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Posts Tagged ‘Rupert Murdoch’s’

Separated at Birth: Rebekah Brooks

Disgraced British newspaper editor, Rebekah Brooks is back in the news. She was in court early on Friday morning and was granted bail until September while she waits to her trial over her role in the phone hacking coverup that has plagued Rupert Murdoch’s company. As we watched her walk into court, we realized she’s the spitting image of the latest Pixar heroine, Merida, from the movie, “Brave.”

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Devlin Barrett to WSJ

This just in…

AP Justice Department reporter Devlin Barrett leaving to take job with WSJ. Will do DC-based reporting as part of Rupert Murdoch‘s expanded coverage of New York. “Huge coup for WSJ,” our tipster opines.

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Barrett chats with MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow

Morning Reading List, 04.16.08

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Good morning Washington. Doug Heye celebrates a birthday today. Yesterday, the new Yahoo! election page went live in conjunction with Politico. And the first lady will soon co-host the “Today” show.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • A third of you recycle, but you are not that into avoiding plastic water bottles.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “How many times will upper management come up with quick money-maker schemes, spend money to put them in place and then refuse to give them the monetary and staff support they need to really be successful? And why does same upper management seem so mystified when said schemes completely tank? It’s all about making a quick buck, to hell with the product. I feel like I work at Wal-Mart.”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washingtonian’s Ben Clark has joined Fleishman-Hillard’s DC digital team.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Poynter’s Ethics and Diversity Fellow Tom Huang writes, “Let me be a realist, if not a pessimist: The diversity numbers released by the American Society of Newspaper Editors on Sunday worry me. A lot. At first glance, the overall numbers don’t seem too gloomy: In the past year, the percent of minorities working at daily newspapers grew a smidgeon — from 13.43 percent to 13.52 percent. But it’s the absolute number we should be worried about. The only reason why the percentage of minorities in newsrooms has essentially remained flat is because both white and minority journalists left our newsrooms at about the same rate”

  • “Republican John McCain was a significant or dominant factor in only 35% of the campaign stories last week. But though he trailed both Hillary Clinton (56%) and Barack Obama (46%) in exposure, he was the winner when it came to the media narrative for the week of April 7-13, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “The Washington Post Metro section has been hot on the trail lately, pursuing the story of full-length phone books getting decommissioned. From the sound of their breathless coverage, you would think there was only one left in the DC area — and that one was removed.”

  • On The Media reports, “Gene Weingarten, writer for the Washington Post Magazine, got an idea: he would lock himself in a room for 24 hours straight with 5 TV’s, 2 radios and a laptop all tuned to loud, opinionated pundits. After basically losing his mind, he tells us what he learned.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The number of newspaper journalists in the US fell last year by almost 5 per cent to a low of 52,600, the lowest it has been for almost 25 years and the biggest drop in 30 years. The new figures, released by the American Society of Newspaper Editors, reflects the attrition going on in the America media.”

  • The AP reports, “About half of the 1,326 employees at Media General Inc.’s Florida properties — including The Tampa Tribune and WFLA-TV — were offered buyout packages Monday as the struggling company tries to cut costs and consolidate platforms.”

  • Check out the winners of the “Best headlines of the year”

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    TV

  • Dan Rather On Les Moonves, The ‘Evening News,’ And Who Should Replace Katie When (Not If) She Goes

  • MSNBC won’t air ‘controversial’ gun ad

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was honored with a 2007 Sigma Delta Chi Award for excellence in journalism in the category of ‘Breaking News Coverage (Network/Top 25 Markets)’ for ‘The Massacre at Virginia Tech.’ The NBC News program was the only network evening news broadcast to win the prestigious award. This is the third consecutive year ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ has won for breaking news coverage.” Check out all of the winners here.

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of April 7-13. The ABC News broadcast averaged 8.03 million Total Viewers, and a 2.0/8 among Adults 25-54, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 110,000 Total Viewers and 160,000 key demo viewers. This marks the 15th time this season ‘World News’ has ranked first among Adults 25-54 and the 9th time this season the broadcast has ranked first among total viewers.”

  • Newsweek reports, “Craig Ferguson can’t beat Dave’s or Jay’s ratings, but he’s got something bigger: a date with the president.”

  • Check out “Bill Moyers Acceptance Speech for the Ridenhour Courage Prize” where he says journalists’ “deeper mission is to uncover the news that powerful people would prefer to keep hidden.”

  • The New York Times reports, “While the fate of Ms. Couric and the ‘CBS Evening News’ is in the headlines, the entire CBS News division represents only a fraction of the CBS broadcast network’s revenue. More perplexing is the prime-time schedule, where no new hit has emerged this year, and as a result, CBS is likely to lose the crown of most-watched network to the Fox network.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • In conjunction with Pope Benedict’s visit to the U.S., washingtonpost.com and Newsweek’s interactive feature on religion “On Faith” is hosting a live webcast. Anchored by On Faith founder and Washington D.C. insider Sally Quinn and Washington Post journalist Eugene Robinson, the video will stream live the mornings of April 16 and April 17 here. The first show begins at around 10 a.m. today.

  • Tech Crunch reports, “AOL will announce the acquisition of San Francisco-based Sphere, a blog content engine that launched in 2006. The price is not being disclosed, but sources are suggesting it’s in the $25 million range, or possibly a little more.”

  • The Los Angeles Times has a, “Interview with Ken Layne, new owner of Wonkette”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “That’s the idea behind a new hyperlink technology rolling out on parts of WashingtonPost.com Tuesday morning. Two of the paper’s blogs, The Fix and Celebritology, will introduce links powered by a tech start-up called Apture. By rolling the cursor over a link, readers can see what’s at the destination — be it an article, photo or video — without clicking through.”
  • Portfolio reports, “No wonder Rupert Murdoch’s in no hurry to do away with The Wall Street Journal’s online pay wall. Even with it still in place around large sections of the site, traffic is still growing at a most impressive rate. According to internal numbers, WSJ.com hosted 15 million unique visitors in March, a 175 percent increase over March 2007, says Alan Murray, executive editor of the Wall Street Journal Online. Page views came in at around 165 million, up 75 percent year-over-year”

  • The Washington Blogger April Meeting is tonight at 7:00PM at Regional Food and Drink. For more info, click here.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The New York Post reports, “Magazines that cover news, business and luxury goods were sent reeling in the first quarter of the year, while food magazines offered a few rays of light for the publishing industry, according to just released figures.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will be hosting NPR’s “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today.

  • A release announced, “The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) congratulates the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) for receiving a MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions. Established by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions recognizes and invests in small, emerging nonprofit organizations around the world that demonstrate exceptional creativity and effectiveness.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • The AP reports, “Rupert Murdoch and Sam Zell, two media figures who led major newspaper acquisitions in recent months, are among four new members joining the board of directors of The Associated Press, it was announced Monday at the news cooperative’s annual meeting.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Shares of media company News Corp., controlled by Rupert Murdoch, fell the most in five years after Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. and UBS analysts cut their outlook for the stock, citing concerns that growth will slow.”

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press announced Monday it will further cut fees paid by struggling newspaper members and will develop an advertising-supported service that will deliver stories and photos to advanced cell phones, including the iPhone.”

  • MediaChannel.org reports, “Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications today announced 22 finalists in five categories in the second annual Mirror Awards competition honoring excellence in media industry reporting. The competition drew more than 100 entries. The media’s top writers, readers and leaders will gather June 23 at 11:45 a.m. at the Rainbow Room, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City, to fete the winners.” For the list of winners, click here.

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    JOBS

  • Forbes Interactive Media is looking for a Regional Sales Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for a Marketing Manager.

  • Society of American Florists is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • “An international news wire service is looking for an entertainment anchor and general reporter with a journalism education and background to anchor a daily entertainment webcast for their website.”

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.20.08

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    Good morning Washington. Did you go to The Express’ happy hour last night at The Greene Turtle? Or perhaps you were at Al Neuharth Free Spirit Conference’s evening gala, which recognized “Free Spirit of the Year” Cathie Black. Or yet another birthday party for that reporter with the curliest chest hair in the business?

