Dan Bartlett, former Counselor to President Bush, will also contribute.”

  • Lindsay Czarniak and Will Thomas make Washington Life’s “Young & The Guest List.”

  • Last Call reports, “In an episode of ‘Family Guy’ that references an infamous vice presidential hunting trip, Karl Rove, Antonin Scalia and Tucker Carlson are inadvertently killed.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “New research from MindShare concludes that the writers strike, which began in November, is beginning to take a serious toll on TV viewing behavior. Almost half of those surveyed in the poll said they were spending more time online as a result of the repeat programming they have encountered because of the strike. More than 60% of viewers said their favorite shows were now in repeat mode.”

  • Eat The Press reports,Jon Stewart: ‘Oh, Bill Kristol, Are You Ever Right?’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Megan Carpentier, Greg Wasserstrom and Hunter Walker have started “The Cynic’s Party.”

  • Washington Times reports on Media CEO Roger L. Simon, the impact of the Internet on politics and the business of blogging.

  • The Bloggies are coming! The Bloggies are coming!

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “No presidential campaign would be complete without self-flagellation by the press about its overreliance on ‘horse race’ coverage. Politico honchos John F. Harris and Jim VandeHei donned the hair shirts earlier this month to compose an apology on behalf of the political press corps for pushing so many horse-race inspired ‘bogus narratives’ on readers. Among the bogus narratives cited by VandeHarris were ‘McCain is dead’ from last summer; Huckabee has no chance in Iowa; Obama is a dud—no, Obama is the bee’s knees!—and the Clinton machine will die in New Hampshire. While I appreciate the pair’s candor, self-reflection, and regret, you can no more divorce ‘horseracism’ (to pinch Brian Montopoli’s coinage) from campaign coverage than you can divorce horseracism from the coverage of horse races.”

  • A release announced, “Helium (www.Helium.com), the leader in online citizen journalism, and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, the leader in international nonprofit journalism, join forces to raise awareness on critical global issues. The partnership provides Helium members with a platform to write about issues raised by the Pulitzer Center, including international affairs that have been underreported, misreported or not reported on at all. … The partnership is the first of its kind online, and gives citizen journalists the opportunity to win an esteemed journalism award from the Pulitzer Center. Helium members can compete by writing to any of Pulitzer’s featured global crisis issues. The Center will then pick from the top-ranked articles in each category and award the winning writer with a Pulitzer Center Citizen Journalism Award.”

  • Reuters reports, “Popular video Web site YouTube.com is opening up its service to run on millions more phones which are capable of using high-speed wireless links, the company said on Thursday. YouTube, a unit of Google Inc, says it is extending its service from a handful of phones to a broader range of devices used by 100 million consumers worldwide that rely on high-speed links to stream videos to mobile screens.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “CSTV.com, a collegiate sports media division of CBS Sports, said Wednesday it entered a digital marketing partnership with USA Today, making several of CSTV’s assets available on USAToday.com.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site, WSJ.com, will keep a significant portion of its content behind its paid-subscription wall, News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Thursday. … Speculation that News Corp. would make WSJ.com a completely free site had been rife in recent months, since Mr. Murdoch had signaled he was contemplating lifting the subscription wall. Mr. Murdoch had indicated that lifting the pay wall could broaden the Journal’s online audience and boost its Web advertising revenue, offsetting any loss in subscription revenues.”

  • Check out the washingtonpost.com’s new “Buzz Map” feature. It graphically displays the most blogged about places in the D.C., Maryland and Virginia areas.

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    RADIO

  • XM’s POTUS channel cancels a Maine program.

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News will offer live, comprehensive broadcast and webcast coverage of President George W. Bush’s final State of the Union Address and the Democratic response on Monday, January 28m beginning 9:00PM (ET). The program will air on NPR member stations around the country, and can be heard online at www.NPR.org. Robert Siegel, Senior Host of the NPR newsmagazine All Things Considered, anchors the special coverage. He will be joined by NPR News correspondents, political analysts and members of Congress providing analysis of a number of key themes in the President’s address. January 29, the NPR newsmagazine Morning Edition will offer additional coverage, with post-address analysis and up-to-the-minute news from Capitol Hill.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Financial Impact Editor.

