TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Ron Paul’

Who’s Naughty and Who’s Nice on Capitol Hill?

Newsmax surveyed congressional staffers, lobbyists, and former members of Congress to come up with their “Popularity Contest 2009″ list. The list outlines the most hated and most loved legislators of this year.

Topping the list of “most loved” is Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX).

Most hated? Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA), Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX), Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX).

Check out Newsmax for the full list and explanations.

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Morning Reading List, 01.30.09

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Tucker On Ron Paul Event: “This is crazy. I’ve got to get out of here. Let’s go get dinner.”

Tucker Carlson was picked to emcee the Ron Paul convention in St. Paul. But he didn’t last long.

From The Weekly Standard:

    Backstage afterwards, Ventura is further holding court for reporters, after having hinted to the crowd that he might be amenable to a presidential run in 2012 if the Revolution stays on track. “I will be watching!” he threatened.

    Tucker hadn’t heard the speech, so I break the news to him that Ventura got off his leash. Being a devout believer in the conventional, single-bullet version of the 9/11 attacks (that the terrorists acted alone), Tucker is both alarmed and offended, but doesn’t have much time to reflect. He is accosted by some grubby indie-media types who start trying to engage him: “Have you ever heard of the Controlled Demolition Hypothesis ….Who I believe did it are the ones who control our money systems … Have you followed the [National Institute of Standards and Technology] report on the collapse of building seven?”

    After a brief sparring match with the nutcakes, Tucker looks ashen. “This is crazy. I’ve got to get out of here. Let’s go get dinner.” We slip out the back door of the arena to hail a cab and get some steaks. But Tucker’s still supposed to be emceeing the event, and Paul has yet to speak.

    “Are you going to tell him you’re leaving?” I ask.

    “Nahhh,” Tucker says. “I really like Ron Paul. I don’t want to hurt his feelings.”

Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.03.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. It’s Caucus Day!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You are torn as to whether The New York Time’s hiring of Bill Kristol was a wise choice.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Roll Call’s Moira Bagley — a FishbowlDC hottie — is leaving the Capitol Hill newspaper to take a job at the Republican National Committee.

  • A reader tells us, “Sean Gallagher has joined the 1105 Government Information Group this week as editor of Defense Systems magazine. In that role, he will be spearheading Defense Systems magazine and Web site. He will also be managing defense coverage across 1105 Government Information Group’s publications.”

  • The AP reports, “The Federal Emergency Management Agency has hired a new director of public affairs to replace the official who was in charge during a fake news conference in October. Jonathan Thompson, most recently a deputy assistant defense secretary for public affairs, strategy and operations, will be FEMA’s new director of external affairs, FEMA Administrator R. David Paulison said in a recent memo to employees.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • USAToday reports, “If you doubt that media companies can profit from going green, look at what’s in store for 2008. Indiana Jones and Madagascar sequels will be sources of renewable box office energy for Paramount and DreamWorks (DWA). New Time Warner (TWX) CEO Jeff Bewkes will recycle his cable division into an independent unit. Rupert Murdoch will save trees by making The Wall Street Journal free online. And Discovery (DISCA) will go after more cable viewers by reprocessing the Discovery Home channel into Planet Green. At least that’s what some of Wall Street’s sharpest media analysts say.”

  • Have you played Politico’s Kingmaker yet? It’s not too late! Whoever gains the most points by March 4, 2008 wins a trip to the White House Correspondent’s Dinner, and whoever wins Iowa wins a $500 Amazon.com gift certificate.

  • CJR reports, “WSJ lacks evidence to support a sweeping, front-page claim against mortgage borrowers”

  • The Newseum and the National Archives present “Back Rooms to Ballot Boxes: Primary Reform, the People and the Press” featuring former McGovern-Fraser Commission lead researcher Ken Bode, American Conservative Union president David Keene and long-time journalist, columnist and author Jules Witcover. Frank Bond, Newseum producer and former anchor and reporter at WUSA-TV, will moderate. The event will be held Thursday, Jan. 31, 2008 at 7p.m. at the William G. McGowan Theater, The National Archives, 7th & 9th Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.

  • The AP reports, “The Post newspapers printed their final editions Monday, ending a 126-year run. However, the final editions also carried some news — their parent company will keep a remnant alive in the form of a Kentucky-oriented online site.”

  • E&P reports, “Murdoch’s ‘WSJ’ Greets New Year — With Front-Pager on Kucinich’s UFO”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Those hyper-local opinion pages in The New York Times—lamenting global warming’s toll on a Maplewood, N.J. lake, or complaining about traffic in southern Connecticut, or opposing a plan to impose tolls on the East River bridges—are now a thing of the past. Over the weekend, readers found a note in each regional edition declaring that the local op-ed sections were being eliminated starting this week.”