    The Newseum’s getting some serious dough, Tim Russert’s bobblehead only went for $46 on eBay, U.S News & World Report’s Alex Kingsbury, just back from Iraq, will be on Jon Stewart Thursday night and Lauren Conrad’s coming to the WHCA dinner!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • It’s not even close — you think the D.C. protests yesterday were annoying as hell.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Barbara Paulsen, former senior editor of National Geographic magazine, has been promoted to assistant executive editor for text.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports,Cliff Sloan, the publisher of Slate and vice president of business affairs at The Washington Post Co.’s online media subsidiary, will join the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in June as a partner in its intellectual property group.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The New York Observer reports,David Paterson and the Art of the Leak”

  • Reuters reports, “Dow Jones & Co, recently bought by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, is ending an agreement of more than 40 years to carry news from the Associated Press after the AP said it wanted more money.”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Now that Tribune Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Sam Zell’s not swearing so much in his meetings with staff, his national tour of the Chicago Tribune parent’s properties hasn’t gotten much attention. Which is too bad. Because what’s being said as he and Randy Michaels, Tribune Co.’s chief executive of Internet and broadcasting, continue their road show is still newsworthy—even if it has nothing to do with cursing, Cubs and Wrigley Field.”

  • E&P reports, “The Audit Bureau of Circulations has moved closer to an overhaul of how it counts paid newspaper circulation. During a meeting of its board of directors last week in Kiawah Island, S.C., the bureau approved modifications that will affect how publishers report starting April 1, 2009. Among those changes: Newspapers will be considered ‘paid’ by ABC regardless of the price.” And, BtoB reports, “ABC gives initial approval to U.S. newspaper rule changes”

  • The Washington City Paper’s City Blog announced, “You’re invited to celebrate the Best of the Nation’s Capitol at Washington City Paper’s Best Of D.C. Ballot Party at Lounge 201.” It is tonight! “Here’s what you get: Free drinks, free hors d’oeuvre, free conversation with other people who you may or may not like but you can at least make fun of. Plus: An opportunity to cast your votes for the best places and people in the DC Metro Area. Votes for the Best Of D.C. will be tallied on March 27th and the results will be showcased in the City Paper Best Of Issue, hitting newsstands April 18th! Best Of categories include Food and Drink, Arts and Entertainment, Goods and Services, and People and Places.”

  • E&P reports, “You may be surprised to learn that, precisely five years ago, at least one-third of the top newspapers in this country came out against President Bush taking us to war at that time. Many of the papers may have fumbled the WMD coverage, and only timidly raised questions about the need for war, but when push came to shove five years ago they wanted to wait longer to move against Saddam, or not move at all.”

  • John McCain failed the Jeff Stein test — a question Stein asked in 2006, “Can You Tell a Sunni From a Shiite?”

  • The New York Observer reports, “It’s 1 P.M.: Who Is on Clinton Phone? Howard Wolfson: Hillary Spokesguy’s Daily Conference Call Is Hottest Party Line”

  • The Tribune Chronicle reports, “It was incorrectly reported in Tuesday’s Tribune Chronicle that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton answered questions from voters in a local congressman’s office. Reporter John Goodall, who was assigned to the story, spoke by telephone with Hillary Wicai Viers, who is a communications director in U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson’s staff. According to the reporter, when Viers answered the phone with ‘This is Hillary,’ he believed he was speaking with the Democratic presidential candidate, who had made several previous visits to the Mahoning Valley. The quotes from Viers were incorrectly attributed to Clinton.”

  • The Crimson reports, “Former Managing Editor of the Wall Street Journal Paul E. Steiger spoke last night at the John F. Kennedy Forum at the Institute of Politics about the current recession in the newspaper business, contending that ‘we have not reached the bottom yet.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Lame duck reporters are bored”

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    TV

  • Obama Ratings Hit, Schedule Stays Packed

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research in metered markets for March 18, 2008, ABC News’ exclusive interview with Barack Obama which aired first on ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Leno’ and ‘Letterman’ in the metered markets. ABC’s ‘Nightline’ averaged a 4.0/9 household rating/share among the 56 metered markets which flew past ‘Leno’ 3.9/10 and ‘Letterman’ 2.5/6. Compared to the prior four week time period average, ‘Nightline’ is up 18% among households.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Oh, It’s On: Dan Rather’s Lawsuit Proceeds As Discovery Moves Forward”

  • Huffington Post’s Maia Szalavitz writes, “Wire v. The Media on Drugs II: You’re Right, David Simon, We Suck”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp.’s Fox passed CBS as the most-watched television network after its ‘American Idol’ singing contest topped ratings and the Hollywood writers strike limited competition from scripted shows.”

  • Machinist reports, “How local TV embraced fake news”

  • Media Daily News reports, “Big Video content producers need to come up with aggregate ratings that combine television viewing with online video consumption, says Patrick Keane, vice president and chief marketing officer for CBS Interactive, speaking Monday morning at MediaPost’s OMMA Global conference in Hollywood. The combined rating would provide media buyers with a cross-platform option that’s simpler and more detailed in terms of data, because of online metrics.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “An unusually hefty though widely expected U.S. Federal Reserve rate cut Tuesday led to the biggest Wall Street rally in five years, but media stocks underperformed.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Los Angeles Time reports, “Facebook Inc. is rolling out tighter privacy controls that allow users to decide which friends can see their profile information and other personal details, the popular social networking site announced during a briefing at its headquarters Tuesday.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commission’s auction of valuable wireless airwaves ended yesterday after raising a record $19.6 billion and setting the stage for the first nationwide network that would be open to all devices and software. The FCC would not yet name the winners of airwaves, so it was unknown whether a new company would enter the wireless world to compete against the two biggest carriers, AT&T and Verizon Wireless. Further, the sole bid for a block of spectrum to be used for public-safety workers was far below the minimum price set by the agency.” And, The Wall Street Journal reports, “After 261 rounds of bidding, a government auction of airwaves ended yesterday, raising almost $20 billion from companies hoping to build new broadband wireless networks for next-generation phones and other devices.”

  • Folio reports, “There’s still a lot of Internet out there. And for publishers joining — or cobbling together — mini ad networks, that means revenue. So says a new white paper released late last week by media investment banking firm DeSilva + Phillips. According to the report, Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail, the approval of Google’s $3.1 billion acquisition of DoubleClick shouldn’t spell doom for smaller ad networks.”

  • The National Press Photographers Association announced, “One of the most comprehensive and powerful visual compilations of America’s past five years of war in Iraq has been published by Reuters in partnership with MediaStorm.org. ‘BEARING WITNESS: Five Years Of The Iraq War’ is a multimedia gallery of photography, video, audio interviews, and informational graphics that’s a must-see for photojournalists.”

  • ars technica reports, “The man who spoke for Comcast at Harvard last month has told the Federal Communications Commission that the agency has no legal power to stop the cable giant from engaging in what it calls ‘network management practices’ (critics call it peer-to-peer traffic blocking). Comcast vice president David L. Cohen’s latest filing with the Commission claims that regulators can do nothing even if they conclude that Comcast’s behavior runs afoul of the FCC’s Internet neutrality guidelines.”

  • CyberJournalist reports, “Microsoft is building a new site called ‘Blews’ that scans the blogs to determine what are the hottest news stories.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Mediabistro reports, “So What Do You Do James Bennet, Editor of The Atlantic?”

  • The AP reports,Lynndie England, the public face of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a German news magazine that she was sorry for appearing in photographs of detainees in the notorious Iraqi prison, and believes the scenes of torture and humiliation served as a powerful rallying point for anti-American insurgents.”

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    RADIO

  • Politics and Prose announced, “Veteran reporter Daniel Schorr, the last of Edward R. Murrow’s legendary CBS team and currently senior news analyst for NPR, will discuss his book, Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium, at the Friendship Heights Village Center on Thursday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m.”

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    JOBS

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer.

  • Voice of America is looking for a Reporter and a News Division/writer.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.06.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s Alan Greenspan’s birthday and, on this day in 1981, Walter Cronkite signed off from CBS.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think John King is hotter than Wolf Blitzer.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • CQ’s Patrick Yoest is heading to Dow Jones

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Daily Collegian reports, “About 400 students gathered in the HUB Auditorium last night to hear esteemed journalist Dana Priest of The Washington Post speak as part of the Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers. Priest is a 2006 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for her disclosure of secret overseas CIA prisons. She has spent nearly 20 years reporting for The Washington Post, covering the CIA, military and counterterrorism.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Pulitzer-Winner David Cay Johnston on Times Buyout List”

  • From a tipster:

      the city paper’s article on david nakamura at the post is so silly. the city paper FOIA’d all these emails between Fenty and Nakamura — how much did that process take away from real government work? was this FOIA in the service of the public? or in the service of a bruised ego looking to settle a score?

  • API has “Five questions for … Richard Honack

  • Newspaper Association of America reports, “Some newspapers are methodically going greener, reducing energy consumption and saving money”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “Nothing seems to make our local paper happier than spotting a neighborhood in the midst of a renaissance, a rebirth, or just sort of coming back. Today, we get the happy headline: ‘A Rapid Renaissance in Columbia Heights’ under the byline of Paul Schwartzman.”

  • Iraq Was Invaded In 2002, As Far As Times Critic Is Concerned

  • The AP reports, “Moody’s Investors Service is considering downgrading New York Times Co.’s credit rating because of declining advertising revenue, the ratings agency said Tuesday. Moody’s is reviewing New York Times’ ‘Baa1′ credit rating, which implies ‘lower-medium grade” credit quality.’”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Regular readers of the Wall Street Journal will notice something new in Friday’s editions — a sports page that uses content from one of the many businesses owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.”

  • Politico reports, “Obama’s Rezko ties escape national radar”

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    TV

  • A tipster tells us, “In a promo for MSNBCs political coverage this morning, shots of most of their ‘personalities’ were shown (in the context of the best political team on TV, or whatever the slogan was) with one notable exception: Tucker Carlson. Why is he ignored by MSNBC management?”

  • TVNewser provides an abridged version of Howard Kurtz’s 2,500 word dissertation on election coverage.

  • In the Center On Primary Night

  • The Deal.com reports, “Timing is everything: Time Warner-Cablevision deal likely”

  • Reuters reports, “Landmark Communications is seeking up to $5 billion for the Weather Channel cable television network, with preliminary bids due next week, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter.”

  • A release announced, “Senator Kerry sent a letter to Kevin Martin, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission today, asking him to investigate an Alabama television station that ‘blacked out’ during a controversial segment of 60 Minutes. Allegations have been raised that the blackout, which the station blames on ‘technical difficulties’, was an example of censorship.”

  • Super Tuesday II: The Cable Ratings

  • TVWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin may be winning the fight he has picked with TV networks that air racy programming. Mr. Martin’s agency lost the last major indecency court case in federal appeals court and he’s awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision on whether it will resuscitate that action against Fox.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “TV ratings have been the gospel for the broadcasting and ad industries for nearly 60 years. They are the yardstick by which our business has determined success or failure; the reason why ‘Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip’ was canceled, why Fox loves Simon Cowell and why the Super Bowl continues to be the most important TV event every year.”

  • TVNewser reports, “America’s Election HQ, the one-hour political show that premiered last week at 5pmET, has been extended past its original end date of yesterday. The FNC program, temporarily taking the place of Big Story, will air through the end of this week.”

  • A Situation Room viewer writes, “When the phone rings at 3:00A.M., We want Wolf Blitzer to answer the phone in the situation room.”

  • Who’s That Reporter In My Studio?

  • Columbia Journalism Review writes, “Fox Business Network’s populist sensibility is refreshing, sort of, but nobody’s watching. Here’s why

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger March Meeting is set for Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00PM at RFD. To RSVP, click here.

  • Nieman Watchdog reports, “Saul Friedman: Mainstream Black Columnists and Barack Obama”

  • A tipster writes in “pr maven gloria dittus won a big award last night and the national museum of women in the arts. charlie cook introduced her, debbie dingell also at the party.”

  • Folio reports, “National Geographic Renews Legal War Over Digital Archive”

  • DMNews reports, “Southern Progress Corporation (SPC), a subsidiary of Time Inc., has launched an online portal, MyHomeIdeas.com, highlighting content from its shelter magazines and book line.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “iReport launched to be like ‘YouTube with focus on personal reporting’, claims CNN director”

  • Columbia Journalism Review reports,Jeannie Kever began her Houston Chronicle column yesterday — a column applauding the ‘US media’ for avoiding the ‘Texas cowboy stereotype’ in its primary coverage of her state”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Time Online reports, “Permira, the British private equity group, has emerged as a potential suitor for Reed Business Information, the trade magazines arm of Reed Elsevier, which could soon be for sale for about £1.25 billion.”

  • iReport, You Decide (if This Crap is Worth Your Time)

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple reports, “Washingtonian Publisher Has ‘Liable’ Concerns”

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    BOOKS

  • Washingtonian’s Garrett Graff writes, “Newsweek columnist Eleanor Clift likely wishes she didn’t have a reason to write her new book, Two Weeks of Life: A Memoir of Love, Death and Politics. Two of her previous books were written with her late husband, Tom Brazaitis, Washington bureau chief of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The new one is Clift’s journal of Brazaitis’s last days, when he was in hospice care with cancer.”

  • Publisher’s Weekly reports, “The New York Times reported Monday that the Far Eastern Economic Review, which Rupert Murdoch recently acquired, killed a review of the Viking Australia book Rupert’s Adventures in China due to the book’s unfavorable look at Murdoch. With the book set for U.S. release this summer, it’s unclear how the media will handle it.”

  • Ars Technica reports, “Book lovers have a message for e-book makers: you can have my paperback when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. We reported yesterday on the 2008 Digital Entertainment Survey from the UK, which found that 70 percent of Internet users would stop sharing files if they received notification from their ISP. But tucked in the survey data was another fascinating finding about the strength of consumer attachment to traditional paper books.”

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    JOBS

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Education Programming Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Hillary will win Ohio.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Rush and Malloy reports, “It must be exasperating to be Christopher Hitchens. Recently voted the fifth most important intellectual in the world, Hitchens was nice enough to the respected war correspondents on the panel he moderated Thursday at the IFC theater, but he eviscerated members of the audience whose comments or questions he deemed not quite up to par.”

  • The Press Gazette reports,Rupert Murdoch’s acquisition of the Wall Street Journal will not have an impact on the Financial Times because there is a ‘fundamental difference’ between the two titles, the FT Group chief executive has told analysts”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Wash Post editor says controversial piece was ‘tongue-in-cheek’”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the March 4 Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage, the Politics section and the ABC News NOW site on ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, March 4 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue until 11:00p.m., ET.”

  • A CN8 release announced, “As all eyes follow the campaign trail, tune in to CN8, The Comcast Network on Tuesday, March 4 at 9 p.m. CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special extended two-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of the pivotal primary elections in Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas and Vermont. Doyle will be joined in studio by CN8 Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief Robert Traynham; CN8 political analysts Brad Brewster, Bill Pascrell III and Steve Ayscue; and political commentator Joe Watkins, all of whom will provide viewers with an inside look at the candidates, platforms and issues impacting these states.”

  • A Bloomberg TV announced, “Bloomberg’s Peter Cook will anchor live business & the ballot coverage from Bloomberg World Headquarters in New York … Bloomberg’s Lizzie O’Leary will be with the Obama campaign, Margaret Popper with the Clinton campaign, and Hans Nichols with the McCain campaign. Bloomberg contributors Stephanie Cutter and Terry Holt provide political analysis. And Kathleen Hays talks to top Wall Street economists for their perspective.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Despite fears of a recession and a crippling writers’ strike that has left television broadcasters bleeding viewers, ad buyers and network executives say the annual ad-buying ritual known as the ‘upfront’ is likely to be stronger this year than last.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Comcast Corp. (CMCSA) has found allies in its fight to convince the Federal Communications Commission that it was doing nothing wrong when it slowed customers’ access to certain applications on its high speed Internet network.”

  • Brit Hume spoke to David Barron of The Houston Chronicle and he reflected on the election and talked about both Obama and Clinton, as well as past elections.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, the Time Warner Inc. unit trying to catch up to Yahoo! Inc. and Google Inc. in Internet traffic, plans to start at least a dozen Web sites in the next six months to attract more advertisers.”

  • The New York Review of Books writes, “Wikipedia: The Missing Manual”

  • The Times Online reports, “New York Times under fire for slow switch to online”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Jobs question as Reuters’ £8.7bn merger is agreed”

  • Blogger News Network reports,Maureen Dowd starts her New York Times column on Sunday, ‘Channeling her inner Cheney, Hillary Clinton dropped a fear bomb, as Michelle Obama might call it, implying in a new ad that if her opponent is elected, your angelic, innocent, sleeping children could die in a terrorist attack’ — a reference to her latest campaign ad (video link), which asks when the phone rings at 3 a.m. in the White House because something has happened ‘in the dangerous world,’ who do you want answering the phone? Not to be outdone, Dowd’s counterpart Frank Rich titles his column, ‘McCain Channels His Inner Hillary’ and writes that the presumptive GOP candidate ‘is emulating almost identically the suicidal Clinton campaign against Mr. Obama. He has mimicked Mrs. Clinton’s message and rhetorical style, her tone-deaf contempt for Mr. Obama’s cultural appeal, and her complete misreading of just how politically radioactive the war in Iraq remains …’ And recently within two days of each other, Boston Globe columnist Ellen Goodman and Dowd both argued that Barack Obama is channeling his inner woman. (Goodman: ‘Now we see a woman running as the fighter and a man modeling a ‘woman’s way’ of leading.’ Dowd: ‘The first serious female candidate for president was rejected by voters drawn to the more feminine management style of her male rival.’) So McCain is channeling his inner Hillary who is channeling her inner Cheney, and Obama is channeling his inner woman — which should mean that like McCain he is channeling his inner Hillary since she is the only woman in the race — but doesn’t, since Hillary is channeling her inner Cheney. Got that?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Newsweek’s Evan Thomas writes, “Is the mainstream press unbiased? No, but we aren’t ideological. What we really thrive on is conflict.”

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “New York’s senior Democratic senator, Charles Schumer, told an audience the evolution of the modern Democratic Party and its success with young voters can be traced to the party’s adaptations to the death of older news sources like the national news and weekly news magazines.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Mags Grow Online but Still Dwarfed by Web Bigs”

  • Folio’s Mark Newman writes, “Editors vs. Art Directors: They make a great team—but the editor is always right.”

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    RADIO

  • Bloomberg Radio announced, “Bloomberg Radio will begin coverage of March 4th primaries from 7pm-11pm ET tomorrow. Tom Moroney will host a special edition of Bloomberg ‘Simply Put.’ Hear Bloomberg Radio Nation wide on satellite radio: XM channel 129 or Sirius channel 130. In New York City, tune into 1130 on the AM dial”

  • An NPR release announced, “NPR News will offer live comprehensive broadcast and webcast coverage of the March 4 primaries starting at 10:00 PM (ET) with NPR newsmagazine All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel and Melissa Block as anchors. The special is slated to conclude at 11:00 PM (ET). Voters in Texas, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont will be participating in this round of primaries and the results from this critical day of primaries may determine the Democratic nominee for President.”

  • Barron’s reports, “XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) and Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) today extended their merger agreement, which had been set to expire tomorrow, to May 1. The two companies continue to wait a decision on the deal from the FCC and the Department of Justice.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Supreme Court this week may reopen for the first time in more than 30 years the debate over what qualifies as an ‘indecent’ broadcast. The media environment has changed dramatically since 1978, when the court last ruled on this issue: Today’s viewers and listeners are exposed to the more freewheeling cable TV, Internet and ‘shock jocks’ on satellite radio.”

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    BOOKS

  • New York Magazine reports, “The Hachette Book Group recently distributed hundreds of Sony Readers to its editors and publishers. ‘People are evangelical about it,’ says publisher Jonathan Karp, who has about 30 submissions on his Reader. ‘If you’re traveling, this is so much easier than lugging around manuscripts. It’s good for reading in bed, too.’ Agents selling to Hachette’s imprints are now required to e-mail their texts to acquiring editors, who download them to their Readers; paper manuscripts are no longer routinely circulated.”

  • Radar reports, “The mere mention of technology or sociology makes me want to run to The Hills and hide. Once nestled comfortably in the folds of a vapid yet soothing conversation between Heidi and Spencer at Don Antonio’s, I often forget that science even exists. It might be, however, that my aversion to expanding beyond the reaches of gossip and reality TV, makes me the ideal target audience for Clay Shirky’s excellent Here Comes Everybody, The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. All it took was peppering social-networking theory with a little blogging, Facebook, and Paris Hilton context to get me in step with the CNET crowd!”

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    JOBS

  • Atlantic Media Company is offering an Editorial Diversity Fellowship.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an Communications Specialist

  • Human Rights Campaign is looking for an Editorial & Web Content Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.20.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you did not have to work on Monday.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Wonkette takes a look at the latest David Brooks column calling it “the worst column in American History”.

  • Gawker reports, “Alt-weekly crusader and Washington City Paper editor Erik Wemple wrote the definitive story on the battle between traditional newsrooms and their web counterparts, where ‘definitive’ means ‘extraordinarily long and often forgetting to make a larger point in its various attempts to embarrass the Washington Post.’ It’s still entertaining though, as a case study in precisely how, over and over again, one should not roll out and maintain the web side of a major publication.”

  • Portfolio reports, “The new (and only) woman on Rupert Murdoch’s board is a 27-year-old fledgling opera diva. Murdoch may have gotten more than he bargained for.”

  • Media Life reports that Sam Zell “who recently took over Tribune Co., matters these days because he’s a new kind of newspaper owner, of the sort that has a lot of journalists worried. Their worry is that he will trim costs even closer to the bone at the once-proud Los Angeles Times and Baltimore Sun, among others in his portfolio, pulling out profits even if it’s at the risk of killing these papers.”

  • Deuzeblog reports, “Sometimes you do not want to be right. And I certainly do not want to claim credit. To a large extent many have written about it, signaled it at various talks and debates, blogged about it, and heard about it from many sources throughout the industry: the media workforce is steadily shrinking. Via Patrick Phillips, editor at IWantMedia, comes this report on AdAge: ‘Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low. Newspaper Slump and the Shift to Digital, Direct Take Toll on Employment.’ This follows last year’s reports by IWantMedia and by Challenger, Gray & Christmas (as reported by UPI) on media industry job cuts, signaling a rise of 88% of job cuts throughout the US media industry in 2006 over the year before.”

  • Reuters reports, “Canadian electronic publisher Thomson Corp won conditional permission from the European Commission on Tuesday to buy Reuters, a deal that will create the world’s leading provider of news and data for professional markets.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News’ Senior Foreign Correspondent Jim Sciutto, producer Angus Hines, and field producer/cameraman Tom Murphy won a 2007 George Polk Award for Television Reporting, Long Island University announced today. ABC News was the only television news organization to receive a Polk Award.”

  • CNN is sweet: They were the only network to go back and rebroadcast Hillary Clinton’s concession speech that Obama cut short.

  • Fired for his Huffington Post blog posts, former CNN producer Chez Pazienza writes about the experience on Huffington Post.

  • The Boston Globe calls Brit Hume “the biggest romantic on television”.

  • Spend an evening with Tucker!

  • TVNewser reports on the latest “Obama/Osama Confusion”. Also, Gawker asks, “Verbal slips are one thing, but how the hell does this make it from the graphics department to the air without anyone noticing?”

  • A C-SPAN release announced that this Saturday, Tavis Smiley Presents, “State of the Black Union 2008: Reclaiming our Democracy, Recasting our Future” from 9:00 A.M.-5:30 PM live Coverage From Ernest E. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA.

  • Slate’s Troy Patterson says Karl Rove “offers clarity, concision, humility, good humor, good posture…”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Gawker reports, “The George Polk awards — described by blogger Will Bunch as the ‘Golden Globes of American journalism’ — were announced early this morning. One of them went to a blogger who blogs! Far out! An army of Davids has stormed the gates! Joshua Micah Marshall of Talking Points Memo (a blog!!) won the Polk Award for Legal Reporting, for his role in exposing the US Attorneys scandal that eventually brought down Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.”

  • Christopher Hitchens asks, “What is the point of a paper of record that decides the untarnished record is too much for readers?”

  • The latestWashington Social Diary is up.
  • His Extreme-ness points out the latest in “Must See” facial hair.

  • Beltway Confidential’s Julie Mason says, “Nothing says ‘congressional dinner’ like Miss America.” Check out her pics here.

  • Variety reports, “Variety, in association with Jobster, today launches the Biz (Variety.com/thebiz), the first social networking website for the entertainment business.”

  • Don’t forget — The Washington Blogger February Meetup is tonight! To RSVP, click here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “Broadcasters and popular websites will have to flag up material deemed unsuitable for children under a code of conduct published on Monday. The guidelines, which have been endorsed by the BBC, Channel 4, Bebo, Google and Yahoo, are designed to protect children from accessing harmful, violent or pornographic sites on the internet and on mobile phones.”

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    RADIO

  • The R&R 2008 News/Talk/Sports Award Nominees have been announced! Check out the nominees here, including WTOP!

  • CNNMoney.com reports, “But last year, a doozy of a merger was announced while most traders were sleeping in — Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) and XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) unveiled plans to combine. At the time, the two companies said they expected to complete the $13 billion merger of equals by the end of 2007, pending regulatory approval. Flash forward to today. Although shareholders of both companies have approved the merger, the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission have yet to give their blessing.”

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    JOBS

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for Top Sales People and an Accounts Payable Clerk.