  • The Futurist magazine is looking for an Editorial/Administrative Assistant.

  • The Winchester Star is looking for a reporter.

  • Safety Net Hospitals for Pharmaceutical Access is looking for a Supervising Editor.

  • The Montgomery County Sentinel is looking for a Reporter.

  • Inside Washington Publishers is looking for Print and online reporters.

  • Legal Times is seeking an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s Caucus Day!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You are torn as to whether The New York Time’s hiring of Bill Kristol was a wise choice.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Roll Call’s Moira Bagley — a FishbowlDC hottie — is leaving the Capitol Hill newspaper to take a job at the Republican National Committee.

  • A reader tells us, “Sean Gallagher has joined the 1105 Government Information Group this week as editor of Defense Systems magazine. In that role, he will be spearheading Defense Systems magazine and Web site. He will also be managing defense coverage across 1105 Government Information Group’s publications.”

  • The AP reports, “The Federal Emergency Management Agency has hired a new director of public affairs to replace the official who was in charge during a fake news conference in October. Jonathan Thompson, most recently a deputy assistant defense secretary for public affairs, strategy and operations, will be FEMA’s new director of external affairs, FEMA Administrator R. David Paulison said in a recent memo to employees.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • USAToday reports, “If you doubt that media companies can profit from going green, look at what’s in store for 2008. Indiana Jones and Madagascar sequels will be sources of renewable box office energy for Paramount and DreamWorks (DWA). New Time Warner (TWX) CEO Jeff Bewkes will recycle his cable division into an independent unit. Rupert Murdoch will save trees by making The Wall Street Journal free online. And Discovery (DISCA) will go after more cable viewers by reprocessing the Discovery Home channel into Planet Green. At least that’s what some of Wall Street’s sharpest media analysts say.”

  • Have you played Politico’s Kingmaker yet? It’s not too late! Whoever gains the most points by March 4, 2008 wins a trip to the White House Correspondent’s Dinner, and whoever wins Iowa wins a $500 Amazon.com gift certificate.

  • CJR reports, “WSJ lacks evidence to support a sweeping, front-page claim against mortgage borrowers”

  • The Newseum and the National Archives present “Back Rooms to Ballot Boxes: Primary Reform, the People and the Press” featuring former McGovern-Fraser Commission lead researcher Ken Bode, American Conservative Union president David Keene and long-time journalist, columnist and author Jules Witcover. Frank Bond, Newseum producer and former anchor and reporter at WUSA-TV, will moderate. The event will be held Thursday, Jan. 31, 2008 at 7p.m. at the William G. McGowan Theater, The National Archives, 7th & 9th Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.

  • The AP reports, “The Post newspapers printed their final editions Monday, ending a 126-year run. However, the final editions also carried some news — their parent company will keep a remnant alive in the form of a Kentucky-oriented online site.”

  • E&P reports, “Murdoch’s ‘WSJ’ Greets New Year — With Front-Pager on Kucinich’s UFO”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Those hyper-local opinion pages in The New York Times—lamenting global warming’s toll on a Maplewood, N.J. lake, or complaining about traffic in southern Connecticut, or opposing a plan to impose tolls on the East River bridges—are now a thing of the past. Over the weekend, readers found a note in each regional edition declaring that the local op-ed sections were being eliminated starting this week.”

  • A plea from the City Paper: “Cherkis: Where the Fuck Are You? Holidays are over. It’s a New Year. I need your pitches. City Desks, District Lines, covers, and then some. Get outta bed.”

  • A Press Club release announced, “The National Press Club … will premiere its 100th anniversary documentary, ‘The National Press Club at 100: A Century of Headlines,’ at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2008, in the National Press Club ballroom.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 23, 2007 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 3.534 million total viewers.”