  • A plea from the City Paper: “Cherkis: Where the Fuck Are You? Holidays are over. It’s a New Year. I need your pitches. City Desks, District Lines, covers, and then some. Get outta bed.”

  • A Press Club release announced, “The National Press Club … will premiere its 100th anniversary documentary, ‘The National Press Club at 100: A Century of Headlines,’ at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2008, in the National Press Club ballroom.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 23, 2007 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 3.534 million total viewers.”

  • C-SPAN’s Iowa Caucus Coverage for tonight will include live coverage of the Iowa Caucus begins on with a preview program at 7pm ET and will be simulcast on both C-SPAN & C-SPAN2, for the Democratic and Republican Caucus respectively at 8 p.m.

  • PBS NewsHour has a special half hour broadcast planned for today in addition to an 11 p.m. special broadcast with Judy Woodruff, Gwen Ifill, Mark Shields, David Brooks, Margaret Warner, Amy Walter and Stuart Rothenberg.

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special ‘Super Week’ coverage of the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, as the first ballots are cast in the 2008 presidential election campaign. MSNBC will present continuing live coverage from Iowa and New Hampshire, with daily reports from correspondent David Shuster, on the ground in Iowa now. ‘Morning Joe’ will telecast live from Iowa Thursday morning and live from New Hampshire on Friday, 6-9 a.m. ET. Tucker Carlson will anchor ‘Tucker’ live from Iowa on Wednesday at 6 p.m. ET, and live from New Hampshire on Thursday and Friday with the John McCain campaign. On Thursday night, coverage of the caucuses continues with a special live ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews’ at 7 p.m. ET and a special edition of ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • Comcast announced, “CN8′s election coverage kicks-off in Iowa, Thursday, Jan. 3 at 9 p.m. and the network will remain on the campaign trail with live broadcasts and analysis from all major events leading up to the presidential election. Featured political events will include: the New Hampshire Primary; Super Tuesday; the Democratic National Convention and Republican National Convention; Presidential and Vice Presidential Debates; Election Night; and Inauguration. CN8 will also cover the primaries in each of the states in its viewership area. Event coverage will initiate from the network’s Philadelphia headquarters with on-site reporters and a live panel of analysts reacting to breaking news and key issues from across CN8′s six state-of-the-art studios along the East Coast and its dozens of remote studio locations and mobile broadcast trucks.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC announced today that Super Week has begun, continuing with their Super Tuesday theme in the lead up to the presidential elections. The Super Week will encompass tomorrow’s coverage of the Iowa caucuses and next week’s New Hampshire primary.”

  • Nikki Finke’s Deadline Hollywood Daily reports, “Hillary Clinton On Letterman Tonight; WGA Pickets Slam Huckabee & NBC”

  • The New York Post reports, “NBC may broadcast “The Biggest Loser,” but in terms of 2007 stock price performance, Time Warner ran away with that title. Of the big five entertainment conglomerates — CBS, Disney, News Corp., Time Warner and Viacom — only Viacom managed to post a share price increase this year, as uncertainty over the impact of digital delivery of content and a weakened advertising environment due to a weak economy dampened investor enthusiasm for the space. (NBC is part of General Electric and doesn’t trade on its own merits like the other companies.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Insiders tell TVNewser that contrary to speculation, MSNBC has no plans to cancel Tucker.”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Couric Newscast Lost 1.1 Million Viewers In ’07″

  • TVNewser reports, “ICN takes MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough to task for performing on stage with Mike Huckabee at a rally last night. Huckabee was a guest this morning, on Morning Joe.”

  • “Fox News Channel has announced its coverage plans for the Iowa caucuses.” TVNewser has the details.

  • The AP reports, “ABC and Fox News Channel are narrowing the field of presidential candidates invited to debates this weekend just before the New Hampshire primary, in Fox’s case infuriating supporters of Republican Rep. Ron Paul.”

  • The New York Times reports, “In the first competitive move in what may become an A-list booking-war blitz, David Letterman has landed the comedian and film star Robin Williams as the first guest when ‘The Late Show’ returns to CBS television Wednesday night.”

  • The AP reports, “The network that burst into public consciousness with the O.J. Simpson trial and other big-name courtroom dramas in the 1990s becomes part of television history Tuesday, renamed truTV to emphasize its prime-time action programming.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Network Anchors Pack Their Bags (Some Lost) For Iowa”

  • “Daily Intelligencer picked up on an uncomfortable exchange this morning during Meredith Vieira’s interview with Sen. Hillary Clinton on the Today show.” Read more here.

  • Huffington Post reports, “Anchor Wars: Williams And Gibson End The Year Neck-And-Neck”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • TVNewser reports, “The ABC News/WMUR/Facebook debates set for Saturday at St. Anselm College in New Hampshire have become a hot ticket for the media trying to cover them. An ABC News spokesperson tells TVNewser that the 550 credentials are nearly spoken for.”

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger January Meetup is Wednesday, January 16 at 7:00PM at Regional Food and Drink. For more info, click here.

  • The New York Observer reports, “In 2007, one online outlaw became the most trusted news source on the Hollywood writers’ strike. How Nikki Finke outfoxed the big boys”

  • Washington Post reports, “Increasingly, ‘Fans Are Setting the Agenda’ in the Blogosphere”

  • Poynter Online asks, “Why on earth wouldn’t CBS News make the Sunday Morning packages available on its site, like NBC, ABC, and (for that matter) most of the material from its other news shows?”

  • ValleyWag reports, “Denton to pay bloggers based on traffic.”

  • A release announced, “The Washington Continent, the District’s newest daily, will add an ‘Election ’07′ section on Jan. 5. The ‘Election ’07′ section will include breaking political coverage and commentary from a veteran team of reporters.” For more info, click here.

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “The New Republic won’t endorse before Iowa”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • An NPR release announced, “NPR News continues its award-winning tradition of exploring American culture and tradition through in-depth, long-form journalism with a new six-month series examining classic fictional characters and how they both reflected and affected American life. ‘In Character,’ a multimedia series, begins January 2 and will air across all NPR News programs. Virtually all NPR News hosts, correspondents and reporters will provide segments. At NPR.org, ‘In Character’ will feature additional audio and video material about the characters profiled in the series, archived stories and a series blog.”

  • Redding News Review reports, “Radio One next week will end its more than six-year relationship with XM Satellite Radio. Lee Michaels, national program director for Syndication One News/Talk and XM 169, told Redding News Review that Washington, D.C.-based XM will take over programming at Black-oriented talk Channel 169 The Power on Tuesday.”

  • NPR announced, “NPR News will produce eight live consecutive hours of Iowa Caucus coverage on Thursday, January 3. The programming will be available on-air on NPR Member stations around the country and online through live streaming on NPR.org. Robert Siegel, senior host of All Things Considered, will anchor from NPR News headquarters in Washington, D.C. beginning at 4:00PM (ET), with All Things Considered host Melissa Block joining him at 6:00PM (ET).”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Living Cities is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • The Maryland Gazette is looking for a Sports Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.26.07

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You don’t want a lifetime subscription to Time or Newsweek. Is US Weekly more your style?

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Are you one of the many headed to IA for New Year’s Eve? Politico’s Aoife McCarthy and Michael Calderone lay out your First Night options. And Poltico’s Ryan Grim reports on the social scene among politicos and journos in Des Moines.

  • The NYT wasn’t that impressed with Dana Milbank’s new book.

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of December 9-14 shows, “All year long, Hillary Clinton has dominated the campaign conversation on the talk airwaves. And last week, signs that the Democratic battle for president might be tightening had many hosts talking up the idea of a Clinton swoon.”

  • Deb Howell says that even critics have their critics (you don’t say…). And Clark Hoyt fields reader questions.

  • Howie Kurtz on covering Iowa.

  • Financial Times named newspaper of the year

  • The Fix asks, “Each state has its Yepsen — the political reporter par excellence who tend to drive the coverage of a campaign or a candidate. … Who are we missing? Live in a state where one political reporter (or political pundit) dominates the landscape? Sound off in the comment section below and we’ll add the list to this post.”

  • The Guardian reports,James Murdoch, the new head of News International, has vowed to ‘set the pace’ in the newspaper industry and promised to decide on the new location for its headquarters ‘in the new year’.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The adult children of slain New York Times reporter David Rosenbaum have reached a confidential settlement with Howard University Hospital, ending a year-old lawsuit that accused the hospital and D.C. emergency workers of negligence and medical malpractice.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “For the second time in eight years, control of the Los Angeles Times changed hands Thursday, passing from a staid Chicago conglomerate to a private company headed by an unpredictable and colorful billionaire, in a debt-heavy deal that creates tremendous opportunities and risks for one of America’s top newspapers.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • “Larry King Reflects: When ‘CNN Wasn’t in Washington’”

  • An ABC release announced, “As Iowans become the first in the nation to have their say in the 2008 campaign, ABC News will provide comprehensive coverage of the Iowa Caucuses. On Wednesday, January 2 and Thursday, January 3, ‘World News’ and ‘Nightline’ will both originate from Des Moines, Iowa, with anchors Charles Gibson and Terry Moran reporting from the field. On Thursday, January 3, Diane Sawyer and Chris Cuomo launch ABC News’ full day of coverage with a live broadcast of ‘Good Morning America’ from Des Moines.”

  • What about a license for local reporting?