  • Bisnow on Business is seeking a Technology Reporter with Flair.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an ENPS Project Manager.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor/Proofreader.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a News Producer, Overnight.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • Landmark Community Newspapers of Maryland Inc. is looking for an Editor.

  • The Bay Net.com is looking for a Local/Breaking News Reporter.

  • International Reporting Project is looking for a Communications Coordinator/Webmaster.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.27.07

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

  • You are not encouraging your kids to follow in your journalism footsteps.

    Television

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of November 12, 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54.”

  • The Carville-Matalin Joke Is on Us

  • New York Magazine reports,Dan Rather’s Last Big Story Is Himself”

  • Brokaw disses Limbaugh.

  • New York Times reports, “The head of the Federal Communications Commission is struggling to find enough support from a majority of the agency’s commissioners to regulate cable television companies more tightly.”

  • Looking into Fred Thompson’s claim against Fox News, The Huffington Post reports, “Evidence actually suggests a strong relationship between the Tennessean and the network that reports so that you can decide.”

  • The Street reports, “For investors, new media ownership rules proposed by the Federal Communications Commission are a sign that TV companies have little prayer of getting bigger anytime soon.”

  • FOX News Channel will carry a live feed of the Des Moines, Iowa Democrat and Republican debates hosted by Iowa Public Television and the Des Moines Register. Both debates will air on FNC at 2:00 p.m. EST with the Republican debate on Wednesday, Dec. 12th and the Democratic debate on Thursday, December 13th.

  • TVNewser reported last week, “MSNBC’s Tucker Carlson, a Dancing with the Stars contestant last year, made a return appearance on tonight’s show. In a spoof skit, Carlson — along with fellow ex-contestants Lisa Rinna, Harry Hamlin, and Laila Ali – check into ‘dance rehab’ (who knew?) in Malibu because they ‘haven’t been able to let go of being on Dancing With the Stars.’”

  • This Wednesday, the Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington will present Michael Jack, President and General Manager of WRC-TV the Silver Medal Award at a luncheon event at the Willard Hotel.

  • “Not only was Keith Olbermann doing his normal Sunday night gig on NBC’s Football Night in America, he also lent his voice to two popular Fox sitcoms,” TVNewser reports.

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “When Tom Brokaw, an old-time mainstream media figure in his own right, says he thinks print newspapers won’t be around in 10 years, that’s probably not a good sign for the industry.”

  • CNN’s Christiane Amanpour explains the safari-jacket look that has become her signature style.

  • Washington Post reports,George W. Hughes, 67, a retired broadcast engineer with ABC News and a dedicated model-train enthusiast, died Nov. 16 of respiratory failure at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington County. He was a resident of South Riding.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News correspondent Lara Logan and her team won the Association of International Broadcasters’ award for ‘Clearest Coverage of a Single News Event.’”

  • “mediabistro.com’s series So What Do You Do? features NBC News’ Middle East correspondent Richard Engel.”

  • Thompson Slams Fox News While On Fox News

    Radio

  • Washington City Paper’s Dave McKenna explores, “The decline of Sam Huff and Redskins radio”

    Online Media

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News and Facebook have launched a partnership focused on the 2008 presidential election. In this first of its kind collaboration, Facebook will feature an application that will provide its 56 million active users with tools for supporting candidates and discussing the campaign on Facebook combined with ABC News political content and information, including the latest news from the campaign trail.”

  • Slate reports, “You know it’s 2007 when a candidate, in this case Mike Huckabee, holds a bifurcated conference call, first with reporters, then with bloggers. I listened in on both calls to see what the differences were. The reporters’ questions were much more concise and polished. But the bloggers’ questions were more substantive by a long shot.”

  • Sky News reports, “The man behind one of the world’s most influential news websites says there’s everything to play for in the battle to win the trust of TV viewers, newspaper readers and web users — and, he says, it won’t all go the way of the big corporations. Matt Drudge of www.drudgereport.com was speaking to Sky News in his first interview for four years.”

    Newspapers

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes,Joan Walsh, editor-in-chief of Salon.com, posted a column Monday asking me to get involved in the recent ‘brawl’ on the op-ed page of The Times over the meaning of Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign visit to Philadelphia, Miss., where he told a mostly-white crowd, ‘I believe in states’ rights.’ Was it a coded appeal to Southern whites to vote Republican because Reagan and his party would side with them against efforts by blacks to achieve equal rights, as liberal columnists Paul Krugman and Bob Herbert contended?”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “The Washington Post stands accused this week of jumping the gun for published information embargoed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. The Post story, by Johannesburg correspondent Craig Timberg, scooped the competition by reporting the United Nations’ plans this week to announce that it was drastically cutting its estimate of the size of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic from about 40 million to about 33 million. The Post published the story to the Web on Nov. 19, and led with the story in its Nov. 20 print edition.”

  • “While the national news media focused heavily on the 2008 presidential campaign last week, the public divided its interest between the campaign and the Iraq war. More than one-fifth of the national newshole (21%) was devoted to the presidential campaign, while news about the war — including the situation in Iraq, returning U.S. troops and the Iraq policy debate — drew only about half as much coverage,” according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

  • The Independent reports, “Rupert Murdoch has admitted to a parliamentary inquiry that he has ‘editorial control’ over which party The Sun and News of the World back in a general election and what line the papers take on Europe.”

  • Reuters reports, “The U.S. media industry is on the brink of a second downturn in a decade, one that could accelerate the divisions between fast-growing targeted advertising and traditional formats aimed at mass audiences.”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is rumoured to be in takeover talks with LinkedIn, the professional networking site founded by Reid Hoffman.”

  • New York Times reports, “The curious relationship between Hillary Rodham Clinton, presidential candidate, and Rupert Murdoch, media baron, flashed briefly before the eyes of Iowans on Saturday night during a Clinton campaign event.”

  • Washington Post reports,Juanita Daigle of Baton Rouge is listed as one of the thousands of people who sent e-mails to the Federal Communications Commission opposing the proposed merger between the satellite radio networks XM and Sirius. But Daigle said she never sent an e-mail and is distressed that anyone would think she did. ‘How did they get my name?’ she asked. ‘I don’t want someone using my name for something I don’t even know about.’ A check by The Washington Post of 60 people whose names were attached to identical, anti-merger e-mails instigated by the National Association of Broadcasters, a major opponent of the merger, produced mostly unanswered phone calls and recordings saying the phones were disconnected. Of the 10 people reached, nine said they never sent anything to the FCC, and only one said she remembered filling out something about Sirius but did not recall taking a position on a merger.”

  • “Fifty three percent of 300 media, advertising and entertainment executives believe writers should continue to ‘hold out for everything they want,’ with 47 percent voting for them to ‘pick up their pencils and get back to work.’ According to the poll conducted at www.jackmyers.com, a slight majority of a group that should be expected to be more sympathetic to the networks and studios express support for the Writers Guild of America.”

  • Vote now for the I Want Media 2007 Media Person of the Year.

  • Everything you have always wanted to know about André Wells’ style is right here.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “New York Daily News publisher Mort Zuckerman has told a House of Lords committee that new online business models for newspapers are just substituing ‘pennies for dollars’.”

  • DMNews reports, “The Wall Street Journal Europe has signed an agreement with The Jerusalem Post, putting the Post in charge of all distribution, printing, sales and marketing for WSJE in Israel.”

  • PRWeek reports, “The Economist has kicked off an online debate series to extend its brand to the social-media sphere. The first debate series, tackling education, launched last month. The second series is set for December.”

  • 23/6 reports, “With George W. Bush’s hapless former press secretary Scott McClellan issuing bleats of blame about having been tricked into lying to the press about the Plame affair, Paul Slansky looks back at some other White House mouthpieces.”

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “In liberal Democratic circles, the debate over Social Security has taken a dangerous ‘don’t worry, be happy’ turn. … One prominent practitioner of this misguided approach is New York Times columnist Paul Krugman.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Back in August, Dow Jones and News Corp announced the names of five elderly appointees to the board that will oversee the editorial independence of The Wall Street Journal—a body established in response to Rupert Murdoch’s takeover. A month later, one of those appointees, former Republican Congresswoman Jennifer Dunn, died. The group hadn’t even met, and it was already down one.”

  • The City Paper has now launched a video component.

  • A release announced, “The Society of Professional Journalists is pleased to announce that it is now accepting entries for the Sigma Delta Chi Awards, which honor excellence in professional journalism in 48 categories, covering print, radio, television, newsletters, photography, online and research.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “The proposed merger between XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. looked dead on arrival back in February, with federal regulators appearing unlikely to give their approval of the $5 billion merger. Nine months later, Wall Street is picking up a different signal: that the deal might somehow pass muster”

  • Jonathan Miller has reappeared on the Internet scene, this time as a member of the board of directors for online search ad management startup, Clickable. Miller’s return comes after a rancorous departure from Time Warner, where he served as CEO of AOL. His landing pad, called Clickable, recently debuted their technology at the TechCrunch 40 conference in September.”

  • Politico reports, “On the evening of Nov. 13, the Wall Street Journal’s Paul Steiger received the prestigious Fourth Estate Award from the National Press Club, in Washington D.C., following a light-hearted roast from guests such as Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie.”

  • Clinton Will Honor CBS Picket Line If Writers Strike

  • Wall Street Journal reports,Janet Grimley had some hard-won investment wisdom to share with colleagues at a gathering earlier this fall of the American Association of Sunday and Feature editors in Savannah, Ga. ‘Look at your comics pages like a stock portfolio,’ advised Ms. Grimley, an assistant managing editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. ‘Diversify. You need to have some risky comics,’ for instance the slightly subversive observational strip ‘F Minus,’ and ‘some safe purchases like the old favorites.’ Such ‘safe purchases’ would include blue chips like ‘Blondie,’ ‘Beetle Bailey,’ ‘Dennis the Menace’ and ‘Hagar the Horrible.’”

  • The Daily Princetonian reports, “In an age where print magazines are increasingly giving way to online journalism, The New Yorker is more important than ever, editor-in-chief David Remnick ’81 told a packed audience of senior citizens, faculty members and students.”

    Jobs

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. is looking for an Editor and a Reporter.

  • Transport Topics Publishing Group is looking for a staff Reporter.

  • American University is looking for a Communications Career Advisor.

  • Danville Register & Bee is seeking a sports reporter/page designer.

  • Observatory Group, LLC is looking for a ECB Analyst.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • National Journal reports, “Average time spent consuming news on a typical workday,” broken down by type of Washingtonian.

  • The Pew Talk Show Index for November 4-9 shows, Dennis Kucinich’s call to impeach Vice President Cheney made nary a blip with the general media last week but it was a big story on in the talk media, especially on the left side of the talk radio dial. Meanwhile the many angles of the 2008 campaign gave everyone grist to talk about.”

  • Deb Howell weighs in on Tim Page.

  • Media General D.C. Bureau Shuffle Cuts Staff, Expands Web

  • NYT on Shep Smith: “Fox Cable Guy Edges Into the Big Pay Leagues

  • When it comes to Newsweek’s hiring of Rove and DailyKos, CJR says they “couldn’t be more predictable.”

  • From DCRTV:

      Adrienne Mitchell will host a new show on DC-based XM Satellite Radio’s presidential election channel “POTUS ’08″ (XM-130) starting Monday, 11/19. The former WTOP anchor and editor will host “The Race” weekdays from 7 PM to 9 PM. The show will focus on the campaign news of the day, plus interviews with journalists and newsmakers…..

  • Inside Cable News & Brian Stelter: Together.

  • Jack Shafer on “Big Media Octopuses, Cutting Off Tentacles” and “Why Newspapers Love the Striking Screenwriters

  • Inside Cable News’ What’s Hot/What’s Not.

  • Local Oscar hopes for Sean and Andrea Nix Fine and Ted Leonsis.

  • Can you answer CQ’s political Trivia for November 16?

  • An RCN release announced, “RCN Corporation … will be a Corporate Partner of MLS Cup 2007, Major League Soccer’s Championship game between the New England Revolution and the Houston Dynamo, which will be held Sunday, November 18, at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.”

  • “SAIS International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellows Libby Casey, a reporter with KUAC-FM in Fairbanks, Alaska; Eliza Barclay, a freelance print reporter in Mexico City; and Krista Kapralos, a reporter with the The Herald in Everett, Washington, will discuss their overseas reporting experiences. Members of the public should RSVP to IRP at irp@jhu.edu or 202.663.7726.”

  • Check out FNC’s Carl Cameron new blog from the campaign trail.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press writes, “Nice Try, CBS, But Rather’s Lawsuit Has Merit”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. said Friday its ad sales from continuing operations dipped 0.7 percent in October on softness in its publishing division. Total revenue from continuing operations edged up 1 percent.”

  • Matt Welch writes, “The funniest thing about anti-media activists — whoops, I mean “public interest groups” — is that their sky-is-falling brief against big media consolidation always (and I mean always) disintegrates on contact with what I like to call “personal experience.” As in, theirs. And mine.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “The leading candidate is a woman, and trailing her are a mixed-race man and a white man. Thus, the contest must be all about gender and race, right? Well, no. But that’s how the media coverage of the Democratic presidential race often reads.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook, “The next time you stop by the White House press room, be sure to admire Julie Mason’s rocking ‘rocket-red’ ‘do. Ed Henry has a new 20-YEAR calendar. Playbook booked him for his birthday in 2009 – we were both open!”

  • Public Eye reports, “Game, set, match, asterisk. The contest/discussion about who or what will be Time’s ‘Person of the Year’ is over. It’s Steroids. Yesterday’s federal indictment of Barry Bonds only sealed the deal.”

  • Susan Katz Keating reports, “This just in… The New Republic is scrambling to fill ‘an immediate opening’ for an editor to run its fact-checking shop. What happened to the old fact-otum? Has the prior chief been banished in the wake of L’Affair Beauchamp? As you will recall, Scott Thomas Beauchamp, an Army private, created quite a stir with his wild stories of American soldiers misbehaving in Iraq. The stir became a scandal when it turned out the stories were fabricated. Now it looks as if TNR wants to make sure this type of thing doesn’t repeat itself.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes,Mimi Valdes Ryan has a tough job. On Nov. 5, she became the top editor of Latina, a magazine and Internet operation, which is run by Latina Media Ventures and caters to Hispanic women.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABCNews.com Changes, Again”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Why Does Fox News Favor Giuliani? Well, Lots Of Reasons”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim looks into “The art of the leak”

  • Murdoch’s free WSJ.com could hurt parts of Dow

  • E&P reports, “It’s not often you see The New York Times’ editorial board joining forces with outsiders to promote political discussions. But that is just what the newspaper’s opinion-makers are doing through the ’10 Questions’ project, an online effort aimed at getting presidential candidates to answer YouTube-style questions chosen by online users.”

  • Guardian reports, “Gannett, the US newspaper chain, is to cut 45 jobs in the newsroom at its flagship title, USA Today. The paper will start with voluntary redundancies and then, if that doesn’t provide the full quota, it will demand mandatory redundancies.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Google Inc. made a big splash last week with its new software for cellphones. But that’s far from the limit of the Internet giant’s wireless ambitions — which could include running its own mobile network.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A key U.S. lawmaker urged Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin to delay his plans for a Dec. 18 vote on a media-ownership rule change that would benefit Tribune Co. and News Corp.”

  • FT.com reports,Rupert Murdoch’s six children are getting an early Christmas present after the family trust Mr Murdoch controls sold more than $360m worth of News Corp shares. The cash pay-out follows a $600m bonanza received by the siblings in February — at the time the biggest distribution of Mr Murdoch’s fortune.”

  • B&C reports, “Former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) will be the first presidential candidate to picket personally with Hollywood’s striking writers”

  • Lisa de Moraes writes, “David Letterman’s overall audience with reruns was on par with the previous week with original episodes — 4 million viewers. And he gained eyeballs in TV’s key demographic groups, including the Holy Grail — the 18-to-49-year-olds.”

  • CNBC reports, “A video made by the Writers Guild is circulating the web. As of now, it’s been seen 111,000 times on Youtube. It dramatically argues that the studios are cashing in on digital distribution and the writers aren’t getting a penny.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Nielsen numbers for online traffic at newspapers, which came out yesterday, show a significant jump in unique visitors to the NYTimes.com for October.”

  • New York Post reports, “The lucrative business of selling Web ads has become so fragmented — and easy to do — that even Martha Stewart has thrown her hat in the ring by setting up an online advertising network.”

  • Reuters reports, “Leading European publishers are coming to terms with what teenage boys and men have known for years — the Web beats magazines in grabbing their eyeballs.”

  • Business Week reports, “IAG delivers precise data on which TV ads are resonating. Now it’s headed online”

  • Folio reports, “Time Warner’s third quarter numbers were released recently, and while overall revenues rose nine percent over same period 2006—despite revenue declines from AOL—Time Inc.’s revenues were flat.”

  • Bed Bugs Found in Fox News Channel Newsroom

  • Poynter Online Steve Outing reports, “This week I gave a presentation to one of Sandra Fish’s journalism classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. (It was an overview of social media and citizen journalism initiatives). I hadn’t been in front of a bunch of college students in a while, so I took the opportunity for a quick news-consumption quiz. I did a pretty good job of guessing in my head beforehand what the responses would be, but my prediction proved a little off when it came to print editions of newspapers.” Check out the results here.

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “The New York Times Op-Ed page hasn’t been this hot in a long time. Now we are experiencing Columnist Wars, with Bob Herbert this week joining in a rapidly escalating battle between Paul Krugman and David Brooks – largely over an incident involving Ronald Reagan at a local fair over 27 years ago.”

  • Mother Jones reports, “With all the articles that have been written about the TV writers’ strike (how crappy the signs are, Eva Longoria’s strike breaking, neonatal guild members birthed onto the picket line, career-change opportunities for Hollywood hacks, and Dowd’s space filling), no attention has so far been paid to the real victims here.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s announcement this week that he expects to stop charging for access to the Wall Street Journal’s Web site is the latest example of a publisher giving up on the subscription-based business model — a significant shift in the evolution of online content.”

  • Fool.com reports, “Murdoch announced at a meeting of News Corp. shareholders Tuesday: ‘We … expect to make [WSJ.com] free, and instead of having 1 million [subscribers], having at least 10 [million to] 15 million in every corner of the earth.’”

  • Washington Post reports, “The District will have to renegotiate a proposed deal to bring broadcasting company Radio One to the city after D.C. Council members rejected a plan to give the developers city-owned land worth $6 million on which to build the project.”

  • B&C reports, “Veteran Fox News Channel critic Robert Greenwald (Outfoxed) opened a second front in his campaign against the top-rated cable news channel, this time aiming to get advertisers to drop their sponsorships.”

  • Wall Street Journal’s John Fund writes, “Lou Dobbs for President? Don’t laugh. After months of telling reporters that he “absolutely” would not consider leaving his highly-rated CNN show in which he crusades against free trade and illegal immigration, Mr. Dobbs posted a commentary on his Web site last week predicting a surprise new presidential candidate in 2008.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., its chief executive and Chairman Sumner Redstone, said a lawsuit filed by former news anchor Dan Rather is an attempt to ‘settle old scores’ and should be dismissed because of its ‘far-fetched allegations.’”

  • AFP reports, “The emergence of ‘smartphones’ has put the Internet, music and videos in the palm of the consumer’s hand, but the technology will need a flow of advertising cash to reach its full potential.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., owner of the most-watched television network, probably would take the biggest hit in a prolonged strike by TV and movie writers.”

    Jobs

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an International Book Licensing Representative.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Special Sections Editor.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking a Training Editor — Persian.

  • Army Times Publishing Company is looking for a Reporter to cover Federal Government.

  • Maryland Beachcomber/Worcester County Times/Ocean Pines
    Independent is looking for a Paginator.

  • Worcester County Times is looking for a staff reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Director, NPR Digital Media.

  • Howard University is looking for a Director of Communications and a Publications Manager.

  • The Hill is looking for a Political Editor.

  • Edleman is looking for a New Media Account Supervisor.

  • BusinessWeek Magazine is looking for a Correspondent for business, money, policy and politics and a legal Correspondent.

  • Center for Independent Media is offering an Online News Fellowship

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.15.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you don’t count religious services as a regular activity.

  • An ABC release announces, “On Tuesday, November 20, ABC News’ Charles Gibson will conduct an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with President George Bush and First Lady Laura Bush at Camp David, the private presidential retreat. The interview, just days before the Thanksgiving holiday, will cover a variety of topics, including: the war in Iraq, turmoil in Pakistan, the state of the economy, and rising gas prices.”

  • A release announced, “Ten Washington DC area women who proudly stand at 5’4″ and under have made the first annual Washington DC Petite and Chic List. Petite specialty retailer Petite Sophisticate is releasing the list in conjunction with the opening of two new stores in the Washington DC area. The list includes local women, 5’4″ and under, who show that women of all heights are stylish and chic.” The ten women are Sen. Barbara Boxer, Lynne Cheney, Nicole Feld, Kathy Fowler, Kathleen Matthews, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Marisa Ramírez de Arellan, Raven, Helen Thomas and Eun Yang.

  • Kiplinger.com has named former AOL programming manager Cindy Schwalb as online content coordinator based in DC.

  • Patterico’s Pontifications reports, Anwyn has an excellent post today from the ‘Facts You Don’t Need to Know’ file of the Los Angeles Times. Anwyn chose to focus on a story the paper recently ran on the prosecutorial record of Fred Thompson. I read that article and meant to comment on its flippant dismissiveness of Thompson’s stint as an AUSA. Some of the lines in the article are blatantly designed to elicit cheap snickers from leftists”

  • Ann Althouse reports,Matt Yglesias is outraged — just outraged — at Tim Russert. How dare that man drive politicians into a corner with tough questions instead of giving them space to inform us. According to Yglesias, questions with the goal of providing information about the candidates’ policies would — take global warming for example — show how fine the Democrats are and trap only Republicans.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “After an exhaustive search, The New York Times has found its new corporate media reporter: Fortune’s Tim Arango will begin work next month.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Silver Spring-based cable network Discovery Health has pulled the series ‘Plastic Surgery: Before and After’ from its lineup this week after reports that the show’s host, physician Jan Adams, operated on the mother of hip-hop artist Kanye West before she died Saturday.”

  • Tuesday was the first anniversary of the launch of DarynKagan.com and Kagan celebrated the occasion on Oprah & Friends. Check out the show here.

  • In addition to his interview with Fox Business News yesterday, President Bush also recorded an interview with Fox News.

  • This is Jade Floyd’s (resident hottie) last week as Communications Manager for American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. She has taken a position as senior associate at the public affairs firm Chlopak, Leonard, Schechter and Associates, based here in D.C.

  • War on Photography reports, “I have to give credit where credit is due. The City of New York has reconsidered its proposal to require permits and insurance from most photographers.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch all but declared on Tuesday that the sky’s-the-limit profits from traditional broadcast TV are over.”

  • DCRTV reports, Jon Sullivan, commercial producer director at Channel 7/WJLA, picks up a national Emmy for ‘Best Local Public Service Announcement’ for his ‘Choose To Save’ campaign entitled ‘Savingsman.’”

  • Seems The Hill has decided they need some flair instead of flare.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “In the days before mounting a strike against Hollywood studios, film and TV writers did something that might be considered unusual in other labor disputes: They completed — and were paid for — a lot of work that was delivered to the companies they were about to picket. Now, the Writers Guild of America, which represents the striking writers, is scrambling to get copies of all the scripts turned in to studios over the past six months as part of an effort to police the use of nonunion labor to complete or polish union work. So far, however, by most estimates, the union’s efforts to collect all of those scripts has fallen far short of its goal.”

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press promoted Managing Editor Mike Silverman to the new position of senior managing editor Monday, and named news executives John Daniszewski, Lou Ferrara and Kristin Gazlay as managing editors. The moves come amid a reorganization of operations at the news cooperative.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. newspaper industry’s Audit Bureau of Circulations said it will change the way it counts paid circulation to provide marketers with more useful information.”

  • Market Watch reports, “Shareholders of Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio voted Tuesday to approve Sirius’ proposed $13.6 billion acquisition of XM.”

  • Variety reports, “In the months since Dane Cook first mounted his groundbreaking MySpace marketing campaign and ‘Saturday Night Live’s’ ‘Lazy Sunday’ skit helped vault YouTube to a billion-dollar Google buyout, online comedy sites have become as common as bad party jokes.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “Newspapers’ paying readership fell again in the industry’s latest circulation reports last week, but publishers took the opportunity to make their boldest pitch yet for counting everyone who sees their news stories — whether by buying a copy or borrowing one, picking up a print copy or finding the paper online.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp. probably won’t buy Clearwire Corp., the wireless Internet service provider whose shares surged today on speculation the largest U.S. cable- television company will offer to acquire it, according to Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.”

  • A release announced, “A prominent national Islamic civil rights and advocacy group today announced the launch of a major initiative to help enhance understanding of Islam and Muslims in the news media.
    At a news conference in the nation’s capital, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) said the centerpiece of its ‘Beyond Stereotypes’ campaign will be distribution of the newly-published ‘American Muslims: A Journalist’s Guide to Understanding Islam and Muslims’ to some 40,000 media professionals nationwide.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In what it calls the ‘biggest expansion of international newsgathering resources in its 27-year history,’ CNN is adding correspondents, opening a newsgathering hub in the UAE and investing in a digital-production unit in London.”

  • The AP reports, “Yahoo Inc., reeling from a growing backlash over human rights and its China operations, settled a lawsuit Tuesday that accused it of illegally helping the Chinese government jail and torture two journalists.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Court TV is firing 16 of the 31 people on its Web staff as the network, which is changing its name to truTV in January, shifts its online trial coverage to CNN.com.”

  • Stars and Stripes reports, “Midlevel editors at Stars and Stripes have called on the newspaper’s acting publisher to resign, saying he has refused to release information on the extent of the paper’s relationship with America Supports You.”

  • Media Life reports, “The news was of the sort that just several years ago would have shocked many, word that Condé Nast was folding House & Garden, the 100-plus-year-old shelter title. But in these far tougher times, last week’s news was not such a shock after all, as just the most recent in a line of closings that have beset the magazine industry.”

  • Helium.com, a social media site that shares its ad revenues with its most popular contributors, has announced a partnership with nonprofit organization OpenTheGovernment.”

  • The National Press Club announced, “NPF has selected Linda Topping Streitfeld as its new Director of Programs following a nationwide search. Streitfeld has been an editor and manager at The Miami Herald since 1992, working on coverage of the 2000 presidential election, education, growth and development, hurricanes and near-misses, government and politics. She managed a major Miami Herald community news initiative and contributed to the newspaper’s robust website and other multimedia efforts.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Filmmaker Sean Fine bristles at the suggestion that his strikingly handsome new documentary, “War/Dance,” is too pretty to tell a gritty story. … ‘War/Dance,’ which Fine shot and co-directed with his wife, Andrea Nix Fine, certainly looks great, even as it deals movingly with the lives of displaced kids in northern Uganda. A low-grade war has been simmering there for 20 years, with children often being conscripted by a rebel group known as the Lord’s Resistance Army.” The movie opens on Friday.

  • Min Online reports, “‘Magazines have an illustrious past, but they have a wonderful future,’ proudly proclaimed Time editor-in-chief Richard Stengel upon accepting min magazine’s award for Top Reinvention of the Year”

  • Public Eye reports, “Criticisms of the White House press corps come fast and furious in MediaLand and Blogistan. (From accusations like they’re ‘an extension of the Clinton spin machine’ to its ‘meekness’ in covering the Bush presidency.) But very rarely do they come from the White House press corps itself. Until this week.”

  • Check out this week’s Ombudsman’s Mailbag from PBS’s Michael Getler.

  • The New York Post reports, “A bidding war has erupted for the rights to Sen. Ted Kennedy’s (D-Mass.) autobiography, which could end up well into the mid-seven figure range.”

  • A release announced, “ICFJ’s Knight International Journalism Fellowships Program receives grants from Knight and Gates foundations to advance journalism excellence and free expression worldwide”

  • Digg the Blog reports, “The Wall Street Journal Online is adding Digg buttons across the entire site, and you’ll now have full (free) access to the articles submitted to Digg.”

  • New York Times reports,Don Imus, whose cowboy hat and western wear looked out of place on MSNBC, may have found a more comfortable saddle. On Dec. 3, when he returns not only to radio but also to television, it will be on RFD-TV, a cable and satellite channel that caters to farmers, ranchers and equestrians, as well as others who merely aspire to live a small-town life.”

  • DCRTV reports, “FTVLive tells us that former Channel 5/WTTG morning news anchor Michael Gargiulo has been promoted to the 5:30 PM anchor gig at NYC’s WNBC-TV, where he had been weekend morning anchor and reporter”

  • The Smoking Gun reported yesterday, “Judith Regan, the volcanic publishing industry figure who sought to publish O.J. Simpson’s ‘I Did It’ (and trysted with Bernard Kerik in an apartment overlooking Ground Zero) today sued Rupert Murdoch’s media conglomerate for defamation, claiming that she was unjustly tarred as an anti-Semite when fired last year. In a blistering $100 million lawsuit filed today in New York State Supreme Court, Regan, 54, accuses several defendants, including Murdoch’s News Corporation and HarperCollins Publishers, of orchestrating a smear campaign that was intended to advance the Murdoch political agenda and protect ‘Rudy Giuliani’s presidential ambitions.’”

  • TVWeek reports, “Although the Writers Guild of America’s pre-strike media campaign was criticized as sluggish, the guild’s headline-grabbing series of protests last week have managed to attract the sympathy of some viewers.”

  • Also of note on E&P’s 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites for October, The Washington Times shows a bump from last month.

  • DCist reports, “Fox5 reported on Sunday that a member of their staff, Gwen Tolbart, was injured in a collision between her car and a Metrobus on Saturday night on her way home. Tolbart was thankfully not seriously hurt, but the bus driver, Harvey Carey of Lanham, has now been charged with failing to stay in the proper lane, which resulted in the accident.”

  • E&P reports, “The board of the Audit Bureau of Circulations voted on a set of wide-sweeping changes that will put more prominence on the metric of total audience and affect the way newspaper circulation is counted.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is taking a swipe at FNC over the $100M lawsuit filed by Judith Regan. Regan worked for News Corp.-owned publisher HarperCollins.”

  • The Daily Northwestern reports, “The process of transforming the curriculum at the Medill School of Journalism to keep up with the times is a work in progress, Dean John Lavine told about 70 students, faculty and others at a forum Monday night.”

  • The New York Sun reports, “There were red faces at the Manhattan Institute, after the Union Club ejected reporters from an awards lunch in its Upper East Side clubhouse where they had been invited to hear Mayor Bloomberg and the former governor of Florida, Jeb Bush, speak” on Tuesday.

  • Washington Post reports, “The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission yesterday proposed relaxing an agency rule to allow big-city newspapers to buy the smaller television stations in their markets, a move designed as a compromise in the ongoing issue of corporate control of the airwaves.”

  • The New York Observer reports,Imus Is Back! But Not Quite Live! Bloodied Radio Cowboy Returns Dec. 3 With 21-Second Delay”

  • Paul Sullivan is a veteran newspaper editor and editor in chief of citizen journalism site Orato.com. Check out the site here.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “For James Goldston, executive producer of ‘Nightline,’ the prospect of a prolonged writers strike that paralyzes much of the television industry offers an awkward upside.”

  • Poynter has the memo from Stars and Stripes Europe bureau chief Sam Amrhein announcing, “I want to inform you that the overseas bureau chiefs Joe, Marni, Tom Skeen, Tim Flack, Chris Carlson and I ­ have called for Max Lederer to step down as acting publisher.”

  • The CJR asks, “A plea to campaign reporters: please resist the temptation to use Sin City-centric clichés in your coverage of Thursday’s Democratic debate in Las Vegas.”

  • BusinessJournalism.org reports, “The number of ‘green’ business stories published in the nation’s 10 largest newspapers this year has already doubled last year’s total, according to a study released Tuesday by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.”

  • Dave and Thomas reports, “NBC Direct is the Peacock’s answer to Internet video and if you are a fan of NBC shows like The Office and Heroes, be prepared to get a little angry. The good news is you can now download various NBC shows to your computer. And it’s free. Kinda. Free like giving an army recruiter you home phone number. First and foremost, you cannot get these shows onto you iPod. Second, it’s only available to PC users with IE only. Third, and this is the most annoying, you must download a crap-load of software to play the videos.”

  • E&P reports, “A top business-side executive at Dow Jones & Co. said it is premature to assume that The Wall Street Journal Web site will definitely drop its paid subscription model, despite comments by Rupert Murdoch that the change is expected.”

  • A Newsweek release via Romenesko announced, “Markos Moulitsas, the founder and publisher of dailykos.com, will become a Newsweek contributor for the 2008 presidential campaign, offering occasional opinion pieces to the pages of the magazine and to Newsweek.com.”

  • Mickey Kaus gives another scathing review of The Atlantic’s anniversary party.

  • CJR reports how “The New York Times went and put the ‘science’ back in the ‘political science’ of the campaign trail.”

    Jobs

  • PBS is looking for a Web Technologist and a Director for PBS Engage.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for an Associate Director, Content & Video.

  • The Star Democrat is seeking a layout editor and reporter.

  • EEI Communications is looking for an Editorial Production Director.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Science Writer.

  • The New Republic is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military Publications is looking to fill a position in Advertising/Sales.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Comments and Group Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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