  • C-SPAN’s Iowa Caucus Coverage for tonight will include live coverage of the Iowa Caucus begins on with a preview program at 7pm ET and will be simulcast on both C-SPAN & C-SPAN2, for the Democratic and Republican Caucus respectively at 8 p.m.

  • PBS NewsHour has a special half hour broadcast planned for today in addition to an 11 p.m. special broadcast with Judy Woodruff, Gwen Ifill, Mark Shields, David Brooks, Margaret Warner, Amy Walter and Stuart Rothenberg.

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special ‘Super Week’ coverage of the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, as the first ballots are cast in the 2008 presidential election campaign. MSNBC will present continuing live coverage from Iowa and New Hampshire, with daily reports from correspondent David Shuster, on the ground in Iowa now. ‘Morning Joe’ will telecast live from Iowa Thursday morning and live from New Hampshire on Friday, 6-9 a.m. ET. Tucker Carlson will anchor ‘Tucker’ live from Iowa on Wednesday at 6 p.m. ET, and live from New Hampshire on Thursday and Friday with the John McCain campaign. On Thursday night, coverage of the caucuses continues with a special live ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews’ at 7 p.m. ET and a special edition of ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • Comcast announced, “CN8′s election coverage kicks-off in Iowa, Thursday, Jan. 3 at 9 p.m. and the network will remain on the campaign trail with live broadcasts and analysis from all major events leading up to the presidential election. Featured political events will include: the New Hampshire Primary; Super Tuesday; the Democratic National Convention and Republican National Convention; Presidential and Vice Presidential Debates; Election Night; and Inauguration. CN8 will also cover the primaries in each of the states in its viewership area. Event coverage will initiate from the network’s Philadelphia headquarters with on-site reporters and a live panel of analysts reacting to breaking news and key issues from across CN8′s six state-of-the-art studios along the East Coast and its dozens of remote studio locations and mobile broadcast trucks.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC announced today that Super Week has begun, continuing with their Super Tuesday theme in the lead up to the presidential elections. The Super Week will encompass tomorrow’s coverage of the Iowa caucuses and next week’s New Hampshire primary.”

  • Nikki Finke’s Deadline Hollywood Daily reports, “Hillary Clinton On Letterman Tonight; WGA Pickets Slam Huckabee & NBC”

  • The New York Post reports, “NBC may broadcast “The Biggest Loser,” but in terms of 2007 stock price performance, Time Warner ran away with that title. Of the big five entertainment conglomerates — CBS, Disney, News Corp., Time Warner and Viacom — only Viacom managed to post a share price increase this year, as uncertainty over the impact of digital delivery of content and a weakened advertising environment due to a weak economy dampened investor enthusiasm for the space. (NBC is part of General Electric and doesn’t trade on its own merits like the other companies.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Insiders tell TVNewser that contrary to speculation, MSNBC has no plans to cancel Tucker.”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Couric Newscast Lost 1.1 Million Viewers In ’07″

  • TVNewser reports, “ICN takes MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough to task for performing on stage with Mike Huckabee at a rally last night. Huckabee was a guest this morning, on Morning Joe.”

  • “Fox News Channel has announced its coverage plans for the Iowa caucuses.” TVNewser has the details.

  • The AP reports, “ABC and Fox News Channel are narrowing the field of presidential candidates invited to debates this weekend just before the New Hampshire primary, in Fox’s case infuriating supporters of Republican Rep. Ron Paul.”

  • The New York Times reports, “In the first competitive move in what may become an A-list booking-war blitz, David Letterman has landed the comedian and film star Robin Williams as the first guest when ‘The Late Show’ returns to CBS television Wednesday night.”