  • Leonard Shapiro’s annual sports broadcasting “year in review” column.

  • TVNewser reports, “Imus on Brokaw: ‘He’s Not the Guy I’d Want to be In A Foxhole With’”

  • Jim Lehrer on the writing life.

  • A release announced, “Reuters, C-SPAN and Zogby International have joined forces to poll Americans on the 2008 presidential election, starting with polls in the key U.S. presidential primary and caucus states. The effort will kick off on Dec. 30 with daily tracking polls from Iowa ahead of that state’s caucuses scheduled for Jan. 3. Daily tracking polls from New Hampshire will begin on Jan. 4 ahead of that state’s Jan. 8 primary. The polling will continue through the general election in November.”

  • Thomson Financial reports, “Moody’s Investors Service said the downturn in print advertising led by classified advertisements for real estate continues to support its negative rating outlook on the US newspaper industry.”

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp, “Herewith my annual list of the top ten newspaper industry stories — not all of them grim.”

  • USC announced, “Twenty-five arts journalists have been chosen from 18 states to participate as fellows in the fourth National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Arts Journalism Institute in Theater and Musical Theater at USC Annenberg. Through the generous support of the NEA, the Institute will be conducted by USC Annenberg’s School of Journalism in Los Angeles from February 5–15, 2008.” For the full list, click here.

  • A release announced, “The Parents Television Council congratulates several companies for taking responsibility for their television ads that ended up on shows filled with graphic sex, violence or profanity. Television sponsors are often contacted by the PTC to inform them of the type of content they are sponsoring on television, particularly during hours when children are watching, and to call on the companies to reevaluate their sponsorships and media buying guidelines.”

  • In a letter submitted to Citizens United, lawyers for Sen. Barack Obama demanded that Citizens United remove “all audio and video footage of Senator Obama” from its new political documentary, Hillary: The Movie. The film includes a clip of Senator Obama’s Nov. 26, 2007, interview with ABC’s Nightline, in which he criticized Sen. Hillary Clinton for “claiming basically the entire eight years of the Clinton presidency as her own.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CourtTVNews.com Shutting Down”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comedy Central’s ‘The Daily Show with Jon Stewart’ and ‘The Colbert Report’ will return to production next month without writers. Both shows will resume on Jan. 7, Comedy Central, a unit of Viacom Inc., said today in an e-mailed statement.”

  • Biz Report reports, “A recent survey by Harris Interactive found an increase in the number of television viewers that are turning to the Internet instead of their plasmas for their visual entertainment. The survey of 2,455 U.S. adults showed that overall online viewership has risen from 74 percent last year to 81 percent this year.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Google reports, “We’re bidding adieu to 2007 with a look back at the breaking news, the big events and the must-have gadgets that captivated us this year (give or take a few weeks; we compile this list by early December). To get a glimpse of what’s been on our collective consciousness, we mined billions of search queries to discover what sorts of things rose to the top. We encourage you to check out our findings to see if you, too, reflect the zeitgeist — the spirit of the times.”

  • Slate says Christmas is possible, but very, very unlikely.

  • ars technica reports, “It’s not every day that a senator takes to the floor to defend “Internet blogs and other Web-based forms of media,” but Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) has done just that in his recent push to pass a Freedom of Information Act reform bill he has coauthored with two Republicans.”

  • blingboing reports, “Five years ago, Dave Winer made a ‘long bet’ with New York Times executive Martin Nisenholtz: ‘In a Google search of five keywords or phrases representing the top five news stories of 2007, weblogs will rank higher than the New York Times’ Web site.’”

  • CBROnline reports, “AOL announced it was acquiring New York-based Quigo on November 7 to expand its contextual advertising prowess, which basically matches text adverts to relevant Web pages. Quigo’s two main offerings are: AdSonar, which allows advertisers to buy ads on Websites based on specific pages, sections, topics or keywords; and FeedPoint, a search engine marketing business that helps retail advertisers manage their marketing relationships with search and comparison shopping engines.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The $3.1 billion merger between Web search king Google and online ad giant DoubleClick approved by U.S. regulators yesterday may create an advertising powerhouse of unrivaled reach and knowledge of Internet users’ lives, desires and interests.”

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “Ad spending for the first three quarters of 2007 dipped 0.1%, but spending on the Internet continued to soar, with a 15.9% increase over the same period last year, the Nielsen Co. said Thursday.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • IMA reports, “The Economist is drawing up plans for a social network following the decision to invest in its site and socialise its content. The magazine wants to develop a major portal for its 3m readers and create what it calls ‘a conversation between them’.”

  • What did Tucker Carlson learn from his adveture with Ron Paul? “People really hate the Federal Reserve” Learn more here.

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • An NPR release announced, “The 28th annual New Year’s Eve special Toast of the Nation rings in 2008 with nine hours of live jazz, swing, samba and salsa from leading music venues across the country. NPR Music and WBGO/Jazz88.3FM in Newark, NJ reunite for their 23rd year of co-producing the special, which will air Monday, December 31 from 8:00PM-5:00AM(ET) on NPR Member stations nationwide.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Aspen Institute is looking for a MLI Communications Officer.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for Summer interns.

  • The News Leader is looking for a Visual Journalist, Still Photography and Videography and for someone to write a great headline for our sports copy editing ad.

  • The The Associated Press is looking for a Medical/Science Writer-Washington DC.

  • Worldwatch Institute is looking for an Environmental Staff Writer.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Business and Policy Reporter.

  • The Observer Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • CongressDaily is looking for a Reporter.

  • UCG is looking for a Reporter.

  • American Sociological Association is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Copy Editor for CQ Today and CQ Weekly.

  • A Fast-growing online business publisher is looking for a Editor-in-Chief.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Deputy Supervising Senior Editor, News & Information.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.19.07

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. On this day in 1998, the House of Representatives sent articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton to the Senate. Oh, and Alyssa Milano turns 35. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • So far, you have already spent more than $500 on Christmas presents. Way to make us feel guilty.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • USAToday reports, “The Federal Communications Commission, overturning a 32-year-old ban, voted Tuesday to allow broadcasters in the nation’s 20 largest media markets to also own a newspaper.”

  • Frank Rich bashes political reporters.

  • A release announced, “In response to a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) vote in favor of relaxing media ownership rules and allowing companies in the top 20 national media markets to own both print and broadcast outlets, the Parents Television Council issued the following statement: ‘The PTC is deeply disappointed in the announcement today by the FCC that will effectively loosen longstanding rules for media ownership. While the ruling today will only affect a select number of US markets, even a small step in the wrong direction is a step in the wrong direction,’ said PTC President Tim Winter.”

  • Reuters reports, “A bipartisan group of U.S. senators threatened on Monday to override the Federal Communications Commission if the agency votes to loosen media ownership restrictions at a meeting scheduled for Tuesday.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “With Web companies now beginning to dominate the market for local ads online, newspaper publishers are scrambling to change the way they sell ads, hiring sales teams that specialize in the digital market and creating new editorial packages to sell. But it may be a case of too little, too late. McClatchy, which publishes 31 daily newspapers around the country, is revamping its commission and incentive plans to better reward staff for online sales. Gannett now operates 50 mom-centric social-networking sites around the U.S. as part of a broader strategy to boost online revenue through what it calls ‘hyper-localized’ sites. Other publishers, from Lee Enterprises to Media General, are taking steps of their own to jump-start sales of local online ads.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “No one will be surprised when Rupert Murdoch starts meddling with the editorial machinery of The Wall Street Journal, despite a formal agreement to preserve its independence. But is he doing it already?”

  • Forbes asks, “Holy smokes–what happened to McClatchy?”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for December 9-14 shows, “The unlikely surge of former Arkansas Governor helped generate the biggest week of coverage for the presidential campaign so far in 2007. But as Huckabee is learning, some media attention is more welcome than others. Plus, the Mitchell report turns steroid abuse in baseball into a front-page story—some might say at long last.”

  • The AP reports, “A media watchdog group said Monday that 64 journalists in 17 countries have died while covering the news in 2007 — the deadliest year in more than a decade. The Committee to Protect Journalists said in an annual report that Iraq led the list for the fifth year in a row, with 31 dead — one fewer than a year ago. Somalia was second with seven dead in 2007, and Pakistan and Sri Lanka each recorded five deaths.”

  • The Chicago Sun-Times reports, “Like most American newspapers, the Chicago Tribune has been reducing the space for news in its print edition. But unlike most papers, it plans to charge more for less.”

  • Washington Post reports, “All Eyes on Blogging Iowa Newsman”

  • “The winners of the 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards were announced on December 17, 2007.” For full results, click here.

  • The New York Times reports, “A usual round of media self-criticism turned into a schoolyard brawl last week, as editors, reporters and bloggers traded insults over a front-page article in The Washington Post, all at the very online water cooler where they usually get their news about the industry. The Post article, which ran on Nov. 29, was about rumors of Barack Obama’s ties to the Muslim world. The piece drew widespread criticism: the Columbia Journalism Review said the article ‘may be the single worst campaign ’08 piece to appear in any American newspaper so far this election cycle.’”

  • E&P reports, “Will 2008 be a winning campaign year for … newspapers? For the first time since John Kennedy beat Richard Nixon in a presidential race that, by a landslide, anointed television as the medium of choice for political advertising, newspapers are daring to believe they and their Web sites will get more than their usual miniscule share of candidates’ media buys.”

  • Check out The Washington Times’ Andrea Billups and her election blog.

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “Bill Clinton is right”

  • Text & Ideas talks to Politico’s Bill Nichols.

    Top of post

    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of December 10-16, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of December 10-14, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 8.86 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54, placing second in both categories.”

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN’s LIVE, long-form programming style will allow viewers nationwide a rare opportunity to witness an entire caucus, from start to completion, bringing the nation to Iowa to witness the first election event in the 2008 Presidential race. C-SPAN will be on site at three of the state’s caucuses, with coverage starting at 7:00 PM (ET) Thursday, January 3rd, with the Democratic caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN, and Republican caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN2. The network will simulcast Iowa CBS affiliate KCCI-TV in Des Moines as part of its coverage to give national viewers the local angle on caucus events and results. C-SPAN will continue with its extensive coverage of the Presidential primary/caucus schedule on January 4, with events throughout New Hampshire, culminating with the New Hampshire Primary Tuesday, January 8.”

  • An ABC release announced, “Continuing the ‘Nightline’ series The Contenders, co-anchor Cynthia McFadden goes on the trail and behind the scenes with Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY). ‘Nightline’ will take viewers to Iowa to spend an all-access day in the life with the 2008 Democratic presidential contender. In the exclusive interview, they will cover everything from life on the campaign trail, to her personal and political campaign teams, to her recent endorsement from the Des Moines Register.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “Once Again, CNN Mixes Up Obama and Osama”

  • People Magazine reports, “CNN anchor Campbell Brown and her husband Dan Senor welcomed their first child, a boy, on Tuesday. Eli James Senor was born at exactly 10 a.m. and weighed 8 lbs. He is named in the memory of his grandfather, James Senor. ‘Eli and his mom are doing great,’ Dan Senor tells PEOPLE. ‘We are thrilled.’”

  • Content Bridges has “What Journalists Can Learn From Screenwriters Strike”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Joe Scarborough“. And, “Joe(y) Scarborough Endorses Ron Paul

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, hired an executive from the Boston Consulting Group to head strategic and financial planning, two weeks after cutting its revenue and subscriber growth forecasts.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The amazing Tina Brown is in a newly struck, first-look deal to bring projects and story ideas to HBO, the TV network that also seems to understand ‘buzz’ and great storytelling versus the hackneyed stuff that is on the networks.”

  • From TVNewser: “Why CNN’s Walton is Having ‘So Much Fun’”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Christopher Hitchens Implies Dead Congressman Was Cult Member”

  • Poynter’s Steve Outing answers, “Why Journalists Suck at Business”

  • Check out Slate’s chief political correspondent John Dickerson’s dispatches from New Hampshire this week.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Young Turks who made their mark as early backers of Facebook Inc. have raised a second investment round more than four times as large as their first, signaling their growing clout as an alternative to venture capitalists on Silicon Valley’s Sand Hill Road. Founders Fund Management, led by a quartet of wealthy and connected entrepreneurs behind such success stories as online payment service PayPal Inc., said Monday that it had raised $220 million from institutional investors to pump into new companies.”

  • MSNBC’s Steve Adubato writes, “Bill Clinton has come to his wife Hillary’s defense and I’m not convinced that’s a good thing. Clinton blames the media for not covering his wife fairly and he argues that we in the media are not focusing enough on Hillary’s experience, implying that we are holding her to a different and unfair standard.”

  • Don’t forget that tonight is The Washington Blogger December Meetup at 7:00PM at RFD. For more info, click here.

  • Wired reports, “After 10 Years of Blogs, the Future’s Brighter Than Ever”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Radar magazine is increasing in frequency, from six to eight issues a year, and is raising its rate base from 150,000 to 200,000. The change will take effect in February 2008, one year after its relaunch in February 2007.”

  • Mr. Magazine’s 7 Great Magazine Moments in 07

  • “min’s Exclusive Review of 2007 Magazine Launches

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • MarketWatch reports, “XM Satellite Radio Inc. said Monday it has settled a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by Universal Music Group over XM’s Inno portable device, which gives users the ability to record music.”

  • NPR’s The Bryant Park Project looks at who some of the Ron Paul supportes are.

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • This is Amy Mitchell’s last week as Managing Editor at The American Spectator. She is about to “embark on a new adventure,” details to follow.

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education seeks an experienced reporter to join our teams of journalists who cover public policy and business issues.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Media Officer.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.09.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Ron Paul is your GOP candidate of choice. Is that because he is fun to cover, or because you dream of having President Paul?

  • B&C reports, “Frontline narrator Will Lyman often lends his smooth baritone to other programs besides the PBS documentary series he’s narrated since 1982. But Frontline’s producers at WGBH Boston said he should not have lent his unmistakable voice to an advocacy video on Internet regulatory policy.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC.com, the online home of NBC News, has acquired newsvine.com, a Seattle-based social media news website. Newsvine describes itself as ‘a giant collection of news from all over the world, contributed and controlled entirely by users.’”

  • George Stephanopoulos loves “High School Musical.”

  • Forbes reports, “Over the past two years, Yahoo! has quietly solidified its position as the No. 1 provider of general, financial and sports news on the Internet.”

  • Min Online reports, “This Thursday (October 11), BW president (since May 2007) Keith Fox, editor-in-chief (since December 2004) Steve Adler, and art director (since January 2007) Andrew Horton will unveil the ‘relaunched’ (Fox’s words) October 22 issue at a reception in New York’s Guastavino’s. Most visible is the first logo change since October 17, 1994, which 1984-2005 editor-in-chief Steve Shepard implemented to mark BW’s 65th anniversary (min, October 3, 1994).”

  • Media Week reports, “The Oct. 4 issue of Wenner Media’s Rolling Stone sports an impossible-to-miss lenticular ad for the Fox TV network, featuring characters from the net’s Sunday-night lineup whooping it up on a roller-coaster ride, their images changing as the reader tilts the ad. Meanwhile, an eye-popping ad for NBC’s new series Bionic Woman that appeared in Time Inc.’s Entertainment Weekly went one further, with the heroine’s mechanically enhanced winker lighting up as readers turned the page.”

  • FT.com reports, “News Corp’s $5bn deal to acquire Dow Jones and its crown jewel, the Wall Street Journal, is not expected to close until December. Yet in the corridors of the publisher’s lower Manhattan headquarters, News Corp and its chief executive, Rupert Murdoch, are already making their presence felt.”

  • New York Times report, “Four years after starting its popular annual conference on technology, The Wall Street Journal plans to expand the franchise to several gatherings a year on a variety of topics.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission didn’t suppress research reports on locally owned TV stations and the radio industry, according to an internal probe of the agency.”

  • AP reports, “The recent rush by major Internet portals to buy advertising companies and extend their sales networks is a sign that the business of being a one-stop shop for information and entertainment isn’t what it used to be.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Some of the week’s biggest bargains were found at Christie’s International’s Oct. 1-3 House Sale, with furniture and artifacts from the former New York Times headquarters on 43th Street. The 107 lots tallied $136,470, including brass lamps and tables fetching just $25. A floral-pattern sofa, perfect for a Southampton sunroom and hailing from the Times’s executive offices, garnered a mere $63.”

  • Don’t forget, the first annual Washington Examiner vs. Baltimore Examiner softball challenge this Saturday, October 13th from 10 am to 12:00 pm at 14901 Layhill Road in Silver Spring, MD.

  • Washingtonian reports that, “Proud POTUS Papa Shows Up to Celebrate Jenna’s New Book”

  • Check out the interview between Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca Dana and Fox News president Roger Ailes.

  • The New York Post reports, “Time Warner Cable Chief Financial Officer John Martin is close to being promoted to CFO of parent Time Warner after Wayne Pace retires later this year, The Post has learned.”

  • Variety reports, “Comedy Central’s bombastic TV pundit Stephen Colbert is going global with the launch of ‘The Colbert Report Global Edition’ at this week’s Mipcom mart in Cannes.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 07.30.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Washington Post reports, “Four days after the Democratic debate in Charleston, S.C., more than 400 questions directed to the GOP presidential field have been uploaded on YouTube, as Republicans are scheduled to take their turn at video-populism on Sept. 17. But only Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) and Rep. Ron Paul (Tex.) have agreed to participate in the debate, co-hosted by the Republican Party of Florida in St. Petersburg.”

  • Carrie Sheffield, formerly of The Politico, has joined The Washington Times as an editorial writer.

  • One year ago last week, Ana Marie Cox was named the Washington Editor ot Time.com and Tammy Haddad was named a Vice President for MSNBC.

  • Swampland reports, “The Ron Paul campaign announced, and other campaigns have confirmed, that CNN is moving the YouTube debate to another date, possibly in December.”

  • The Columbia Journalism Review has some prime examples of “Why the Dow Jones Vote Matters”

  • The Politico reports that CNN president Jon Klein “said the new Campbell Brown show at 8 p.m. will be talk-oriented, built around the day’s news. Leaning toward more an opinion show where Campbell doesn’t give the opinions, the guests do.”

  • From the Christian Science Monitor: “Declining newspaper readership, especially among the young, is forcing editors to reexamine their focus.”

  • Poynter Online writes, “Facebook: What’s In It For Journalists? With the help of some new friends, we came up with a few answers. And just as many questions.”

  • Huffington Post’s Zack Exley writes, “GOP front runners seem to be bailing on the September 17 YouTube/CNN debate. Democrats should rejoice at this news.”

  • “With Senator Clinton—and her femininity—featured as a story line, the Presidential campaign filled 13% of the airtime and was the second most-popular talk topic on radio and cable, according to PEJ’s Talk Show Index from July 15-20. (Cable shows paid far more attention to the campaign than the radio talkers did.) The one subject that commanded more attention last week than the Presidential race was the renewed debate over U.S. strategy in Iraq.”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s new series, “Hey, How’d You Do That?”, “walking you through how those in the media industry navigated key professional junctures, achieved career-making coups, tackled spur-of-the-moment scenarios and made the decisions that furthered their work.”

  • Houston Chronicle’s Claudia Feldman called the YouTube debate “a lively CNN-YouTube debate that turned the usual format upside down and may have forever changed candidates’ obligatory parade in front of the TV lights.”

  • Fortune reports, “Newspapers are dying. At the Washington Post Co., CEO Donald Graham is banking on the Internet to save serious journalism. If he can’t figure this out, nobody can.”

  • From Save The Debate.com: “Some Republicans are talking about ditching the long-planned YouTube debate, like the Democrats and Fox News. As concerned Republicans, we respectfully ask them to reconsider. Republicans cannot surrender to Democrats on any front — least of all new media — or we may well lose in 2008.”

  • Todd And reports, “I’m very excited to announce that the Power 150 ranking of top marketing blogs is joining forces with Advertising Age, the world’s leading marketing and media publication.”

  • Reuters reports, “The number of help-wanted ads in U.S. newspapers fell in June to a 49-year low, a private research group said on Thursday.”

  • Time reports, “Hugh Hewitt, a popular right-wing blogger and radio talk show host, got more specific about what conservatives might object to in a CNN/YouTube debate — he alleged that CNN cherrypicked the submissions for biased questions that a ‘responsible’ journalist wouldn’t ask: ‘the CNN team used the device of the third-party video to inject a question that would have embarrassed any anchor posing it.’ One staffer for a Republican candidate now leaning toward not participating put it this way: ‘The problem isn’t YouTube, it’s CNN.’”

  • A release from Atlantic Media announced that Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Mallon, Debbie Applegate and Jeffrey Goldberg will be attending Bookmark events on Nantucket.

  • The Washington Examiner reports, “Washington wins the award for ‘most e-mail addicted’ city in the country, according to a new study released Thursday by Dulles-based AOL.”

  • Redding News Review reports, “Radio One’s Syndication One announced a new lineup late yesterday that includes ‘The Al Sharpton Show,’ ’2 Live Stews’ and ‘The Warren Ballentine Show’ on its XM 169 The Power.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle’s Chip Johnson writes, “Megan Greenwell was a reporter at Berkeley High School’s biweekly student newspaper, the Jacket, nearly eight years ago when she cracked one of the most sensational Bay Area news stories of the year — scooping the region’s media. … So it’s no fluke that Greenwell, now at the ripe old age of 23, is a professional journalist at not just any newspaper, but the Washington Post. And she’s not covering any average beat; she’s based in Baghdad and covering one of the world’s biggest stories, the war in Iraq.”

  • Who Still Reads Magazines? Just About Everybody”

  • New York Post reports, “Don Imus is about to get paid. The disowned shock jock is close to a settlement that would have former employer CBS buy out his contract as a way to avoid costly and ugly litigation, according to multiple sources close to the situation.”

  • Business Week reports, “Should the Bancroft family, the controlling shareholders of Dow Jones & Co., decide to reject Rupert Murdoch’s takeover offer, prompting the mogul to take his $5 billion off the table and walk away, everyone knows what would happen. Dow Jones’ stock price would fall from its recent highs in the upper 50s”

  • Check out Media Bistro’s updated How To Pitch.

  • Redding News Review reports, “Redding News Review today learned that Radio One has cut at least four staffers over at its satellite radio channel XM 169 The Power.”

    Jobs

  • The Education Trust is looking for a New Media Manager.

  • McClatchy is looking for a Senior Correspondent in Washington D.C.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for a Senior Producer for AAM Television.

  • CNN is seeking a Senior Producer for Reliable Sources.

  • Worcester County Times/Maryland Beachcomber/Ocean Pines Independent is looking for an Editor.

  • Print Solutions Magazine is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • DC Magazine is looking to hire style-savvy fall interns/editorial assistants immediately for the Fall Semester. Please send cover letter, resume, and clips to tjow@modernluxury.com with availability and potential start date. Position begins mid-August.

  • Washington Hospital Center is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • Connection Newspapers is looking for a Sports Writer/Editor.

  • PoliticsNJ.com is looking for an Advertising Sales Director.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext