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Posts Tagged ‘Rudy Giuliani’

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rudy Giuliani, Bob Woodward and NBC’s Chuck Todd.

  • Face the Nation: Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano (D), Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), former MA Gov. Jane Swift (R) and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX).

  • This Week: Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), McCain Victory chair Carly Fiorina, former Federal Reserve Chair Alan Greenspan and a roundtable with George Will, Democratic strategist Paul Begala, Time’s Jay Carney and ABC’s Claire Shipman.

  • Fox News Sunday: Former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles (D), Alaska Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell (R-AK) and Karl Rove. The “Power Player” is Pentagon Memorial Fund president Jim Laychak.

  • Late Edition: Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R), New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson (D), Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Republican strategist Alex Castellanos, Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen and Washington Times’ Tara Wall.

  • The Post Politics Program with Ed O’Keefe and Emily Freifeld: Segments of Bob Woodward‘s May 2008 interviews with President Bush, Retiring Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr., Jennifer Agiest and Chris Cillizza.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) will be interviewed by New York Times’ Edmund Andrews and Wall Street Journal’s Damian Paletta.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Mark Whitaker, NBC News Washington Bureau Chief; Cynthia Tucker of the Atlanta Journal Constitution; Patrick Healy of the New York Times; and Katty Kay, BBC Washington correspondent.

  • Reliable Sources: Houston Chronicle’s Julie Mason, Washington Post’s Anne Kornblut, CNN’s Frank Sesno, St. Petersburg Times’ Eric Deggans, Kansas City Star’s Aaron Barnhart and truTV’s Lisa Bloom.

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: DNC communications director Karen Finney, Republican strategist Rich Galen, Roll Call’s David Drucker and Roll Call’s Emily Heil.

  • Fareed Zakaria’s GPS: New York Times’ Tom Friedman, Wall Street Journal’s Bret Stephens, Council on Foreign Relations managing editor Gideon Rose, NYU’s Moral Courage Project director Irshad Manji, and author Greg Mortenson.

  • This Is America with Dennis Wholey: Reg Weaver, former President of the National Education Association.

  • Mediabistro Course Management 101

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    The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

    Morning Reading List, 09.03.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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    Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) and a roundtable with presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, NBC’s David Gregory, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, GOP strategist Mike Murphy and NBC’s Kelly O’Donnell.

  • Face The Nation: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and former Hewlett-Packard Chairwoman Carly Fiorina and New York Times columnist David Brooks.

  • This Week: Cindy McCain, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) and a roundtable with ABC’s Sam Donaldson, Cokie Roberts, George Will and Matthew Dowd.

  • Fox News Sunday: John McCain and a panel with Brit Hume, Washington Managing Editor of Fox News, Mara Liasson, National Public Radio & Fox News, Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard & Fox News, Juan Williams, National Public Radio & Fox News and the Power Player of the Week is Mike Miller, Director of Operations, Republican National Convention.

  • Late Edition: Gov. Charlie Crist (R-FL); McCain supporter, Gov. Mark Sanford (R-SC); McCain supporter, Fred Thompson (R); former presidential candidate; McCain supporter, Rep. John Boehner (R-OH); House Minority Leader; McCain supporter, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA); McCain supporter, Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) Minnesota; McCain Supporter, Nancy Pfotenhauer, McCain Campaign adviser, Tom Daschle (D); former Senate Majority Leader, Obama Supporter, Sen. Christopher Dodd (D) Connecticut, Obama Supporter, David Paulison, FEMA Administrator, Howard Kurtz, host, CNN’s “Reliable Sources” media reporter, The Washington Post, Dana Milbank, columnist, The Washington Post, CNN contributor, Roger Simon, chief political columnist, Politico, Lynn Sweet, political columnist, The Chicago Sun-Times, Rachel Sklar, media editor, TheHuffingtonPost.com and Amanda Carpenter, national political reporter, Townhall.com. This is a three hour special show.

  • Fareed Zakara GPS: Mikhail Saakashvili, President of Georgia, Sergei Ryabkov, Deputy Russian Foreign Minister, Fred Krupp, president, Environmental Defense Fund, Richard Haass, president, Council on Foreign Relations, Andrew J. Bacevich, author, “The Limits of Power”, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Howard Fineman of Newsweek; Elisabeth Bumiller of the New York Times; Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune; and Kelly O’Donnell of NBC News.

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Roll Call’s David Drucker, Erin Billings and Emily Heil.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Minority Leader Rep. John Boehner (R-OH), Republican National Convention Chairman will be interviewed by Patrick Healy, New York Times, Political Reporter.

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Obama’s chief campaign strategist David Axelrod, Margaret Carlson, Kate O’Beirne and Bloomberg’s Hans Nichols.

  • This Is America with Dennis Wholey: NPR’s Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr, author of “Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium”

  • Larry Kane, Voice of Reason: GOP Leadership Council political director Mike Inganamort and Obama Pennsylvania communications director Sean Smith.

    Note: Reliable Sources is pre-empted.

  • Morning Reading List, 11.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You say “no way in hell” to group houses.

  • Stephen Manfredi, a Senior Account Executive with Shirley & Banister Public Affairs, has accepted a position at the White House as Associate Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives.

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “It’s not as if this president has been Mr. Openness. But by some important measures, George W. Bush is more accessible to the reporters who cover him than are some of the leading candidates to succeed him — most notably Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.”

  • The Statesman reports,Jim Lehrer sticks up for traditional media at UT”

  • A release announced, “Twin Cities Strategies, a special events and consulting firm serving clients for the 2008 Republican National Convention, today announced its partnership with Hoffman Communications, the Midwest’s premier events management and production company. The TCS/Hoffman partnership provides corporations, trade associations and state Republican Parties with the most effective, one-stop-shop for all of their 2008 RNC Convention events, media, strategic consulting and public relations needs.”

  • A release announced, “Acorn Media Group, a leading independent global media company, announces Bruce Belliveau as its Chief Financial Officer and Mark Stevens as its President of Acorn Media U.S. effective this month. Stevens replaces John Lorenz who was promoted to Vice Chairman. Far outpacing industry growth, Acorn Media Group continues to grow rapidly. The company projects $80 million in global sales from its four divisions in 2007, an increase of 33% over 2006.”

  • Washingtonian reports, “It’s official: Don Graham ‘gets it,’ perhaps more than any other big newspaper publisher.
As in ‘gets the Internet.’… This week Graham alerted Posties that their work is now part of Facebook, the social networking site that is drawing eyeballs across the globe. His e-mail introduced the new ‘widget’ to Post employees on Halloween night.”

  • A release announces, “From November 8 through 11, Jim Lehrer, anchor of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS, will lead a national conversation entitled Dialogues in Democracy: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness, as part of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions’ By the People project. The conversations — exploring the rights, responsibilities and expectations of American citizens — will occur in the historic buildings of Colonial Williamsburg, a seminal site of American democracy and citizenship. The final convocation, at which the ‘Declaration of Citizenship for the 21st Century’ will be debated, will take place in Colonial Williamsburg’s Capitol in the Hall of the House of Burgesses, where the founding generation produced the first comprehensive Declaration of Rights.”

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will launch a channel dedicated to the music of rock icons Led Zeppelin on 11/8. ‘XM LED: The Led Zeppelin Channel’ (XM-59) will feature the band’s complete audio catalog, interviews with band members, and other ‘unique content that celebrates the musical contributions of Led Zeppelin.’”

  • CNN Money reports, “Fitch Ratings said it believes the Hollywood writers’ strike has limited impact on the credit profile of the media and entertainment sector over the short-term.”

  • FishbowlLA reports, “Dan Cox informs us that he’s moved from the weirdly exciting California gubernatorial referendum of a few years back to cover a political race even more enthralling: Sixth-grade class president.”

  • Associated Press reports, “New York magazine agreed Tuesday to stop accepting sex ads after the local chapter of the National Organization for Women threatened protests outside the offices of the popular weekly publication.”

  • A release announced, “Bonneville DC’s Talk Radio 3WT (1500 AM, 820 AM, 107.7 FM) adds ‘The Stephanie Miller Show’ to its lineup, starting tonight at 7 p.m. Miller will be heard regularly on 3WT weekdays from 7-9 p.m.”

  • Tonight on Nightline, “correspondent Jake Tapper travels to Iowa where he talks to GOP candidate Rudy Giuliani.

  • Multichannel News reports, “Access Intelligence said Tuesday that it will fold 18-year-old industry publication Cable World in December.”

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “So this is a fun tale of media intrigue, media carping and the effort to deliver raw, unfiltered content without the interference of ‘a 26-year old reporter that really doesn’t know necessarily what’s really going on.’ If you find media covering media about media coverage insufferably boring, move right along, stat.” If you are uo for the rest, click here.

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner Inc’s AOL said on Wednesday it will buy Internet advertising technology company Quigo to bolster its ad force and make it more competitive with Google Inc and Yahoo Inc.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Add another item to the list of changes that the Murdoch era could usher in for The Wall Street Journal. Since March 2004, The Journal has maintained an exclusive partnership with the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House with which the paper collaborates on Journal-themed reference guides, crossword puzzle collections and some of the nonfiction books written by its reporters. To date, they’ve collaborated on at least 12 books, among them The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Business of Life, The Wall Street Journal Complete Identity Theft Guidebook and The Price of Admission, by The Journal’s former Boston deputy bureau chief Daniel Golden.”

  • Tech Confidential reports, “The American Antitrust Institute fired off a white paper Tuesday arguing that Google Inc.’s pending $3.1 billion agreement to acquire DoubleClick Inc. will hurt competition in the online advertising market.”

    Jobs

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Specialist, Renewals.

  • Smithsonian Publications is looking for an Associate Editor, Air & Space Magazine.

  • Meltwater Group Inc. (Media Monitoring Company) is looking for an International Management Trainee.

  • Baltimore Business Journal is looking for an Editorial Researcher.

  • Kiplinger’s Personal Finance is looking for an Investment Writer.

  • Elsevier is looking for an Experienced Association Editor.

  • The New Physician is seeking an associate editor.

  • U.S. Grains Council is looking for a Manager of Communications.

  • Culpeper Star-Exponent is looking for a Reporter.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a reporter.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Community news editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.13.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Third party in ’08? You think it is not going to happen.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the seventh consecutive week, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. Averaging 7.71 million Total Viewers and a 1.9/8 among Adults 25-54, ‘World News’ outperformed NBC by 280,000 Total Viewers and 80,000 key demo viewers. With last week’s win, ‘World News’ has now finished first among Total Viewers fourteen times in the last eighteen weeks and has placed first among Adults 25-54 thirteen times in the same period. This also marks ABC’s eighteenth win this season among key demo viewers.”

  • Deets from David Halberstam’s funeral service.

  • James Carville call your agent

  • A RCN release announced that the company won Stevie Awards for the categories of Best Turn Around Business and Best Communication Organization in The 2007 American Business Awards.

  • Slate is introducing an online video magazine. “In late June, Slate will launch Slate V, a new video-only site. Each weekday, Slate V will publish fresh video that brings the Slate sensibility to the news, politics, arts, culture, technology, business, and more.”

  • It’s your turn freelancers: “30 freelancers sound off on rules they’d wish their editors would follow

  • From DCRTV:

      Shales Mixes Up Scarboroughs – 6/13 – In the above Tom Shales DC Post piece on Dan Rather, Shales writes: “Rather said that he never planned an attack on the ‘Evening News’ or on Couric, but that he was asked about it by Chuck Scarborough, who has replaced the deposed Don Imus on morning radio and MSNBC-TV. ‘He asked me directly what I thought,’ Rather said. ‘It is my wont to answer a question directly. It was not planned.’” Ah, wasn’t he asked the question by Joe Scarborough, the MSNBC talker and former Congressman from Florida, and not Chuck Scarborough, the longtime NYC anchorman at WNBC-TV in NYC? Hmmm…..

  • Clarification to this post: Contrary to how he was described on the Politico’s website, David Baumann was not a staff writer but a contract writer, who had signed on to contribute for a few months.

  • Censure of Opie, Anthony irks fans

  • Robin Reid has a confession to make: “As a senior editor of The Politico, I have a terrible confession to make: I am not a politico.”

  • Paris Hilton’s problems represented only the second celebrity tabloid tale this year — the first being Anna Nicole Smith’s death — to make the roster of top five stories, according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index from June 3-8.”

  • The State Journal reports, “Three years after the parent company of The Charleston Gazette purchased its capital city rival, the Charleston Daily Mail, the U.S. Department of Justice has stepped in, declaring the sale as illegal.”

  • From the Washington Post: “Religion Finds a Home On TV, Then Adds On”

  • Politico reports, “Mitt Romney and Rudy Giuliani have both ‘personally assured’ Tim Russert that they will appear on ‘Meet the Press’ as part of the show’s meet the candidate series, according to ‘Meet’ executive producer Betsy Fischer.”

  • Bob Woodruff writes about and meeting with an interpreter in Syria who saved his life after the IED attack.

    Jobs

  • National Geographic is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • NPR is hiring for everything.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An NBC release announced that “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ topped the Sunday morning public affairs competition, winning the week ending Sunday, June 3, 2007 in total viewers, homes and in the key demographic adults 25-54.” On Sunday, “Meet the Press” attracted 3.308 million total viewers, a 37% advantage over CBS “Face the Nation”, 40% more than ABC “This Week”, and a 202% lead over FOX “News Sunday”.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of May 28 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continued its growth trend in Total Viewers. ‘Nightline’ grew year-to-year while its competitors declined. In addition, second quarter to date, ‘Nightline’ increased 4% in Total Viewers while both ‘Letterman’ and ‘The Tonight Show’ decreased.”

  • “News about an Atlanta man infected with a dangerous form of tuberculosis drew a large audience last week. The saga of the man’s illness and his travels abroad was the second most closely followed news story of the week – trailing only the situation in Iraq,” according to the Pew News Interest Index for the week of May 28.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “generation ago, federal regulators opened the way for consumers to buy telephones rather than rent them from the phone company. Now, the government has its sights on the television set-top boxes that consumers rent from cable or satellite companies.”

  • Freelance writer Kelly DiNardo has started her own blog.

  • Reuters reports, “General Electric Co.’s NBC Universal said on Wednesday it will allow personal Web sites to link to video snippets of NBC programs such as ‘Access Hollywood’, underscoring the Internet as a growing destination for video entertainment.”

  • Multichannel.com reports, “The newly anointed NBC Entertainment co-chair, Ben Silverman, is complaining that Nikki Finke ruined his big weekend when she blew out the blogsphere with her breaking news that Silverman would replace Kevin Reilly, and then said, ‘but as one source tells me, 36-year-old Ben ‘can barely manage his way out of a paper bag’ because of his extreme lifestyle, relentless ass kissing, and constant jetting around in his private plane.’”

  • MediaWeek.com reports, “Anyone who’s spent time watching lots of bad videos online in search of a few good ones knows Michael Caruso’s frustration. Caruso, the former editor of Wenner Media’s Men’s Journal and of Condé Nast’s Details, has channeled that frustration into a new Web site he founded, The Daily Tube, that promises to compile the best new videos across several subject areas: humor, celebrity, music, late-night category, political, sports and Web-based stars.”

  • Reuters reports, “Online auctioneer eBay Inc. said on Tuesday it is ready to begin auctioning advertising airtime on 2,300 participating U.S. radio stations, expanding on an existing plan to sell cable television ads.”

  • “Newspapers hoping to retain their readers and survive in the technological age must venture into the online and cellphone spheres, a World Association of Newspapers (WAN) meeting heard on Tuesday.”

  • ABC.com reports, “Last.fm, How Stuff Works, Comedy Central’s Honesty and EepyBird.com are among the top winners of this year’s Webby Awards.”

  • Media Matters has looked into how the press is covering the various looks of the White House candidates, including Rudy Giuliani, John McCain, Mitt Romney, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and John Edwards.

  • A reader writes, “Milbank has funniest little antenna extending 3 inches from his cell phone, which is clipped to his belt. Sweet, but nerdy.”

  • Old-House Journal is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • Thomas B. Fordham Foundation is looking for a Communications Director/Associate.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.22.07

  • An ABC release announces that “World News with Charles Gibson” will air a special series — “Key to the World” — reported by ABC News’ Bill Weir. “The series will take Weir on reporting assignments around the globe, and in conjunction, ‘World News’ will have a single commercial sponsor the first four Mondays in April — April 2, 9, 16, and 23.”

  • John Kelly uncovers “some surprises” at the Radio & Television Museum in Bowie, “a labor of love by members of the Radio History Society that opened in 1999.”

  • Charles Babington reports, “The proposed merger of the nation’s two satellite radio companies came under sharp criticism” Tuesday from Sen. Herb Kohl.

  • From The Hill:

      Reporters have a lot of access on Capitol Hill, but the Standing Committee of Correspondents made it clear this week that such access has its limits.

      Following an incident in which a reporter mistakenly walked onto the House floor, the standing committee issued a memo Tuesday stating, “Reporters are not allowed on the floor of the House or the Senate.”

  • 1M Comcast Subs Face C-SPAN2 Cutback

  • Tom Friedman celebrates 100 weeks of his book’s success.

  • In Memoriam: Catherine Seipp.

  • DCRTV reports, “XM Satellite Radio will launch a special radio channel featuring a mix of music and vintage audio dedicated to the sport. Play Ball will air from 3/30 through the end of opening day on 4/2 on XM-200.”

  • Politico’s Jonathan Martin reports how advances in media technology advances could make Sen. John McCain’s second bid for president a bumpier ride than his first run.

  • New York Times looks at how Iraq has changed the face of television “since the early, heady days of shock and awe.”

  • A tipster tells us about PBS: “You should know that there’s been some moving and shaking there. They hired a new SVP of Interactive — Jason Seiken, formerly executive editor of washingtonpost.com and something or other at AOL. Also, they hired Angela Morgenstern as new director of interactive. She used to head MTV News interactive (and before that produced for PBS).”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced that it is naming its internship program after former Vice President Whayne Dillehay, “in honor of more than 15 years of dedication and passion.”

  • Today at Nathan’s, Mark Plotkin will give an update on all things political before DC Police Chief Cathy Lanier.

  • Did the Edwards / Fox flap backfire? Either way, Paul Begala says it’s time to go Fox hunting

  • Michele McLellan and Tim Porter, authors of the new book News, Improved: How America’s Newsrooms Are Learning to Change, will present the findings from new national survey on training for U.S. midcareer journalists. Check it out at the news conference at the J.W. Marriott Tuesday, March 27 at 9 a.m. Eric Newton, Vice President/Journalism Program, of the Knight Foundation, will also be present.

  • The Northern Virginia Daily in Strasburg, Va., “needs a copy editor who knows the basics and is ready to take the next step.”

  • CQPolitics.com probably having a ton of fun with the Congress-March Madness nexus. Check out this, this, and this.

  • Don’t forget to check out the 2007 Reel Journalism: Screenings and Symposia which starts tonight. Check out the full schedule here.

  • GW announced the creation of a master’s degree program in strategic public relations through the Graduate School of Political Management. The program begins fal 2007.

  • Josh Gerstein discovers how a “New Technique Lets Bloggers Tackle Late-Night News Dumps.”

  • David Brooks got the shaft from Rudy Giuliani, who instead gave some love to Nicholas Kristof.

  • Sign the petition to make The Colbert Report a full hour.

  • John Hughes makes his pitch to keep Voice of America’s budget in tact.

  • The staff of the forth coming Portfolio have been given a gag order on Conde Nast’s new business magazine.

  • New Giuliani Book Coming Out

    From Soft Skull Press:

      Now that Rudy Giuliani has filed his statement of candidacy papers to the Federal Election Commission, Soft Skull Press is pleased to announce the publication of “AMERICA’S MAYOR, AMERICA’S PRESIDENT?: THE STRANGE CAREER OF RUDY GIULIANI,” the revised and expanded edition, edited by Robert Polner, with a Preface by Jimmy Breslin.

      Forthcoming April 2nd, this new edition includes Michael Powell of the New York Times on Rudy & Race; Paul Schwartzman of the Washington Post on his formative years; and Richard Steier on the Kerik Affair.