  • The AP reports, “The network that burst into public consciousness with the O.J. Simpson trial and other big-name courtroom dramas in the 1990s becomes part of television history Tuesday, renamed truTV to emphasize its prime-time action programming.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Network Anchors Pack Their Bags (Some Lost) For Iowa”

  • “Daily Intelligencer picked up on an uncomfortable exchange this morning during Meredith Vieira’s interview with Sen. Hillary Clinton on the Today show.” Read more here.

  • Huffington Post reports, “Anchor Wars: Williams And Gibson End The Year Neck-And-Neck”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • TVNewser reports, “The ABC News/WMUR/Facebook debates set for Saturday at St. Anselm College in New Hampshire have become a hot ticket for the media trying to cover them. An ABC News spokesperson tells TVNewser that the 550 credentials are nearly spoken for.”

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger January Meetup is Wednesday, January 16 at 7:00PM at Regional Food and Drink. For more info, click here.

  • The New York Observer reports, “In 2007, one online outlaw became the most trusted news source on the Hollywood writers’ strike. How Nikki Finke outfoxed the big boys”

  • Washington Post reports, “Increasingly, ‘Fans Are Setting the Agenda’ in the Blogosphere”

  • Poynter Online asks, “Why on earth wouldn’t CBS News make the Sunday Morning packages available on its site, like NBC, ABC, and (for that matter) most of the material from its other news shows?”

  • ValleyWag reports, “Denton to pay bloggers based on traffic.”

  • A release announced, “The Washington Continent, the District’s newest daily, will add an ‘Election ’07′ section on Jan. 5. The ‘Election ’07′ section will include breaking political coverage and commentary from a veteran team of reporters.” For more info, click here.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “The New Republic won’t endorse before Iowa”

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    RADIO

  • An NPR release announced, “NPR News continues its award-winning tradition of exploring American culture and tradition through in-depth, long-form journalism with a new six-month series examining classic fictional characters and how they both reflected and affected American life. ‘In Character,’ a multimedia series, begins January 2 and will air across all NPR News programs. Virtually all NPR News hosts, correspondents and reporters will provide segments. At NPR.org, ‘In Character’ will feature additional audio and video material about the characters profiled in the series, archived stories and a series blog.”

  • Redding News Review reports, “Radio One next week will end its more than six-year relationship with XM Satellite Radio. Lee Michaels, national program director for Syndication One News/Talk and XM 169, told Redding News Review that Washington, D.C.-based XM will take over programming at Black-oriented talk Channel 169 The Power on Tuesday.”

  • NPR announced, “NPR News will produce eight live consecutive hours of Iowa Caucus coverage on Thursday, January 3. The programming will be available on-air on NPR Member stations around the country and online through live streaming on NPR.org. Robert Siegel, senior host of All Things Considered, will anchor from NPR News headquarters in Washington, D.C. beginning at 4:00PM (ET), with All Things Considered host Melissa Block joining him at 6:00PM (ET).”

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    JOBS

  • Living Cities is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • The Maryland Gazette is looking for a Sports Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.21.07

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    Good morning Washington. You don’t plan on watching any college football games on New Years Day. And, this morning, Kiefer Sutherland celebrates his 41st birthday sober, and in jail.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The Washington Post put together a quick audio slideshow that deconstructs Barack Obama’s fashion choices. Surfacely it seems that Obama is almost always wearing the same dark suit, and often without a tie. Robin Givhan and Nancy Donaldson look closer to see what these vestments signify. According to them, it shows that Obama is a modern leader, echoing the relaxed but still professional mindset of the American workforce.”

  • John Boehner is a fashion cop for reporters.

  • Bloomberg reports, “The chief executives of Gannett Co. and Media General Inc. personally lobbied top U.S. regulators before winning exceptions to rules that limit newspaper and broadcast ownership in the same markets.”

  • New York Times’ David Pogue explores, “The Generational Divide in Copyright Morality”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “A new era at Tribune Co. began taking shape Wednesday with the departure of Chairman and Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons and the expected arrival of new leadership under Chicago billionaire Sam Zell. The changing of the guard represents a make-or-break proposition for the 160-year-old media concern, struggling to transform itself for the Internet age by going private in a daring, debt-laden $8.2 billion deal.”

  • We hear the Washington Times tree is back up. The first one had its needles fall off.

  • Washington City Paper reports, “To this day, the Washington Post lives by the guiding principles of fabled publisher Eugene Meyer, who decreed, among other things, the following: ‘As a disseminator of news, the paper shall observe the decencies that are obligatory upon a private gentleman.’ And these days that means not publishing the word ‘dick’ in the Style section.”

  • DCist reports, “Metro fares aren’t the only thing going up in price in D.C. If you’re in the habit of purchasing a copy of the Washington Post from a vending machine or a sidewalk hawker on your way to work in the morning, take note: the cost of the daily paper is about to go up by 15 cents. The Post’s newsstand price will become 50 cents beginning on Dec. 31. The company cited a decline in the paper’s circulation and advertising revenue as the reason for the increase.”

  • The AP reports, “The National Press Foundation will honor half a dozen journalists at its 25th anniversary dinner in February.”

  • The New York Times reports,Claudia Payne, special sections editor, is answering reader questions Dec. 18-21. Questions may be e-mailed to askthetimes@nytimes.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Editors at the Associated Press have picked the year’s top 10 stories, and we expected the presidential campaign to be like, you know, top five or something, right? Well, it lands in at #8 — coincidentally one spot ahead of the immigration debate.”

  • Drudge reports, “McCain Pleads with NY Times to Spike Story”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Thursday revenue fell 9.2 percent in November, primarily from a sharp drop in classified ads as jobs and real estate listings continue to migrate online.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, December 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ posted 3.12 million total viewers, the program’s best total viewer delivery since the week of February 4, 2007. In addition, ‘This Week’ increased the most of the Sunday discussion programs among Total Viewers compared to last year, a significant 28%.”

  • Also from ABC: “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 10, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Adults 25-54 for the third week in a row. The last time ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ three weeks in a row in the demo was May 1995.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 16, 2007. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.205 million total viewers.”

  • “CNN and NBC/MSNBC have released their coverage plans for the Iowa Caucus, Thursday Jan. 3.” Check out the full details at TVNewser.

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN will air a Special **LIVE** ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE, Sunday, December 23rd at Noon (ET), and will re-air in the normal Road to the White House timeslots of 6:30 & 9:30 pm”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News Sunday Morning continues as the #1 Sunday morning news program, and it’s growing. Last Sunday the Charles Osgood program drew 5.34M Total Viewers, up 12% year-to-year.”

  • An ABC insider tells us, “Hilarity has ensued at our bureau after a widely attended ‘facebook seminar’ earlier this month. It’s now commonplace to see highly regarded producers and correspondents asking interns about ‘poking’.”

  • USAToday reports, “If you plan to dance at your New Year’s Eve party, you might want to pick up some moves from White House correspondent David Gregory, who boogied this morning to Mary J. Blige music.” Check out the video here.

  • One year after her departure, Kathleen Matthews’ picture has finally been removed from the banner welcoming visitors to WJLA in Rosslyn.

  • Forbes reports, “Despite a growing cadre of viewing alternatives like the Web and repeat-heavy schedules on the broadcast networks, people are still watching television, a new survey finds.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle is taking participatory democracy into the newsroom. The broadcaster is asking viewers and Web surfers to submit videos about the upcoming New Hampshire primary to the station Web sites of its WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H., and WCVB-TV Boston as well as the stations’ YouTube channels.”

  • Check out the latest installment from Green Room Girl.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Beet TV reported yesterday, “Earlier today I interviewed Cynthia Farrar, the CEO and producer of PurpleStates.TV. Tomorrow, the first of nearly a dozen video segments produced by her new company and reported by non-professional citizen journalists, go up on the Op-Ed pages of the NYTimes.com The videos will be uploaded through February 5, ‘Super Tuesday.’”

  • PolitiFact is a finalist in the prestigious DigitalEdge awards by the Newspaper Association of America for best overall news site along with the Star-Tribune of Minneapolis and washingtonpost.com. You can find out more here.

  • WebProNews reports, “Bloggers from the left, center, and right sides of the political spectrum opened a group blog on Newsweek.com called The Ruckus.”

  • The LCV just launched a new website “calling the Sunday talk show hosts to task for ignoring the issue of global warming.” Check it out here.

  • Hotline’s On Call announced, “check in often between Christmas and New Year’s for On Call’s up-to-date coverage of the presidential contest.”

  • The AP reports, “Antitrust regulators approved Google Inc.’s $3.1 billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc., clearing the way for a formidable combination in the burgeoning online advertising sector. Microsoft Corp. and AT&T Inc. have lobbied heavily against the deal, but the Federal Trade Commission gave it the go-ahead Thursday.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • In the first edition of The Atlantic’s politics roundtable, Marc Ambinder, Ross Douthat, and Matthew Yglesias predict which candidates will win the primaries and debate whether Hillary’s slide is a media fabrication. Check it out here.

  • A reader points out “a notable first for DC: NYMag.com suggests that the DC food scene has something that New York doesn’t. ha.”

  • Starting this week, much of CQ content is now accessible and easy to read on your handheld device. “The new handheld-optimized pages include news stories from CQ Weekly and CQ Today, CQ Transcripts, CQ BillAnalysis and many other services.”

  • Popular Mechanics has published its first ever Geek the Vote — an online guide to all the candidates’ stances on issues related to science and technology including energy policy and climate change, gun control, science education and infrastructure investment. Check it out here.

  • The New Republic reports,Max Brantley, the editor of the alternative weekly Arkansas Times, has feuded with Mike Huckabee since the presidential candidate first appeared on the political stage during his failed 1992 Senate run. A liberal columnist married to a circuit judge appointed by Bill Clinton, Brantley penned weekly columns antagonizing Huckabee for his staunchly conservative social views, opaque campaign finance disclosures, and acceptance of gifts during his time in office. ‘Huckabee would believe I covered him obsessively, and he’d be right about that,’ Brantley says.”

  • The New Republic’s Sean Wilentz writes, “Opinion-slingers are mooning over Barack Obama’s instincts. Don’t they remember how badly that worked out last time?”

  • The Atlantic’s Megan McArdle writes, “the wild, drunken office Christmas party used to be a staple of television, books, and movies. Now I feel as if it’s dropped pretty thoroughly out of the popular imagination; the only example I can think of recently is a fleeting scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary. Were office holiday parties really that much wilder in the past? Or have we just stopped noticing, literarily?”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News and South Carolina ETV Radio (the state’s public radio network) will present an audio-only Republican Presidential Debate, to be broadcast on NPR Member stations and webcast live from 2:00-4:00PM (EST) on Wednesday, January 16. NPR News journalists and hosts Steve Inskeep, Michele Norris and Robert Siegel will act as moderators.”

  • So far, there has been over 3000 comments in response to Bryant Park Project blog post asking Ron Paul supporters to identify themselves.

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Preparing your boss for a MTP appearance isn’t an easy assignment (especially when it’s the full hour)! Many a guest has recruited high-priced talent to do their best Russert in hopes of better preparing for the grilling they will receive on Sunday. Word on the street was that former Bush Administration flack, Adam Levine did the best Russert impersonation in town. Looks as though he has some serious competition after Romney’s appearance last Sunday.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Steve Valentini, the circulation director for Politico, is jumping ship and going over to the Examiner.

  • On Jan. 2, Quin Hillyer is leaving Citizens United to begin work at the editorial page of the Washington Examiner as Associate Editor.

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    JOBS

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director of Business Development, an Editor for Morning Rundown and an Editor for the
    Afternoon Rundown
    .

  • The Daily Progress is looking for an Assistant City Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext